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Disconnection: Scientology’s Most Toxic Sacrament

HandsetClaire Headley is taking us on our journey to train as Scientologists. She and her husband Marc were Sea Org workers who escaped from Scientology’s International Base in 2005. She spent years working with Scientology’s “tech,” and was trusted to oversee the auditing of Tom Cruise. Go here to see the first part in this series.

Last week, Claire began taking us through the PTS/SP Course (for Potential Trouble Source/Suppressive Person). It’s a crucial course for Scientologists, laying in some of the most important conditioning that produces an “us vs. them” way of thinking.

Rather than move on to the next course, we’ve asked Claire to spend some more time on one of the key ideas that is introduced in the PTS/SP experience — the policy of disconnection.

As Claire explained last time, when a Scientologist is found to be a “Potential Trouble Source” — for something as seemingly innocuous as a head cold — they are expected to identify which “Suppressive Person” is causing the upset. An “SP” might be a family member who refuses to get involved in Scientology and criticizes the church. Church members are required to “disconnect” from SPs, even if it means splitting up a family, separating a parent from a child.

CLAIRE: I think it’s worth discussing this because the church insists that disconnection is a church member’s “choice,” which is an utter fabrication.

In my opinion, disconnection is Scientology’s chief means of leverage to isolate members and separate them from loved ones who might question the church. Scientology understands well that the people who have the most influence over your choices in life are your closest family members. That poses a threat to the church if the family member does not approve of Scientology.

THE BUNKER: How does the church get involved in identifying the SP that is making you PTS?

Up_The_BridgeCLAIRE: It’s done with a PTS interview, where you are asked when you got sick or “roller-coastered” — had poor results in your courses — and who you were connected to right before that.

This establishes your “PTS item” — in other words, the person you are PTS to. And that person is an SP.

I would like to note that there were numerous times during the 14 years I worked at Scientology’s International Headquarters near Hemet that when staff members were labeled as PTS, in their PTS interviews the person they were found to be PTS to was David Miscavige.

THE BUNKER: The leader of Scientology, a suppressive person? Well, we’ve heard that before (and one of these days we’ll ask Jon Atack about writing up Miscavige in an SP declare that proved very popular with church members at the time).

CLAIRE: Well, for a further irony, the “SP Hole” was David Miscavige’s invention, established as a means to “disconnect” Scientology’s top executives, whom he had labeled as SPs, from the rest of the staff at the base as well as cutting all ties they had to the outside world. For example, this is why you no longer see Heber Jentzsch (nominally, still the president of the Church of Scientology International) and other top executives in Scientology’s public events.

THE BUNKER: So Miscavige decided that most of the members of his “upper strata” were a bunch of suppressives, and put them in a hellish, bizarre office-prison — some of them for several years — in order to keep them disconnected from the rest of Scientology. It’s mind-blowing. From 2004 to 2009, we have reason to believe, people like Heber Jentzsch were kept in captivity, day and night, forced to participate in mass confessions and sleeping on the floor of a ratty office. After press reports began exposing “The Hole” in 2009, we hear that conditions for its residents improved — but they are still kept separated from other base employees and under constant supervision. Some, we believe, have now been under this bizarre method of control for about nine years — prisoners of an office complex, in the United States of America. Truly, it’s incredible.

Claire, can you tell us a little about disconnection in your own life? Weren’t you threatened with disconnection from your own husband if you insisted on having a child?

CLAIRE: Disconnection was always something I feared. I wrote about it at some length at my blog.

I never knew my father (still don’t to this day) because he left Scientology when I was 2.

So disconnection has always been very real to me.

When I was 7, another girl I knew in the UK Cadet Org, Susie Bellmaine, had to disconnect from her mother Morag. Her mother was one of the people who posed as “missionaires” and were able to get copies of the OT materials in Europe in the early 80s. Morag was promptly declared a suppressive person and Susie lost her mother.

I always knew that if I tried to leave Scientology I would lose my mother.

And yes, disconnection was always used as a threat to come between me and my husband Marc. It could happen if one of us was sent to either the Old Gilman House — a place on the base where people were sent to be kept under constant watch — or on the Rehabilitation Project Force, the Sea Org’s prison detail. During the time we were married, Marc was often restricted to the property for months at a time, during which I never saw him.

There is a Scientology policy called Leaving and Leaves, where you are told that it is a suppressive act (and can get you declared a suppressive person) if you discuss leaving or wanting to leave Scientology with anyone other than an ethics officer (who of course will promptly tell you the only reason you want to leave is because you have committed crimes).

I am not a Scientologist today. And yet disconnection means that the only way I would ever be able to talk to my family members still in the church would be to go back into Scientology. That is simply not going to happen. Scientology’s punishment for my walking away from the church is to cut me off from my family.

The church says otherwise, but disconnection is not a “personal choice.” A Scientologist cannot say “no thanks, I don’t want to disconnect.” That has never happened.

THE BUNKER: Do you remember the story we did at the Village Voice about Tommy Davis, who was secretly recorded in 2009 threatening a low-ranking Scientologist with disconnection and losing his entire family if he didn’t quit his job working for your husband, Marc, who by that time had been declared an SP? (At the time, Tommy was still the church’s chief spokesman.) It was pretty obvious from those recordings that disconnection was being used as leverage, as you put it.

CLAIRE: Yes, and Tommy Davis had said in 2008 on CNN that disconnection doesn’t exist. I think it was one of the church’s biggest PR foot-bullets ever. I know for myself, his lying like that on national television had me so screaming mad — after all, I had lost my entire family to Scientology’s policy of disconnection. To hear him say “it doesn’t exist” was a complete outrage. I think what he meant to say was that the church doesn’t enforce it — but that’s another lie.

THE BUNKER: And just recently, the church may have made another blunder. In its rush to throw a monkey wrench into the Luis Garcia federal fraud lawsuit, it submitted a motion that described one of its former attorneys, Robert Johnson, this way: “Johnson had a good knowledge of the Church’s refund procedure and other internal policies such as the Church’s religious doctrine called ‘Disconnection’ from suppressive persons.” (Church motion to disqualify, p. 9)

In other words, the Church of Scientology just put into a court record that one of its former attorneys is important because he was familiar with disconnection.

Oops.

Claire, what’s the worst case of disconnection that you’ve heard about?

CLAIRE: That’s hard to say. Every single example of disconnection is sickening, and outrageous. Every single instance I’ve ever heard of has been heartbreaking. But I think the worst ever was the situation with Karen de la Carriere and her son Alexander Jentszch. To not allow a mother to her son’s funeral is the worst form of evil I can imagine.

THE BUNKER: At one point L. Ron Hubbard appeared to cancel the disconnection policy. But you describe it as an essential part of the PTS/SP course, which is one of the most central courses in Scientology.

CLAIRE: Yes, that’s true and I’ve seen that policy cancelling disconnection. Ironically it too has been cancelled.

And unfortunately, to this day, disconnection is alive and well.

I’m working on a new website — stopdisconnection.com. Scientology has a fascination with statistics, so I’m putting together facts in regards to disconnection, where people can document disconnection. And reconnection. And hopefully one day this will be an evil of the past.

 
——————–

RAISING ARIZONA

Tucson1On Sunday, we posted photos of Scientology’s Tucson mission taken over a series of months that showed the building had been vandalized with graffiti. Some of our commenters had doubts about the photos, suggesting that the graffiti was not real and had been photoshopped onto the building.

We need to protect the identity of our source for the photos, but we can say that the person is one of our better sources, with a long and spotless track record. We brought up several of the issues pointed out by our commenters, and our source sent this reply…

The photographs were taken about a month apart. The staff members at the Mission paint over the entire frontage of the Mission with an airless sprayer to get rid of the graffiti. The photos look like they’re taken from the same location because they are. I leaned my 300mm zoom lens up against a sign post that’s across a 5-lane street from the mission so as to eliminate any blur or shake. Of course, my own height doesn’t change, so the place at which the photos were taken is, within a tolerance of millimeters, exactly the same. Like I said, the mission front would be painted within hours of the graffiti appearing. That’s why I decided to start taking the pictures when the graffiti appeared. Any delay, like between the time I drove past the first time and drove past eight hours later, was fatal to the business of photo-capture.

