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The Heinlein Letters: What L. Ron Hubbard’s close friends really thought of him

HubbardProfileA couple of weeks ago, we looked at a 1949 letter written by L. Ron Hubbard which hasn’t received a lot of attention before. Russell Miller paraphrased the letter in his 1987 book Bare-Faced Messiah, but the full text of the letter has never been published in a book or news article, as far as we know.

In it, Hubbard wrote to his friend Forrest Ackerman about the work he was doing on what would become Dianetics, the 1950 book that would change Hubbard’s fortunes and eventually lead him to create Scientology.

But Hubbard sounded far from a man about to become “mankind’s best friend” and a great humanitarian who was setting out to improve the human race.

Instead, he sounded like kind of a creep.

“Have a nice office…very neat and very quiet, with its own silk and gilt. Could become a den of vice very easily, I fear, so I only allow women over 16 in there,” he wrote to his pal. And he promised Forry that he’d soon send him an early copy of the book…

I shall ship it along just as soon as decent. Then you can rape women without their knowing it, communicate suicide messages to your enemies as they sleep, sell the Arroyo Seco parkway to the mayor for cash, evolve the best way of protecting or destroying communism, and other handy house hold hints. If you go crazy, remember you were warned.

That Hubbard, what a card. He also admitted that it was a good “publishing trick” to have people sign releases before they read the book in case it caused them to go insane. (For years he’d been telling people that he had a manuscript that had convinced some of its readers to commit suicide or go insane. Now, he admitted that it was just a good “trick” to get the book attention which, of course it was.) He admitted that he had put the book away for a while, but then had become interested in it again “and have not decided whether to destroy the Catholic church or merely start a new one.”

In all, it was a remarkable look at L. Ron Hubbard before he put on a very different face and told the world that he’d made the most significant scientific advance since man’s discovery of fire — which is the actual boast that he makes at the start of Dianetics.

Our posting of the letter produced a lot of interesting reactions. Someone accused us of not knowing that Hubbard was “joking” and that we were fools to think he was actually saying that Dianetics would give someone the power to “rape women without their knowing it.”

That one caught us by surprise. We thought it was quite obvious that Hubbard was almost always putting everyone on, and the real challenge was to find those extremely rare occasions when he was actually telling the truth.

The other reaction that caught our attention were the readers who questioned the letter’s authenticity. We had anticipated this, and had talked to Gerry Armstrong before we posted the text of the letter. It was Armstrong who had discovered the letter when he saved a huge cache of Hubbard documents from being destroyed in 1980. He had later been sued because he’d kept copies of some of those documents, but he was thoroughly vindicated in court. (At least he was vindicated in that case. We’ve written extensively about his other legal nightmares.) To this day, he and his wife Caroline Letkeman maintain extensive web archives of Hubbard’s documents, which is where we had found the text of the 1949 letter. Gerry told us he doesn’t have an image of the original document, but, he told us, “To my knowledge, the Scientologists have never challenged the letter’s authenticity. I had it when I was doing the biography project, and I have always believed that it is real.”

That wasn’t good enough for some folks who saw our post and didn’t like what the letter said. One of our sources, however, pointed out that what might answer those doubts was that Hubbard had said similar things in letters to his good friend, legendary science fiction writer Robert Heinlein. We were told that there were actually some very interesting things about Hubbard in Heinlein’s collection of letters, some of which had not been made public before.

Oh really?

Well, that set us off on a hunt. And we did find some very interesting items. But here’s the deal. Heinlein’s letters are held by a trust that allows anyone to download copies of them for a small fee. But they are very particular about the use of that material. So what we’re going to do is carefully describe what’s in those letters and supply some short quotes in the name of “fair use.” As for images of the letters for you doubters, we’ll let you pay a few bucks and download the letters for yourself. We promise that you will find exactly what we’re about to reveal.

OK, so here we go.

 
Robert Heinlein to John Arwine, May 10, 1946

By the end of World War II, Heinlein (1907-1988) and Hubbard (1911-1986) had been friends for years. Heinlein’s career in fiction was still growing and his best books were ahead of him. But that didn’t seem to be the case with Hubbard, who had spent much of the war chasing after naval postings that tended to end in disaster. Now, after the war, Hubbard seemed to be struggling with finding direction, at least from Heinlein’s perspective.

“I don’t understand Ron’s current activities. I am considerably disturbed by them,” Heinlein confided to their mutual friend, John Arwine, who was, like Hubbard, a war veteran. Heinlein told Arwine that he was concerned that Hubbard was trying to be a “Big Operator” rather than getting his writing career back in order.

Heinlein was apparently aware of Hubbard’s involvement in 1945 and 1946 with Jack Parsons, the Caltech rocket scientist who was into the occult and with Hubbard got up to some pretty strange sex magick rituals. After Hubbard took Jack’s girlfriend Sara “Betty” Northrup away from him, the three of them cooked up a scheme to buy sailboats, sail them to Florida, and then sell them at a profit. Parsons ended up getting rooked in the deal.

Heinlein appears to have been aware of some of these details and warned Arwine not to get involved with Hubbard if he ran into him in New York. “I think you could easily find yourself in some sort of a jam if you let him get too close to you at this time,” Heinlein warned.

As for Hubbard’s history with Arwine, the Scientology founder later turned that friendship into one of our favorite yarns of all time. A couple of years ago, we posted a segment from the 2012 Hubbard birthday celebration, which included this amazing tall tale that Hubbard spun in a lecture that had been turned into a short film by the wizards at Scientology’s Golden Era Productions. If you haven’t seen it, you’re really in for a treat…

 

LRH_2012_4 from Voice Media Group on Vimeo.

Here’s our summary of what you just saw from our 2012 article…

To recap: Hubbard and his friend Johny Arwine visited Caltech near the end of 1945 and, honest to goodness, every important atomic scientist in the land gathered to hear these two soon-to-be demobbed middling Navy men give them a lecture about what a bunch of reckless morons they were and how they ought to get a grip on that there bomb of theirs.

The scientists, for their part, took umbrage and lashed out at Hubbard, admitting to him that what they actually had in mind was to use the doomsday weapons at their disposal to overthrow the government of these here United States!

Whew! We sure are glad Hubbard and his Navy pal turned in these scoundrels, who were then punished and the country was saved from their treachery. Which reminds us: why isn’t there a national holiday dedicated to this ginger God of a man?

 
Of course, this event never happened. And rather than save the world from the country’s rebellious atomic scientists, Hubbard instead got into occult “magick” after the war ended, and his buddy John Arwine was actually told to stay far away from Hubbard by their mutual pal, Robert Heinlein.

 
Leslyn Heinlein to Catherine and L. Sprague de Camp, August 7, 1946

Robert Heinlein’s second wife, Leslyn, also had concerns about their friend Ron Hubbard in the days following the war. In a letter to science fiction writer L. Sprague de Camp and his wife Catherine, Leslyn explains that she and her husband are really concerned about Ron, who seems “possessed by some entity out of one of the more horrid Unk. [Unknown magazine] stories.”

Well, that’s funny. Possessed by some creature out of science fiction? If she only knew how close she really was.

Leslyn warns Catherine to keep Sprague away from Hubbard and his new wife Betty Northrup, who she says is Hubbard’s latest “Man-Eating Tigress.”

They had tried to warn John Arwine about going near Hubbard, but Arwine had stopped answering their letters, she says.

“You see, Ron is working the Poor Wounded Veteran racket…and Johnny is a sucker for the Our Boys stuff,” she writes.

It’s Sprague who answers Leslyn’s letter, and that’s when things really get interesting.

 
L. Sprague de Camp to the Heinleins, August 13, 1946

Lyon Sprague de Camp (1907-2000) had a very long career in science fiction and fantasy. (We’ll admit that we knew him mainly for his promotion of Robert E. Howard’s Conan character in a series of posthumous collections and pastiches put together by de Camp in the 1960s.)

Reading his letters, de Camp strikes us as a no-nonsense kick in the pants. He reassured the Heinleins that he wasn’t putting up with any funny business from Hubbard. But he disagrees that Hubbard is suffering some kind of post-war breakdown.

“I think he always was that way, but when he wanted to make a good impression or get something out of somebody he put on a first-class charm act,” de Camp writes.

He adds that he’d seen enough of Hubbard before the war to know that he was not a person to be trusted. He says that Heinlein had warned him about Hubbard’s “fascist leanings,” but Heinlein later was happy to realize that Hubbard was a liberal. De Camp tells Heinlein his first impression was the correct one. (Heinlein himself would later go through a significant change of heart from left to right in his own politics.)

De Camp concludes that Hubbard’s politics are less important than his opportunism.

In the name of Fair Use, we’ll quote this next paragraph from de Camp’s letter in its entirety, because it’s really something…

I suppose Polly [Hubbard’s first wife] was tiresome about not giving him his divorce so he could marry six other gals who were all hot and & moist over him? (Seriatim, of course.) How many girls is a man entitled to screw in one lifetime, anyway? Maybe he should be reincarnated as a rabbit. Doesn’t he get a disability pension from Uncle? That would explain Polly’s reluctance in part, since she would get said pension after he dies. Personally I think if anybody gets anything out of him it’s all to the good.

 
So Hubbard was an opportunistic womanizer working a racket on other veterans — and that’s what his friends thought of him. Ouch.

The collection also contains letters from Hubbard to Heinlein, and we’ll go quickly through a few of them. In September 1948, Hubbard said he was glad that he was going to get an opportunity to write more westerns and wouldn’t have to do so much science fiction. “Between you and me, I hate the hell out of gadgets,” he told Heinlein.

In November 1948, Hubbard made a boast about his upcoming book Dianetics that was similar to the one he made to his friend Forrest Ackerman: “I will soon, I hope, give you a book risen from the ashes of old Excalibur which details in full the mathematics of the human mind, solves all the problems of the ages and gives six recipes for aphrodisiacs and plays a mouth organ with the left foot.”

On March 8, 1949, from Savannah, Georgia — where Hubbard had sent his letter to Ackerman a couple of months earlier — Hubbard again said he was working on his “magnum opus” and hoped to send Heinlein a galley soon. “If it drives you nuts, don’t sue. You were warned!” he writes.

He later brings up “Coventry,” a 1940 short story Heinlein had published as part of his “Future History” series…

Well, you didn’t specify in your book what actual reformation took place in the society to make supermen. Got to thinking about it other day. The system is Excalibur. It makes nul A’s. So even if it does upset a few apple carts and blow a fuse in the current moral and political system, I’m releasing it and to hell with the consequences. Know a good hide-out? I fear the Catholic Church is going to take one look at that book and heave a fit that would make the [József] Mindszenty affair pale. It ain’t agin religion. It just abolishes it. It aint agin anything, which is wherein lieth its deadly poison. It’s science, boy, science. That’s a godly word we all love. Anyway, I’ll send you a galley so you kin man the barricades in time. Cause like the chicken that et the Japanese beetle in good faith, this one is going to come straight out through the side of any society what digests it.

 
Here is more corroboration of what University of MacEwan professor Susan Raine asserted in a recent paper — that Hubbard was drawing on the “space opera” of the time, including his friend A. E. van Vogt’s famous 1945 novel, The World of Null-A, in which intellectual superman rule the rest of humanity.

And that would become the dominant theme throughout Dianetics and later Scientology — that Hubbard had discovered a hidden history of the galaxy that enabled him to produce a new, more evolved race, the homo novi, who would “clear the planet” and ultimately rule the universe over “eternity.” We can now see he’s already thinking along those lines in 1949.

Also, we see in this message to Heinlein another example of Hubbard, as he had in the letter to Ackerman, saying that his book Dianetics was going to be a problem for the Catholic Church, or would destroy it. That’s a really interesting sort of corollary to what he had been heard to say to several different people in this same period (1948-1949), that he was tired of working for a penny a word as a writer, and the real money was in starting a religion. It’s really fascinating to see that Hubbard fully expected his book to wreak havoc on “any society that digests it.” He ended up being right about that — at least among the small number of people who took him seriously.

Heinlein, for his part, encouraged Hubbard to finish the book and said he was very eager to read it. Later, Hubbard tried to get Heinlein involved in his Dianetics schemes, and also in a related caper about dunning the world’s scientists for monthly dues, but we’ve written about that in the past, and we may come back to it again in the future. For now, there’s plenty here for Hubbard historians to chew on. And thanks again to our tipster who set us on this path — you know who you are.

 
——————–

Jesse Prince is feeling well and is in fighting form

Yesterday, Jesse Prince posted a 6,000-word dispatch on his long-neglected blog which helps bring us up to date on what’s been happening with him. The former Scientology executive had been battling cancer, but he says that as awful as things got, he’s now almost three years clear of the disease, he’s moved to Los Angeles, and he’s feeling much better.

Jesse talks about what it was like to leave Scientology and then spend years dealing with its aftereffects. He describes watching Marty Rathbun and Mike Rinder ditch their posts in Scientology’s top ranks and then come out and criticize the church as they too went through similar transformations. He says he’s pleased to see how far they’ve come.

Jesse also explained that he’s still hoping to produce a book, specifically about L. Ron Hubbard’s final four years (1982-1986), which took place in seclusion. We’ll be fascinated to see what Jesse reveals about that time period.

 
——————–

Posted by Tony Ortega on November 8, 2014 at 07:00

E-mail your tips and story ideas to tonyo94@gmail.com or follow us on Twitter. We post behind-the-scenes updates at our Facebook author page. Here at the Bunker we try to have a post up every morning at 7 AM Eastern (Noon GMT), and on some days we post an afternoon story at around 2 PM. After every new story we send out an alert to our e-mail list and our FB page.

Learn about Scientology with our numerous series with experts…

BLOGGING DIANETICS (We read Scientology’s founding text) 1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 7, 8, 9, 10, 11, 12, 13, 14, 15, 16, 17, 18, 19, 20, 21, 22, 23, 24, 25

UP THE BRIDGE (Claire Headley and Bruce Hines train us as Scientologists) 1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 7, 8, 9, 10, 11, 12, 13, 14, 15, 16, 17, 18, 19, 20, 21, 22, 23, 24, 25, 26, 27, 28, 29, 30, 31, 32, 33, 34, 35, 36, 37, 38, 39, 40, 41, 42, 43, 44, 45, 46, 47, 48

GETTING OUR ETHICS IN (Jefferson Hawkins explains Scientology’s system of justice) 1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 7, 8, 9, 10, 11, 12, 13, 14

SCIENTOLOGY MYTHBUSTING (Historian Jon Atack discusses key Scientology concepts) 1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 7, 8, 9, 10, 11, 12, 13, 14, 15, 16, 17, 18, 19, 20, 21, 22, 23, 24, 25, 26, 27, 28, 29, 30, 31, 32, 33, 34, 35, 36, 37, 38, 39, 40, 41, 42, 43, 44, 45, 46, 47, 48, 49

PZ Myers reads L. Ron Hubbard’s “A History of Man” | Scientology’s Master Spies | Scientology’s Private Dancer
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  • DodoTheLaser
  • Dee Fogger

    Common, man, when the hell is the book coming out? So much arcania combined with such in debth knowledge and insight. Really, when does it drop? Articles like this make me want to demand that the book should be published NOW! ( although I certainly don’t want to make demands of our proprietor).

  • DodoTheLaser

    “Excalibur” (that nowhere to be found and probably a code name for Dianetics) was supposed to make people insane or super powerful, same drivel with OT III (with a chance of dying of pneumonia). Typical tricky Hubbard.

    • Dr_Orpheus

      Excalibur probably wasn’t so much a code name for Dianetics as a working title.

      • Eivol Ekdal

        Exactly. It is hidden because it reveals too much of how to control a society through creating fears. Dianetics is the supposed ‘cure’ to the problem that Excalibur illustrates/creates.

        • DodoTheLaser

          Maybe “Brain-washing” was his secret “Excalibur”.

          • Eivol Ekdal

            Classic! One of Hubbard’s many attempts to create a fear that Dianetics could fix.

    • Mighty Korgo of Teegeeack

      I heard that it was his “Book of Affirmations,” sort of a self-hypnosis book that he would read to give himself a feeling of self worth.

      • DodoTheLaser

        Perhaps Affirmations and Excalibur are the same thing.
        At this point, I won’t be shocked by anything. I think.

      • As Tony says above, Excalibur and the Affirmations / Admissions were separate documents.
        The admissions (C/W a lengthy introduction by Gerry Armstrong) are here http://scicrit.wordpress.com/2014/03/29/l-ron-hubbards-affirmations-admissions/

        They are more like exercises out of a personal ‘positive thinking’ self-help programme than anything he produced later – a throwback to pure magical thinking. They also reveal some serious underlying insecurity.

        • Mighty Korgo of Teegeeack

          Thanks. I learned something today, too.

      • Robert Eckert

        I can never hear about the “Affirmations” without thinking of…

        https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=6ldAQ6Rh5ZI

        • Mighty Korgo of Teegeeack

          I had never seen that. It was a riot! Also, I went straight to youtube for it and the ad was for the Broadway version of On the Town. It is the first time I have, knowingly at will, sat through a youtube ad without clicking clicking the skip button.

          • Robert Eckert

            Al Franken did that routine for years, I always loved the Stuart Smalley segments. Then he ran for the US Senate, and won by a handful of votes after an endless recount. He won re-election handily last Tuesday.

            • Mighty Korgo of Teegeeack

              So that is Al Franken. I hadn’t heard of him until he ran for office.

    • Tony Ortega

      Excalibur existed. It was an early manuscript that contained ideas — such as “survival” that would show up in Dianetics later on. As we pointed out in that previous story about the letter to Ackerman, a few people did get to read the manuscript, including Arthur Burks, whose lengthy description of it we linked to. (Burks basically said it was extremely boring crap.) Gerry Armstrong has read several different versions of the Excalibur manuscript — there were three of them, I think he said. In other words, Hubbard always wanted Excalibur to be thought of as some magical, mystical thing, but those who saw it say it was anything but.

      The Affirmations was something completely different, a set of statements Hubbard had written to himself to be read out loud to help him get past a lot of his personal hang ups. It’s a stunning document, and we have Gerry Armstrong to thank for rescuing it from oblivion. We quote from it in our story about Hubbard and the occult…

      http://blogs.villagevoice.com/runninscared/2012/02/scientology_and_4.php

      • DodoTheLaser

        Thank you for clearing it up for me re: Excalibur, Tony.
        That’s what I suspected, it’s nice to have a solid confirmation.

      • True, and it was (at least in one version) printed up in a big leather-bound version to be very impressive to people. Sea Org members in the 80s were sent out to retrieve them, according to Gary Lowe (had a kid, was married to Lee Purcell). But then, Gary’s a lying scheming cheating bastard, so maybe he was lying about the book.

      • “Excalibur” always struck me as a straightforward con that didn’t get off the launch pad.

        It was presented by Hubbard as containing the secrets of the universe. He wanted it to be a very expensive limited edition. I think that, if he had have managed to persuade anyone to publish it, he would have been long gone – with the money – before his marks customers had been able to read the contents.

        “Dianetics” was a second run at this idea. Hubbard abandoned the ‘limited edition’ scam, but
        kept the incredible claims
        . This time, he hoped he could make money the old-fashioned way (by selling a lot of books). Of course, he struck lucky when John W Campbell, the editor of the popular SF pulp magazine “Astounding Science Fiction” enthusiastically promoted the book – and the rest is history.

        If the “Excalibur” con had have come off, he would probably have become persona non grata in the publishing industry, never been able to publish “Dianetics”, and we would not be here.

  • BosonStark

    Jesse’s proposed book about Hubbard’s last four years of life would be of real value, especially if he could get Pat Broeker to talk. The cult just files it under “research,” when really, his day-to-day life in hiding, while deteriorating mentally and physically, must have been kind of different, considering how social and active he’d been previously.

    • DodoTheLaser

      What you said and I am very happy that Jesse is doing well!

    • Anonymous

      “… his day-to-day life in hiding, while deteriorating mentally and physically, must have been kind of different…”

      Heh. Do ya think?

      I mean…all those BT’s chasing him around…it must have been hell for Mankind’s Greatest Friend.

      • Axton

        His list of affirmations gradually got smaller and smaller, until eventually the only affirmation left was “you have perfect and lovely feet.” That was his mantra until the end.

  • Sergeant Pepper

    Hubbard’s inflated sense of self importance shines brightly in all his correspondence.

    • Missionary Kid

      I’d call it hubris.

    • Rocket J. Squirrel

      Indeed, and although his followers may question the authenticity of some of those letters, they can’t deny that he wrote these words:

      “The creation of dianetics is a milestone for Man comparable to his discovery of fire and superior to his inventions of the wheel and arch.”

      The enormous egotism of that claim is beyond belief.

      • joan nieman

        It truly is unbelievable and the mess he left behind needs to be cleaned up. An oil spill of deceitful crud.

  • Eivol Ekdal

    List the concerns on your conscience.
    Null them to oblivion with repetitive tech.
    Repeat

    • DodoTheLaser

      Ex-Auditor?

      • Eivol Ekdal

        Are you asking if I was an auditor?
        Heavens to Mergatroyd! No!
        But I do listen well.

        • DodoTheLaser

          You sure do.

          • But never mix up Listing and Nulling with Assessment, because that has “practically killed thousands of PCs”.

            https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=t9reLONOJ7U

            • DodoTheLaser

              Oh God..

            • Robert Eckert

              That is one of my favorites.

            • It’s one of the best examples of Hubbard’s madness brightly shining through the cracks in his head.

  • Graham

    Sounds like the Nuclear Scientists were just as bad as the Evil Psychs. Good job the two groups never joined forces!

    How did a cult whose founder was a sex magick womaniser turn into a group so afraid of sex that you can’t even masturbate without having to make amends?

    • Sid

      He was the only one allowed to do any of that stuff. It was for research though. Extensive research.

      • Mark Foster

        Ron´s zen exploration: ¨What is the sound of one hand wanking?¨

        • Sid

          He did write a few processes that involved the hands. “Give me that hand. Thank you.” He might have added, “Where was that hand?”.

          • How do you know he wrote them? He might not have, seriously.

            • Sid

              He may have stolen the process, but we still don’t know where his hand may have been.

            • Cute, but I knew a hypnotist he paid to write processes. Sea Org members would pick up the envelopes.

            • villagedianne

              That is very valuable information,Skip Press. I hope you can reveal more in future. There seems to have been many authors of the Tech.

            • Sid

              That does not surprise me at this point. Thanks for sharing it.

    • Eivol Ekdal
    • Missionary Kid

      It was easy to use sex as a weapon because of all the misinformation and guilt that our society places on it. In addition, all natural emotions are made unnatural, so even more fear and guilt can be used to control the $cientologist.

      • Mooser

        I feel the same. I did not like all that stuff about “safe sex”. Sex, as I’m sure you know, is never safe.

        • Missionary Kid

          I took much of the worry out of being close by getting a vasectomy.