And what, we asked, did our source think about the slogan from L. Ron Hubbard’s pamphlet The Way to Happiness being one of the slogans spray-painted on the building?

The slogan is easy enough to find on the Internet. But the three separate appearances and their content lead me to suspect a very disgruntled Scientologist. I never saw a message about “Scientology sux” or Hubbard lies,” for example. The church pisses off so many people with their disconnection policy and alterations of the refund/repayment policy it doesn’t surprise me there are alienated people in the field in general.

Our source also scanned his negatives and sent them to us. (For you kids, ask your parents what “negatives” are.) We grabbed just one frame from the strips to show here…

TucsonNegative

 
We’re pretty convinced that someone — probably a former mission employee or customer — is spray-painting graffiti that the mission is cleaning up as quickly as it can. And again, we’ll say that we find it a counterproductive way to protest Scientology.

 
——————–

Posted by Tony Ortega on May 21, 2013 at 07:00

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  • Disconnection is the one of the biggest practices that pushes them over the cult line for me. It’s not the beliefs, it’s the actions that define the church and this is and always will be disgusting. More than that however, it’s proof to me that they have no actual confidence that what they’re selling is true. If one percent of Scientology was real then you’d have no fear of dissension from family members and friends who disagree with you.

    Instead of open debate, which is from an outsider’s view some of the most interesting parts of a new religion, disconnection is the absolute cowards way of enforcing belief. It destroys any chance of internal reformation and puts the entire group squarely in the category of a cult.

    • FLUNK_101

      Great post, Noah. Remember when I first started posting last summer? We didn’t get along too well,

      did we! I think we understand each other better by now. You argued with me about me coming on

      the blog talking about my “wins.” If I may, I would like to explain where I was coming from, hopefully

      for the last time!

      I was only active in Scientology for a few years, but I could have left a lot sooner than I did, if only a

      Time Magazine article was more honest. I was “in” during the mid to late 70’s, and I read an article about

      Scientology in Time. It talked about how Hubbard had come ashore in Clearwater to establish a land base there. It had

      some bad stuff about Scientology. Reading it was like a punch in the gut. I was concerned, to say the least. My experience

      at that point was I’d stopped getting high, and I was really enjoying the auditing. But the article made no mention of anyone getting

      something positive out of it … the only mention was something to the effect that “converts can be effusive.” This didn’t make sense

      to me. At the mission, they easily convinced me that whoever wrote the article had am axe to grind.

      You are absolutely justified in your criticism, but that’s not the point.

      You say things that about the Scientology mentality that are not accurate.

      Based on that alone, any Scientologist reading your remarks is going to laugh it off.

      What if you were talking to a drug addict?

      Would you tell her that drugs actually don’t get her high? That she’s “deluded,” or that

      it’s “all in her mind?”

      She’s going to laugh at you.

      From the viewpoint of brain science, it IS all in her mind, but that’s probably not the

      way she looks at it.

      She knows very well how good the drugs make her feel!

      You have to address that, or there’s no point talking to her.

      Now imagine telling her that the only reason

      she thinks drugs make her feel better is because she was “hypnotized.”

      She. Will. Laugh. In. Your. Face.

      Now, it’s true that drugs make you feel better by actually changing your brain

      chemistry … but so does any pleasant experience that elevates your mood.

      Peter Kramer, author of the 1993 book, “Listening To Prozac,” was asked if he himself

      took Prozac. He said no, he doesn’t, and that he raises his serotonin levels by taking

      his dog for a walk!

      So, it’s true that changing your brain chemistry can make you feel

      better, but feeling better can change your brain chemistry. It’s a two way street.

      Usually, a person’s first “win” has to do with feeling better. That’s real. But based on

      that reality, they will begin to trust Hubbard (remember, this is a confidence game). They start taking

      other things in Scientology on faith. Throw in an out-of-body experience, and POOF!

      You’ve got a “true believer.”

      Did you ever think that Scientologists might be reading this blog?

      That’s why I say the things I do. I talk about Scientology on this blog in EXACTLY the same way

      I would talk about it to someone who’s still “in.” The first thing I do is acknowledge that auditing

      can change the way they feel in a profound way, but that there are scientific

      explanations for that! And that they don’t have to believe the bullshit. I start with what’s real, and

      then I deconstruct.

      P.S. AAAAAAARRRRRRRRGGGGHHH!!!!

      (That was for you, SPF!)

      • It was never about that the act of auditing doesn’t release endorphins. It’s that what is claimed as a win isn’t actually what is happening. There is no “cell” that is an engram. There is no reactive mind. Those things do not exist. To say that they do is delusional.

        To use your drug addict analogy. If a drug addict said that their cocaine cut with heroin wrapped in a shroom sent them to Venus, I’d tell them that they were getting high and hallucinating a trip to Venus. So, we’re still not on the same wavelength. Your wins did not exist as described by Scientology doctrine and I believe to act like they do, is to do someone a disservice. To pretend that, for the sake of having a discussion, that the reactive mind is real, is demeaning to the person you’re talking to. Either you’re willing to be honest with them from the start or you’re not.

        • FLUNK_101

          Please don’t misrepresent what I said. I’ve always said there’s no such thing as “engrams,” the “reactive mind,” “body thetans, or any of that stuff. That’s the “bullshit” I referred to in my comment when I said, “they don’t have to believe the bullshit.”
          And it’s never a disservice to tell the truth, especially to someone who’s still in the grips of this evil cult.

          • I get that, what I was saying is my position was that your wins are not wins because they are a different bill of goods than what you paid for. Yes a rush of endorphins and what not do occur. That’s a “real” event. But it isn’t what you’re told is going to happen. You paid for a car and they handed you a hot wheel, which isn’t a real car.

            • FLUNK_101

              Fair enough!

        • bingo. i totally agree …

        • dwayners13

          And this is exactly why Hubbard came up with “what is true, is what is true for you” (or some delusional nonsense like that). It allows people to justify their delusions/hallucinations of “wins, OT powers such exteriorization etc”. It helps them to deny the realities that they don’t want to acknowledge or admit to themselves. For example “I didn’t imagine that my car & I teleported from work to my house without driving, it really happened”. (An actual claim by an individual known as ‘the magic thetan).

      • Missionary Kid

        It is common knowledge among researchers that exercise can (notice I said can) be as effective at combating depression as the anti-depressants. The problem is, it is difficult to get the depressed person to get up from their keyboard/tv/sleep/reading and out to exercise.

        • Missionary Kid

          I should add that there are studies that verify the effectiveness of exercise in treating depression when compared with drugs, placebos, and talk therapy

          • Vistaril

            It depends on the type of depression but, yeah, I can vouch for your statement. One of my loved ones got herself into a terrible slump after being laid off from her job and struggling for over a year to get another one at the same level. Six months she spent being miserable before finally going to the doctor. The doctor said, in her circumstances and given the nature of her depression, he would in the first instance offer a “green prescription”. It dictated a vegetarian diet, at least two one-minute long hugs per day, one hour anaerobic exercise (that which stimulates lactic acid fermentation) every second day for eight weeks, and to volunteer with a community group one day a month. If, after that, she was still unable to see much point in going on, consideration would then be given to some sort of pharmaceutical additive. She never needed that additive and swears to this day it was the exercise which switched life back on for her.

            • sugarplumfairy

              That’s a good doc.. First step in treating depression should always be walking/exercise.. It works..

            • BuryTheNuts2

              When I was in high school I got hit with my first real bout of depression.
              It was indescribable it was so awful. One day in a fit of misery…I ran out of the house and just kept running. I ran and ran and ran until I thought I was going to die. (Actually, I ran and ran hoping I would die if I am going to be honest).

              But afterwords I felt better. So I kept running.
              In the long run, it wasn’t quite enough.
              But to this day (despite great meds), when I start bumming the Nike’s go on my hoofs and I hit the pavement.

              I will agree that if it is “possible”, activity should always be a first step to alleviate symptoms.

            • sugarplumfairy

              Very good point.. Sometimes depression is so severe, physical activity is nearly impossible.. I’m glad you found what works for you , Bury.. you’re much too wonderful to be sad..

            • BuryTheNuts2

              Thanks, I think so too!

            • Missionary Kid

              That’s anecdotal evidence, but I’m sure that your loved one is glad it was one of the things prescribed. The hugs would reconnect her with her feelings, which are often ignored or suppressed, and the volunteering put her in contact with other people, which would also stimulate her.

              Good doctoring.

          • monkeyknickers

            God who is packing down arrows for you today! ?

            • Missionary Kid

              First, don’t call me God. 😉

              Actually, I don’t care. They’re too chicken to confront me directly. I didn’t even notice it until you pointed it out.

            • Missionary Kid

              I think it’s a clam named Nicholas Edward Matavka, who’s now posting replies to my posts made days ago.

              He’s extolling the advantages of unfiltered Kools in his lat reply. I told him to please smoke more, just not around me.

        • BuryTheNuts2

          That depends on the severity of the depression! Activity is not a cure all.
          Depression has more than one form and some people can’t even get out of bed when it hits them hard enough.

          • Missionary Kid

            VERY good points. I should have been more specific. The type of depression being studied was not the extreme type that totally disables one.

            Also, exercise is not a panacea, just as one specific drug may have much different results on different people. It often takes trial and error before finding the right drug for each person because apparently the individual brain biochemistry of people can be different in very subtle ways.

            • BuryTheNuts2

              Oh, I got a good story for you!!!!!!

              When I first went on depression medication my regular Doctor (of Osteopathy) told me to be careful. She asked me if I had ever done LSD. Because (according to her) if you have taken hallucinogens you should not take Prozac because it can re-stimulate the effects of the LSD.
              NO SHIT! TRUE STORY.

              She was a WISE Doc, eh?

              Edit: and after years of trial and error. Prozac is a winner for me.

            • Missionary Kid

              Took me a minute to discern the difference between WISE and wise. I’d never heard that re-stimulation theory before. That is a good story.

            • BuryTheNuts2

              Yeah, and it was total bullshit. I spoke to other doctors and told them her little theory and they looked at me like I had lobsters growing out of my ears.

            • Missionary Kid

              It’s just as much bullshit as the theory that you can sweat the drugs out of your system long after you are sober and treat them with niacin and other vitamins.

            • BuryTheNuts2

              Huh?

              GASP! Are you saying the tech doesn’t work?

            • Missionary Kid

              Oh, nooooo, why would I say that?
              Everything that L.Ron Hubbard said is the gospel truth. Why do you think it’s been inscribed in steel in titanium vessels to preserve for future generations.
              Of course it works, all you need is money. It will be joyously be relieved from you, and it will work. If it doesn’t, bring more money, and they will try again. And Again, and again.

            • Bella Legosi

              “Why do you think it’s been inscribed in steel in titanium vessels to preserve for future generations?”

              Because they are really provoking Bella into fashioning her own portable RailGun to test the strength of said bunkers. I swear it!
              Or they do it to really piss people off. In that case they have succeeded and have only implanted, reinforced, and have dangled the dare for Bella to test homemade rail guns! So OSA, NSA if you have caught this and/or are reading this: Crazy Scientologist’s made me do it!

              Don’t Squirrels bury shit like that?

            • Missionary Kid

              Actually, I’d rather just haul it off for recycling.

              The titanium is the valuable shit. The stainless is not as valuable, but it goes for a good price.

            • BuryTheNuts2

              Yes, we bury those nuts!

            • Bella Legosi

              It is estimated that millions of trees start life each year, due to squirrels forgetting where they hid their nuts.

              I love squirrels. It is a shame their likeness and name are used to denote scientologists! I doth protest!

              Bury you have been photographed and caught in the act!

            • BuryTheNuts2

              Oh no, you caught me nekkid and I showing off my tail!

            • ThetaBara

              Holy crap! Close call!

            • BuryTheNuts2

              Oh it gets worse!
              She and I were drinking buddies outside of the office.
              I never put two and two together for a long time. She was my Doc for years.

            • grundoon

              +1

        • Douglas D. Douglas

          Reminds me of an old episode of The Beverly Hillbillies. Drysdale is astonished to discover that Granny has an infallible folk remedy that cures… the common cold! A skeptical doctor tells him that the only known “cure” is rest, plenty of fluids, and letting the cold run its course for a couple of days. Drysdale invests some time and money in Granny’s cure before asking exactly what it is. Her reply: her secret “potion,” followed by rest, plenty of fluids, and in a couple of days, a complete cure. Works every time!

          • Missionary Kid

            There’s also the placebo effect.

          • Douglas D. Douglas

            I note that Granny did not recommend mega-doses of niacine and several hours in a sauna. She was a smart old gal at that…

    • Poison Ivy

      “More than that however, it’s proof to me that they have no actual confidence that what they’re selling is true.”

      Think about other religions that actually encourage theological debate and disagreement, almost as a seamless part of the faith itself – Judaism comes to my mind immediately, but I’ve seen such debate among Imams, priests, and others. The Dali Lama! I remember my dearly departed Dad (a Paulist) arguing with his close friend, a Jesuit Preist, day in and day out, about women being allowed into the preisthood. Can you picture that going on in Scientology?
      Of course not. You’ve hit the nail on the head, Noah. They can’t allow dissent because one smart “theologian” would pull the whole house of cards down.
      (That’s part of why it’s interesting to read the Marty debates from time to time, if you can do it without getting a migraine. Whatever you think of the Indies, at least they are opening up their beliefs to internal discussion and debate.)

      • Douglas D. Douglas

        Yup. Within Christianity there’s even scripture to back this up. The Bereans were commended by the Apostle Paul for their “doubt,” which manifested in a search for truth: “And the people of Berea were more open-minded than those in Thessalonica, and they listened eagerly to Paul’s message. They searched the Scriptures day after day to see if Paul and Silas were teaching the truth.” (Acts 17:11)

        To this day there are “Berean” groups within Christianity who continue to foster self examination. They are not always popular with fringe practitioners!

        • monkeyknickers

          and doesn’t Timothy something something essentially say, “provide a plausible argument for your beliefs”.

          Plainly I need to look this up.

          • clam_in_a_halfshell

            1 Peter 3:15-16: “Always be ready to make your defense to anyone who demands from you an accounting for the hope that is in you; yet do it with gentleness and reverence.”

      • Missionary Kid

        O.K., please don’t get offended, but I’ll also point out that while the debate is allowed in the church, Il Papa has the ultimate say on the question of women in the priesthood. American nuns have been chastised for not hewing to dogma set forth from Rome.

        He hasn’t sent anyone to the hole, but the threat of excommunication does loom.

        I will point out that excommunication in the CC means that one is not entitled to liturgical services of the church, and not disconnection and banishment from all communication with people still in the church.

        • Excommunication DID mean banishment from ordinary social interaction with the community back when the Church had the power to make that stick.

          • Missionary Kid

            And there are individual Catholics (and other Christian sects and members of them) that take excommunication to that extreme. Among certain Amish, that is the practice, for example.

            • Jehovah’s Witnesses are that way too.

            • Missionary Kid

              Yup, I mentally included them in other Christian sects.

              I had a girlfriend for over a year who had not only left the JWs, but had divorced her deacon husband at the same time, and wasn’t disfellowshipped! Apparently, it’s up to a committee of 3 in the local church to rule on whether it happens or not, and she got lucky.

        • Zana

          What I see is that Co$ is NOT a religion. It’s a self-help group that called itself a religion to get the tax benefits. In that respect it is a criminal organization. It has nothing to do with the Divine. Or Love. Or God. There is no whiff of the deeply mysterious and healing about this cult. It cannot stand questioning because the deep Source of Life is non-existent here. It’s a self-help strategy gone mad. It is definitely not a group that inspires love, healing, connection or helping one another. No compassion. Why do they throw their old people out on the street after they are used up? Why do they disconnect children from their parents. Husbands from wives? Why can it not stand scrutiny? Because it is NOT a religion. It’s a wolf in sheep’s clothing.