          Masturbation, done in private, is safe, unless one uses moose appliances.

    • Baby

      ” OUR HERO..”

      Edit: I just threw up in my mouth.. Water..WAter..errr Mouth Wash Mouth Wash!

    • Sergeant Pepper

      I lol’d.

    • Adam Warlock

      Most religions seem to have a hang up about sex. Beyond it being used as a tool to control people, this obsession with sex is beyond me. I’ve heard some good possibilities, which is sometimes born out in reality… such as; you are what you hate, kind of thing.

  • i have a couple errands to run this AM (need to beat the rain) and i only wrote some ‘theme’ haiku for tomorrow (Sunday—yes sometimes I haiku ahead) last night, so i thought, why not open one of the 2 filled up little notebooks and tweet again some haiku? so here’s some haiku i tweeted many many months ago! 🙂 and sadly, they’re still applicable!

    They call things a game
    Unlike a game it’s not fun
    Plus there’s no winners.
    #scientology #haiku #WellChurchBankAccountWins

    Defrauding people
    anyway to get money
    niblet needs more scotch
    #scientology #haiku #COB

    Imported liquor
    Private planes, chef, custom suits,
    Typical church head
    #scientology #haiku #COB #HeDoesNOTLiveLikeSeaOrg

    Won’t give interviews
    Tried that once with Ted Koppel
    Ted won an emmy.
    #scientology #haiku #COB #nibletHides

    Get celebrities,
    L Ron decreed. Instead, they
    got @JennaElfman
    #scientology #haiku #HaveYouRapedBabies #NotAStah

    Church of $ci Mind Fuck
    Self-perpetuating trap
    Thinking in circles
    #scientology #haiku #PrettyMuchSumsItUp

    Separate people
    Stop them from discussing things
    Psychopaths do this
    #scientology #haiku #niblet #COB #psychopath

    Divine Comedy
    Tho’ not funny when lives lost
    niblet laughs at death
    #scientology #haiku #niblet #COB #TooManyHaveDied

    Golden rod paper
    meant to symbolize ouster
    Freedom is golden
    #scientology #haiku #SP #Freedom

    • DodoTheLaser

      Golden rod paper
      meant to symbolize ouster
      Freedom is golden
      #scientology #haiku #SP #Freedom

      My favorite.

      • thanks, i like that one too….it’s weird, but when i get to writing i’m sort of ‘detached’ if that makes any sense….and then i go back and it’s like i’m looking at someone else’s work…..

        • DodoTheLaser

          I know the feeling. I call it a creative zone. I generate mine by focusing on music I like.
          It’s a well known phenomena, usually referred to as being “in the zone” or some such.
          Keep it on, Miss Tia!

          • i’m not sure how i generate mine…i’ll get an idea and sometimes it’ll just be one, but then other times i just keep going and going and going….but yes “in the zone”, good way to put it! 🙂

    • Missionary Kid

      Niblet laughs at other people’s death.

      • joan nieman

        Sad but true.

      • i’m sure he does….he certainly feels no empathy or remorse….

    • joan nieman

      I love the reference to the Divine Comedy. Thank you once again Tia!

      • thank you, as always joan! someone had requested—when i did that one months ago—i try to incorporate some shakespeare! 🙂

  • Sid

    This is the stuff that really paints a picture of what kind of man Hubbard was. It’s enlightening but at the same time makes me feel like an idiot for falling for the whole thing.

    • DodoTheLaser

      Didn’t Hubbard said “It’s a PR world”?
      He sure knew his “PR”.
      At least we are out and a whole lot wiser.

      • Sid

        I’m definitely glad to be out. From a social standpoint I can’t say it was all bad times throughout the years. There were some really nice people I met along the way. Aside from that though I could have skipped the whole thing.

        • DodoTheLaser

          Of course. Same here.

          • Sid

            I do also find the posting and warning part is a bit cathartic and hopefully reduces some of the emotional mish-mash as well.

            • DodoTheLaser

              Thank you for posting, Sid. For every reason.

            • Sid

              You also compadre.

          • Eclipse-girl

            AND THOSE warnings do help.

            We Never Ins need the stories from the Exes.

            Think of how musch worse we would be in famous Exes never spoke out,
            If Karen never did her videos,
            Marty never started his Blog or wrote his book,
            Mike never exposed the lies of expansion.

            I Thank ALL of the Exes who are willing to share.
            IT takes courage to share their personal stories.

            • joan nieman

              That’s correct E-girl and don’t forget Tony who clearly and precisely puts the pieces together.

            • Eclipse-girl

              I love it when they talk with Tony O and tell their story.

              I also think when anecdotes come out here, not only is it helpful for us I hope it helps the writers heal.

  • endoftheQ

    I think “black” magic was something of a deliberate sensationalist misnomer on Hubbard’s part. Parson’s was heading the O.T.O. Agape Lodge at the time and it’s highly unlikely that he would have permitted outsiders to witness rituals, leading to the conclusion that Hubbard was actually initiated into O.T.O. by Parsons.

  • Baby

    ” To this day, he and his wife Caroline Letkeman maintain extensive web
    archives of Hubbard’s documents, which is where we had found the text of
    the 1949 letter. ”

    Gerry I didn’t doubt for a second that this was an authentic letter. You have gone through hell and back .. Your character speaks volumes. Thank you for all that you have done and continue to do.

    You are a great warrior in presenting the Truth through facts. You have become a great historian and reference point. I honor you.

    • Missionary Kid

      AMEN!^^^^^

      • joan nieman

        And another Amen.

    • Prim

      Hubbard was such a hack. He never wrote anything memorable in his life save the abomination of Scientology. Heinlein wrote superb science fiction. His “The Moon is a Harsh Mistress” is a classic that I’ve read ten times over the past 30 years. Putting the Ginger Pigs name in the context of Heinlein and writing successful fiction is disgusting.

      Hubbard should have come home from the war and sold insurance or cars. And Lisa McPherson would still be alive.

      • Baby

        Absolutely agree Prim..

        100% Hack.. and deplorable as a human being. RIP Lisa.. We will NEVER forget.. NEVER..and to all those who have lost lives, family and income..

      • richelieu jr

        Hubbard shouldn’t have come home at all. We should have dropped him on Hitler and been done with the both of them.

        I mean seriously– Would you want to buy cars or insurance from that guy?

        You’d get to the hospital only to find your policy was typed on the backside of s Syphillus Cure Flyer, or
        hit the brakes and find out it as up to you to stop that Lemon Berney RUbble-style… Yabba-Dabba– DUUUUPED!!!!!

    • richelieu jr

      And a great big ‘SHAME’ out to Mike Rinder for continuing to badmouth Gerry.

      • Baby

        Graham Berry.. Gerry and Mike.. Will never be dance partners that’s for sure..

        Gerry wants Marty to Fess up.. spill the juice about his crimes toward his victims and make it right..Make amends .. Until that happens there will be bad blood between them.

        We shouldn’t hold our breath rich..

        It is the ultimate Catch 22.. for Marty and Mike.. to do so would present legal and criminal consequences.

        • indie8million

          I didn’t know about this “feud” between Gerry and Marty and Mike. My passing thoughts are that, even though they aren’t “confessing their crimes”, what they are doing is making a huge impact (delivering an effective blow, etc.) that should more than make up for whatever they took part in. We were all stupid at one point in time. Possibly Gerry too.

          • Baby

            indie if you google Mike Rinder and Gerry Armstrong you’ll find info.

            I agree with you.. M and M are certainly making an impact! It nun my business.. ha.. It didn’t happen over night between them.

            I am sure that there is info that we will never know about!

        • richelieu jr

          Exactly, Baby.

          Which is key to my problem with those guys s well, though at least it does seem to be getting better (though I’ll withhold my participation in praising their ‘courage’ until they do so…)

          • Baby

            I personally don’t think that it is in Mike’s best interest to as you said earlier to badmouth Gerry. It leaves a bad taste in my mouth. Same with Marty.

            I also think that there is a lot behind the scenes that we know or will ever know.

    • indie8million

      Isn’t it funny to be on this side of the fence now? Those who were considered “enemies” are now shown as the true, brave souls that they are. Good job, Gerry. Now is the time that you can take care of yourself. It’s your turn.

      • Baby

        Yes.. It’s his turn!

  • Panopea Abrupta

    El Wretch was such a bombastic self-congratulating dishonest piece of ….

    Dianetics: the least significant unscientific nonsense since man’s discovery of ire

    And DM is the Dark Knight of the Hole.

    • Yeabutnobut

      Oh lordy, I read that as Knight of “Dark Hole”. I am so immature!

  • Mighty Korgo of Teegeeack

    I may get back to his later by way of a long edit, but for now, I think of the words, “Bull-goose looney,” from One Flew Over the Cuckoos Nest. “Which one of you is the bull-goose looney?” I don’t know if they would have all pointed to Hubbard. Certainly he was trying to take that role. And I don’t know if he ever attained it. Over the years so many SF writers have tried to achieve the title.

  • Baby

    Tony I am still reading and will watch the video.. I have seen it before, but so many after..I have to watch it again now that I have so much more information.

    I just wanted to say.. ” Wow.. This is such a fabulous post..All of it.. You went beyond the call of duty! We appreciate it. Thank you..

    • Mark Foster

      Yeah, Tony Ortega is the man. Baby,I won´t, however, post the famous meme from Denzel Washington´s line in Training Day with Ethan Hawke to express my admiration, okay? *wink* 🙂

      • Baby

        wink wink.. ha

        While I am here.. Again from Tony and the Bunker..You guys are working over time and give us our daily ” Fix..” Thank you Tipsters! ( refresh)

  • Now that various letters have set the stage, including the one in Strange Angel from L. Sprague de Camp to Isaac Asimov which also mentions the Poor Wounded Veteran racket, it’s time to find and read a copy of Anthony Boucher’s murder mystery Rocket to the Morgue (1942).

    While it may be a so-so mystery, what Anthony Boucher did is populate his book with fellow members of the Mañana Literary Society and others in that circle, lightly disguised. (And they were the intended audience for the book–a good fun in-joke rather than a cruel exposé.)

    It has Heinlein. It has Hubbard (as two people, as I recall). It definitely has Jack Parsons with his dual life. And rockets.

    http://www.heinleinsociety.org/rah/works/articles/murdersuspect.html

    Keep in mind that this was published in 1942, probably written pre-WWII, years before Hubbard came back from the navy and moved in with Jack Parsons, and yet it’s a good snapshot of the social group in California that he moved in.

    I should reread it, and count how many times Hubbard gets his face slapped.

    • Sergeant Pepper

      In for face-slap count, also any juicy tidbits you might share.

      • My copy is a 1967 paperback where the ink has gotten lighter and the paper darker. I’ll take notes as I go.

  • Sherbet

    Ron was a walking, talking April Fool’s prank. Tony’s post should be shouted from the rooftops, printed on broadsheet, and blasted from PA system outside every major scientology enclave 24 hours a day. This lying buffoon, scientologists, is the demigod who changed your lives and emptied your pockets.

    • DodoTheLaser

      And he fell for his own fantasies at the end. It didn’t end well.

      • 1subgenius

        So good of a con-man that he conned himself. That’s good.
        “Don’t mess with my brain, its my second favorite organ”- Woody Allen
        “Watch what you put into that head of yours, because you will never, ever get it out”- (?)

    • Stacy

      He sure did like the sound of his own voice, didn’t he? Sadly, others did too. It’s good to know his “friends” weren’t taken in by LRH.

      • Sherbet

        Then he got other friends (ones with money), and he did succeed. There’s no justice.

        • Tory Christman

          Karma is Justice…and “dave” and gang cannot escape, or pay off *that*. 🙂
          Tick Tock, “dave”….:)

        • Stacy

          Well, he started thinking evil people were sneaking into his room at night and replacing one of his boots with one a half size smaller (I’m reading “Going Clear right now. Love it!). That’s karmic justice.

  • 0tessa

    Now we’re getting the real picture of Hubbard, slowly but surely. The picture Scientology did not want us to have. All their efforts to prevent it were in vain. And now that the emperor of Scientology has lost all his clothes, Scientology will also implode.

    • Missionary Kid

      It won’t implode because of this information. The clams won’t see it. Self-censorship is the rule. It’s entheta.

      • Sherbet

        I was thinking the same thing, Kid. The cos and the scis themselves have developed Super Powers of spin, turning lrh’s lies into truth. It’s Rumpelstilskin all over again. (Repulsivestillspin)

        • Baby

          Sherbet.. Repulsivestillspin.. bawwwwwwhahahahah.. NOW THAT IS GOOD!

          • Sherbet

            And that’s on only one cup of coffee, Baby.

            • joan nieman

              Today’s blog deserves more coffee. I am off to the kitchen.BRB.

            • Robert Eckert

              Great minds think alike.

      • 0tessa

        Of course, it will not implode because of this information only. There is so much more. Also, I think the implosion has already set in. We are waiting for the big blow by Marty Rathbun.

        • Missionary Kid

          Are you talking about the court case or something else?

          • 0tessa

            He has also a new book coming out. Remember his announcement of some weeks ago, when he wrote his last post?

            • Baby

              Yes.. and he also said that ” We haven’t Seen Anything like we’re going to see..” (Paraphrasing)

              That Texas boy has something up his sleeve!

            • 0tessa

              Sure Baby!

            • Missionary Kid

              As I wrote on another reply, a book won’t cause the chult to implode any faster.

          • mirele

            We’re also coming up on 20 years of Scientology v. the Net in 2015. I, for one, will be celebrating. WE’RE STILL HERE, DAVEY!

            • Missionary Kid

              I like the sign that says, “IF OT POWERS ARE REAL, WHY ARE WE STILL HERE?”

            • mirele

              Here’s a story about the vaunted Oatee powers. On November 1, 1997, I protested in front of the Shrine Auditorium in LA as Scientologists streamed in to some festivity or another. (And there were a LOT of people.) OSA tried to block my sign with balloons and distract me. At one point during my protest, I noticed three Damnation Navy types come out–one was in front and shorter than the others. I turned to my handler and said, “Is that David Miscavige?” Well, I can’t be for sure, but he had more fruit salad on the front of his Damnation Navy duds than the others, and he was shorter, and he was giving me a death stare. So it was either him or his brother Ronnie. I’m thinking it was Little Davey. In any case, they couldn’t get me to budge off the sidewalk until I decided I wanted to leave.

            • Missionary Kid

              Good story.

          • joan nieman

            I am sitting here with my mouth agape too MK.

            • Missionary Kid

              I’m probably wrong about my prediction of operational collapse by the end of the year, but the retrenchment is already obvious. The empty buildings and short staffing speak volumes.

        • Sergeant Pepper

          I wonder what it is. He alluded to it in his “Reality Check” post of Aug 31st. ” When events of 2015 are in full roar I don’t want people to get the idea that all I have written over the past two years was some sort of diversionary ruse.” and ” It has nothing to do with any current legal proceedings and is unrelated (as am I) to the scientology infotainment lampooning industry (whose main useful purpose is attention distraction). If you hear rumors or ‘inside skinny’ about what this parallel work entails, you are hearing lies or the imagination of someone still caught in the scientology hallucinatory cause syndrome.”

          • As I have said before, I suspect that he is gearing up to release some sort of ‘reformed Scientology’ of which he will be the de facto head and ‘technical expert’ – a classic ‘squirrel group’.

            His group will acknowledge the shortcomings of Hubbard, and weave in some of the strange ‘philosophies’ (aka woo-woo) that he has been exploring in his blog. It will present itself as ‘selecting out the parts of the tech that really work’.

            The fact that what he had written “over the past two years” seemed to indicate that he was drifting away from Scientology is the “diversionary ruse” that he wishes to deny

            He also gets in a pre-emptive strike against “the Scientology infotainment lampooning industry (whose main useful purpose is attention distraction)”. That’s people like Tony and ourselves, who he knows will be deeply disappointed when he assumes guru status.

            It’s possible that he is expecting to win his court case, believes that this will provide his household with legal protection against Scientology harassment, enabling him to directly confront Miscavige in this way

            • Eclipse-girl

              I hope you are wrong for young William James’ sake.

            • So do I… but this hypothesis fits

              > The strange hints in his blog
              > The fact that he still seems to be ‘auditing’,
              > The tenor of his previous books
              > His apparent inability to surrender the (imagined) status he enjoyed when he was a ‘high official’ in the CofS

              I suspect that he has also been saving revelations about Miscavige for a ‘big reveal’ when he get away with it. Much is said about COB’s personal vendetta against Rathburn, but I think Rathburn returns the compliment, and would be prepared to do whatever it took to inflict damage on his persecutor.

            • Eclipse-girl

              I agree the hypothesis fits. It mades me sad.

            • Sad indeed – for him, his family and his potential followers.

              However, I think many critics, pleased with the damage he was doing to the CofS, have consistently read too much into his blog posts. We have wanted to see him drift away from Scientology, and hoped that he would eventually make a clean break. We have seen evidence for this hope that was not there – to be fair, his writing can be so obscure that you can read almost anything into it.

              I think he remains the man he was when this 2012 profile was written in the UK newspaper “The Independent”. http://www.independent.co.uk/news/people/profiles/scientologys-heretic-how-marty-rathbun-became-the-archenemy-of-l-ron-hubbard-devotees-7618944.html
              He still believes, and he is unwilling to abandon his prominent position in the ‘Independent Scientology ‘community for a mundane occupation.

            • Eclipse-girl

              When Millers Bio was reissued this year, Marty read it.

              Marty even encouraged Mike Rinder to read it.

              I am not arguing against (or for) your position.
              Its just that if Marty is learning the truth about Ronnie —
              Well then he is quite the ‘bot that most believers are.

            • To go with my speculation, Marty’s version of Scientology would acknowledge that Hubbard was fallible but argue that he still discovered valid therapeutic techniques. Not a ‘bot at all – but not ever likely to make a clear break from Scientology, either.

              I am saddened when someone is still captivated by this kind of superstition – but their beliefs are none of my business. I am only concerned that whatever system he creates is more benign than the one that he worked for for many years.

            • Eclipse-girl

              It is NOT about belief but about behavior.

              It still bugs me when people believe in pseudo – science, too

            • Can’t have a Scientology Pope without a few Anti-Popes waiting in the wings.

            • joan nieman

              Somehow I just can’t go there today. It is an interesting analogy but is still only speculation. I will ride with the waves for now.

            • Making a public prediction is a fair test of how well I understand the mindset of people like Marty. It’s certainly speculative – but it’s based on what we know of his life, and his writing.

              I will ride the waves alongside you until we find out. I just hope it isn’t hype to sell a new book.

            • Sergeant Pepper

              I fear your analysis is accurate, but that would be deeply disappointing.

            • That was my initial impression of what he was doing and I’m sure you’re right. But it won’t work. $cientology is bullshit, cobbled together from other sources, filled with hypnotism (some of it bought from practicing hypnotists), and is simply going to die. Rathbun has nothing to sell but the same bullshit he bullied for, for years.

            • I agree that such an organisation would not be viable, long-term. It would probably not make any impact on the CofS either. However, Marty has the attention a small group of committed people who will rally around to ‘recover the tech’ and ‘save the planet’ with him at their head. This will probably be enough for him.

              With luck, he not repeat past mistakes and try to apply ‘ethics’ and his organisation will be relatively benign. Still deluded – but as long as it does no significant harm, members are entitled to their beliefs.

            • Kim O’Brien

              I believe that Marty is “blank” …there is something really off about him. After watching him talking about Annie ( on video ) and dragging her back to DM …he makes my freaking skin crawl . He craves and misses and YEARNS for influence /power. He needs minions and is cut from the same cloth as every other wanna be cult leader. Lemme guess …out there in the middle of nothing TX …he builds little ” retreat cabins” for auditing . Once you think about it ..he would be stupid not to take advantage of the drones who are already pliant ….staggering out of the church …he is a fucking soul vulture

            • I have never been able to make up my mind. Sometimes Marty seems to be retreating from his past… and then I remember he has never spoken about his involvement with the Lisa McPherson cover up.

              On the days I can put the questionable actions in his past aside, I can’t decide if he is sincere in condemning the abuses of the CofS – or would hypocritically return to those same tactics given a chance. Like the picture below, it flips between one thing (duck) and another (rabbit) while you are looking at it.

              I suppose, like many here, I would have liked to see him redeem himself. Now I doubt this is possible. One thing I am settled upon is that he will never abandon magical thinking, nor the attention and influence his involvement with Independent Scientology gives him.

              Mine is, of course, a ‘never in’ point of view. Those who have suffered from the application of the sort of ‘ethics’ that he specialised in during his time in the CofS might be more definite.

              As for the ‘cabins in the woods’ – the way to hold together a geographically-distributed community of independent Scientologist is through the Internet… and online auditing mediated through the ‘net is perfectly possible. I don’t know if this would be better or worse…

            • Kim O’Brien

              i agree ..i am a ” never in ” too . I just go with the skin crawling reaction i have to him . I would not write of the ” cabin in the woods ” thing off though …he had Case Blanca (his house ..) ..a ” scientology bed and breakfast ” …with bargain prices .

            • OK… but the cabins would only be available to a limited number of acolytes/executives… it’s no way to run an organisation that he would want to rapidly expand

            • Kim O’Brien

              Marty just needs enough ” rapid expansion” to make a good living and anyone staggering out of the Big cult ..is there for the picking . He is in his 60’s …no education , no work history ,no retirement , nothing you can put on a resume . He just needs to cultivate enough DM culties into clients for the next 15 years or so . He can cloak it in ” a safe stepping stone ” ..blame the reason on DM ..lay himself up as a ” uniquely qualified spiritual guide / terminal ” . He knows that no one new is JOINING scientology …so expansion really is not possible , nor the point . ( IMO )

            • It’s ironic that it is the Miscavige vendetta has made Marty a big fish (in a small pond). Without the attention that this has brought him he might have become much more disillusioned by now, and laid the cans aside.

              And you are right. Sadly, so many people have “no education , no work history ,no retirement , nothing you can put on a resume” thanks to the CofS. However, many of them have turned this situation around and found fulfilling occupations. Marty has no incentive to do this as long as Miscavige provides him with a spotlight that attracts ‘Independent Scientologists’ like moths to a flame.

            • Kim O’Brien

              spot on . Jefferson Hawkins seems to be the healthiest of them all i think …

            • Like many here, I would like to see Marty redeem himself. Unlike many, I believe he will never turn aside from magical thinking nor his position of ‘influence’ in Independent Scientology.

              However, I cannot make up my mind whether he sincere in condemning the abuses of the CofS or whether he would return to his old ways if he got a chance? Is it even possible to ‘reform’ Scientology I don’t think so).

              From a never-in point of view my attitude towards him is like the picture below, flipping between one sincere (duck) and manipulative (rabbit). I can understand that exes who have experienced the ‘ethical’ treatment Rathburn used to apply during his time in the CofS might be more definite.