          If it were billed as what it is… a tool for self-help… then there would at least be honesty and an end point. Expecting people to believe in space operas is silly… until it becomes tragic.

          • Missionary Kid

            I don’t care if Co$ is a religion, self-help group, or a fairy coven. (If there is such a thing).

            I was just pointing out that the practice of disconnection has been a part of Christian history.

            • clam_in_a_halfshell

              If you’re Amish, definitely.

          • grundoon

            The “self” being “helped” was L. Ron Hubbard.

        • excommunication in the CC mean that the Holy Father has deemed you be outside of the Church ..no longer able to accept communion , no longer in the fold of the one and true church. It pretty much damns you to hell AKA ..denial of gods love and denial of the ability to transcend to Heaven .

          They excommunicated a woman who brought her 10 year old daughter ( who had been raped by her stepfather ) for an abortion . Pregnancy would have killed her.

          The church excommunicated the mother , the doctor and prevented the girl from confirmation .

          They did NOT excommunicate the rapist . Go figure .

          • BuryTheNuts2

            Wow, that there is all kinda f’ed up!

          • Missionary Kid

            Even while I was a Christian, it always was interesting to me how someone in this temporal existence could proclaim what the result will be in some other existence which is only achieved by death in the present existence. The passage from the other existence to this one, is, IMO, impossible because it’s a one way trip.

            Church leaders also claim guidance from the bible and directly from god, and, as a consequence, make declarations on behalf of a deity.

            That being said, according to the CC, abortion is wrong, and the highest evil because a life is taken. They have declared that a fetus, indeed, a zygote is a human being. Rape, in their eyes, is a lesser evil. They also have declared that if a choice is to be made between a fetus and a living person, the fetus has the higher priority.

            It is, again, a claim for the greater good.

            The logic is internally consistent, but I disagree on so many levels. While I was never a Catholic, that type of reasoning is also a part of why I am no longer a Christian.

          • monkeyknickers

            And it’s all much ado about NOTHING. NOTHING. No gods with special powers, no ultimate reward based on mortal fear of punishment, no virgins (who’d want to sleep with a virgin anyway), no 8 limbed blue elephants, nothing.

            The ONLY sensible thing to do in that situation is find the ass who raped your wee daughter and bury him alive. It’s so much easier. And costs less!

          • clam_in_a_halfshell

            And I, another Christian, think that they did wrong by so doing. I don’t know what is up in Brazil.

            And, FWIW, as far as I know, excommunication is never meant to be permanent. At least not in the Orthodox Church, it isn’t. I would really doubt if Roman Catholics thought it was supposed to be permanent either.

            The only one who is able to decide one’s eternal state is God. I don’t have the hubris to declare that my heaven card is punched, either.

            • Missionary Kid

              The excommunication is permanent in this life unless the person repents and does acts of contrition, as I understand it. In Co$, there is a way to get back into the church as well.

              The permanence that the CC and Co$ declares is in another existence. My amazement is that someone in this existence makes declarations about what happens in another. Of course, the CC says that it is up to god, but the Pope, as his representative on earth, supposedly speaks with god’s authority.

              It can be looked at as the perfect con. There’s no evidence to contradict it just as there’s no evidence it is true.

              The mythology of LRH has had only 50 years or so to evolve, while Christianity has had two millenia.

      • ThetaBara

        I cannot do it without getting a migraine, and frankly, I’m kinda surprised that they even can! It’s by far the most fascinating aspect of the indies – seeing how they manage/attempt to logic themselves out of corners. None of it stands up to real scrutiny so I think it is a matter of time before the whole house of cards falls. In the meantime, they serve as a good halfway house.

        • FLUNK_101

          Are their stages to leaving Scientology?
          1) Scientology is great, but Miscavige ruined it.
          2) Ron was bad too, but Scientology would be great if you could practice it for personal benefit without the domination and control.
          3) Scientology is bad, but it has some good stuff in it.
          4) All the good stuff came was ripped off from somewhere else …
          5) Any which way you look at it, Scientology is evil from beginning to end.
          6)It’s evil, but it ‘s also perversely fascinating!

          P.S.Is Theta Bara an anagram for A Theta Bra? Because I had a very close Scientologist friend who told me, “I went Clear in my Maidenform Bra!”

          • ThetaBara

            Seems pretty accurate!
            I chose
            ThetaBara after a post about LRH bitching that your parents talking about popular movies before you were born would somehow screw you up forever. He mentioned Theda Bara (who I adore) and I realized, Theda/Theta – LOL!

            Honestly, this shit is all so toxic and depressing that I gotta get my lulz where I can. Plus, check out my glamorous userpic! And I get to roll my eyes at the cult in perpetuity!

            • FLUNK_101

              Cool. Very cool! Actually, I googled Theda Bara … part of her mystique had something to do with her name being an anagram for “Arab Death.” Very interesting lady. I wish I knew more about her and her movies … when I have time I’m gonna check her out.

          • grundoon

            Arnie Lerma’s 8 steps out of Scientology (later he added 2 more steps)…

            1) There is something wrong here, if this is so great, then why is (______) going on? [insert whatever atrocity you have recently witnessed]
            2) The guys at the top must be crazy
            3) Miscavige and crew are evil demons from another dimension [or something similar]
            4) Hubbard went crazy at the end …..
            5) Hubbard went crazy in 1966
            6) Hubbard was mad from the start.
            7) This whole thing is a complete fraud
            8) my god, its a criminal organization… with criminal convictions all over the world… and it was only about money
            9) realization that THERE ARE NO OT’s THERE!
            10) realizing, after leaving Scientology, this makes one an ex-nazi and wanting to do something about it

            At the link above, Arnie has posted a series of interesting comments and followups related to his 8 (10) steps. Here’s one by Chuck Beatty:

            At first, when first reading these 10 steps, about 2 years ago, some are just, well, out there. I could not agree with them. Now, after 2 years being out and being free to read, talk, phone call, email, internet chat about 100 to 200 ex official Scientologists and staffers I am amazed that this mental progression OUT of the mindset and delusional worldview, in my opinion, is more and more accurate. … I find myself actually agreeing with the gist of these steps more and more.

            • ThetaBara

              This is great stuff. Thanks, Grundoon.

            • Captain Howdy

              Thanks for the links. Saved both of them.

          • grundoon

            FreeToShine, a devoted Scientologist for 32 years – from age 14 in 1967 – wrote her 9 stages of leaving Scientology.

            This is my own personal view of the stages of leaving Scientology. I realise it’s an individual journey and some may not agree with me, but it’s worth discussing. It’s around point 6 that many seem to go back and forth a bit.
            1) Noticing there is something wrong in some area.
            2) Attempting to have the wrongness corrected locally. (“It must be just that person’s MUs”.)
            3) Attempting to have wrongness corrected by upper manangement. (“The local area is not following Source.”)
            4) Personal Ethics cycles/sec checks as none of your reports were acted on and so any disagreement must be your fault. At this point you either step back in line or start seeking more information.
            5) CRISIS POINT. The realisation that orgs are not run the way you first envisioned, and the thought that it must have changed with DM and has been “taken over”.
            6) Finding out the truth about all the lies you were told. At this point you may still want to believe that some parts of the “tech” works, or that it was only in later years that it went wrong.
            7) Realising that Hubbard designed it all from the start.
            8) Realising it is a complete fraud, there are no Clears and Ots and it was all about money.
            9) Wanting to do something about it.

            Some closing words from FreeToShine:

            A friend once said that what released her from the bonds of scientology was doing a ‘correction list’ on the item “Opinions you can’t say”. She realised “What am I doing in a group that promises me freedom and I’m not allowed to state my opinion?”.

            For those who are ‘keeping quiet’ or don’t know what to do, there is a way to release the bonds and that is simply to allow yourself the freedom to really look. Not the kind of “freedom” scientology promises, but real freedom without “must and must not”.

            And it changes your life.

            • This closely follows my own experience. The first major wrongness that I couldn’t assign to just myself or not being adequate, was in about 1992. From there it follows accurately to my doubt formula in 2003 and thereafter.