              As for the cabins in the woods – the Internet is the best way to exploit a geographically-distributed community of Independent Scientology, and ‘auditing’ can be performed remotely. I don’t know if this is better or worse.

        • Juicer77

          Mr. Rathbun has a toddler who is nearing the age when “why” is an everyday word. He’ll be looking at the world through a whole new set of eyes – his son’s – as the questions begin. Who can say what the result will be?

          • Kim O’Brien

            Run Mosey run

        • Missionary Kid

          I don’t think that Marty’s blow is going to be a direct one. As you posted on your other reply, you think it’s going to be his latest book. I disagree.

          I believe that perhaps a government agency will take action based on Marty’s or someone else’s information.

          The chult is already in the imploding stage. There are obviously more people leaving than are being recruited, and, from the stories we hear, I think they won’t have the qualified personnel to run things. The Sea Ogres can only do so much, and a lot of them are young and inexperienced. They’re bound to screw up.

      • DodoTheLaser

        They will see it. They are looking at it right now.

        • L. Wrong Hubturd

          I love your positive attitude. I’m a pessimist by nature. If the Bunker ever has a homecoming dance and a pep rally, you and Baby are in charge, OK?

        • Missionary Kid

          I certainly hope so.

      • aegerprimo

        After 15+ years of being away from the Co$, it was only a year and a half ago that I decided to get on the internet and find out what $cientology was up to in the world. I had a hard time at first reading articles like today. The self-censorship (brainwashing) runs deep in $cientologists AND exes.

        ETA: It took reading books like Bare-Faced Messiah to come to terms with the ONLY thing Hubbard was good at was conning people.

        • Eclipse-girl

          And look at how far you have come in those 15 yrs, and in the final 1.5 yr.

          YOU no longer doubt.
          You are aware of the creep this person was.
          You are a valued part of a community that jokes and degrades the Fatboy

          I think you have come to value the freedom to think for yourself.

          (((HUSG)))

          • aegerprimo

            ((((HUGS)))) back at ya E-girl, and all the Bunkeroos. ♥

        • Missionary Kid

          The self-censorship is powerful, isn’t it?

          • aegerprimo

            Yes it is!

            It NEVER ceases to amaze me HOW POWERFUL self-censorship is. This is why I am constantly compelled to read and post here at the Underground Bunker everyday. It is important for my own full recovery, and I hope that anything I say, or repeatedly say, may help a lurker on the fence about the Co$, or help a never-in understand the danger of $cientology and about the strong lure of cults in general.

            • Missionary Kid

              I’d say that the real “religious” implant is LRH and his tech that was pounded into you.

            • aegerprimo

              Yes. I joined the Sea Org only 3 months or so after reading Dianetics and starting the “Bridge to Total Freedom” (first step being the Purification Rundown = sitting in a sauna for hours and taking niacin and lots of vitamins).
              UGH! What a dumbass and naïve person I was!

      • Sid

        It might be the internal goings on that gets one looking, but it’s the truth out on the internet that gets one out.

        • Missionary Kid

          It’s so much more available than before, isn’t it? Before, every person who left had to feel very much alone, and Co$ would emphasize that, to discourage them. Now the exes, indies, and antis all have a presence, and, because there’s so many exes of all stripes, and there are more of them than $cientologists, one peek at the internet will probably bring another one out.

          • Sid

            So true. As they increase the pressure on the inside with more regging, heavy ethics, and disconnections, there is increasingly more info available on the outside. It’s entirely becoming a one way street.

            • Missionary Kid

              Hopefully, it will soon be a freeway out.

        • Robert Eckert

          Except for the people who are staying in The Isolator:

          http://static1.lxdcdn.net/images/max/w/806/72743ad677bb7561feccd064996fb303.jpeg

          • Sid

            That may just be better than the Cone of Silence.

      • Bob

        MK, I’m sad to report that those in the bubble are still monitored to within an inch of their lives when it comes to reading anything about L.R.ECCH that’s not sanctioned by the cherch. It’s self censorship only because it’s now a defacto crime in Fear-entology to read ANY “Entheta” about the greatest man in the universe.
        What is needed is a story about Shino-atology that is so big and ubiquitous that the Sciebot ostriches cannot avoid it. Katie Holmes and Tom was close but not direct enough. I fear it will take an incident so dastardly or sensational that it crosses all borders before it will reach the eyes and ears of the hypnotized Scie-cult members. One such incident would be, Tom Cruz publicly turning his back on the cherch. I doubt that will happen soon, unless he really tanks at the Box office and finally realizes that Fraudatology is toxic to his career.
        Of course there is always the “on drop of water at a time wearing away the mountain”. I much prefer a thunder storm washing away the cult. I’m hoping that happens soon.

        • Eclipse-girl

          Tom has his own family watching over him. He brought his sisters and mother into the chult.

          I do not think Tommy will ever depart.

          • Bob

            Yes, you are right. Sad. I still have hope.

        • joan nieman

          Yes Bob. A tidal wave might also be of use.

          • Bob

            Good point.

        • Missionary Kid

          Part of the prison of belief is the idea that Co$ tries to plant in everyone’s head that they can detect any lies with the e-meter.

          That’s bullshit, but the placebo effect is pretty strong. Just yesterday, there was a story of someone fooling the e-meter.

          Fear is the emotion that Co$ is running on now, and, while powerful, leads to emotional fatigue, which can lead to breakdowns, suicides, and, best of all, people leaving.

          I now don’t think Cruise will leave. They’ve got him in their bubble. I’ve been wrong before. IDK, Travolta or Krusty will leave, either. Travolta, because I think he’s really sold on the idea of family, with his hardcore wife who would threaten him with disconnection from his kids, and Krusty, because she’s just a plain flake with money.

          • Bob

            Yes,fear, fear and more fear. It is the glue that holds these Hubbsurdists together.
            And it causes 24/7 stress which leads to breakdowns, suicide, financial ruin, and sudden and prolonged death.

            • Missionary Kid

              My thought was initially, “Isn’t death always prolonged, because that’s it?” Then I realized what you meant. 😉

              Fear and Loathing on the $cientology bridge.

            • Bob

              That should be a title for a movie

            • Missionary Kid

              It is, of course, a riff on the “Fear and Loathing…” books, articles, and movie by Hunter S. Thompson, RIP.

            • Bob

              That’s what I thought

            • Robert Eckert

              It took me a second too. “Side effects of Quivuxor may include prolonged death…”

  • HappypantsDance

    Great work, Tony. What Hubbard’s own friends write about him is so revealing. None of it is necessarily surprising, but it certainly fills in the image of the real man, not the doctored image Hubbard himself and the church have tried to paint.

    I am overjoyed to hear that Jesse Prince is still cancer-free and is flourishing. I’m very much looking forward to his book!

  • but Heinlein later was happy to realize that Hubbard was a liberal. De Camp tells Heinlein his first impression was the correct one.

    I can just imagine Hubbard adjusting his projected personality to suit his audience. De Camp seems to have been able to see straight through it, and I’m sure that pissed off Hubbard to no end.

    • Eclipse-girl

      I get the feeling that many of the the old writer friends were starting to see though the veneer / the facade that was Ron Fatboy Hunnard.

  • aegerprimo

    We thought it was quite obvious that Hubbard was almost always putting everyone on, and the real challenge was to find those extremely rare occasions when he was actually telling the truth.

    YES!

  • Sherbet

    Thanks for reposting the video of Ron Saving the Day. It’s a jaw-dropping gem — a CZ of truth. I’m hoping at least one person at Voice Media Group was savvy enough to laugh at it, albeit privately and quietly.

  • Baby

    Jesse.. I can not tell you enough how good it feels to hear that you are cancer free..I book marked your blog and will be reading it when I am relaxing at the end of the day when my home is quiet..

    I admire you so much. So many heroes in this saga and you are one of them. Thank you for exposing this evil cult for what it truly is.

    • aegerprimo

      Just finished reading it. DEFINTELY time well spent. Thanx Jesse!

  • Sherbet

    It’s too nice a day in New England to spend inside with lrh. I’m over and out for now.

    • It’s snowing here, and the coffee’s on.

      • Sherbet

        I’ll be right over with a shovel. Or maybe not. 🙂

        • S’alright, it’ll turn to rain later. It’ll give me a chance to swap the lawnmower for the snow blower.

  • HillieOnTheBeach

    In reference to Hubbard and Arwine’s alleged visit at Caltech.

    As a never-in, scientologists’ convoluted rationalizations of Hubbard’s real-world unacknowledged accomplishments is one of the most difficult aspects of the scilon bubble to understand.

    It is somehow easier to believe that Hubbard was subjected to an extraordinary universal conspiracy and unprecedented case of damnatio memoriae rather than the simplest (Occam’s razor), most logical (and factual) explanation: he made it all up. Hubbard’s and scientology’s explanations of his absence in the history books requires the implausible, unanimous and perpetual collaboration of the media, international governements, the scientific community, the navy, etc. You can barely get more ridiculous. *bangs head on desk*

    It’s frustrating and somewhat disenheartening the level of unchallenged reverence he accomplished despite being completely undeserving.

  • EL-RON OF THE CITY OF BRASS
    L. Sprague de Camp
    [Printed in the “Literary Swordsmen and Sorcerers” series in Fantastic, August 1975]
    http://www.xenu.net/archive/oca/elron.html

    I came across hints that CoS, in its usual charming style, went after De Camp for that. Hopefully De Camp’s papers have been collected somewhere, and more details eventually come out.

    • And for just that reason I have real problems with the established writers who have anything to do with Writers of the Future–no matter how sweet the candy is.

    • Lurkness

      In this article de Camp has a great takedown of Book One:

      “IN Dianetics, HUBBARD started with the concept of an “engram.” This term, invented by the German psychoanalyst Richard Semon early in this century, means a permanent impression left on protoplasm by a stimulus. For instance, said Hubbard, all sorts of haritiftil engrams are impressed on a human fetus during gestation as the mother is raped, kicked, or beaten by her husband, or as she attempts abortion by knitting needles. All these events, the book implies, are normal in average married life.”

      • ze moo

        The concept of life itself reforming and changing dna and the ‘protoplasm’ of a person was widespread in the 1900’s. There was never any evidence of such things and it led to ‘lysenkoism’ and other attempts to apply evolution to human affairs.

        • Douglas D. Douglas

          Good on you for invoking Lysenko. If there was ever any reason for people to understand the epic (and tragic) implications of following bad science, this is it.

          • ze moo

            Odd {to us in the present or maybe just to me} concepts about ‘race memory’ and past lives and spiritualism abounded in the late 19th and early 20th century. Harry Houdini debunked the spiritualist claims over and over again, but some still believed. After so many scandals involving preachers and priests and all sort of ‘officially recognized laity’ {the early 20th century abounded with such things}, a lot of people were disillusioned with traditional religion. I can see looking to Buddha or other non-traditional religions, but why throw out your intelligence with your disillusion?

            The ‘race memory’ and hidden or lost human ability scam has been around for a long time. I suspect that Lroon just taped into some other writers work for that too. Not his own work, he was not that imaginative.

            • aegerprimo

              I had to Google Lysenko, and took the easy way and read a quick bio at Wikipedia.

              Lysenko incorrectly claimed that a vernalized state could be inherited – i.e., that the offspring of a vernalized plant would behave as if they themselves had also been vernalized and would not require vernalization in order to flower quickly.

            • Eclipse-girl

              I believe his famous experiment had to do with removing the tails from mice (or rats)

              The offspring always had tail, and they were never and shorter.

              This is what creeps me out about this whole idea of “homo novi”
              The false enhanced abilities would never be passed down (genetically) to their children.
              It was never evolution.

              The pseudo – science in all of the codswollop this lying liar produced is one reason WHY we need to worry about the education system. KIds could easily be innoculated from most (all) cults if they learned about science, the scientific method, critical reasoning in their schools.

            • Robert Eckert

              That was Weisman who demonstrated, decades before Lysenko, that “acquired characteristics are not inherited” by cutting the tails of mice for multiple generations. It was pointed out to him that, since he was Jewish, his ancestors had already performed an equivalent experiment…

            • Eclipse-girl

              Thank you for the correction.

      • TheQueenofBulgravia

        It was in the LRH marriage,,,,Nibs premature birth from his testimony @1982 Clearwater Hearings Day 2, Part 1

        https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Z9cskEln5EE&feature=player_embedded

  • Shelly Britt Corrias

    Killer post once again, Tony. While still shaking my head over the first part (as an ex, it’s interesting to process and oh-so-valuable), I was thrilled to catch up with a dear friend Jesse! Double-whammy. Happy weekend all!

  • ze moo

    Hubbtard seems to suffer {or enjoy} the effects of dissociative schizophrenia or perhaps just plain old sociopathy. His demeanor changed with his audience and the only constant in his personality was hubris and self aggrandizement. The ‘atomic scientists’ he so thoughtfully lambasts were rarely ever together after August 1945, and they would not have had a meeting with 2 non-technical officers from the Navy and Coast Guard. I don’t know about Arwines work during the war, but Lroon was a total fuck up and was trusted to do anything with out close supervision. Leslie Groves would not have let Lroon near anything with the word ‘atomic’ stenciled on it.

    Thank Xenu Lroon and Arwine saved the day!! The absurdity of atomic scientists getting their own atomic bomb for their little club is past ridiculous. Over throwing the government? Where would the scientists pay checks come from it they over threw the pay office?

    I wonder what any correspondence from John Arwine would show? Probably just past loans that Lroon never repaid.

    “Between you and me, I hate the hell out of gadgets,” Well Lroon, sci-fi is just a genre of fiction that places people in strange situations and then sees how they react. Those authors who kept everything on the ‘gadget’ level were always 3rd rate hacks, but even they didn’t have regard for Lroon. He was always a hack whose pretense at greatness was always overshadowed by his abject failures.

    His one success was in formatting a self help pyramid scam with hypnotic overtones and fascist management. That the scam has lasted this long is merely a testament to ability of the auditors and others to get people in the door and paying for joy of brainwashing.

    Be well Jessie Prince and enjoy life.

    • DodoTheLaser

      His one success was in formatting a self help pyramid scam with hypnotic
      overtones and fascist management. That the scam has lasted this long is
      merely a testament to ability of the auditors and others to get people
      in the door and paying for joy of brainwashing.

      This. ^^^

    • joan nieman

      I would think the E meter is certainly a gadget.

  • shasha40

    So happy you are cancer free Jessie , waiting patiently for your book ! Yours too, Tony !!! Those letters at least show his peers were aware that he was a scam artist !

  • Captain Howdy

    Anybody know what the “Kim Izentchy affair” was? Hearsay never heard of it.

    • Tony Ortega

      That word or words were extremely difficult to discern, and usually Hubbard’s handwriting is a snap to decipher. That was the best I could do, but it could have been almost anything near it.

      • Captain Howdy

        When i googled it a bunch of rubbish about the Kardashians came up.

        • DodoTheLaser

          It could be a reference to some N. Korean leader.

          • Eclipse-girl

            too early, I think.

            • DodoTheLaser
            • Eclipse-girl

              Knowing the actual year the letter was written would have been nice.
              You are correct, as early as the late 1940s Some Kim was messing around with fascism / dictatorship in NK.

              I think of the Korean war as taking place in the 1950s – hence My thought the reference could be too early.

              I think Eivol may have found the correct reference, though.

          • Elar Aitch

            My first thought

        • Lol!

      • Mark

        I think it might mean “Kim, isn’t she?”. ‘Kim’ seems to have been 40’s hipster slang (antedating the Kardashians)—an epithet for a sexy girl: http://www.urbandictionary.com/define.php?term=kim
        ETA: And Eivol’s reference to Cardinal Mindszenty too.

        • shasha40

          I learn something new here , everyday . Thanks, Mark!

    • Eclipse-girl

      Could Hubbard have been using “Pig Latin” or some other simple way to disguise the name?
      He thought of himself as clever when he did such stuff

    • Eivol Ekdal
      • Captain Howdy

        Sounds about right.

        • Sherbet

          Because of the context, I was expecting lrh to reference something scandalous, though. Something where the Catholic Church embarrassed itself.

          • Captain Howdy

            Well, the secret police did force him to make scandalous confessions to everything under the sun. Flubbard probably thought they were true.

            • Sherbet

              OK, I defer to everyone’s detective work. Maybe back then it appeared the “Mindszenty affair” was going to cripple, or at least piss off, the Catholic Church irrevocably. I don’t see it, but that’s just me.

            • Captain Howdy

              I thought you were going out?

            • Sherbet

              How astute you are, Howdy. It’s the siren call of the Bunker that has lured me in yet again. Off I go.

            • Sergeant Pepper

              Scientology is the tar-baby, Br’er Rabbit. Enjoy some sunshine, Sherbet!

            • Eclipse-girl

              We don not know what the secret police put the priest through.

              We do know what scientology puts their critics through.

      • Eclipse-girl

        I think this could be correct

      • Tony Ortega

        That’s it.

      • DodoTheLaser

        József Mindszenty. That’s pretty metal name.

  • Eclipse-girl

    My best wishes to Jesse Price and those who love him.
    Cancer is evil and vile.

    I am glad he is a survivor and appears to be living well.

    Lets see that book because many of us want to know.

    • Eivol Ekdal

      I just watched this again the other day…
      https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=xqBA9qcu0Ws
      Spot on Jesse!

      • Mark Foster

        I watched that, too, after watching I-Betty´s post of the John Duignan speech a few days ago. It´s worth re-visiting 🙂

        • Eivol Ekdal

          I think I was prompted by the same comment from I-Betty. That was a 3am finish after watching them all.

      • Anonymous

        When that cold blooded murder was committed by an “OT” out on the street I confronted a senior GO person about it and asked how it could possibly happen. The person looked at me and flatly stated…”even an OT can go “out ethics.”

        WTF?

        How the hell then is “clearing the planet” and “auditing out the 4th dynamic engram” going to make “a world without war crime or insanity?”

        • Eivol Ekdal

          In an Ideal World the society would support the use of R2-45 for any out ethics OT.
          The get to go up the bridge in a shot.

          • Anonymous

            Badda Boom…heh.

            • Eivol Ekdal

              That is what ‘two to the chest, one to the head’ sounds like.

            • Anonymous

              It was a double entendre rimshot and SP “cure.”

            • Eivol Ekdal

              🙂

          • TheQueenofBulgravia

            Instant Permanent Clear (Nibs, CW Hearings 1982)

        • joan nieman

          It was never meant to make sense. It was meant to make money.

          • Juicer77

            This ^^^^

      • aegerprimo

        Jesse’s prediction about Marty was correct.

  • Anonymous

    Interesting post Tony…thanks for doing the research.

    Among the many patterns of bizarre conduct from Hubbard was the need to drape himself in the aura of others who had already accomplished something in their lives. He often pretended that he was somehow in the company of, or otherwise involved with, people who were famous or well positioned in society. It did not matter to Hubbard if the stories he made up about these folks had him cast as a hero or a villain …he just wanted others to think these people cared at all about him, so that somehow he (Hubbard) would be thought of in a similar light. Here are a few of Hubbard’s choice self-promoting canards where Hubbard In writing or taped lecture claimed:

    “[He was] flown home in the late spring of 1942 in the secretary of the Navy’s private plane as the first U.S.-returned casualty fromthe Far East”.

    ”…I sort of won the Maharajah of Jaipur’s luxury Sussex estate [St. Hill] in a poker game…”

    “…[He was] “severely wounded and was taken crippled and blinded” in WW II

    “…Our enemies are less than twelve men. They are members of the Bank of England and other higher financial circles. They own and control newspaper chains and they, oddly enough, run all the mental health groups in the world that had sprung up…”

    “I happen to be a nuclear physicist…”

    “To some degree, it was my responsibility that this world got itself an atom bomb…”

    “Therefore, I am a little bit angry with psychology because I walked onto the stage as a nuclear physicist in 1932 wanting to know something about the mind.”

    The list of examples above could run dozens of pages. Hubbard was a chronic liar about his past, his present and what his plans were for the future via Scientology.

    A few months ago while searching the web for something having nothing to do with Scientology I came across the letter below. Hubbard dedicated his book Dianetics to Will Durant who was well known (along with his wife Ariel) for his popular works including “The Story of Civilization” of which volume 4 (of 11) was released in
    1950. This example of implying that he was somehow associated with the famous and respected Durant was another typical “angle” for Hubbard, part of a lifelong pattern of hubris and deceit. Durant did not know Hubbard, nor had Durant given Hubbard permission to use his name to add gravitas to Dianetics, as the letter
    below clearly states. I’ve posted this image before, but it bears re-posting in the context of today’s post by Tony.

    • Sid

      Great point! Hubbard also said he used to write the President of the United States on his passport’s who to contact section. Made him seem important.

    • Excellent – thanks for that.

    • Tory Christman

      Speaking of bizarre conduct, one of THE things $cientology uses all the time is “Oh that is old news. It doesn’t happen any more”. Really? REALLY? Well, we were at the Complex *last night* here in LA, and look what happened:

      https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=YLrXZUEMxR8&list=UU__gcXYVQlmVocNLZykibUw

      “That Hubbard, what a card. He also admitted that it was a good
      “publishing trick” to have people sign releases before they read the
      book in case it caused them to go insane. (For years he’d been telling
      people that he had a manuscript that had convinced some of its readers
      to commit suicide or go insane. Now, he admitted that it was just a good
      “trick” to get the book attention which, of course it was.)”

      I know, calling someone “insane” is deep…but honestly, the guards at the phony, fraudulent business pretending to be a “church” …the “church” of $cientology, and their members sure acted insane LAST NIGHT. Did they arrive “in” $cientology that way? No. $cientology …whether with Hubbard or “dave”….the product is the same: NUTZ PEOPLE WHO CANNOT THINK. Thanks, Tony and Gerry and all who helped with this: Great info!! Also, congratulations, Jesse on finishing!! Yay!! TICK TOCK BABY!! 🙂 <3 Tory/Magoo

      • Tory Christman

        This quote actually defines members of C of $ to this day. ““I don’t understand Ron’s current activities. I am considerably
        disturbed by them,” Heinlein confided to their mutual friend, John
        Arwine, who was, like Hubbard, a war veteran. Heinlein told Arwine that
        he was concerned that Hubbard was trying to be a “Big Operator” rather
        than getting his writing career back in order.”

        THAT describes these guards, Sea Org and members per *last night*: They are SO busy proving they are “Big Operators” that they’ve ***completely*** lost sight of why they even joined this group, let alone learning the FACTS (Such as this very article or the TONS you have posted, Tony), Gerry and many others have produced. Thankfully free speech IS alive and well OUTSIDE Of C of $. My love to you ALL 🙂 Tory/Magoo

      • Anonymous

        Yes…the famous Scientology BS line “We don’t do THAT anymore.”

        To which Arnie Lerma came up with the brilliant retort:

        “And you also don’t do it any less.”

      • richelieu jr

        Good Gravy, Tory, what a scumbag this ‘Otto’ must be…

        Ahd I agree- This anecdote is so telling, on so many levels. We’re lucky to have you around. I’m absolutely easy prey to this sort of assholery (MU, still-ins? Look in your Hubbard Dictionary under ‘Bull Baiting, or ‘Behaving like LRH)…

        And as far as conversion go– I’ll take yours over Saul of Tarsus’ any day– He did stop killing Christians, which is great, but he pretty much stayed an overbearing jerk, whereas chez toi, when the Sci-LooneyToonery fell way, you proved to be just as sweet and smiling, only with all the spikes and venom washed away (but not the spine!)…

        Go get ’em, girl!

  • rom661

    “Very vast”. From the video, which should be required viewing for anyone who thinks there just may be something to this Scientology thing. Besides the completely ludicrous account and his poor use of language, I guess I had forgotten how poorly Hubbard actually spoke. He was truly pathetic. So affected that you would know he is a bad joke independent of the actual words he is speaking. In fairness to myself I got in before I had been exposed to anything like this. The irony is that once I was exposed to this kind of rubbish, I was willing to believe that the problem was that I was inferior, just didn’t get it. I mean, all these people (fellow staff members), most of whom I liked were sitting there with me and not having a problem, right?

    • Eclipse-girl

      Hence the problem with any type of system that prevents people from talking to one to one another.

      As catty as this sounds, I actually like it when people can share informations and gossip.
      You may not be getting the whole truth but you are getting some information – usually unfavorable to a person.

      It makes the group as a whole much harder to control.

      • shasha40

        Yeah, and in the end you can decide for yourself !

      • Anonymous

        The best histories of any event are written by ALL of the participants and witnesses.

        There may be contrary observations and recollections, but folks can get an idea of the truth by listening to everything, then making up their minds about what most likely actually happened.

    • Anonymous

      There is an excellent term for the phenomenon you describe: pluralistic ignorance.

      See my post above: http://tonyortega.org/2014/11/08/the-heinlein-letters-what-l-ron-hubbards-close-friends-really-thought-of-him/#comment-1682917031

      EDIT to add: I meant to post this in direct response to yours, but accidentally posted it as a separate thread. Talk about ignorant…sheesh.

    • kemist

      There’s a reason you were not exposed to this at first.

      This is the way you can be sucked in without your mind actively fighting this stuff.

      I think a major part of how they do this is with “Study Tech”, which attempts to make you distrust your own critical thinking, synthesis and comprehension faculties. You’re forced onto a “gradient” of weirder and weirder things to accept. Whenever you don’t understand something by trying to apply your own reasonning to it, you’re just driven to even more confusion by chasing words in dictionaries. Because you’re forbidden to speak of it to other “students”, you start believing you’re the only one who is confused, when they are all faking it so as to get out of this excruciating boredom.

      • Mark Foster

        Yes, kemist, if you have a question in the course room, the answer is: ¨ What do your materials state?¨ It´s training you to turn off critical thinking skills, so that you are able to ¨better comprehend¨ the material. This ¨training from altitude¨(Hubbard figured it out, if you don´t get it…introvert and dig around in dictionaries and clay demo) and the repetition of nit-picking, rabbit-hole cycles of action are just 2 ways that adherents get hypnotized into accepting and parroting the dreck Hubbard served up. Reading and studying and ¨chinese-schooling¨ the (intentionally)confusing volume of contradictory statements, edicts, policies,¨technical theory¨, and ¨whole-track truths¨ close the process of synthetic personality creation and common sense deletion. In scientology,¨studying¨ equals Hubbard implant reception. My opinion/experience, anyway…

  • No more

    Just finished the book Strange Angel about Jack Parson’s life. Definitely helps paint a picture of the time period that formed the basis for LRH’s life’s work. Some letters to and from Hubbard are quoted in the book that corroborate the ones in this post. Fascinating story about Jack that also illuminates the true cockroach nature of his very toxic “friend” Hubbard.

  • At my boarding school we had a word for people like Hubbard described here: leech

    He was the guy who always seemed to be on the periphery of the cool kids, guys in the first school teams, school prefects, basically the pupils who were revered by the younger boys. I guess he experienced a vicarious sense of belonging just by always being close by but he was never part of the inner circle, he kind of thrust some kind of friendship on you through pretence and always seeming to be ‘there’.

  • kemist

    That video… Bwahahahahahaha…

    Ok, so this doofus says he and some Coast Guard dude show up at Caltech to talk with “nuclear physicists” who worked on the bomb. And not only are “they” (who? This was a small community of people who all knew each other by name at the time) plotting to overthrow the government in the most ill-thought out conspiracy of all time, “they”, like the stupidest James Bond villain ever, openly divulge it to the first idiots who show up at their place. And Einstein something, something about it. No one cares, he’s just there for name dropping.

    For someone who used to write fiction for a living, there’s a spectacular number of humongous plot holes in there.

  • Anonymous

    There is an excellent term for the phenomenon you describe: pluralistic ignorance.

    In pluralistic ignorance, individual members of a group come across information that they do not believe, yet at the same time think everyone else believes, so they either hide or explain away their own disbelief.

    More info about this very common phenomenon is here:

    http://phdsinlogic2011.appspot.com/abstracts/jens-ulrik-hansen.pdf

    and also here:

    http://changingminds.org/explanations/theories/pluralistic_ignorance.htm.

    Many have remarked that Hubbard vilified psychology and psychiatry because if one studies those fields, one realizes that Hubbard stole much of Scientology from those fields and that the rest of Scientology crumbles into dust when compared to the material from which it was actually “sourced.” Heh.

    • Missionary Kid

      Your last paragraph is what I try to tell to the people who think that their “wins” in Co$ were so special. i maintain that they’d have gotten far better results at a far cheaper price in money, life, and mental health, if they’d gone to a real psych.

  • Roger Larsson

    In the 1980’th I had the control of $cientology and in the 1990’th I controlled the politics in Sweden.

    $cientology is more a soft breeze compared with stormy politics.

    • Missionary Kid

      Charles A. Lindbergh’s grandfather would agree. He fled to the U.S. with the maid to avoid jail, changing his name in the process.

  • Eivol Ekdal

    Tony, speaking of books, can you give us any update on your’s?
    And will you be taking working title suggestions from your correspondents?
    May I suggest..Exocet

    • Captain Howdy

      Why Exocet?

    • Not a good title idea for me – it has very bad associations.

      Exocet (French for “flying fish”) was an anti-ship missile that was used by the Argentinians to devastating effect during the Falklands conflict.

      It was fired in the rough direction of its taget from a distance, and flew only one or two meters above the surface of the ocean so that it could not be seen on a warships radar. After a timed interval it lit up its
      own radar and homed in. By the time observers saw it coming, it was too late.

      The only defence (retrofitted after the war) is an automatic Gatling gun, which, if you are lucky, will shoot the damn thing down at close quarters.

      Exocets were also fired at the US Frigate USS Stark by an Iraqi warplane during the Iran – Iraq war, causing considerable loss of life.

      All told, a very, very, nasty example of the perversion of human ingenuity.

      • Eivol Ekdal

        It was not a serious suggestion.

        • I know. Sorry if I over-reacted.

          It’s just that I can’t even think about wishing one of those things on anyone – even Miscavige.

          • Eivol Ekdal

            Agreed, unfortunately there are newer, scarier versions today. Syria has a shit load from Russia. Relatives in Falklands?

            • Before the Falklands war I did some casual work for a private club where the ships company of a Royal Naval frigate had the occasional party with their wives and girlfriends.

              They were well-behaved, generous people with an anarchic sense of humour. I liked them.

              During the war, their ship caught an exocet with their galley.

  • Sejanus

    Listening to him wax on about being such a mighty mind makes me laugh my ass off.
    I love how $cientology has done such killer work preserviing his wit and wisdom for all to enjoy.
    The funny thing is..this stuff to any sane intelligent free thinking human being is hilariously insulting to ones intelligence.

    He could not tell a truth if his very life depended on it as it was clamped firmly onto his buttocks.
    Every story he weaves has him as this larger than life centre of morality, wisdom and adventure.
    The calm eye in the storm.
    It is frigging epicly bad.
    He wanted to be Luke Skywalker oh so very badly.

    If it weren’t for the trail of bodies, broken families, broken lives and broken bank accounts….this guy would have been one incredibly long unfunny joke with a hell of a punchline.
    Instead though, he managed to secure himself a place in history as a modern day snake oil salesman with delusions of godhood.

    The Scarlett Jackoff never disappoints.

    • The Scarlett Plumper-Null eh?

      • Missionary Kid

        I’ve added “The Scarlett Plumper-Null” to LRH’s nicknames.

    • Missionary Kid

      I’ve added Scarlett Jackoff to his nicknames.

  • Douglas D. Douglas

    Haven’t had time to read through all the comments, so this may have already been done today:

    (Refresh!)

    • Where Robert E. Howard saved himself brain-racking labor in plotting by endowing his heroes with Herculean brawn, which got them out of all predicaments, Hubbard achieved the same end by providing them with invincible magical gadgets.
      – L. Sprague de Camp

      • aegerprimo

        Key phrase being…
        invincible MAGICAL gadgets

        • He hated SF gadgets because, if not actually based on science, at least had to have a rational explanation for how they worked.

          Hubbard didn’t do rational well.

          • aegerprimo

            No shit! Makes me wonder… with a typewriter, did he have the ability to touch type or was he a two finger pick-n-peck typist?

            • He was renowned for being able to bang stuff out at speed, but I don’t know if anyone remarked on his touch-typing ability. Not having to stop and think would account for some of the speed.

            • Ding-ding-ding! We have a winner!

    • Observer

      That color scheme makes it look like some sort of bathroom appliance.

      • Missionary Kid

        It’s just missing the “church seat” that flips up with the gap in the front.

      • Todd Tomorrow

        It does like a water pick but for genitalia.

  • Robert Robinson

    “Someone accused us of not knowing that Hubbard was “joking” and that we were fools to think he was actually saying that Dianetics would give someone the power to “rape women without their knowing it.””

    Obviously, this person has never read the Admissions (Affirmations) of L. Ron Hubbard.

    • There’s a special mystical mark-up to all of Hubbard’s works that only those with the insight that comes from having their brains scrambled can see. All of these adepts can look at the text and instantly know which sections where Hubbard was clearly “Just Kidding!”

    • aegerprimo

      For those who have not read them – Admissions (Affirmations) of L. Ron Hubbard – here is the link….
      http://www.gerryarmstrong.org/50grand/writings/ars/ars-2000-03-11.html

  • sugarplumfairy

    Hubbard is just so repulsive.. Seriously.. he’s the best that scientologists can find to idolize? I’d sooner idolize dog droppings..

    • Sejanus

      OK how did you get OT 9 materials about the Sooper Powerz of Dog Dooky?

      OSA has been notified and are on the way…lol

  • Tony: “Possessed by some creature out of science fiction?”

    Well now, H.P. Lovecraft did meet Hubbard and remarked “That is a remarkable young man!”, and if there was anyone who’d know eldrich alien possession, it was Lovecraft.

  • Anonymous

    It seems like it isn’t even necessary to say it, but that internally produced Scientology video where the virtually unknown Hubbard supposedly assembled, then spoke to, a group of atomic physicists at Cal-Tech may be one of the most laughable pieces of horseshit in the entire history of an organization famous for producing laughable horseshit.

    This is the sort of video that just HAS to be seen by anyone who is “on the fence” about Scientology.

    What an astonishing, unarguable, filmed admission that the entire subject is nothing more than a HOAX.

    • BosonStark

      My favorite, again, “the old-time atomic physicists who had been at the projects that dropped the bombs, the people from Los Alamogordos.”

      There’s Los Alamos and Alamogordo in New Mexico, but they were never referred to as one city. They’re 250 miles apart.

      I wish Anderson Cooper could have had Tommy “Xenu” Davis on his show to play this clip, and ask him about these details, especially that there was no such meeting. The cult uses Hubbard’s absurd lies to impress its membership, many of whom don’t even care if Hubbard makes it up as he goes along.

      • Anonymous

        Because of the way the church PR machine operates and because their BS has been exposed so often, chances are that some how, Hubbard and Arwine (or possibly one, but not the other) were in fact on the Cal-Tech campus on some particular day that can be documented.

        It would then probably be possible to trace back that in fact some smallish group of folks who could arguably be called nuclear physicists did somehow get in a room together that day and talk. Hubbard or Arwine might even have possibly been in that room, maybe to empty the waste baskets or mop the floor.

        From that tiny bit of truth, the church PR machine will then spin an enormous, complex lie like that astonishingly stupid video.

        And as has been a six decade pattern, if someone gets too loud about exposing the truth about the fabrications in the video, that person will be hounded by Scientology hired thugs in an effort to silence them.

        That is the nature of hoaxes and racketeering conspiracies. It is what they do.

        • Science Doc

          Caltech was probably an eight minute drive from Parson’s house on Orange Grove and Caltech was already entwined with what would become JPL, so Hubbard was aware of Caltech even if Caltech was mercifully unaware of him. No chance he was at any faculty meeting. Once again he confuses and conflates atomic and nuclear physics. Also you can know how to build a nuclear weapon, and a lot of people do, but getting ten kilos of plutonium, machining it into a warhead, surrounding it with an explosive lens, etc., etc. requires billions in infrastructure. No academic lab in the US has ever had much of this. The man was an idiot.

          • Anonymous

            “No chance he was at any faculty meeting.”

            You are almost certainly correct, but that is not the point…at all.

            The story in the video is obviously a lie, but there is almost certainly some tiny shred of evidence that Hubbard strolled onto campus one day. He may have even been walking his dog and had his picture snapped under a tree while the dog took a crap.

            That tiny shred of evidence, becomes the “proof” that the rest of the story “happened.”

            If challenged on the video, the church will point to the picture, with the dog cropped out.

            Believe me…that’s how it is done…and is has been done that way for decades.

          • aegerprimo

            Need we mention that in the video Hubbard said nuclear fission. The dumbass does not know the difference between fission and fusion or atomic and hydrogen bombs.

          • kemist

            And there is this teensy little inconvenient fact that you need engineers to do the actual building of such a thing in any efficient capacity.

            Yes there were physicists in Los Alamos, but there were also a whole bunch of engineers of different fields.

            Engineers and scientists don’t have exactly the same skillset and outlook on things. Scientists investigate things at a fundamental level, engineers build them.

            I know, my second degree is in engineering, my first is in science.

            Also, any type of efficient bomb manufacture demands lots and lots of testing. Most self-designed artisanal bombs are failures, unless the builder does a lot of testing. Those tests are far from discreet with conventional bombs, and definitely unsubtle with nuclear devices. The very idea that some cabal of “nuclear physicists” (probably already closely monitored by US intelligence services to see if they will sell Los Alamos secrets to the USSR) could build such a thing on their own, in some badly equipped uni lab, unobserved, is utterly laughable.

          • Missionary Kid

            The man was an idiot, and a liar, and a convicted thief, and a con man, and …to infinity and beyond. 😉

        • They’re not above digging up corroborating tidbits that smell a lot like plants done after the fact. The Wikipedia articles on “Snake” Thompson and “Old Tom” have that pungent ripe aroma.

          • Anonymous

            Absolutely.

            There are groups of folks inside OSA dedicated to creating false historical anecdotes that appear to corroborate much earlier lies told by Hubbard or the church.

            That type of activity has been going on for decades and is fundamental to the HOAX of Scientology.

            “What is tree for you is true for you” is not just a solipsistic piece of blather from Hubbard…it is a foundational operational idea that folks inside the church use to create false appearances.

            Those false appearances, if repeated often enough…eventually “become true” in the minds of the indoctrinated…or in the minds of judges, juries or law enforcement personnel who only have a passing understanding of Scientology and can be easily fooled.

            • “What is tree for you is true for you”

              A typo, but when I went looking for the Bishop Berkeley limericks by Ronald Knox, I found this interesting bit that connects to Orson Wells:
              http://bytesdaily.blogspot.ca/2013/03/god-in-quad-and-falling-trees.html

            • Anonymous

              I “planted” that tree on purpose. Just like Scientology. Heh.

              FIFY – thanks!

            • It must take an extra mind-twist to be able to work in that unit. Here they are, working on manufacturing and planting fakes, but believing that the fakes they just created are true because Hubbard said so.

            • Anonymous

              In many cases, the people doing the posthumous manufacturing of Hubbard historical anecdotes, do not realize they are “faking” history. They are given a set of compartmentalized instructions that they are to follow and are completely isolated from the bigger picture as to why those instructions must be followed.

              Up high enough on the “command chain” there is of course eventually somebody (or several somebodies) that know the truth and who are privy to the various compartmentalized lies and how those lies weave together into a deliberate conspiracy of falsehoods. Those are the “conspirator operators” of the Scientology HOAX.

              As I have mentioned before, near the top management echelon, Scientology most closely fits the operational pattern of a large propaganda and intelligence agency. That is it’s operational nature. The disguise is that Scientology is simply a religion.

              Most of the Sea Org and staff (and virtually all of the public members) do not know this is true…it is that well hidden.

            • Elar Aitch

              Like ‘milions of followers’ , ‘global expansion’ etc

            • Anonymous

              The giant, but empty, Ideal Orgs are a good example. They are the manufactured “evidence” of expansion.

              But when one look behind the glitter it is seen that the actual activity inside the building is not greater than what was occurring in the older facility that it replaced.

              In fact, because of the intense fundraising done to build the Ideal Orgs, in many cases the new building have LESS activity than the older ones they replaced because the church public avoids the new buildings completely.

        • aegerprimo

          Personally, I don’t think there was even that much truth to it Anonymous. Maybe Hubbard met Arwine once, and maybe Hubbard set foot on the Cal Tech campus once. Otherwise, I feel the rest of the story is bullshit.

          • Anonymous

            Correct.

            That is in fact the way Scientology PR…”works.”

        • kemist

          I can’t even imagine physics grad students wasting one minute of their time with this idiot.

          Faculty ? Bwahahahahahaha …

          • Anonymous

            Well…Hubbard DID invent music…so there!

        • Cosmo Pidgeon

          Spot on Anon..hey that rhymes..but yes exactly.

        • LongNeckGoose

          Kind of like that 1930s article where Ron brags that he found an actual Blood Brother of a Blackfoot Indian while researching his book “Buckskin Brigades” but a few years later, guess who the Blood Brother is now? And there’s a fancy certificate in LA that proves it, with a red ribbon, gold seal and everything!

          • Anonymous

            That particular piece of documented historical nonsense is a great example…thanks for bringing it up.

            The LA Times article below tells a bit about that particular manufactured historical anecdote. There is more to this story, but the link below provides sufficient insight into the BS factor of this “event.”

            http://articles.latimes.com/1990-06-24/news/mn-1013_1_blackfeet-blood-brother

            • LongNeckGoose

              Thanks for posting those links!

    • Stacy

      CoS doesn’t actually SHOW this video to people, do they? What a joke! A 6th grader would know he was being fed BS.

      • Anonymous

        Actually the ONLY audience that would sit still for such nonsense is people already in the church.

        NO person outside the bubble would be able to keep from laughing aloud hysterically at the utter nonsense that video portrays. It is just too stupid for general public consumption.

  • Science Doc

    The video is just absurd at every conceivable level. Postwar Caltech scientists tended not to agree with each other on very much. But nearly all of them were very negative toward applied science. They ran Arnold Beckman off the faculty for being interested in things like making the first glass pH electrode, for example. Beckman got even by becoming a billionaire and later giving most of his money to Caltech. Most of these people were very well known. They had names, and many are familiar to this day. Einstein spent a few months in Pasadena. I forget which year. But he was a Princeton guy. Part of that video might have been shot at the Arboritem on the Caltech campus. The last time I saw Steven Hawking he was having lunch there. Nice place.

  • Heinlein and others wrote science-fiction. Elwrong wrote science-friction. Go find me some science in any of his crap. “It’s science, boy, science.” That’s a boy talking, trying to be a man; he never made it.

    • aegerprimo

      It didn’t take Isaac Asimov (who was an actual scientist, biochemist, and sci-fi writer) to see through Hubbard.

      Isaac Asimov read an advance copy of the Dianetics article and thought it was ‘gibberish’.

      Chapter 9 of the book by Russell Miller Bare-Faced Messiahhttp://www.xenu.net/archive/books/bfm/bfm09.htm

      • Missionary Kid

        Asimov was so brilliant that his degree and specialization was in chemistry, yet he taught biochemistry.

        Hubshit, it looks like, couldn’t master simple math.

    • Robert Eckert

      From “Battlezone Planet”:

      For 3 human days, Johnny had been on the scary side of the moon, where the danger-aliens were known to roam. He opened his space-backpack to do an inventory:

      One sleep-blanket.
      A flask-holder of liquid drink-water.
      Four holder-containers of nutrition-food.

      Through his vision-glasses, Johnny saw a colony of danger-aliens and feared they might catch the scent of his nutrition-food.

      The danger-aliens were out on patrol-patrol, hunting for nutrition-food. Johnny thought with his mind-brain, “I must bury the nutrition-food. I MUST bury the nutrition-food.”

      • joan nieman

        A grade three student would probably laugh at that. One word for his attempt at writing…pitiful!

      • It’s a bitch when you pretend-write while drunk-stoned. 🙂

        • Robert Eckert

          On Battlefield Spork, Nathan Johnson (after wondering about how the “eye-bones” function and noting that the name is the least stupid thing about the “breathe-gas” the Psychlos need, which turns out to explode if there is any background radiation) loses it:

          Oh, and there’s a hyphenated word that isn’t a stupid alien term: “kill-club.” Just… why? Does he have a “wound-club” and “stern warning-club” and “just to look threatening-club?” Does he change its name if he smacks a wolf with it but the critter doesn’t go down in one hit? Is Windsplitter his “ride-horse?” Argh.

          • Elwrong was probably distracted by his limp-club when writing that.

          • Windsplitter had an unfortunate gas problem.

      • richelieu jr

        Fun Fact: On my (little-known) first record, I put a ‘funny side’ and a ‘scary side’ instead of ‘side A’ and ‘side B’)

        Little did i know I was following in such hacky hoof-prints…

    • richelieu jr

      But Skip! What about all that ‘RESEARCH’?

      He clearly said he’d done lots of it, and it was all very scientific! Many of his figures even include decimal points!

      I guess they call you ‘Skip’ because you SKIP right over all the evidence, eh?

      • Ah yes, research. That’s how he came up with “date locate.” In English, that translates to “I’ll just write down a bunch of fucking numbers on a piece of paper and tell them that’s when the universe started and the first incident happened and the fools will believe it.” 123445674837293999927872222920200473920222222000047373646663633821811121111777 Research like that, stunning. They call me Skip because it means “captain of the ship” as in Norwegian, as in Viking. Skoal, mother fuckers!