      • Real Shellback

        I have little patience with the Marty-Indie bunch. If you throw out the dictator in Scientology without admitting that Hubbard was little more than a charismatic crackpot, what do you have? “Hello to the new boss, same as the old boss.”

        And of course some of Scientology works. Nearly ANY therapy works with some people. The one truism in Psychology seems to be “there is no magic bullet, but one can find the key to unlock nearly anyone.” The reason Scientology’s flavor of Psychology fails is because they are indoctrinated to believe it’s a perfect solution to everyone and if it’s not right for you? It’s your own fault. So the loyal ones just keep pounding the round pegs, the smart ones leave and the rest go quietly out of their skulls.

        • Missionary Kid

          Another reason it fails is that the goal isn’t to help anyone with their problems, but to relieve them of their money.

          • Zana

            Right on. Yes. That seems to be the final event taking place here.

            • Missionary Kid

              It is not the final event, but the purpose of (and the reason I spell it this way) $cientology from the beggining.

          • Lady Squash

            Spot on!

        • in terms of the Martydites…just another emotional gang bang . It is just sad . sad , sad and REALLY creepy

          • enoughofthissh…

            Very creepy! Outright scary.

          • clam_in_a_halfshell

            Yep. Could not agree more.

        • monkeyknickers

          They are also heavily indoctrinated tho, no? They’re peeling it back layer by layer by layer in a way that doesn’t blow their minds. They’ll get there.

        • enoughofthissh…

          🙂

    • BosonStark

      For me the beliefs and actions are integrated and it’s impossible to separate them in most cases. Disconnection is an extension of Hubbard’s Suppressive Person belief/doctrine that the SP is responsible for a person’s failure or illness, or temptation to do things like have bad thoughts about Hubbard or question something in Scientology.

      When disconnection or SP doctrine is practiced between parents and underage children, it is particularly cruel. It’s a crazy belief and practice to foist on children who must be terrified, when they have Sea Org or zealous parents, that they will be disconnected when they are young, and not have any means of supporting themselves or getting an education as well as being separated from their family.

      Another example would be a belief in Xenu. It’s lame and relatively harmless on one level, but it’s not okay when they charge so much for it, keeping it secret, holding threats of illness or death over members’ heads if they learn the cockamamie too soon. If it’s so damn important, let everyone know about it in a brochure before they buy their first course. This is why I do not trust indies. They want to hold this crap sacred in some way, because Hubbard did, and that’s crazy considering how it was used to trap people and make them fearful.

      An example of a belief that is used both ways is skills that may be learned in a communications course. It’s one thing if you want to improve your social skills and overcome shyness by establishing ARC, and quite another if it’s so you can find their ruin and sell them into the scam.

      I don’t mean to sound too Eckhart Tolle-ish but I think adults need to move on from their past — no matter how tragic — and try to get joy and meaning out of the present, being grateful for what they have right NOW. Because, if you have the kind of tragedy and guilt and that Karen de la C has to deal with, having it eat away at you is going to make your existence miserable, no matter how materially successful you are or what lawsuits are won.

      All of us are sustained by hope for transformation in the future. Stop it! Stop it right now. Live for today. If you feel able to protest, or are willing to put the effort to help make a change, good. But, don’t expect to do it at the expense of your own life, or don’t do it because you think the future is going to hold some great promise and you’ll feel good then.

      I think disconnected people should do what that lady did by visiting her son in Texas. Do it. Do it any way you can, and try to let the people you miss know honestly how you feel about being disconnected from them. If once they get your letter, they burn it because it’s from an SP, well, at least you tried.

      • BuryTheNuts2

        “For me the beliefs and actions are integrated and it’s impossible to separate them in most cases.”

        Absolutely! And those beliefs are certainly not innocuous!
        All of Hubbard’s Space Opera beliefs are braided into his policy which is then braided into his “self help tech”.

        It is one big closed loop with Scientology. It is the yellow brick road to hell.

        edit: Oh, and nice post.

        • richelieu jr

          As I’ve said before about Hubbrdiism, Scientology, Dianetics, Rathbunism, etc…

          It’s like the guy who asks ‘You know that little milky liquid around the poop when a bird shit? What is that?”

          That, ladies and gents, is bird shit too.

      • I agree quite a bit, but many religions become intellectually compartmentalized. I mean the beliefs in say Christianity are in many ways equally insidious, but over time and internal debate it’s become something bearable. If you remove disconnection Scientology can reach that same, but still factually wrong, position quickly.

      • clam_in_a_halfshell

        Amen, and Amen, and Amen, and YES INDEED.

    • monkeyknickers

      Word brother. This is what happens when pathologically insecure, fearful headcases buy boats and form a fake navy. I hope someone writes it down for posterity.

    • clam_in_a_halfshell

      It’s not just medium bad, it’s all-the-way bad.

  • VickiStubing

    Tony, I’m glad you trust your source, but there is still the question of the birds being in the exact same spot in two of the photos. Any explanation for that?

    • It looks like a bird showed up in nearly the same spot on the roof, I didn’t count the panels but it looks farther over in one than the other. Considering the shadows are very different in the two shots I doubt that’s evidence of anything. So…. Birds being in the same spot means that bird was in the same spot.

      • VickiStubing

        I DID count the tiles, and it is the same spot. Maybe the bird is a member of Anonymous and leaves little presents on the cars of people visiting the mission. He’s found the best spot to watch and wait.

        • Ze Moo

          It looks like a piece of wood or some schmutz that got stuck between the tiles. The various shadows show they are different pics taken at different times and days. A former scilon seems to be the best perpetrator to me.

      • TonyOrtega

        I can’t believe I’m wasting time on this. AND, if it is a bird in the same spot, at high resolution they have very, very different pixel makeups. So it’s not a dupe. Sorry, this theory of a shoop doesn’t pass the smell test. Yes, it’s unusual — and a GOOD kind of unusual — that our source is still using film in 2013, which gives us a level of confirmation we don’t usually have.

        • VickiStubing

          Tony, don’t waste any more time on it. You and Noah are clearly on the same page and I’m convinced. Move along, nothing to see here.

          • Vicki , Let’s be honest. I think everyone’s real questions are – 1. Where the hell did you live when the boat was docked and

            2. How did your dad ever have any time to steer the ship?

            Less important but equally mysterious, 3. How is it that Doc was ALWAYS was getting laid but everyone else on the ship (employees) seemed to be going through a real long dry spell?”

            I think you should be obligated to answer those questions before we start stacking up new questions for others.

            • BuryTheNuts2

              Um, yeah! I am especially curious to that answer about the Doc getting laid question!
              WTF was up with that?

            • VickiStubing

              Hoo boy, I knew it was just a matter of time before Doc’s sexual prowess became a topic of discussion here. Remember, Marc, I was just a little kid for most of my time on the ship, so a lot of that stuff went over my head. But here goes:

              1. We had a lovely condo in Boca where we stayed when the boat was in dock. Daddy was very popular with the ladies, so I spent most of my time at the beach and the mall. That uniform was really uncomfortable and soooo gnarly.

              2. Daddy had the original cruise control. Get it? BWAHAHAHA, Gopher told me that one. Before he went to Congress and got all serious, anyway.

              3. It was the 70’s, man! Doc had all the good stuff and was willing to hook up the right people, wink wink nudge nudge. And, it was written in his contract. For every week he spent at sea, Carnival had to fill so many cabins with attractive, promiscuous young women. Plus, he was a master smooth talker. Bartender? Got those back home. Gopher? Seriously? Um, no. Daddy? See Boca condo, above. Julie? Ah, she got her fair share. But she was usually too busy saving Gopher’s butt to chase the hot guys around decks.

              Uh oh, Daddy tells me I’ve spilled too many secrets for today. Guess who’s gonna be scraping barnacles this afternoon? Toodles,Vicki

        • Sherbet

          We don’t have to waste time on this. We can go back to the Portland Ideal Org ‘shopping controversy. There must be 4 or 5 theories that haven’t been beaten to death yet.

          • Truthiwant

            Poor Tony this week. Photoshop is going to come back and haunt him!

            • Sherbet

              It’s haunting all of us.

        • Vistaril

          Unless its a photo of a photo 😉

          (Puts down wooden spoon)

        • I did a detailed analysis on my rebuilt thermal radial spectrum quantum bionic analyzer using a two-fish de-encryption model and all of these images appear to be from a thin transparent base material made up for the purpose of capturing images. Now, I very well could be wrong or my 8th grade math could be off but I think you guys might be onto something here…

          • Well since I don’t have the money to go to Tucson any more after donating to the Portland Ideal Org, I decided to use my OT powers to exteriorize my way to Arizona and watch. I can not only verify that the graffitti is real but tell you that it is no mere disgruntled Scientologist, but a genuine bitter defrocked apostate grinding an axe on a huge grain of salt!

          • sugarplumfairy

            I can’t even imagine a creative mind and remarkable personality like yours being expected to fill a position requiring blind faith, unquestioning obedience and stoic silence.. Thank God you’re out..

          • BuryTheNuts2

            Marc, did you rebuild your own thermal radial spectrum quantum bionic analyzer?
            Mine has been acting weird when trying to self propagate the transverse oscillating wave function.
            There is weird hissing noise that appears to be coming from the horizontal magnetic plane.

            Any ideas?

            • John P.

              You two have been getting a little heavy on the techno-speak. And for me, a professional software engineer (my career before being called to the exalted heights of money at Global Capitalism HQ) to be confused by all the terminology is really something. Perhaps you have been watching some training videos showcasing some cutting edge technologies from Rockwell Automation, like this one: http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=RXJKdh1KZ0w

            • FLUNK_101

              It’s amazing they used actual company names and logos. Hilarious!

            • John P.

              They used actual company names and logos because the company whose names and logos are used produced the video. It was an internal film put together by the marketing department at Rockwell’s industrial controls division for their sales people at some internal sales meeting. It was a spoof on the techno-babble that often takes root in high-tech companies attempting to sell complicated products. It starts off reasonably enough but the gibberish quotient goes higher and higher.

              As an amateur historian of technology (which is why the video of Hubbard lying about encountering an early computer sends me through the roof), I did a bit of digging on the history of the “retro encabulator.” It turns out that this particular gimmick including much of the exact wording goes back to the 1940s or 1950s! This is just like how many “urban legends” that seem to be all about contemporary issues end up being retellings of medieval morality stories. Read the work of Jan Harold Brunvand for excellent (but fun to read) scholarly analysis of the medieval roots of urban legends in his various books.

            • grundoon

              I want one!

            • Inverse the dynaflow conductor. That works for me every time!

    • TonyOrtega

      There’s an object on the roof in two of the photos in the about the same spot. One commenter suggested that it’s a bird, and others were then convinced. But I don’t know that it is a bird. Our source pointed out that there is a nest of cardinals in a tree just outside the frame, and he says they’re a pretty common site — but he doesn’t know for sure that’s what we’re seeing. I don’t see enough detail in the shot to convince me that it’s a bird. So for me, Occam’s Razor: either there’s an object on the roof that may be just about anything, or somehow someone has gone to the enormous trouble to fake consecutive negatives in order to create a some images to send to a website, and for what reason?

      • VickiStubing

        Oooh Tony, I can think of lots of reasons someone would want to “catch” you disseminating bad info. I will grant you that this would be beyond the shooping capabilities of your average Sciloon.

        But my parents remind me that birds are creatures of habit, and there is probably something on the roof that the bird likes to rest on (assuming it IS a bird, which I’m pretty sure it is). So until I can get my camera to Tucson, I’ll go with ya on this.

      • ParticleMom

        Sorry, I think I suggested it 🙁

    • Truthiwant

      That bird just won’t move and I notice the mission are getting a bit sloppy about painting over the graffiti!

      • sugarplumfairy

        Looks lovely.. now they just need a nice drop box so folks can drop off their old gold teeth and fillings..

        • Truthiwant

          I think the bird is a thieving magpie. Somewhat appropriate for Scientology!

          • sugarplumfairy

            Lol.. I love it..

      • It’s a blue jay, a bird with a poor reputation and the Mission staff are terrified of it.

        Andrew

        • Captain Howdy

          I have communicated with my comrades in the blue jay collective, and they have agreed to help in the eternal struggle against the fascist clams.

          • Sherbet

            That picture is making me roar with laughter, Captain H!

          • aquaclara

            🙂

        • richelieu jr

          It is a thieving Magpie, very in-ethics, Head of the Registrar’s Office and favoured to replace little Davey at some point…

          That is if it can avoid associating with those squirrels that live out back, and make their livings picking through the Church’s garbage…

      • Douglas D. Douglas

        If the bird flies back wearing an ascot, show it right in…

        • Sherbet

          And smoking a Kool.

      • John P.

        Perhaps this documentary on avian veterinary care may provide some insight into why that bird is having trouble moving. http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=4vuW6tQ0218

        • Missionary Kid

          Is that the dead parrot version of the dead agent strategy?

    • MO Mom

      Last year, there was this single freaking bird that sat on the window ledge in the same 3 foot area every freaking day. And it chirped. And chirped. All day, every day. Birds are creatures of habit, and sometimes a bird on the roof is just a bird.

      However, my cat in the same sunny patch every day is a plot to take over the planet.

    • Observer

      That’s not a bird. I know this because the only birds a Scientology mission would attract are vultures.

    • If it’s building a nest, or already has one in the tiles it will go back to the same spot.

    • grundoon

      Quoth the Raven, Nevermore!

  • sugarplumfairy

    Well, I see tht the running cost list of scientology courses/processes has changed from last week.. so, wow.. disconnection is free?? I’m completely amazed that the f*ckers don’t charge for it..

    • I bet you’ll have to pay for rehabilitation auditing from your time with the SP.

      • FLUNK_101

        You pay for everything in Scientology, and not just in dollars!

        • Missionary Kid

          It’s the old, “Your money or your life.” question turned on its head. It becomes “Your money and your life.”

      • FistOfXenu

        Do they charge for some kind of repair auditing? Do they sec check you from here to the moon and back? There’s gotta be money in it somewhere. They can’t be giving away that much hurt for free.

        • I’ve heard from some that your pay for the Sec Check, and from others that you don’t. Anyone happen to know if you do?

          • TonyOrtega

            Public do. I talked to a man who had been in 40 years and estimated that he’d paid half a million dollars just for sec-checking over that time. Sea Org members may get sec checked more than the public, but remember that costs tend to be deferred for them (they only make 20 to 40 bucks a week) with the understanding that they’ll have to pay later if they leave — “freeloader’s debt.”

            • Observer

              Holy crap!

            • Paying for the privilege to be interrogated to see if you’ll have the right to pay some more.

            • sugarplumfairy

              unfrkngbelievable..

            • Captain Howdy

              The first time I heard about people having to pay for being sec checked I was gobsmacked. OT VII’s have to get sec checked every 6 months to the tune of twenty grand or thereabouts. Imagine if the cops started charging people to be interrogated? Without a lawyer!

            • Marta

              Oh yeah, Noah, you boiled it right down to the bone. Measuring up for the right to stay and play is rule one. Practiced all along their “route to total freedom”.

            • Poison Ivy

              (Off-topic Tony – what the heck is happening over at the Village Voice?! Talk about disconnection!)

            • BuryTheNuts2

              Tony spoke about what is going on at VV in yesterday’s post PI.

            • FLUNK_101

              They fired Michael Musto! WTF?

            • ThetaBara

              OH NO THEY DIDN’T!!!
              Wow.

            • Almost all of my last $170K was for “FPRD style” sec checks, sold as “preps” for the O.T. levels.

            • BuryTheNuts2

              Fuckin A, Michael!

              170K to be abused, tormented and tortured by your “religion”.
              What a deal, eh?
              Glad you are here and long gone from there!!!

            • aquaclara

              That is a boatload of dineros, my friend. That had to hurt.

            • I was anesthetized while they extracted it. The wound is taking a long time to heal.