        • richelieu jr

          That isa very impressive figure, Skip!

          I see you’ve been doing a little research of your own! Skoal, indeed, Captain!

          • Thank you. I just focused my Super Powers (you might have noticed that my initials are SP) on the Tater Universe and retrieved the number of evil ideas Elwrong Hubtoad had in his last lifetime.

          • Thank you for recognition of my mighty abilities. I just used my Souper Powerz (you’ll notice my initials are SP) to reach into the Tater Universe and instantly retrieve the number of evil ideas Elwrong Hubtoad had in his rotten little lifetime.

  • Mark

    “So Hubbard was an opportunistic womanizer working a racket on other veterans…” Quite so, and in more ways than one, it seems (refresh):

    • aegerprimo

      Didn’t know Hubbard was a WAC.

      • Mark

        The photo-caption said they were the first graduating class of female marines, Aeger. But what does that R. Lee Ermey know, anyway? http://www.rleeermey.org/viewtopic_print.php?t=12840&start=0

        • ze moo

          Is that Guy Fawkes in the back row?

          • aegerprimo

            Looks like it! Ha ha!

          • Mark

            No ‘Veet’ or ‘Skin-So-Soft’ back in those days…

        • aegerprimo

          That’s right, fat ass didn’t know shit from shinola. He was a whack-job who thought he was da shit.

      • Observer

        He was definitely whack.

    • Observer

      I just do not get Hubbard’s success with women. Sure, he was better-looking when he was young, but he was never good-looking. He must have been a very charming sociopath indeed. Charming people make me wary, with the single and notable exception of i-Betty.

      • Mark

        “You don’t look at a sociopath when they’re stroking your ego”?

      • aegerprimo

        i-Betty is very pretty.

        • HillieOnTheBeach

          She has a lovely voice, too.

      • HillieOnTheBeach

        Sometimes I wonder if his often cited charisma wasn’t more of a self-perpetuating legend. In the “famous for being famous” sort of way.

        • Also, many of the people who describe him as ‘charismatic’ first encountered Hubbard in Dianetics and Scientology ‘congresses’ and ‘lectures’ – a social environment composed of like-minded who were expecting to see a ‘great man’ at work. Those who attended and were disappointed were unlikely to do so again, so he gradually surrounded himself with uncritical admirers.

          The opinion of fellow pulp writers (an entertaining but untrustworthy fantasist) seems to provide a more accurate assessment of his public personality.

          • Missionary Kid

            And, even then, he slipped some of the BS past them.

      • Missionary Kid

        He obviously was a bullshitter and could be a charmer. What he did was convince people that he was on their side. Probably the same for women.

        • I think he got his face slapped a lot.

          • Missionary Kid

            I don’t doubt it. Of course, he probably tried to appear “insouciant” to them, like an Errol Flynn type would.

            He reminds me of someone I briefly met who was a minor grifter who would take just a little bit from everyone, but he was so charming and gave people such good stories, that they didn’t mind. I mentioned his name at a meeting of sailplane pilots, and many laughed and groaned, and shook their heads.

            • Todd Tomorrow

              A guy like that tried to take my elderly Grandmother for a ride. She lived in her original house far from us on the East Coast. Luckily, some neighbors gave us a call and we went for a visit to meet this,”War Hero”, we’d all been hearing so much about. Sure enough after having my cousin( an undercover cop) run his name we discovered he’d had numerous but small interactions with the law.
              My cousin and my Uncle decided to take him for a ride the next day to look at some land they were thinking of selling. Nobody knows what they said to him but within the week he told my Grandmother he had to leave for Florida at once to wrap up some family business. My Mother, then sat her down and explained how this guy was not only never in any wars but had a wife in, Florida. She was angry at first but then calmed down and admitted he asked her to borrow some money and she told him, her father always said,”Never a borrow nor lender be.” So at least he never got away with her money.
              I don’t know if she has dated anybody else but she said if she did it would only be someone from their local church. Recently my Mom and Uncle went to take away her car keys. The neighbors said,”You weren’t gone 20 minutes and she was off in her car to have dinner at her favorite seafood restaurant.” I laughed, like she wouldn’t have another set of keys.

            • Missionary Kid

              Unfortunately, there’s grifters that target church ladies, too.

            • Todd Tomorrow

              This small town is very protective. My Grandmother met this guy in, Fl.,and now she is too elderly to travel without her kids. Thinking of selling her house in, Palm Beach because.”most of my old friend’s are dead.”

            • Missionary Kid

              It’s tough. I’m seeing old friends drop by the wayside, and I’m not that old.

        • Todd Tomorrow

          And in his private writings he talked about having premature problems getting it up, from injections he got in the navy. So it wasn’t his sexual prowess.

          • Missionary Kid

            As Raquel Welch said, the most erogenous zone in the body is the mind.

          • Todd Tomorrow

            His private writings(someone has a link) show an unstable, insecure man with sexual problems both is his childhood and in his relationships. (Please someone post these). At one point he was accused in his early teens because his testicles hung too low for his age. He was accused of excessive masturbation and scolded.
            I know Kim has the link from, Jon Atacks’s collections. Insightful and creepy at the same time.

  • joan nieman

    Wonderful read this morning Tony! I wish all the bubble people would do a little research too! Wake up ye scions! Can you not see that your leader, who you worship, was a madman?

    • aegerprimo

      For those who have doubts, read the book L. Ron Hubbard, Messiah or Madman? a biography written by Bent Corydon.

      • Artoo45

        I think that was the first critical bio I read in the ’90s. It’s a solid book and along with brilliant A Piece of Blue Sky and Miller’s Bare Faced Messiah makes up what Miscavige must consider to be the true Trilogy of Terror. Essential reading for all serious Scientology watchers and the foundation on which the excellent books by Reitman, Urban and Wright were built.

        • aegerprimo

          I agree Artoo. I read Hugh B. Urban’s book first – The Church of Scientology:
          A History of a New Religion
          . I found it in my college library during a sociology research paper. I read it and then I was able to digest what you call the “True Trilogy of Terror.”

          ETA: The sociology research paper was about a topic on cultural diversity in the healthcare setting.

  • nottrue

    Best wishes to Jesse Prince….I can’t wait to read his book…..

  • I find that Heinlein fans are the worst bunch of gatekeepers around. Thanks to Tony for taking the time to jump through their hoops and escape alive.

    I’ve heard through Gregg Hagglund, that Heinlein had plenty to say about Hubbard in private to fan groups like the Dorsai Irregulars. So far, their Code of Silence seems to be holding. It’s almost like some cult or something…

    • Lol, Wikifur!
      http://en.wikifur.com/wiki/Dorsai_Irregulars

      (I can’t laugh too hard. I know both the people in the picture on the article.)

    • Missionary Kid

      I was confused because I remembered the Dorsai to be a Gordon Dickson creation, but then I reread the sentence and realized you were talking about “groups like the Dorsai irregulars.”

  • Panopea Abrupta

    Red-X Red-X Red-X

    Fermi, Oppenheimer and Feynman told me about the Caltech meeting over a beer one night.
    Seems Hubbard really upset them.
    But faced with such a towering intellect, they couldn’t fail to be impressed.
    They wanted to quit and become busboys immediately.
    I was given a photo of Hubbard chairing the meeting.
    Scoffers, repent.

    Other lies here:

    https://docs.google.com/spreadsheets/d/1-Kvg78kCcvo5gL7UfPcmhmbsagTNtdj0y2LAiHVFrCU/pubhtml

    • Mark

  • Satansthetan

    Fantastic article, thank you! I so want to forward this page to a few people but………..disconnection…..Hubbard wasn’t just a con man, he was downright fucking evil!! Looking forward to Jesse’s book. This rabbit hole keeps getting deeper!

  • 3feetback-of-COS

    Hey OSA, so where is your trust and repository LRH’s PERSONAL letters showing what a great guy he was? Not the phoney tech and bullshit policies, but personal letters that are put out about all really great historical figures.

    No such compilation’ huh? That’s because it would show what a low-life scumbag he was.

    • Anonymous

      Perhaps you missed this particular gem…which features photographs of L. Ron Hubbard meeting / speaking with all the US Presidents from Obama, going back all the way to George Washington.

      It also shows Hubbard photographed in conversations with Jesus, Buddha and Mohammed. And yes I understand the contradictions.

      But if you bring those contradictions up, some OSA goons will be sent over to “correct” your mistaken thinking.

  • Artoo45

    I was reading this rich trove of Hubbardian batshite to Butch Pansy over pancakes this morning. When I finished the quote about Coventry, he said it was clearly fueled by the Grandiosity of Amphetamines. I’m pretty sure that might be a good subtitle for a book about Hubbard.

    • FromPolandWithLove

      Or more mysterious sounding title: “Grandiosity of pinks and grays” Subtitle : LRH adventures in a pillshel, ekhm I mean in a nutshell

  • Racnad

    I looked up “The World of Null-A” and although I was familiar with it before, it seems to have inspired – or at least part of chain of works what inspired – many fictional works that we’re more familiar with, including The Matrix, Dark City, Gattaca, and even the Church of Scientology.

    • Phil McKraken

      … and countless Star Trek episodes.

  • Kim O’Brien

    are the indies going to freak out ?

    • aegerprimo

      I hope so.

    • Missionary Kid

      I doubt it. They’ve always been picking and choosing what they follow or think is true.

  • Observer

    I cannot stop laughing at this:

    “Between you and me, I hate the hell out of gadgets,” he [Hubbard] told Heinlein.

    What about the jim dandy whizzer? What about the e-meter?!

    • aegerprimo
      • Observer

        GMTA! Hahaha

        • aegerprimo

          Yes YES they do! ♥

    • daytoncapri

      Wrote Hubbard: Yesterday, we used an instrument called an E-Meter to
      register whether or not the process was still getting results so that the
      auditor would know how long to continue it. While the E-Meter is an
      interesting investigation instrument and has played its part in research,
      it is not today used by the auditor…. As we long ago suspected, the
      intervention of a mechnical gadget between the auditor and the preclear had
      a tendency to depersonalize the session…. https://www.cs.cmu.edu/~dst/E-Meter/volney.html

      • Eclipse-girl

        TY for that.

        I remembered reading that , and the source. I just couldn’t find it when I went back to look for it.

  • Jgg2012

    “It ain’t agin religion. It just abolishes it.” Judge Waldrip was right, it’s mostly a commercial enterprise.

  • chuckbeattyexseaorg75to03

    Tony Ortega: “….de Camp strikes us as a no-nonsense kick in the pants. He reassured the Heinleins that he wasn’t putting up with any funny business from Hubbard. But he disagrees that Hubbard is suffering some kind of post-war breakdown.

    ” “I think he always was that way, but when he wanted to make a good impression or get something out of somebody he put on a first-class charm act,” de Camp writes…..” – above article on this blog

    This above is the kind of outside world views of L. Ron Hubbard that needs be heard and understood.

    L. Ron Hubbard’s colleagues had the best understanding of L. Ron Hubbard.

    This is a nugget of gold observation from a person who really knew L. Ron Hubbard, it fits with and reminds me of what Russell Miller learned from L. Ron Hubbard’s elder relatives’ views on L. Ron.

    Cream of the crop nugget of supporting bottom line conclusion about L. Ron Hubbard!

    Thankyou so much Tony Ortega. Excellent history and sharing of what the smart colleagues of Hubbard felt about Hubbard!

    I’m filing this article under “What L. Ron Hubbard’s colleagues thought of him”.

  • FOTF2012

    Fascinating look into that era. In one of the links Hubbard said not to Kroshak the kids in the playground — I’m not sure I even want to know that that means!

    To Prince — thank goodness you got out of Scientology. Otherwise you would have died auditing out the supposed 2D (second dynamic) causes of cancer instead of getting valid medical treatment. Best wishes.

    • Eivol Ekdal
    • FOTF2012

      PS I’ve long thought that Hubbard was a one string banjo, playing off a simple idea: everything we see around us (behavior, culture, religion, technology) is just a symbol of things we can’t see.

      In other words, everything is a “dramatization” of our suppressed memories.

      Starting from that simple concept, you can spin quite a yarn. Any random thought or specious association is converted from “noise” to a glimpse of the galactic truth.

      The idea of visible things just substituting for the deeper, invisible truths was not new to Hubbard. Perhaps Freud can lay claim to the basic idea, but even Freud reportedly said that sometimes a cigar is just a cigar.

      So, “Dear Mr. Hubbard, Sometimes a volcano is just a volcano. A movie theater is just a theater. And the world is just what it is. You are looking at your own mind — and the incredible capacity of all human minds to create perceptions of reality. That’s all. Best wishes to you on Target Two — your one-time friends, the Human Race.”

      Perhaps a line from the 1971 movie “The Last Valley” says it well:

      You are so naive.
      You want to look under the plate
      they put the food on.
      There’s no need for that.
      Nothing’s hidden.

      So look around you, True Believers of all ilks. There are no implant stations. No life on Venus. No Xenu imprisoned in an electric mountain cell for all time. No body thetans. No end of the world that is nigh — unless we cause it. No demons possessing you. No magic that lets you make parking spaces appear through your power of thought. Listen to Lennon’s “Imagine” a few times for comfort, and then plunge all your passion into trying to find out how the mind and the universe really work — it is far more magical and incredible than our limited human intelligence can yet fathom, much less describe.

      In the end, we are not Homo Novis. We are Homo Sapiens — and we are still struggling to live up to that last word — sapiens!

  • Shelly Britt Corrias

    On EXes coming to terms with the tech and its origins, short version: if you’ve never been there, be patient with those who have. Some of this sh*t takes a long time to un-ravel. Try to not judge.

    TLDR version: It can take TIME to come to terms with the “tech” and its origins, even after realizing that the church itself is a fraud.

    Throughout my time in, I battled with doubts about the “tech”. It didn’t work for me the way it was supposed to. Yet when I used it on others, it seemed to work for them. This put me in a constant quandary.

    While on book printing projects, I sometimes ate at a local cafe outside Madrid. One day, the owner told me his brother was ill. Something wrong with his equilibrium/balance rendered him unable to work for weeks. Whatever the doctors were doing was not effective. I offered to give him a nerve assist: it was the only thing I knew how to do that I thought might help this man. And I DID so want to help – he and his family were suffering and they were good people. Lucky for me, the nerve assist procedure is mostly silent – my Spanish was not great and he spoke no English. We did the procedure for about 30 minutes. The man then told me he felt calm and relaxed for the first time in weeks. He left. A few days later, I learned that he was well and back to work, balance restored. His family thanked me profusely. I felt really happy for him, but once more, terribly conflicted.

    A couple years later, I had finally begun the process of leaving the SO without blowing. I was supposed to be doing hard labor, but pretty much did my own thing when I wasn’t being sec checked. I would read, garden, make flower boquets and take them to people I still liked. A long-time fellow SO and former RTC, was living in the trailer next to me. He had MS, which prevented him from continuing his normal job in the Grounds area. Still, he worked as much as he could. He told me he’d like to get assists to help him deal with the MS, but had no one to help him. I offered, and for several weeks gave him assists – all different kinds, and usually several a day. He said they helped him cope with the MS and was intensely appreciative. I was overjoyed to be able to help a friend, but it tore me up every time i did it! I literally decided that I would shelf it, figure all that out later, after I was safely gone. I continued to help my friend until the night I left the Int base.

    I worked mostly in PR & Marketing, so my direct tech experiences would pale to those of full-time tech people, who spent every waking hour immersed in it. I can only try to empathize.

    It’s now more than 12 years out. While I stopped “believing” in the tech long ago, it is only recent that I’ve begun to look deeper, try to grasp what was behind it all, and realize that there is still much, much more to know. Thus my appreciation to Tony and too many others to mention. Invaluable work here.

    Peace.

    • aegerprimo

      Thank you for sharing your story Shelly. There is no scale of importance of someone’s story to another. ALL those who tell of their encounters expose the con of $cientology.

    • romanesco

      That’s the hell of it, apparently. Some things actually do work, which leads people to buy the whole enchilada. Good luck on your project of sorting out the rancid parts.

    • Missionary Kid

      Thank you for your story. One of my brother in laws is a physician, now retired, who spent almost his entire career studying MS. They still don’t know what causes it, but they are closing in on it, I believe. One of the things that I’ve learned is that it comes and goes. I’m wondering what eventually happened to your neighbor.

      The placebo effect is quite strong among people who believe in faith healing. The man who came back to work may have just been looking for an excuse to assume normal duties again. Without a thorough medical and psychological work-up both before and after, who can tell what the effect of your actions were

      I happen to believe that the great majority of “miracles” seen at Lourdes and other places are psychological, but I’m a skeptic, familiar with faith healers.

      • Shelly Britt Corrias

        Thanks MK. Last I knew, my friend with MS was still in the SO, living on a ranch outside LA. He would be in his sixties now, and I’ve no idea how far the MS has progressed. I think about him often and hope he is OK. Oddly enough, my current neighbor also has MS. So I am once again experiencing its effects indirectly. It’s tough, to say the least.

        Placebo effect, definitely a factor IMO. Sometimes just talking to someone, or having someone listen, is unbelievably therapeutic. To some, ritual of any kind is comforting. In terms of assists, there is also a certain physical massage effect, and I don’t think there’s much doubt that massage can be therapeutic. There are many sensible explanations, now, IMO.

        • Missionary Kid

          One of the things that supposedly is not good for a person with MS is heat. I hope that person is able to stay cool.

        • Science Doc

          There has been some progress in biological medicines for MS. There are about five different kinds of MS, and different therapies work best for each. Devastating illness. I’ve got a congenitally derived spinal cord injury, but I can say I’m glad it’s not MS, which was one of the first diagnoses, along with ALS.

          • TheQueenofBulgravia

            Generally, folks are glad, no matter how nasty their thing is, that they don’t have the “something else”….The Human Spirit is astounding! gentle (((( SD ))))

        • romanesco

          Good points. I wonder whether this “touch assist” thing was lifted from Chinese acupressure?

          • Missionary Kid

            My mom, who was an RN and midwife in rural China from the early 30s until 1949 told me that she never saw or heard of acupuncture. That, and accupressure, I assume were put forth by the communists in their barefoot doctors program to provide basic health care to the Chinese, especially since they didn’t have access to much modern medicine.

            I would say that the practice of acupuncture and accupressure were probably big city ideas.

            • They’ve found a possible explanation for how acupuncture works:

              http://www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2013/03/130314085528.htm

            • Missionary Kid

              It’s interesting, but highly preliminary. If they can duplicate it in humans, who produce more of the chemicals measured, they might have an understanding.

              I hope they keep going.

            • Aspsusa

              Thanks for that link – that kind of mechanism sounds highly plausible to me.
              I witnessed the effect of acupuncture on an old dachshund. Both immediately post spinal injury, and then as the dog grew older and got more old-doggy. The neurological effects in the acute injured phase was astonishing (correct posture for a few hours post acupuncture), but unfortunately for the poor dog pain-relief and stress-relief was never achieved with acupuncture.

              When the injury had healed the dog got a few sessions a year mostly just for age-related arthritis, which did improve mobility and cut down on the anti-inflammatories. But the one session that sticks in my mind re. this article was when the vet suggested a few needles for “general old dog perking up”. It seemed good the first hours post acupuncture, but could have been observer bias on my part. But then it turned not-so-good: the poor dog had 48 hours of what I can only describe as renal and intestinal “overdrive”. Peed, pooed, drank, ate, incessantly. Like a weeks bodily functions speeded up into two days. There was absolutely something systemic going on. After that we agreed that further session would only focus on musculo-skeletal issues…

              Another thing that makes me think this study is on the right track is that our vet (who is not much of a believer in “Chinese” theories) told me that acupuncture originally got a foothold in Nordic veterinary medicine, in the days before hormonal treatments of false pregnancy and other hormonal imbalances was cheap/safe enough to be routinely used.

            • romanesco

              Interesting. I once worked for a Taiwanese woman who showed me some acupressure exercises. My point was that it appears the techniques Hubbard taught that actually had an effect were typically lifted from elsewhere.

            • Missionary Kid

              I have used acupressure to ameliorate some sinus headaches that I used to have. What I eventually found was that a good massage on two points and just below the shoulders about two inches and outside of the line coming down from the neck would get rid of the pain and my sinuses would start to drain.

              I would find a muscle that was knotted up there, and massaging it would cause it to loosen up. There were also some other pressure points that I learned from acupressure that I would massage that would also help.

              I don’t believe in the diagrammed paths and terms that the Chinese use, but I found the information useful.

              In reading about headaches,(because they were so severe that I thought they were migranes, but because the pain was on both sides of the head at once, they weren’t), I discovered that dehydration, low blood sugar, lack of sleep, allergies, and tension could all trigger the knotted muscles, and hence the headaches. I rarely have them now because I’m careful.

              If I do drink, and some of those conditions are in existence, I will wake up with a sinus headache because alcohol dehydrates the body, and can cause stupid behavior. The biggest result of those headaches, however, is that I’ve pretty much stopped drinking, because I don’t want to risk the pain that comes afterwards. That’s more effective than Antabuse for me, so even if I’m going to have a beer, I run through the checklist. If I have a drink, I’ll alternate it with a glass of water. That slows down my drinking and hydrates my system.

            • arcinva

              I, too, get frequent headaches caused from sinuses and/or knotted muscles. The muscle issues mostly stem from my anxiety disorder, I believe. That, and I have very bad sitting habits at my desk job. 🙂 Occasional visits to the chiropractor (maybe 4 a year) and massage are massive helps. I firmly believe that insurance should cover therapeutic massage. My bro-n-law that began having serious back issues that were not controlled with anti-inflammatories or muscles relaxers found near complete relief when he began getting a professional deep-tissue massage every 6 weeks. I also had a coworker for a short time that was trained in shiatsu that did a little work to help my sinuses once and, wow, what a relief.

            • Missionary Kid

              I maintain that a good massage can take care of a lot of back and muscle problems. Without having to go to one, I maintain that a good physical therapist can help with many of those problems. Their knowledge of physiology and knowledge of therapeutic techniques is the result of (pun intended) hands on experience.

              My posture is, for the most part, very good. The Marines took care of that.

              In figuring out my own problem, I also discovered that my allergy to oats could also trigger he sinus headaches. I used to live where all of the backcountry was peppered with wild oats from horses. I used to take antihistamines, but I’ve discovered that anti-allergy pills taken before I go there will manage most of the problem.

              I’ve gotten pretty good at massages, first learning from my own body, then from learning from other people’s problems and giving them massages.

              I used to hang out at a blues/boogie bar, and one night, one of the women that I knew, who was sitting at the bar complained about her neck bothering her. I gave her a brief massage where she was sitting, followed up by another one about 10 minutes later. From then on, whenever she would see me, she’d turn around and back up to me. Her girlfriends started to do it, too.

              Guys that didn’t know us (we were just friends) would think that I had some weird control over the women. We’d just laugh.