        • richelieu jr

          It’s like third-word dictators forcing families to pay for the bullets that their fathers/husbands were executed with…

          And this ‘freedloader debt’ thing just blows my mind. Lkie it was a privilege to sleep 6 hours a night and eat slop and be watched 24/7… It reminds me of that right-wing whack-job at the Republican shindig a few months ago who, hearing that Frederick Douglass had written a letter to his ex-owner forgiving him said, “What, for giving him food and shelter for decades for free?”

        • richelieu jr

          Honestly, the difference between the SeaOrg and that hours the three women were ties up in for a decade?

          30-40 dollars a week.

          Disconnection? Check.
          Lack of freedom? Check.
          Forced abortions? Check (he even used the L Ron brand- The kind he’d have you believe 9 mothers out of 10 tried repeatedly)

    • Poison Ivy

      You have to pay for the moving van.

  • Observer

    What a foul, evil thing L. Ron Hubbard was. He was one book that could accurately be judged by its repulsive cover. The more stories like Claire’s I hear, the more grotesquely ugly Hubbard’s meat sack appears to me.

    Meanwhile, Claire just keeps getting more amazing and beautiful.

    • MarionDee

      Yes, every time I see a photo of Claire I’m struck by how lovely she is.

  • Stuart Young

    In my opinion most puritanical religions do the same – take Jehovah’s Witnesses, some Muslim sects and a number of others. It’s pure protectionism and shows the religion/cult to be nothing like what they preach. A total hypocrisy. Very twisted people that make this choice. The irony is: the higher up in Scientology members get the more they need a good psychiatrist.

    • Vistaril

      Heh!

      Patterson’s Law: all public internet discussions about Scientology will include a post claiming that other religions are equally bad

      Thing is, if Scientology were a religion, you might have a point. Of course, the better analogy would be the Mafia where if someone is declared a tell-tale the “fair game” is on.

    • Poison Ivy

      It’s one of the dividing lines that pushes a “religion” or a belief system into the “cult” category.

  • j238

    The most suspicious aspect of the photos is the idea that someone was using silver-oxide film to take photos to be posted to the internet in 2013.

    • If they’re an ex or even a current member on the outs I don’t find that shocking at all. They only stopped selling cassettes fairly recently.

      • FistOfXenu

        Cassettes are coming back. 😛

        • Actually I have a neighbor who totally records and sells albums on cassette… Does pretty well I guess. Audiophiles are getting older and the next gen is all about that sweet plastic tape.

          • FistOfXenu

            And some youngsters are getting tired of digital. My kids don’t fight about anything except who should get our album collection when we die.

            • BuryTheNuts2

              Just think, you guys might get bumped off by your own kids for some Thin Lizzy.
              Bummer

            • FistOfXenu

              Thanks for that cheerful thought. It’s been yrs since I slept with my pistol under my pillow. But I trust my kids. Mostly. 🙂

            • Get Chutney Love

              “My child wanted me dead for my Blue Oyster Cult collection. On the next episode of the Maury Povitch Show.”

    • MO Mom

      Back when I took photography classes, I found the entire darkroom process to be very relaxing and comforting in a way. Don’t knock someone if they continue an older method that they possibly enjoy very much. Sometimes being ‘old school’ is just what it is and nothing more.

      • ThetaBara

        I got sooooo tired of tearing up expensive photopaper and trashing it. I had dreams of photoshoop!

    • FistOfXenu

      Are you kidding? Film’s still the way to take pictures. Better originals make better copies. And the negatives are gonna last long after your computer tries to read your 20 yr old hard drive and shouts at you WTF?

  • sugarplumfairy

    “..after all, I had lost my entire family to Scientology’s policy of disconnection. To hear him say “it doesn’t exist” was a complete outrage. I think what he meant to say was that the church doesn’t enforce it — but that’s another lie…”

    At his exulted level, sometimes disconnection doesn’t exist.. Anne Archer won’t have to disconnect from him.. Tom doesn’t have to disconnect from Suri.. Different rules for the big beings..

    • Observer

      Yeah, but Tommy knows good and well that the peons are forced to disconnect.

      • richelieu jr

        Tommy is the among the worst of the worst.
        And his harpy wife.

        • BuryTheNuts2

          Some couples really are just a perfect fit for each other.

    • media_lush

      We’re coming up to a year where we have yet to see a photo of Cruise with Suri. The last supposed visit was after his movie wrapped in London and he flew to New York and was apparently “seen” in a New York park with her…… given his huge case against that major media company was that they were lying when they said he no longer saw his daughter (and by the way, how’s that going Bert?) you’d have thought his people would make sure there would be photos.

      Personally I think it’s a lot easier to stop seeing your daughter if you know that she’s not biologically yours….. Or maybe he wants to remain in tiny fists good graces by still showing he’s a true scion at heart.

      • aquaclara

        and of course, TC enforced the disconnection between his older two kids and Nicole….Wonder how he likes it this time?

        • Observer

          He’s been pretty low-key lately. I wonder if the events of the past couple of years have given him something of a reality check? Or maybe he’s just ruthlessly putting ethics in on himself.

          • Captain Howdy

            Tom Cruise + reality? Are we taking about the guy who makes his living playing make believe, and when he’s not doing that he’s playing make believe space cult with a bunch of other delusional dodo’s?

            • Observer

              I know. It’s wishful thinking, but stranger things have happened. Katie making a fool of him has to sting even a Big Being like him.

            • Lady Squash

              Just gotta say, I loved how Katie pulled that one off. Very smart. I’d say she is a very Big Being if I actually knew what that meant.

          • aquaclara

            I just think it’s because he has no friends left….

            • Observer

              I wonder if Davey’s still taking his calls …

            • Missionary Kid

              Not taking calls = not getting money. What do you think?

            • Missionary Kid

              He does have friends, but they are usually $cions.

              Apparently, in the acting community, he is generally considered a nice guy and quite professional.

            • BuryTheNuts2

              Sycophants aren’t really friends.
              I always sort of feel sorry for famous people. It must be confusing figuring out who your real friends are.

            • Missionary Kid

              That’s why often famous people go back to people who knew them before they were famous for friendship.

              I can think that Cruise has drunk so much of the Kool Aid that it’s a topic that non-$cions stay away from.

            • Observer

              That’s why I’m perfectly happy languishing here in obscurity. lol

            • ThetaBara

              But… here, you ARE famous! it’s just that this kind of fame doesn’t stop you going down to the pub without being papped. 😉

            • Observer

              Infamous, more like. lol

            • Lady Squash

              Nice one.

            • BuryTheNuts2

              Yeah, me too!

            • FistOfXenu

              Neither are OSA slaves.

          • Missionary Kid

            He’s much more low key because he got rid of his $cion sister as his PR person. That was done after his infamous confrontation with Matt Lauer and other incidents.

            • Observer

              That was years ago. He’s been less visible since Katie dumped him than at any time I can remember in his career. Even after he dumped Nicole in such a caddish fashion he was still all over the place. Now unless he’s promoting a movie you hardly see or hear anything about him, except from us criminal J&Ders.

            • Missionary Kid

              His publicity machine is working overtime, but his American popularity is waning. He’s no Cary Grant.

              Co$ worked hard to find Katie for him, and he was still young enough to influence someone that young and naive. Now, he’s passe to women in that category, and Katie did (oops, that was unintentional) the unthinkable of exposing him for the dick that $cinetology has made him.

            • ThetaBara

              He got a lot of flack on gossip sites for his lack of contact with Suri. The prevailing theory seems to be that his strategy is to avoid being seen with her so as to not rub it in the faces of cult members who are forced to disconnect, and also to keep people guessing as to how often he sees her. But while he was in London, he was papped going to clubs every weekend, clearly not having daddy-daughter time.

            • Observer

              Honestly, as long as TC is neck-deep in the clam-aid I think the less time Suri spends with him the better. Given what he did to Nicole with turning their kids against her I have no doubt that he’d try to poison Suri against Katie.