            • arcinva

              Trust me. If you can give a good massage, you have control over the women. LOL. 😉

            • Missionary Kid

              😉

            • Shelly Britt Corrias

              I can relate. I began having migraines a few months after I joined staff. I battled with them for about 20 years, at which point something changed in my physiology or I learned how to prevent them, or both. They were mostly triggered by lack of sleep or extreme heat/dehydration. A doctor at the time told me that pretty much any extreme physical stress was bringing them on with me – he said it was my body’s way of forcing me to stop and let it recover. (That doctor was Stephen Price, who is probably still kissing DM’s azz. So in retrospect I must take into account the source. But his explanation still makes sense to me today.)

              Attempts to treat those migraines were a circus, however. Not allowed any pain relievers, or even assists (there’s a technical reason for that), we resorted to all kinds of things: ginger foot baths, chiropractic, homeopathic remedies, mega doses of calcium/magnesium, and other vitamin “bombs” and injections. Hell, one time I ended up out for dinner with a rip-roaring migraine. I somehow choked down a huge steak with mushrooms. By the time I got up from the table, the migraine was miraculously gone. So yes, I subsequently tried eating steaks for migraines but it never worked again. Maybe it was the mushrooms. 😉

              Seriously though, the only thing that consistently worked for me was sleep, if I could manage to get there. And Tylenol, which I secretly resorted to on maybe half a dozen occasions during the first three years. The last time I took Tylenol (while in) it was because the pain was so bad I was literally banging my head against the wall at 3:30am because it felt better than anything else. I thought I was going to lose my mind. I was in the middle of Dianetics auditing, so I was sent to Ethics the next day and threatened with expulsion if I ever “took drugs” again. Talk about feeling alone.

              Today, I certainly have my health issues – who doesn’t at my age, regardless of her past? But I haven’t had a migraine since I left that house of horrors. 12 years, baby!

            • Missionary Kid

              Congratulations on 12 years.

              The tension and lack of sleep from being on staff was triggering your body’s response, which was to tell you that you were doing the wrong thing. Unfortunately, it’s never $cientology’s fault, so you ended up trying all sorts of quack or, at best, marginal remedies. That’s really all that $cientology has to offer.

              While I was in college, I had a final that I crammed most of the night for, woke up with low blood sugar and decided to have a hot, healthy breakfast. What did I do? I had some oatmeal, and, later, by the time the test was over, I had a raging headache and went to student health services. They did a complete workup and neurological exam. They thought it was a migrane, which they assumed because it was more on one side than the other. Later, I discovered that I’m allergic to oats. That supposedly healthy breakfast, lack of sleep, and tension, had triggered a sinus headache.

              After I discovered the problem was sinuses, I started to use antihistamines, which would drain my sinuses and relieve the pressure. I now avoid the triggers and live in a place where wild oats are rare.

            • richelieu jr

              Migraines are typically more a female probelm than a male one (though I suffer from chronic ones, so…) They often diminish around the menopause (not that I know how old you are Shelley, and am certainy not menopausal myself (more’s the pity!)!)

          • arcinva

            Having never been in, I don’t know what exactly goes on during a Touch Assist but my thinking has always been it was cribbed from Reiki.

          • richelieu jr

            Sorry, but no- In Chinese Acupressure, you actually touch someone, and there may be some truth to physical aid..

        • HillieOnTheBeach

          Thank you Shelly for sharing with us.

          Re/ your comment “Sometimes just talking to someone, or having someone listen, is unbelievably therapeutic.”

          IIRC a documentary I saw not very long ago about the controversial presence of homeopathy in British “medical” practice is the characteristic that homeopaths can spend up to an hour with a patient listening and validating every ache and pain. That’s far from the (reasonable) case when you’re in a medical doctor’s office.

          The theory being that it’s not so much the homeopathy that helps the patients, but rather the caring ear.

          On the hospital/clinic’s balance sheet, keeping those patients in the homeopathy ward is cheaper than having them congest emergency rooms and precious medical doctor time.

        • “There are many sensible explanations, now,”

          Exactly! Being a cult victim is all about accepting at face value the outlandish explanation. The body thetans as an extreme example, but everything from the TRs and up have exuberant claims regarding the reason they “work” attached to them inside the criminal organisation known as the “church” of $cientology. A more prosaic explanation (the simpler choice, after all) and the willingness of people to believe seems much more attractive to the non-clam (such as myself), and entirely consistent with the varied success rate…

          • Shelly Britt Corrias

            You said it.

        • richelieu jr

          I sure hope the SeaOrg is treating your friend with as much understanding, charity (caritas) and respect as you clealry did, Shelley.

          Somehow I doubt it.

    • Lurkness

      Was the person with MS Uwe Stuckenbrock? If so, I am sure his brother Markus would like to hear from you if you haven’t already spoken.

      • Shelly Britt Corrias

        No, but I knew Uwe, and I’ve been in touch with Markus. I’m still heartbroken over what happened there.

    • Faith Healing is pretty common in a lot of cults (including the fringey evangelical one I grew up in).
      Good luck in your recovery.
      http://skepdic.com/faithhealing.html

      • Shelly Britt Corrias

        Excellent article, thank you.
        http://skepdic.com/faithhealing.html

      • daytoncapri

        Gee. I dunno. My faith-healed friend really does seem healed. Stage IV breast cancer –> surgery –> chemo –> completely clean.

        Personally, I only watch and wonder: I live with the conflict of saying it can’t be, I cannot believe it, and I don’t share her faith. In this case, she went to a catholic priest – mystic, whose work is not recognized by the church. She’s had holy visions, felt prayers work on her, communicated with her dead parents, summoned her guardian angels.

        She’s one of my closest friends, like a sister to me, and told me pretty much everything. After her ordeal, she’s back as my normal friend, disavowing nothing, and obviously happier and more committed to living life more fully. We’re keeping her dog with us this week-end.

        We can chalk up these happy results to modern science only? All that other stuff was unnecessary and wrong?

        • Missionary Kid

          Remember that all the people who survived a cataclysmic event can credit their survival to a spirit, or god or anything else. The ones who died can’t say anything. It’s called survivor’s bias.

          • daytoncapri

            Yeah, but if science tells you don’t have much of a chance, are you willing to look elsewhere. Is there a term for that?

            • Quackery. Charlatanism. Woo.

            • daytoncapri

              Looking outside of science is Quackery. Charlatanism. Woo. – That is your answer? Does love and caring fit in with healing? To the best of my understanding, science does not contain those things. Or does it? You tell me.

            • Nothing is “outside” of science. Scientists study the effects personalized care and attention have on people. They also test “alternative” therapies and if they provide significant beneficial results that can be repeated consistently, they incorporate them and they become mainstream therapies. It is a slow process and not perfect, but at least it doesn’t require “faith”. And I have met many loving and caring physicians and scientists in my day.

            • daytoncapri

              Nothing is “outside” of science. I can’t fault your logic in a well-constructed answer. You are very firm about science, and about faith. Please just explain this to me, as I am just trying to understand you, there is neither sarcasm or a trick question here.

              Is it correct to say that you have a certain “confidence” in science, and that confidence should not be confused with “faith”?

            • Correct. I have been shown evidence that the scientific method can be counted on to produce beneficial results overall. I have also witnessed and read about the damage relying on faith to solve one’s problems can cause because the results are not consistent or reliably repeatable. Science is imperfect especially when it comes to medicine (remember leeching and bleeding or more recently, promotion of smoking) but it has a built in system of skepticism and reliance on hard proof. It looks in on itself and evolves. Faith healing practices remain unchanged for centuries upon centuries.

            • daytoncapri

              I agree with everything except the last sentence. Humankind is always inventing something new, so some new twist on faith-healing practices is par. My personal theory: I think that my friend has employed a very powerful placebo with her faith. I would posit that optimism from her faith might help her build immunities and promote healing, but I dunno, there’s no scientific study on her. Her nurses are reportedly “amazed” but I wonder if she’ll make it into any medical journal in any way other than as a statistic.

            • Aspsusa

              Might be that (faith=> placebo), might be just statistics.
              One other thing to take into consideration is that the “amazed nurses” are actually dispensing a pretty strong placebo too – it is part of their job. And if they are really good, they might even be extra amazed at your friends, because if s/he is the kind of person who wants/needs “faith” and “feeling blessed” or “chosen”, it stands to reason that reenforcing this belief/sense of miracl-y specialness will be extra important for this person.

              The thing with statistics is that they are pretty useless on an individual level – incorporated in the statistics will always be the outliers. Both the ones with miraculous spontaneous remission and the ones where an organ just happens to pack up soon after diagnosis.

            • daytoncapri

              Friend. Not friends. Her dog is an old yellow lab.

              So far, I don’t see the science/anti-woo advocates putting her recovery into practical terms so much as fitting into the paradigm. That’s pretty much what I would typically do. The difference for me this time is my closeness to the situation.

              She turned to faith in her desperation, in her experience. It worked.

              No one has yet answered the question of “what would YOU do?” when the medical practitioners inform you that your situation is dire.

            • Aspsusa

              What would I do? It is impossible to know beforehand, because so much would depend on my state of mind. Since I seem to lack the “faith gene”, I would probably focus on comfort.

              If I did have that “faith gene”, and a strong drive to survive at all costs, I might do something completely different. Lourdes, “superfoods”, who knows?

              There are in my mind two very different kinds of “woo” when it comes to medical matters: One is a delusional view of the physical universe, and causes great harm (refusing life saving treatment, think Christian Scientists et al), and the other is the much more benign “it can’t hurt to try”.

              The important point, which is often overlooked with this second form of woo, is that it is a fallacy to ascribe causality in remission to whatever particular faith healing or natural wonder berries was practiced, when the nature of statistics is such that this kind of explanation just isn’t needed.
              (And it hardly needs mentioning that all “complementary therapies” have a huge factor of confirmation bias – your friend happened to recover, but how many of the healer’s other clients eventually died after feeling a bit better for a week or a few months?)

              But the external view of cases such as your friend’s (and let’s remember the conventional treatment before the healing!) shouldn’t take away from your friend’s _internal narrative_ of what happened. There are lots of things in medicine where we never get an exact water tight explanation of what exactly happened (especially so in trivial matters, though we seldom bother to talk about those), but as humans we like to build explanations and narratives. Doing so helps us function, and as long as it doesn’t actively harm us or others, that’s a good thing.

            • daytoncapri

              Accepting that you won’t survive, and that palliative care is the way to go. Is that it? If so, your answer is a workable plan. Your choice.

              I asked myself that same hard question. The answer was “I followed the rules, and in the process, was barely more than a prime example of despair and self-pity.” That’s my hard-truth. I survived because the doctor gave me an improper diagnosis that include repeat testings and 2 biopsies over the course of 4 years. I couldn’t take it any more, and switched doctors. The new doctor said “There’s nothing wrong with you. Never was. Who was your doctor. Oh, I know about that guy…”

              That’s my personal and scientific answer to my own question, all rolled into one.

              As for my friend, I am glad that it worked for her on her own terms, even though it might not suit people here.

              At this point, this forum has 3 answer to the question: hers, yours and mine. Each are different.

            • daytoncapri

              your term “faith gene” prompted a net search, Thanks for the concept. http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/God_gene

            • Missionary Kid

              There are areas that science cannot describe or test. Faith is one. By that, I mean that belief and science are entirely different areas. One cannot prove or disprove the existence of god, (I don’t believe in it).

              One can try to make experiments to prove or disprove the existence, but nobody has come up with one yet.

            • Missionary Kid

              That’s a statistical term.

              If someone is told that their odds are one in 10 to survive, and they survive, either the statistics are wrong, or they’re the one person in ten who survived. If all the other people believed or acted as they did, and didn’t survive, then the statistics hold. If more or less survive, the statistics need to be changed.

              The other nine people are dead, if they have the same beliefs and took the same actions as the person who survived, then any survey that just includes only the survivor has survivor bias built in because the survey doesn’t include the dead people.

            • daytoncapri

              Am I reading you right? She beat the statistics, but her faith had nothing to do with her actual healing, it only affected her interpretation of it?

            • Missionary Kid

              Yup. It could also say that nine out of ten times, the strategy was unsuccessful. When you do a survey, you have to look at the entire population (including the dead), or you have to compare her with other survivors to have meaningful statistics that might tell what the reason for survival is.

              An example: You have 10 Christians aboard a WWII bomber as crew. Nine are killed in a crash. The survivor attributes his success to believing in Jesus. That same strategy didn’t help the other nine, did it?

              It’s exp post facto reasoning. All the failures are excluded. People make that mistake all the time.

        • *barf*

          • daytoncapri

            Stay well. Be happy.

            • daytoncapri

              She took a path that I would not conceivably choose for myself.

              Nat – I pose an ernest question to you. So, what would YOU do – Nat – when science tells you that you don’t have a chance? Like Andy Kaufman maybe? Give up? Or what? https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=d285LX7x9Xo

            • Don’t act like you are a sweetheart when you are spreading B.S. that endangers the vulnerable. It is disingenuous.

            • daytoncapri

              I endanger no one. The report I tell is true. I am amazed, while you call it BS. I am not going to swap insults with you. She picks up her dog on Monday morning btw.

    • Baby

      Shelly..So glad that you shared your story..that is part of the healing process.. I can’t imagine how brave you are for examining your journey.

      You just keep coming back. We have more patience than money : )

      We also realize that it is a slow process. Thank you.. ((HUGS)) baby

    • daytoncapri

      Glad you are here.

    • Thanks for sharing (no, really!)

      While my focus has always been on informing people who were never in, more perspective on why victims stayed in and what they went through is always interesting and sometimes useful.

      It would be neat to hear more, but it’s up to you.

      • Shelly Britt Corrias

        Thanks! I’ll be back. Fascinating discussions here, ranging from hilarious to horrifying, but all comfortable somehow. Cheers.

    • Lady Squash

      Dear Shelly, your story resonated with me especially when you said, “Throughout my time in, I battled with doubts about the “tech”. It didn’t work for me the way it was supposed to. Yet when I used it on others, it seemed to work for them. This put me in a constant quandary”.
      I felt the same way. On me it didn’t work the way it was supposed to. Yet when I used it on others it seemed to work for them.
      I was astonished by the help I could be to others using the Tech–in one case a terminally ill cancer patient went into remission. In another case, a mentally ill person was able to live a more or less normal life. Astonishing results. It puzzled me.
      I’ve been out about 4 years now and have done a lot of reading about psychology and healing trying to understand all the contradictions.
      One explanation I have come up with for myself is the power of empathetic listening and the power of caring. I really cared about both those people. Hubbard’s tech gave my caring some structure perhaps, but I believe that it was the vibration of empathy that did the real work.
      The truth is that I have seen Scientology fail more often than succeed in such cases. But at the time I was a true believer and would never acknowledge the failures–that’s confirmation bias for ya. I’m a little wiser now.
      Thank you for sharing

      • Shelly Britt Corrias

        Thanks for this. I think about it a lot, not just in relation to Scn but in relation to humanity, science and spirituality, or whatever we call it (pseudoscience, woo, faith, spirits, magic). Sometimes, it haunts me. But I find myself particularly drawn to EMPATHY as a tool, and learning more about it.

        • Lady Squash

          I don’t know if you ever saw the movie “To Kill a Mockingbird” but it was great. One line that has stayed with me all these years is along the lines that you shouldn’t judge someone until you’ve walked a mile in their moccasins. Gaining the ability to walk that mile is a worthwhile exercise. BTW, you already sound very empathetic. : )

    • Wow Shelly, what you have written here is excellent and I am there with you in my writings. I can hardly wait until I am really prepared enough to talk with you. I know you are talking about Spike Bush whom you know was one of my best and oldest friend. I heard about his MS and it made me sad because there are medical treatments he could be on to make his life better. Anyway, more from me soon.

      • Shelly Britt Corrias

        Thanks Jesse. I read your blog post – it inspired me to offer some anecdotes/stories here. Last time I talked to Spike, he was considering leaving, and just going somewhere where he could deal with the MS with all the proper nutrition and resources. Of course he was considered out-ethics for doing so, and I guess they convinced him to stay. I can understand – he knows so much, it’s easier this way. 🙁 Just so wrong. Loved him. You too, Jesse. xo

  • chuckbeattyexseaorg75to03

    Jesse Prince did a huge amount of heavy lifting in the criticis history exposing Scientology’s behind the scenes bad history. Jesse media’d out, media just was NOT up to speed where to take the story next at the end of the LMT.

    It took a whole new round of senior ex’s to get their voices and explain recent crazy Scientology history.

    This blog is unbelievable in covering such big chunks of Hubbard and Scientology history and the key people who’ve helped expose history all round L. Ron Hubbard and results of his “work”.

    Tony you have truly one of the most embracive understandings of L. Ron Hubbard and Scientology of anyone alive.

    Thankyou so much for this blog.

    • shasha40

      Ditto , times a Gazillion ! As a never in this blog has helped me to understand the myriad of reasons people do join Scientology and gives me pleasure watching Davey being exposed for the tyrant , albeit ,tiny , that he is . Thanks to all Bunkerittes for being such an Awesome community !

    • Thank you Chuck! It would be a strange day in the world if Ray Mithoff just up and showed up indeed. Absent of that, Ray Mithoff has come up in my writings and I what I have to say won’t disappoint.

      • chuckbeattyexseaorg75to03

        thankyou Jesse! What you did was so important, for someone so near the top to be in the media and facing the idiots for years. The 1990s and early 2000s were a whole big story.

        That the LMT was right there on the same street as the Clearwater Building, daily for those years.

        The Happy Valley TV show on Wiekbe Hansen’s disappearance, was amazing. A bunch of people who’ve now gone public were out at Happy Valley with Wiebke (Bruce Hines was her twin on the RPF at that moment you were being filmed).

        This has some of my favorite media you did, thankyou so much:

        https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=uyNfEm8Vo8Y

  • ElleGee

    Fascinating!

  • . . .

    • shasha40

      Delusional as usual , Lloon Hubbtard !!!

  • cdub

    I was a huge science fiction fan growing up but when I was duped into Scientology in 1970, honestly, I had never heard of L Ron Hubbard the science fiction writer. I looked him up of course and read his old SF stories, which I found typical of the times.

    • Missionary Kid

      IMO, the great majority of his writing is far inferior to his contemporaries, in ideas, imagery, and writing style. He writes like a person who has to write 500 words on a subject, but has no ideas to put on paper.

      • aegerprimo

        Earlier today one of the Bunkeroos posted a synopsis of Hubbard’s works by L. Sprague de Camp….
        http://www.cs.cmu.edu/~dst/Cowen/essays/elron.html

        • Missionary Kid

          It’s interesting how Hubshit’s early life was elevated after de Camp’s look at it. He’s already started his historical revisionism of it by the 40s.

          I’d also say that his work was usually slapdash.

          To avoid that in my life, I tell people about my athletic career by saying, “The older I get, the faster I was.”

          • L. Sprague de Camp was well aware of Hubbard’s real history, to back before the war. I’m sure that he knew CoS’s official history was bull, but had to be careful what he wrote.

            Even so, there was some Fair Gaming, leafleting his neighborhood, etc. Unfortunately, I don’t remember where that was said.

    • daytoncapri

      One of my neighbors was a well-regarded science fiction fan. Something of an expert. He (my neighbor) was often an honored guest at the Conventions, pretty well known. He knew LRH’s comtemporaries, some of which were his personal friends. We would watch his house as he would go to cons or stay at some author’s house.

      My neighbor had plenty to say to me – to the negative – about Ron as cult leader. He also was eager to warn me off, but I was already out. I first heard Ron’s “religion as a money-maker” quote from my neighbor.

      As for Ron’s Science fiction work, he didn’t really have an issue with it. He didn’t call it trash.

      When Ron supposedly wrote and released new material towards the end of his life, my neighbor said it was actually a bit fun to read, as the writing style was from earlier times, when he himself (my neighbor) was much younger.

      • Missionary Kid

        Your neighbor enjoyed the nostalgia. In the middle 50s, when I started to read it, the quality of science fiction writing, which had started to improve in the 40s, had passed LRH by. I don’t recall reading any of his stories then, but if I had, I would have skimmed them.

        I went back and read Ralph 124C41+ by Hugo Gernsback. His language is far more outmoded than LRH’s, but LRH’s stuff, IMO, was pure space opera, written with a lot of words, because that’s how he got paid.

        I’ve posted this before, but an elderly neighbor of mine, a science fiction fan, went to see LRH when they both lived in Phoenix, and LRH was selling Dianetics. He told the audience, “Stick with me, and I’ll make you rich.” My neighbor stood back and observed LRH when the talk was over and said that LRH was the most evil man that he’s ever seen, and my neighbor was in his 80s when he said it.

        • Frodis73

          Now that’s a cool story.

          • Missionary Kid

            It was at least 15 years ago, and I had just finished reading Bare-Faced Messiah and mentioned it to him, along with a summary. That prompted his story.

        • daytoncapri

          Works for me. I don’t think I’ve read more than a few paragraphs of LRH’s Science Fiction. That was while browsing inside a B. Dalton Bookstore. http://www.lermanet.com/scientologynews/sandiego-books031590.htm

          • Missionary Kid

            I was staying at a friend of mine’s house (he’s my age), and I saw that he had a copy of Battlefield Earth. I’d never read it, so I picked it up and started to read it. I lasted about 5 pages, then skipped ahead, and it was the same crap.

            He hadn’t read much science fiction, and he thought it was OK. Sometime, I’m going to introduce him to some good science fiction, like Stand on Zanzibar or some of Phillip K. Dick’s work.

            • daytoncapri

              The Man in the High Castle by Philip K. Dick. Outstanding.

            • Missionary Kid

              I know I’ve read it, but I can’t recall it right off. One of the things that I really respected about Heinlein was that he helped to pay for Dick’s back taxes. That would put him out-exchange, according to Hubbard’s fucked ideas. RAH really was a stand-up guy.

            • daytoncapri

              Going to bed now – but I do recommend a good movie https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=YYflIj6QR-I

            • Missionary Kid

              Thanks. Some of the older films have a purity of ideas, unfettered by the scientific knowledge that we now are encumbered with. At times, they are incredibly prescient, like Metropolis.

            • daytoncapri

              The Danish film that I sent you has been described as the “First Space Opera”.

            • daytoncapri

              thanks for your info on the water filters. I’ll be checking out the wellowner site.

            • Missionary Kid

              You’re welcome. I hope the information helps you.

        • Exterrier

          Gore Vidal recalled meeting LRH, and described him as “dripping with evil”.

          • Missionary Kid

            Sounds right.

          • Sergeant Pepper

            According to Arnie Lerma: “Gore Vidal on meeting L Ron Hubbard:

            “He exuded evil, malice, and stupidity””

    • cdub

      Just try reading pulp science fiction magazines from the 40’s because it’s not easy. I bought a few once and lost interest real quick. They were written for teenage boys and they didn’t have to make much sense. Ron Hubbard wasn’t in the few 40’s Amazing Stories issues I bought from some dealer but I felt, after reading his SF years later, they fit right in.

      The COS claim that he led the way in the genre however is bull. Authors love to talk about themselves and each other and during my early years reading SF, believe me, the name Ron Hubbard NEVER CAME UP. His stories were nowhere to be seen. Anthologies did not carry him. I spent probably hundreds of hours in used book stores and never once saw anything by him.

      I realize in recent years Authors Services has been busy promoting him. What I’m saying is that in the 1960s in the SF world I lived in he was a non-person. Didn’t exist. Nothing.

  • chuckbeattyexseaorg75to03

    Jesse Prince:

    “The purging of the contamination from Scientology takes time…”

  • ItsIBBy

    His flippant thoughts on rape are just adorable :l

    What a sleazy greasy bloated duck faced blowhard.

    • Jgg2012

      He should run for Congress..

    • Missionary Kid

      I’m not defending LRH, except to say that in the 50s and earlier, in that context, it didn’t have the connotation it has now. The idea was that women basically didn’t want sex (because of the few methods of birth control available, the consequences or out of wedlock pregnancy, and the cultural lip service paid to the purity of womanhood), so simple seduction of a woman could be characterized as rape.

      As I’ve said before, the meanings of words and phrases have evolved. To say, “making love” back then usually meant “to court.” Now it means to have sex.

      • aegerprimo

        I am a person who knows surgery…. and Hubbard’s description of the use of knitting needles by women makes me cringe.

        • Missionary Kid

          He was one crude, lewd, ignorant, dude.

          • Robert Eckert

            Calling Missionary Kid… oh, wait…

            • Missionary Kid

              I’ll be “modest” and say that it meets my standards. I’ll put it on the Things Said about LRH list.

            • Baby

              Ha.. Oh it is quite worthy Kid.. ; 0

            • Missionary Kid

              Thanks.

          • Eclipse-girl

            No only that, he implied every mother did not want their child, every father was rapist and did did not their child.
            It really is away of insulting every person on the planet

            • Missionary Kid

              Hubbard was an insult to humanity.

            • Missionary Kid

              I’m going to put that post on my list of things said about LRH. I think I may have shot my wad.

          • Dale A.

            Crude Lewd Ignorant Dude belongs your list of names. But which one? They are eventually all alike.

          • Todd Tomorrow

            That’s all you got, MK? Keep going and add some of your own to the list!

            • Missionary Kid

              Now that I’m trying, it doesn’t come so easy. When the subconscious is working, I do better, as it does for most people.

        • Todd Tomorrow

          Just think if his mother would have hit das cult leader in the head properly with that knitting needle. What a wonderful world it would be..

          • aegerprimo

            She could’ve perforated her uterus and died from abdominal sepsis. Not good.

            • Todd Tomorrow

              I wasn’t thinking of his mum, just that he would have never been born. What a better world it would be! Didn’t mean to be crass.

      • romanesco

        Bullshit.

        • Eclipse-girl

          I do not understand your comment.

          MK is correct in the change of meaning of words and phrases. Being different in age by ony 15 or 20 yrs may mean a completely different connotation to a phrase.

          I do not think I am quite as old as MK, but i am old to know when people used the phrase “make love” in a different time, older time , it did not mean having sex.

          • romanesco

            If you people don’t know what rape means and always has meant, I can’t help you.

            I can’t BELIEVE I have to spell this out. There was never, ever any “assumption” that women didn’t want sex. Any negative fallout from extramarital sex was almost always blamed on the woman, and up until very recently women have been held accountable for their own rapes. Jeez, Louise! Where ya been? No, on second thought, don’t answer.

            • Kim O’Brien

              you beat me to it …rape meant the same in 1950 as it means today …maybe not to a fucking douchbag and his minions but to everyone else with a vagina …and everyone who does not need to ” word clear” something as basic as the word ” rape ” .

            • romanesco

              Thank you.

            • Missionary Kid

              Context is everything. That’s the problem with “word clearing.” It lacks context of the time and circumstances that a term was used.

              Kim, if you’re in your 60s or 70s, blast me out of the water, but I was around before usages changed, and I’ll be an ageist and say things were taken differently then. I hate LRH with a white hot heat, and I’m willing to trash him at the drop of a hat, but, as I said before, I’m not willing to bust someone over anachronistic terms.

            • Kim O’Brien

              i am in my 40’s , mother in her 60’s , gramma in her 80’s …yup ..rape meant rape…

            • Missionary Kid

              Not in that context. and in the vernacular of the time, the word rape would have meant having sex. In a different context, it would have meant forcible sex. Have your dad, or someone of his age who isn’t a puritan, read the letter and have them tell you what the phrase would have meant to them at the time and in that context.

              You are the beneficiary of the pioneers who raised everyone’s consciousness, but, IMO, as I’ve said before, youth has no memory. In other words, all of us make the assumption that things were the same in past times as they are now.

              Just as LRH felt entitled to use the N word, he also used the word rape too freely.

            • Kim O’Brien

              yeah …always ask a man what “rape” means . That makes total sense . MEN might have used it differently ( duh ) but WOMEN KNOW WHAT RAPE MEANS AND ALWAYS HAVE

            • Missionary Kid

              Thank you, in a way, you just made my point for me. For one man to write that to another man doesn’t have the meaning that it does for a woman.

            • Missionary Kid

              To add: Men and women’s vocabularies and speech often have different meanings to each of them, and it creates a lot of misunderstanding because while they’re using the same words, each one interprets what the opposite sex means differently than the intent of the other.

            • Todd Tomorrow

              You had that link to, Tub’s private writings. Still have it Kim?
              Thanks, T

            • romanesco

              Anybody think the guy who painted this blurred the line between rape and seduction?

            • romanesco

              ….?

            • Robert Eckert
            • Missionary Kid

              First, the attitudes of the 40s and 50s were antediluvian. Someone might throw out the term, “rape and pillage” not meaning it literally. That would not be accepted today.

              I understand your anger, but I’m asking you, how old are you?

              if you’re 50 and under, I’m glad that your contemporaries have had their consciousness raised, and brought the rest of society’s with them, particularly men.

              My theory is that if you’re in your 60s or 70s, you’d have observed the change in language and the difference in usage.

              Language was practically victorian in many ways, and in other ways, crude, particularly among men.

              Remember that Lucille Ball couldn’t use the term “pregnant” on television. I remember that in 1957, a song called “Party Doll” was banned from many radio stations because it contained the line, “I’ll make love to you.” That was in spite of the phrase “making love” being in many books and movies out of the 30s and 40s. The line was a more active form of the expression, so it was banned. Of course, that made it something everyone had to listen to.

              With the rise of women’s consciousness in the 60s and 70s, women started to point out male behavior and speech that was misogynistic, mean, and uncalled for. Before then, many terms didn’t have the same meaning, and were ignored or taken in jest.

              Yes, I’m being an ageist. But I was around before usages changed. Blast me out of the water if you’re in your 60s or 70s.

            • noseinabk

              I am under 50 and well know the antiquated views and language you refer to. I enjoy historical fiction, among other good reads, and I love to immerse myself in the language of those books. I enjoy them without judgement since I understand that they were victims of the ignorance of that particular time.
              You don’t need to defend yourself MK.

            • texasexpat

              My grandmother said “limbs” instead of legs because one should not refer to a woman’s legs. Also, according to my grandmother, all my grandfather’s cattle were cows, the word “bull” would never have been used by my grandmother. Just a little example of how language and the use of it has changed.

            • Eclipse-girl

              MK never addressed the word “rape” but even in today’s culture we still have men who do not understand the word NO.

              In that era, all good girls were thought often thought to be frigid.

            • romanesco

              “…simple seduction of a woman could be characterized as rape.” constitutes a failure to address the word “rape.” Yeah, right. Next.

            • Missionary Kid

              It was a surprise to me to find out that “good girls” weren’t frigid, and they enjoyed physical contact as much as I did.

              I actually had much better relationships when a woman said, “Stop” and I said, “OK,” and did. What often happened was that she changed her mind, but it was her decision all the time. Assholes who harass women or keep pushing are teaching women that they can’t be trusted, and that they’re selfish.

            • Sergeant Pepper

              The assumption that women didn’t want sex was common in American society in the 50’s. That society gave boys greater permission to pursue sexual contact than women, and women who engaged in sexual acts lost social standing and became
              less attractive to boys as long-term partners.

            • Missionary Kid

              If they were going to engage in sex, the smart girls picked guys who kept their mouths shut, . Just buying a prophylactic was a big deal, so pregnancy was often avoided by not having intercourse or the withdrawal method, which is a poor one.

              Girls and women actually weren’t frigid, but the label was put on women to disparage and demean them, especially because their greatest fear was getting pregnant, pre-pill.

              It took me a while to realize that many guys lied about their sexual experience and prowess. I didn’t talk about my experiences, because by the time I had any, the sexual revolution was upon us.

        • Missionary Kid

          As I posted elsewhere, “He was one crude, lewd, ignorant, dude.” It was rough, sexist, and inappropriate, but it didn’t have the same meaning as today. I’m almost old enough to remember that era, and by the late 50s, the meanings hadn’t shifted that much.

          LRH was an asshole, and I’d love to pile on the ridicule, but I’m unwilling to use what I consider anachronistic definitions for his words.

        • noseinabk

          Look at how he used the word rape.“Then you can rape women without their knowing it“. To me it reads that you can subdue a woman and coerce her into sex without her being aware that you used some strange technique to get her to submit. I get what MK is saying. In literature (historical, Victorian up to the 50,s) you see woman spoken of as poor pitiful things who submit to sex and those who enjoyed it were considered some rare glorious deviant.

          • romanesco

            OMFG, you don’t even see a difference between sex and rape, do you? Either of you? Whether or not it came from Hubbard, you’ve swallowed some serious kool-aid.

            “Glorious deviant?” WTF? Try “slut,” “whore,” “hussy,” and ESPECIALLY when the victim of sexual abuse. Jeez fucking Louise, I can’t believe you.

            You know what, hon? If you guys are ex-culties, I suggest you go back. Just saying.

            https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=IPZuYwYxnL4

            • Missionary Kid

              OMFG. As I said before, how old are you? You’re applying todays meanings to past times.

            • noseinabk

              Not an ex. Just a long time reader of the bunker who knows the MK is a very nice man and was just posting in regards to how LRH may have used the term. I see very clearly why you are taking offense to what he said. I did not see MK,s remark on being about the crime of rape.
              He was speaking to the 1940 or 1950 view of men like LRH who viewed women as
              a conquest and not a partner. Just because a person understands why people spoke that way in the past does not mean that they agree with it.
              None of us deserve a personal attack.
              I wish I could convey what i want to say better. I am speaking of what I have read about on how men viewed women in the past and not defending the crime or LRH.

            • texasexpat

              I abhor rape. But I read the above comments by MK and took no offense at all by his discussion which was about the ever changing usage of the English language. It was not in any way condoning rape or LRH.

          • romanesco

            Subdue????? Fucking SUBDUE??? What the fucking FUCK? What are you thinking, if anyythimg? Are you even READING what you’re saying? SUBDUE?

            • Sergeant Pepper

              Your rage is misplaced here and your language is deplorable.

    • romanesco

      Well put.

  • Missionary Kid

    I’m adding, from the quote in Tony’s post above the nickname, ginger God to L. RON HUBBARD NICKNAMES http://tonyortega.org/2014/06/12/more-proof-of-kerri-kasems-scientology-involvement-and-laura-prepon-lies-like-a-rug/#comment-1439058951

  • Panopea Abrupta

    Lord Hubris: the turd that couldn’t be hushed

    $cientology: when it’s true for you, it’s through for you.
    $cientology: when it’s through for you, true for you.

    OT VIII: Truth Revealed ?
    Fraud Concealed and Critical Thinking Congealed more like it.

    Hubbard interviewed in Mayfair magazine (Evans, p.61; L. Ron Hubbard: “L. Ron Hubbard Breaks Silence” ):
    “If you point out something you don’t like to a psychiatrist he promptly puts you on his list as insane and calls up his contacts in the police department and military intelligence to have you raided or arrested as a dangerous agitator. . . . He knows he can do nothing to really help and can only make somebody quiet. He is operating on a failed purpose to help others. And it makes him savage and morose. He even doubts his own sanity and often winds up completely mad in his own institutions. . . . If psychiatry had paid attention to its ethics of practice and had organized to prevent wild malpractice, it would not today be so vulnerable to attack.”

    Substitute the words $cientologist and $cientology for the two words I have struck out.

    He so often projected his own insanity and his own behaviour on his arch-enemy du jour.

    • Missionary Kid

      The only thing that I’d disagree with is that Hubturd spent a lot of energy, money, and time to prevent what he deigned as malpractice of $cientology, also known as squirreling the tech.

      The Hubster’s problem was that the tech didn’t work, if at all very much, in the first place, and it’s still true.

      • Sid

        That might have been mainly to protect his source of revenue.

        • Missionary Kid

          That, and to retain control.

          • Sid

            LRH said, “Control equals income”.

            • Missionary Kid

              Exactly, and that’s why he introduced so many methods of control. The tech wasn’t for the benefit of the people being audited, it was for LRH’s benefit.

            • Sid

              Yup!

    • Bleuler

      I can’t count the number of times I called my “contact in military intelligance” after seeing a patient. Wait, I can, it’s ZERO.

    • ze moo

      Hushed or flushed.

  • Axton

    It’s too bad there’s no word for the kind of contemptible wretch LRH was. He incorporated so many loathsome qualities, it’s incredible. “Evil lecher” doesn’t quite do justice to his feeble thinking and massive insecurity.

    • Missionary Kid

      I’ve added Evil letcher to his nicknames. To be posted later.

  • Science Doc

    Last week several of us, including MK, were debating French Dip sanwiches inspired by some tripe in a Ft. homicide newsletter. A lot of people had been to Philipppes, but no one could even remember the name of its LA rival claimant as the creator of the Dip.

    It’s called Coles, and I just ate there for the first time in my life. The comparison and contrast with Philippes is not to be missed. Coles may have the better sandwich, and is much more assertive to the claim. Coles is on sixth street between Main and Los Angeles. Think prohibition era faded elegance. Three blocks further east and you are in the heart of skid row. Another three blocks and you can make a left on Alameda and be at Philippes across from Union Station in five minutes.

    DTLA is the home of the French dip sandwich, and the Ft. Homicide can screw itself.

    • Missionary Kid

      I’ll have to try Coles next time I get to LA. Thanks.

      Btw, last time I was in LA, I ate at a sandwich joint in Eagle Rock on Colorado Blvd. called Oinkster. (There’s also one in Hollywood, I just discovered, on Vine). It’s been written up all over the place, and their sandwiches have a LOT of flavor. Be prepared for large portions. I wasn’t very hungry when I went in, but I made a pig out of myself on the pastrami because the flavor was so good. I couldn’t stop.

      • Science Doc

        I’ll make a note. One of the best pizza places in LA is in Eagle Rock too. Casa Blanca?

        • Missionary Kid

          Yup. Now the kids are running it. Unfortunately, I tried to go there too early, and it was closed, so I went to Oinkster.

          A few years back, Jonathan Gold started out a piece on Casa Bianca by telling that one of his fellow workers on the LA Times, a mild mannered guy, threatened to break his legs if he wrote about Casa Bianca, because he was worried that it would become too popular.

          For those of you who don’t know, Mr. Gold has a Pulitzer in food writing, and he gives high marks to both Casa Bianca and Oinkster. Oinkster in Eagle Rock is in an old IHOP, I believe.

          • Science Doc

            I looked it up. It’s an old Jims Burger location. They kept most of the sign.

            • Missionary Kid

              I believe that before it was Jim’s Burger, it was an IHOP, which used that style of building, but the roof is the wrong color.

              I’m not familiar with Jim’s Burger because it’s only recently that I’ve been in LA in that area again after decades. I’ll have to ask someone about it that I know who’s been there over the years, probably when it was built.

      • MaxSpaceman

        Back in the day, Lindy’s on Fairfax, was a favorite for deli in Los Angeles. For me, still the best if what it was then it still is today.

        • Missionary Kid

          Oinkster isn’t a deli, but a place that specializes in slow cooked meats. Their take on pastrami has a tangy but sweet cole slaw.

    • Axton

      Does it come with au jus?

      Or just au jus?

      • Science Doc

        With aj jus, unlike Philippes.

  • Very opinionated piece.

    • Eileen

      Go away Cat Daddy. You drove some very nice people off this board last night. Ignore tech employed.

    • daytoncapri

      Explain? Example? Rebuttal? Alternate view? Not all of us share the same viewpoints, please give us yours.

    • Axton

      Cool story, bro

  • Pierrot

    *** RED X +–+ Reminder ***

    Sweet Saturday, 13 ads posted so far today. View & flag them in the Daily Wip tab of the google doc: https://docs.google.com/spreadsheets/d/1-Kvg78kCcvo5gL7UfPcmhmbsagTNtdj0y2LAiHVFrCU/pubhtml

    Do not forget to come back every 2 to 3 hours as WUS would have posted some ads through!

    Ty Dodo & Artist + Ap for keeping an album of Dodos
    portefolio: https://www.flickr.com/photos/120371503@N05/15729704432/in/set-72157642802079293

    • Pierrot

      And an extra 12 in the last hour!

  • I’m happy to report that 2 longtime Scientologists in my area have left the cult! Just wanted to share this good news with the bunker! 🙂

    • HillieOnTheBeach

      Are you at liberty to give us some detail?

      • Unfortunately I’m not.

        • aegerprimo

          Oh well. Good news nonetheless!

        • HillieOnTheBeach

          Fair enough. Best wishes to your friends/acquaintances.

        • Baby

          That is OK 411… Thrilled.. Hopefully they will be part of our merry band some day.. baby steps are just fine.

          • indie8million

            Planting seeds. Takes a while for them to sprout but then they grow and grow and grow.

            • Baby

              Absolutely indie!

    • romanesco

      😀

    • PRenaud

      Yipeeeee…

    • Axton

      I wonder what was the tipping point….. great news!

    • And I’m Cute, Too
      • Robert Eckert

        But do you rent cars?

        • And I’m Cute, Too

          ????

          Sorry, I’m missing a reference, or something…

          • Robert Eckert

            Sorry, we had a friend here “And I Don’t Rent Cars” who got upset during a troll visitation and left. I was hoping you were her, returned to us.

            • And I’m Cute, Too

              Ah, I see. I do remember that nickname and the commenter, but I couldn’t understand why you were associating me with her. Sorry to hear she hasn’t been here lately.

            • Eclipse-girl

              Cutie is also a kind person, just not cars.
              I am sorry Cars got caught up in the trouble.

            • Robert Eckert

              I hope she comes back.

            • Eclipse-girl

              I do, too.

            • Johnny Tank (Forever Autumn)

              Lol. I always thought that Cars was a dude. I should really hang out here more…

            • Stacy

              I wondered the same thing.

            • i-Betty

              I miss Cars 🙁

            • Robert Eckert

              She poked her head in for New Year’s Day greetings but I haven’t seen her since.

        • Captain Howdy

          I saw Cars at Rinder’s a couple of days ago.

          • Todd Tomorrow

            Doing some squirrel busting for some extra cash, Howdy. He He ! Or getting some indy touch assists?

          • Have you seen Bugs Bunny anywhere?

    • Missionary Kid

      I hope that you can help them with decompression.

    • Phil de Fontenay

      Good for them!

      Now they can start enjoying their life 🙂

    • Soli

      Congratulations to them.

  • Bruce

    No offenses, I’m sorry but I find this article too biased and full of assumptions..

    • stillgrace2

      Do as Tony suggests, then, pay the small fee to the trust, download Heinlein’s letters, and read them for yourself. Maybe you didn’t read that particular part of the article. Maybe you didn’t read any of the article. Who knows? Who cares?

    • romanesco

      Can you be more specific?

    • EnthralledObserver

      Truth and evidence will do that to a journalist… shame you won’t bring yourself to look at that same evidence. 🙁

    • TonyOrtega

      Come on, give us some detail. We can handle it.

    • No offenses, I’m sorry but i will just post some random crap just to get my stats up.
      I wont bother reading this article as that would mean I might educate myself and learn the truth and we cant have that.

      • And I’m Cute, Too

        …and I might have to go through additional sec checking, and I really can’t afford that.

    • Axton

      No offense taken, moron!

  • MaxSpaceman

    It is so fantastic that Jesse Prince’s voice is back !

  • George M. White

    Great post, Tony. Thanks for digging.

    Homo Novis was introduced early and Hubbard never forgot about it
    even in 1980 when he wrote the “Student Briefing” I realized in 1988 that
    I was actually part of his plan, but I was aware enough to reject it point blank.
    I remember the exact moment when I read his request to clear the genetic
    entity and help produce “uncontaminated bodies” for him.
    I drew the line and left shortly after that. It was useless information.
    The irony is that I was expecting something from him and in the end
    he asked me for something. What is that called?

    • Eivol Ekdal

      It’s called scientology.

      • George M. White

        Yea, I felt like Marjorie Cameron.

        • Eivol Ekdal

          That’s quite funny.
          Joking aside, I do appreciate your contributions to the story.
          Thank You.

          • George M. White

            Thanks for the kind feedback. I am starting to remember more details about the
            maiden voyage of the Freewinds and its time period. After Hubbard died, the activity
            at the Flag land base in Clearwater was at a very intense level. The build-up was
            a great marketing tool for donations. This “Truth Revealed” angle did produce a lot
            of anticipation and I went into it expecting something new. Hubbard always talked
            about “amnesia” on the whole track. I figured this was his great opportunity to
            show his merit.
            His “Truth Revealed” to me turned out to be the essence of why he could bounce and jump from assumed identities. He could falsely projected himself as Buddha and as Lucifer at the same time without any moral shame. His deep hatred of Christianity mainfested itself in his criticism of Jesus. Then he says that the Marcabs are waiting to implant an
            electronic charge on humans while he appears as the anti-Christ. Obviously he is projecting the ultimate victory of scientology on earth. Then he said he wanted me
            to assist him.
            Miscavige then pulls the document and thousands of scientologists end up in a cult and they have no idea where they are going. In a sense, these top scientology executives are in a double cult – one formed by Hubbard another by Miscavige.
            All of this wasted effort from a man who could only accept subjective reality but had enough resources to isolate himself.

  • 1subgenius

    Happy to see this:

    Table 8 Productions to Present A VERY MERRY UNAUTHORIZED CHILDREN’S SCIENTOLOGY PAGEANT!

    http://www.broadwayworld.com/las-vegas/article/Table-8-Productions-to-Present-A-VERY-MERRY-UNAUTHORIZED-CHILDRENS-SCIENTOLOGY-PAGEANT-20141105#

    Although none of the cast members can legally drive yet, and some of them are still losing their baby teeth…this is definitely NOT a children’s show. “Pageant doesn’t pull punches. All the accusations are laid bare, from the money laundering to mental abuse. And it seems all that more sinister when presented by these smiling, innocent children.”

    Soundtrack rocks, available at Amazon, use Tony’s link.

    • Baby

      OMG sub.. This looks too good to be true.. Would love to see this. Hope it gets around the rest of the country and is a huge success.. Lovin the Edginess of it..

      • Robert Eckert

        From YouTube comments:

        ProjectFlashlight6123 years ago

        The outtakes bootleg is very good, too. “I’ve Been To Heaven (43 Trillion Years Ago)” should have been on the cast album, while ‘Wheeze Wheeze Wheeze, I’m Small, Asthmatic, Possibly Gay And VERY Angry (aka David Miscavige’s Theme)” makes Dark Side Of The Moon look like a CD maxi-single of Ooh Stick You.

      • 1subgenius

        Have you heard the soundtrack to “Book of Mormon”?
        It is really good as stand-alone music.
        This is in a similar vein in terms of quality of music and approach to subject matter.
        No exaggeration of the facts, they just let the truth do its thing.

        • Baby

          Yes I have.. and yep it is good.

          It is amazing how facts don’t need exaggerating to be absolutely unbelievable and horrifying. I hope I get to see it one day. Hopefully it will eventually be put on video.

          • 1subgenius

            And as the author says:
            “And it seems all that more sinister when presented by these smiling, innocent children.”
            Brilliant!

            • Baby

              Yes.. Sinister is the word I was looking for. Very Brilliant..

              Trojan Horse wrapped up in a child. Lovin it.

              Edit.. Little Trojan ponies.. xo

            • 1subgenius

              OT, Just between you and me

              some friends of mine play on this

              http://www.theguardian.com/music/2014/jul/10/cambodian-space-project-whisky-cambodia-review

              along with Motown legend who I see every Tuesday, Dennis Coffey:

              Interesting, no? What a world, Cambodian world music fused with Motown, long distance. Just had a long talk with my neighbor who’s on this about the process.

              Fascinating.

              I wish I could find a stream of the songs to link to, but not yet.

            • Baby

              Oh how fun! Oh living near Detroit I’ve certainly heard of Dennis Coffey.. You let me know the minute you get the stream of songs.. Would love to hear them.

              It’s cool that you have friends that play with them..I bet they are really entertaining. My kind of funk.

            • 1subgenius

              oooh oooh, I found it.

              http://metalpostcard.bandcamp.com/album/cambodian-space-project-whiskey-cambodia

              Its all good, but scroll down and hit play on #8 to get the feel of the power of the horn section, which would be “Sensitive” Kenny Robinson-trumpet, Johnny “Showtime” Evans-sax, and David McMurray-sax.I think there’s a T-bone in there I’m forgetting.
              (And listen to #1, for some deja vu.)

            • Baby

              Oh Yay.. I found it on Spodify and will download.. Do you have Spodify? It’s free.. ( Charge for premium but free for regular..

              Really good sound sub.. So different… Powerful horn section. Thank you.. Good sound..and now I can listen to it anytime I want! Woo Hoo

            • 1subgenius

              Don’t ya love the pic of them on the motorcycle.

              No, I’ll check Spodify out.

              I was telling Dennis that 30 years ago a Cambodian (or Mexican, for example) band wouldn’t have all the other musical influences they do now. How Cambodian Space Project came to want and get Dennis Coffey to produce an album has to be a story in itself.

              And in other news, T-Bone Burnett was approached by Bob Dylan’s manager and asked if he wanted to put music to some decades old lyrics of Bob’s they recently uncovered. So he got some folks together and did.

              http://www.npr.org/2014/11/07/361758046/to-catch-up-with-bob-dylan-t-bone-burnett-assembles-a-dream-team

            • Baby

              Yes I loved the pic of them on the motorcycle. I love goggles and if I could I would wear them around the clock. What a rag tag team of creative geniuses..

              I just woke up.. and took the most fabulous journey through that video.. The graphics with the music together just incredible sub.. Wow.. One of the best I’ve seen.

              What a cool story too.. I will tell you also one of my favorite movies and music .. I mean I have memorized it is.. ” O Brother Where For Art Thou..” That old country rockabilly.. just goes to my heart.

              The first couple of cords in Spanish Mary recalled “O Brother .. ” Love T Bone

            • 1subgenius

              btw, you don’t mean to say you currently live near Detroit, do you?

            • Baby

              Nope.. Sunny Florida for the past 5 years.. I don’t do snow.. ha

    • Robert Eckert

      There are some clips available from previous productions:

      https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=YD9FrbgFafM

      • Baby

        Oh thank you Robert..This looks great. I love the music..

    • Eclipse-girl

      Please warn people it is satire / parody.

      The songs are happy and appear to accepting if not pro-scientology.
      You have to be in o the joke.
      I would like to see a stage production.

      • 1subgenius

        Think “Book of Mormon”.

      • Baby

        Well E.. We certainly in on the joke known as Scn. aren’t we!

  • Cosmo Pidgeon

    This has been a great few days for LRH history. Does anyone know where he got his “pinks and greys “from?. Especially while on the Apollo. Somebody on that ship must have known or got the for him at various ports. Also what were pinks and greys . Apparently this is what he was taking while doing his “research” on OTIII. Hey, I did some of that kind of research.

    • MaxSpaceman

      the family of pinks & greys is – uppers and downers. made up of stuff like the following, but are not these: Seconols (red), Tuinols (blue- lotsa peeps miss these babies) for downs among other products; and Dexedrines (pinks, iirc) and Black Beauties (amphetimines or biphetamines) for uppers among other products.

      • Captain Howdy

        Yea, pinks were most likely Dexedrine and greys were Librium or some other type of tranquilizer.

        • Cosmo Pidgeon

          Uppers and downers Thanks… What I wonder is how he got them. I just don’t see him off the ship in Morocco walking to the local pharmacy with a prescription. My guess is that maybe someone procured them for him ,and if so that person or persons would have some great stories.

          • MaxSpaceman

            his minions, Cosmo- what was her name who was with him in Queens, Kima Douglas? People like her over 50 years got him pills.

          • grundoon

            The late Kima Douglas indeed had some great stories.

            • Cosmo Pidgeon

              Thanks to all for helping. I started reading some of this. Wow, this is so fascinating and liberating.

          • Captain Howdy

            Supposedly he was seen in the possession of a prescription pad or pads while on the Apollo. Also, it was much easier to obtain prescription drugs back in those days. They could be bought over the counter in some countries.

            • pronoia

              They still can be bought over the counter in some countries. I dont think it would’ve been too difficult back then. Morocco would’ve been a good bet.

            • Baby

              OH hell yes.. I got speed.. ( Diet Pills) from my Dr. and didn’t lose a pound..Nor at the time I didn’t need to ( Wow..things have changed)

              Yep good old Eskatrol .. It only cost me a fortune to get my teeth up to par for years after.
              ( 22 cavities in a year)

              I was flying..My house was never so clean. Of course I stayed up for days … and would just crash.. ( Wash, spin, release)

        • 1subgenius

          Phenobarbs used to come in a pink and grey cap.
          I believe blues were Nembutol. We called it the “Nembutol Nasties” because being a “truth serum” (lowered inhibitions) one would speak what they considered the truth, which of course was blunt and rude.

          • Captain Howdy

            Nembutal were yellow, Tuinals were blue and red, and Seconal were red. In the late 70’s we use to get bags of a 100 tuinals for $100 or something.

            • 1subgenius

              Yeah, yer right on the Nembutals. They did make you nasty tho.

            • Captain Howdy

              All those barbs, especially mixed with alcohol, made the user into a semi-catatonic violent beast.

            • I thought that was a poem at first:

              Nembutal were yellow
              Seconals were red
              In the late 70’s

              I was outta my head!

            • Baby

              Nat.. You have missed your calling..haha OMG funny girl.

            • 😉

    • I recall reading somewhere that, during the 1940s and 50’s ‘pinks’ and ‘greys’ were slang for benzedrine pills.

      • MaxSpaceman

        yes, one color was benies and the other was dexies. think the dexies were pink, iirc.

      • Eileen

        Pink and grey was Darvon

        • MaxSpaceman

          but pinks and greys were 2 separate drugs Ron took

          • 1subgenius

            Not necessarily.

        • Captain Howdy

          Hmmm..maybe you’re on to something. Darvon are a fairly mild opiate.
          refresh

          • Todd Tomorrow

            Not even good for a stubbed toe and shredded your liver. Class action suits are popping up. Mild is an understatement.

            • Captain Howdy

              Opiates don’t affect the liver etc. It must have been the cut.

            • Todd Tomorrow

              Whatever, Darvon and latter Darvactte either caused liver or maybe kidney problems. Or maybe it was an increase in heart attack. Just remember it was serious.

            • Captain Howdy

              With percocet, vicodin, codiene etc the health hazard is that they’re cut with aspirin, Tylenol etc and people take large amounts of them to get a heroin level buzz and all that cut hammers the crap out of their livers. If you know what you’re doing, you do the cold water extraction method.

            • Vaquera

              I have reactions to Percocet, Vicodin, any codeine/synthetic codeine-based pain medications. Darvon suited me well. Tramadol doesn’t do jack. So, I’m kinda’ SOL.

            • Todd Tomorrow

              They didn’t have much opiate in them.

        • Todd Tomorrow

          Which has been pulled off the shelves two years ago for its damaging effects on the liver. Never worked for my pain anyway..

    • noseinabk

      Amusing that when you search ” pinks and greys” on google, the first result is a hit on LRH.
      http://www.forum.exscn.net/archive/index.php/t-4426.html

      • Jimmy3

        But we can all agree that marijuana is “green”, right? Unless you’re smoking a High Times centerfold.

        • Captain Howdy

          Never heard of Acapulco Gold?

          • Jimmy3

            Many dreams come true
            and some have silver linings
            I live for my dreams
            and a pocket full of gold…

            Acapulco Gold….

  • Verve

    Good for Jesse Prince, I’m glad you didn’t go all “touch assist” until you died.

  • pronoia

    Homo Novis? Hmmm. Now what other fascist demagogue had delusions that he could create a master race who would save all of mankind? Who also founded his “philosophy” in the fantasies of the 19th century occult?

  • LADIES AND GENTLEMAN I HAVE COME ACROSS THE MOST AMAZING PHOTO TAKEN AT THE FORT HARRISON HOTEL ….. (would love to know the back story on this!)

    • …. and a strangely prophetic song to have come up with there

    • Baby

      Fabulous picture and story Lush.. Yes I would love to read the background story..

    • Sergeant Pepper

      Saw this a few weeks ago but can’t remember what rabbit hole. What led you to it?

      • it was a celeb pic site I hadn’t visited in awhile… I’d seen the pic before but it didn’t mention the hotel

        • Robert Eckert

          I think it was posted at the Bunker way back, maybe when there was that Sunday Funnies about the Fort Harrison restaurant’s burritos.

          • Captain Howdy

            It was posted as recently as a few months ago.

            • Mark

              …and I thought I had a bad memory! I used it in my ‘Sunday Funnies’ shoop a fortnight ago:

            • Baby

              Hahahah .. That’s where I’ve seen it.. OMG.. OK time for a beer..

            • Bury_The_Nuts

              And it will be posted in a few more months.

    • Qbird

      In 1965, I Can’t Get No Satisfaction, written at the hotel. Brian jones died in 1969… all this before the COS bought the hotel.

      • a ha!, that explains it….. shame, it would make for an interesting urban myth!

        • Qbird

          COS took possession in 1975.

          • Tony Ortega

            Scenes from “Bang the Drum Slowly” were also filmed at the hotel, but the name was changed to the “Agua Clara” — “clear water,” get it?

            • Qbird

              See See… Si.
              You know all around that part of Fla. there are beaucoup natural springs – just pure sweet fresh water bubbling up out of the earth – amazing & beautiful.

            • TheQueenofBulgravia

              …but is it negatively ionized?

            • Qbird

              ha! Nope, just natural, not man-made…

              the blood of the land, so to speak.
              Agua Clara ~ worthy of awe.

            • Frodis73

              I want to live there. So beautiful.

            • TheQueenofBulgravia

              That can’t be healthy!

    • Captain Howdy

      That picture has been posted around here numerous times, great as it is.

    • Cosmo Pidgeon

      That’s where Keith Richards wrote Satisfaction. He did it one night doing “research”and woke up to find it.

    • as way of apology for getting it wrong with this pic here’s a melange of tiny tommy you might not of seen before

      • Todd Tomorrow

        Was Cher ever a clam like Sonny. Wondered because she wouldn’t pay a dime for her daugter’s/ now sons sex change. If I was gay i’d boycott her auto-tune garbage!

      • Remember when Cher said Tom cruise was one of her top five lovers of all time? That one floored me.
        http://www.usmagazine.com/celebrity-news/news/cher-tom-cruise-was-one-of-my-top-five-lovers-of-all-time-2013286

        • Frodis73

          Omg. I’ve never heard that….I’m not buying it either. I bet he’s fast, sloppy & selfish. lol

        • “Awww,” Cher cooed when asked about Cruise, whom she dated in the very early days of his Hollywood career. “He wasn’t a Scientologist then,” she quipped of the actor, who went on to marry and divorce three times. “It was pretty hot and heavy for a little minute. He’s a great guy. The person that I knew was a great and lovable guy.”

          … another way of looking at it is she’s deliberately saying he’s become a douche asexual since he DID become one… a subtle hint to get out maybe

          • Good interpretation I think.

          • Eclipse-girl

            I think Cher was married and divorced at least once by the time she met Tom.
            Sonny was gone by then,

    • Qbird

      Still, I really like this photo Lush! Look at those cheeky bastards! Hot youngin’ rock stars from across the big water!
      Getting famous big time. Livin’ large poolside at a fancy hotel.
      They’s just sayin’ ‘neener neener’ hey hey — here’s a guy-hello to all their family, friends & fans back home.

      hmmm.
      3 inches of snow on the ground here, right now.
      Just sayin.

      If you and I were there, right now, together M_L ~ 😀
      oh we would take a photo just like this, wouldn’t we?!
      ha.

      • Captain Howdy

        Before Brian scrambled his brain on acid and before Keith discovered smack

        We watched our friends grow up together
        And we saw them as they fell
        Some of them fell into Heaven
        Some of them fell into Hell

        http://youtu.be/55Yp8vecWXM

  • Narapoid

    I am glad Jesse’s doing better. The Youtube video of him speaking about Marty Rathbun from 2010 was terrific. Jesse’s experience and voice is something I look forward to hearing more of. Power on man! https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=xqBA9qcu0Ws

    • MaxSpaceman

      Jesse Prince: “There is no retirement in the business of Scientology. Ron taught his prodigy to quickly and quietly get rid of the most loyal staff members without remorse.”

      Thus, The Hole.

  • chuckbeattyexseaorg75to03

    “Here is more corroboration of what University of MacEwan professor Susan Raine asserted in a recent paper — that Hubbard was drawing on the “space opera” of the time, including his friend A. E. van Vogt’s famous 1945 novel, The World of Null-A, in which intellectual superman rule the rest of humanity.”

    But if anything, Scientology has proven that Hubbard is more of a garden variety Martin Gardner niched crank!

    Hubbard’s Scientology has NOT produced OTs or nul A superpeople.

    Cranks cry not just wolf, but that their magical potion subjects will change humanity.

    Hubbard’s late in life ASI advice on how to position him to the public, he called himself a “civilation changer.”

    Megalomania is what he suffered from, it’s a crank’s symptom Hubbard repeated all his life!

    Walter Mittyism. Worse in that he went authoritarian, Keeping Scientology Working #1 is Hubbard’s megalomania and authoritarianism on full display.

    The dark side of Scientology is Hubbard’s authoritarianism all through the staff and member rules isolating them in the Hubbard crank megalomania.

    • Baby

      Megalomaniac is the perfect word to describe Hubbard 100% Chuck!

      • chuckbeattyexseaorg75to03

        “Would you want others to now be as megalomaniac as you?”

        Ah, yes, of course!

        • Baby

          Hahahha.. Good one. I can hear him saying that too!

          • chuckbeattyexseaorg75to03

            Change “tech” for “hype” and you have:

            “Scientology hype works!”

            The products of Scientology are deluded megalomaniacs who know they won’t lose their megalomania abilities they’ve gained.

            Except the megalomania wears off and people quit in a long drawn out shame and foolish feeling of what they played along with.

            • Baby

              By Jove You’ve got it! ha

    • While Null-A was interesting, so long as you don’t read past the second book or think too much, Slan is the one to watch for Science-Fiction fandom attitudes that Hubbard (and Campbell) tapped for early success of Dianetics and later for forming the tribal aspects of Dianetics and Scientology social grouping apart from normal society.

      Some faaans were Slans. (Or thought they were.)
      http://fancyclopedia.wikidot.com/faan

      The Aberree scientology fanzine (typical of fanzines of the time, except for the Scientology part) would be the next step on that exploration.

      • Exterrier

        Loved Slan,,and loved Van Vogts amazing mind for plot, which took him far. So superior to LRon. And yes, the thread of superman creation is evident in a lot of Van Vogts work. I was surprised he got caught up in Dianetics, and even ran his own spin off of it here in Los Angeles. But he really did not like go for Scientology at all, recognizing it as the third rate sci fi plot that it was.
        I have a rare record lp of Mrs Van Vogt running a Dianetics auditing session on a demonstration album. If anyone collects such things.

  • Johnny Tank (Forever Autumn)

    Alexa update for November 8: *refresh for images*

    Tony: US rank #31,364 – down 122 from yesterday. (Average rank last 3 months: 21,378)
    scientology: US rank #53,982 – down 1,245 from yesterday. (Average rank last 3 months: 61,347)

    Difference: 22,618 – 1,123 more than yesterday. (Average difference last 3 months: 39,969)

    Clicks from India – 9,0% today.

    • noseinabk

      Thanks JT! We appreciate you keeping us up-to-date on our stats.

      • Johnny Tank (Forever Autumn)

        Thanks, nose! The positive comments from you guys are what keep me going, and the fact we every day show Slappy who the real Boss is 🙂

    • Baby

      WE LOVE YOU JOHNNY!!! Thank you thank you.. Tony O.. Yep he’s popular alright. Pulitzer Prize popular! I know it may seem like a thankless job you do at times..

      but always look forward to your ” Stats!” xooxo love baby

      • Johnny Tank (Forever Autumn)

        Thanks, Baby 🙂 I mainly do it because I want to, not for the accolades, however I do appreciate your kind comments.

        What I do, unlike scientology, is report on stats that aren’t always to our liking, but they are based on factual information, AND anyone can check them. There is no 47x, but as long as Slappy is getting whooped, then we can keep on smiling 🙂

        xoxo

        Much love,
        Johnny

        • Baby

          Oh I know you do Johnny.. It seems we all have our little jobs around here, huh? xox

          Well we love you 47x more than we love Scn.. ( Really infinity x infinity more)

    • Johnny Tank (Forever Autumn)

      Here is another report from Google Trends (I know it’s hearsay, but…) *refresh for image*

      It shows the search engine traffic for the keyword ‘scientology’ on the largest search engine in the galaxy. Remember, this is only search traffic on Google, not actual traffic to the scientology website.

      First image shows stats for the last 10 years. Shows a steady decrease in search traffic, with a few spikes here and there, most of these being regarding Tom’s shenanigans, and later Leah’s escape from the cult.

      Second image is for the last 12 months, and basically shows that search traffic for scientology is at an all time low. The last big spike was when Leah made headlines regarding her departure from the cult was to protect her daughter. After that it just fizzles out…

      What is a bit interesting is that there is a lot of traffic to the site from Germany. In the 10 year graph Germany has the second highest amount of search traffic, and in the 12 month graph Germany is in first place.

      • Eclipse-girl

        You work hard at this.
        We read the updates.
        I do not always get to up vote your comments, but I ALWAYS read it.
        I appreciate the explanations, and the graphs.

        Thank you for your hard work.

        • Johnny Tank (Forever Autumn)

          Thanks, E-Girl! I hold you in very high regard, and it means a lot to me that you take the time to read the stats 🙂 Have a grrreat Sunday!

      • Science Doc

        The hard data tells the tale. In the larger world no one gives a shit about scientology. Most of the public learned all they needed to know from South Park.

    • daytoncapri

      Thanks for this Johnny,

  • Good to hear from Jesse.

  • Phil de Fontenay

    Oh that Hubbard! He was such a “Joker & Degrader” wasn’t ‘e? ~LOL

    Imagine if any of us had made jokes like that in the Church. That would be very expensive not to mention stuck in ethics for a while.

    I hope that Mr. Hubbard handled all his overts and withholds that are behind all of his lascivious jokes ~LOL

    But, I am sure they were just passed down to dear ole’ Davey Full-of-Crock-it!

  • Pierrot

    *** RED X +–+ RED X +–+RED X +–+ RED X *** Fun Sunday the 9th of November

    Good morning Early Birds and Night Owls,
    I must go away, the various schedules will be updated by 5am est I will check with you I about 2 or 3 hours time.
    If you have not done so yet, read the write up : https://whyweprotest.net/threads/taking-down-co-on-craigslist-co-ads-on-craigslist.113779/page-117#post-2494321
    RedX spreadsheet: https://docs.google.com/spreadsheets/d/1-Kvg78kCcvo5gL7UfPcmhmbsagTNtdj0y2LAiHVFrCU/pubhtml

    FREELOADER Debt is ILLEGAL and CAN’T BE ENFORCED.
    DON’T route out, BLOW, Get HELP, get OUT. CALL 1-866-XSEAORG

    Ty AP : https://www.flickr.com/photos/120371503@N05/15585014751/in/set-72157642802079293

    • Pierrot

      Here is the score for a laid back Saturday: 50 new/updated on Saturday bringing our Last 4
      Days
      down to 337 and the 7 days Regional List down to 585.

  • Eivol Ekdal
    • DodoTheLaser

      So cool, in every way!

  • Exterrier

    This post alone, by Tony, really cuts to the bone of Lround as a human. What a two faced deceiver, that liked to brag to the boys about how clever he was. And they were suitably appalled by his moral,degradation, which certainly showed once he had his young flock with him out at sea.

  • EnthetaMeter

    666

  • Bradley Greenwood

    Under 16 in danger? I can’t believe after all else that LRH was a pedophile.
    This is a staggering view into his mind.

  • richelieu jr

    Great stuff this time, Tony.. There’s got to be tons more great stuff in the Heinlein letters..Who has Forry’s correspondence?

    And wonderful news about Jesse Prince. You can’t keep that man down!

  • Pete Griffiths

    Excellent post Tony! Bloody marvellous mate! This stuff is priceless, now, if only we can get the few remaining Scientologists to realise that they have been duped, game over.