            • ThetaBara

              I totally agree, and so does most of the gossip sphere. Which is why I think Katie is SP of the Year for 2012. So many more people are now aware of the viciousness and deceit of the “church”- people who weren’t really interested in the subject before. Between that, and Jenna and Larry’s books, the word is out!

          • Ze Moo

            “ruthlessly putting ethics in on himself” means holding the cans and paying the CO$ mucho denero. Pay a lot for more brainwashing. Burlwood not included.

            • Missionary Kid

              That’s more recordings of Tom-o for Davie-o to laugh at.

            • Ze Moo

              You can be certain that Tommy’s sec checks are a high priority for COB. One of the worst things that could befall Davey is a public defection of Tom Cruise. A bitch fight between the two of them would be so much fun!!

            • Missionary Kid

              It won’t happen. The Co$ cocoon around him is too enveloping.

              We can dream, though. It would be a popcorn moment to see TC wake up and blow.

            • Lady Squash

              I’m waiting for the day.

          • FistOfXenu

            So far his reality checks keep bouncing.
            On Oprah’s couch.

        • Ze Moo

          Aren’t clams forced to disconnect from someone only if they publicly come out against the scam? Holmes has been careful to keep away from any mention about clamatology. Yeah, people have been declared for less, the whales do have different rules. We’ll see if Suri gets some summer time with daddy after school ends. Photo op or real family??? How could we tell???

          • Missionary Kid

            When Tom dumped Nichole, he pretty much held the cards. I’m sure that it’s in the divorce agreement that she not talk about certain things. Nichole may have hopes of at least some contact with their children.

            When Katie divorced Tom, she held all the cards. I’m sure he paid handsomely for some sort of non-disclosure agreement.

            • Ze Moo

              I always considered the Kidman divorce a preemptive move by TC. They were approaching 10 years married and California law gives spouses more money at divorce time for a ‘long term’ marriage. TC was just saving money, everyone in clamatology is disposable, except COB.

            • Missionary Kid

              What was in their prenup could also have an effect.

            • ThetaBara

              I think COB manipulated him into it.

            • ThetaBara

              Nicole is playing it very wisely; she clearly would love to reconnect with her kids and the only way to do that is to be open and welcoming.
              There are rumors that TC shoots blanks. If this is the case and Suri is not biologically his, that would be one reason to roll over in court. In any case, Katie has surely had a look at some of the disgusting sausage factory and you know they don’t want her talking. I hope she got money, too, but if all she got was getting away with her daughter and her life, it was probably worth it.
              I really feel for Katie. I got suckered by a socio and it SUCKS!

            • Missionary Kid

              I think that Katie got out with a pile of money, mostly because she sucker-punched TK and filed in N.Y., as well as had a shit load of information that would really nail Co$. The rumor is that she actually consulted with Nichole via the drop phone she used to consult with her attorney father.

              For once, the organization that depends on all sorts of espionage got outflanked.

              I believe Nichole is playing it just right. For one thing, while she doesn’t have the following that TC has, she’s a far better actor than he, and takes chances with her roles to stretch her abilities.

            • ThetaBara

              Doesn’t hurt that Katie’s dad is a skilled divorce attorney. IDK about her speaking with Nicole (no h, FWIW).
              I make a point of this because of TC’s tendency to call Nicole “Nic” and Katie “Kate” – those are not their names! So I do my best to get it right, just to rub his scrunchy little face in it.

          • ThetaBara

            That pic of the two of them running through the park like a couple of fugitives suggests to me that we’re not going to be seeing another Disneyland trip, or paps invited into a hotel swimming pool with them again any time soon. I think that TC has to keep it on the DL to avoid a flap about disconnection not applying to him (even though it SHOULD and it obviously DOESN’T).

      • Missionary Kid

        Are you saying that Suri isn’t Tom’s biological child?

        • media_lush

          There has been a lot of conjecture that Suri is not his kid. You only have to look at her to see that she looks more like Tommy Davis than Tom…. also his cousin William Mapother is another guess. I have loads of comparison photos on my scientologybollocks blog

          • Missionary Kid

            Of my kids, the one who’s adopted looks more like me than the other, biological child.

            • ThetaBara

              It’s been rumored that he shoots blanks. Of course, it’s also been rumored that Connor IS his biokid. Not that it really matters all that much, although it could be a reason why he caved so quickly in the divorce. Wouldn’t want to be forced to do genetic testing!

            • Missionary Kid

              I think he caved so quickly because Katy’s father & a team of lawyers laid the groundwork, accumulating all of the dirty linen that TC and Co$ don’t want out there. Having the $ciobot spies following her outed to the press didn’t help them, either.

              I think Co$ just realized how screwed they were and did what they always do: cough up a bunch of money.

        • pronoia

          Suri is just a kid — and as far as she knows or cares he IS her father. I think it would be very painful for her to encounter this kind of speculation some day. IT may seem like a way to attack TC, but she does not deserve the collateral damage.

          IMHO

          • Missionary Kid

            I agree. May she be raised with all the love and care that she can be provided with, and let’s rejoice on her escape from the clutches of evil. I’ll leave parental speculation alone.

      • ThetaBara

        It’s actually only a few months since they were papped in that park. But his contact with her has been rare since the summer.

        • media_lush

          …. show me the pictures…. my point is that all we got was “they were seen” from his well oiled PR people…. kindly suggest you reread what I wrote above

          • ThetaBara

            Sure, let me google that for you. Which pictures do you want? Him clubbing? Them running through the park behind a wall of trees (most recent shot of them together,a couple months ago)? Them at Disneyland? All this shit is online. The visit that is only rumored is Thanksgiving. There are photos of all the others. And it is still very little contact. I suggest you read what I write, too. 🙂

            • media_lush

              the one of them in the NewYork Park when he came back from shooting Oblivion

            • ThetaBara

              Same pic; I replied to another comment which right now is not displaying for me (???) but just in case, here is the linkydink again:

              http://www.celebuzz.com/2013-04-15/tom-and-suri-cruise-have-a-daddy-daughter-park-date/

              Someone made bank on that one!

            • media_lush

              hmmm, absolutely no other “major” media outlet published these pics…. the Daily Mail would have been all over them.

              Here’s a recent pic of Suri…. look how tall she is compared to Katie, and remember Katie towers over her ex….. I would have to call bullshit on their legitimacy… but that’s just me

            • media_lush

              here’s another one…… to me the pic on the right she just looks taller than the park pics taken a a few weeks after

            • BuryTheNuts2

              She has her Momma’s flippers!

            • ThetaBara

              Ehh, the Daily Fail is in the UK and therefor pretty sensitive to libel suits. I think it looks recent enough. I have not seen it dox’d as an old photo. In any case, it is the closest thing to a pic of them since the Disneyland Dad and swimming pool pap pix from the summer.Think whatever you want to. Real or not, he’s not much in her life. And to the degree that he is, he is failing to put in Ethics on himself.

            • media_lush

              There is nothing libellous about this photo, especially as it’s supposed to be a public park. If you put the pic into google images and/or Tom Cruise + Suri + New York Photo you will see that not a single “legitimate” media outlet used it. They did, however post the story. The person who took it would have had a scoop on his/her hands and made a ton of money…. but, I say again, the didn’t touch it [provenance is a big deal with proper media outlets and these photos obviously didn’t have them].

              The Suri pic shows she is as tall as Katie’s boob level, even when Katie’s wearing heels…. the park pic shows her clearly below Tom’s ‘boob’ level… and we all know Katie is quite a bit taller than Tom.

              The fact the big outlets didn’t use this photo [and libel is nothing to do with it] speaks volumes to me.

            • aquaclara

              Another shoop! Whooop! Sorry, I just had to get that out.

              anyway, I agree – this looks totally fake. And no one goes traipsing off into the woods dressed like that.

  • Go Claire! The church has many Achille’s Heels but Disconnection is probably the biggest and the one that will have more impact than anything else in bringing about the final inevitable demise of this wretched organisation. There isn’t a single ex-member who doesn’t have a story of disconnection. Fortunately for me as a public Scientologist I hadn’t embedded my life too deeply into the local Scientology community such that my livelihood was dependent on staying connected – but when I walked away in 2009 there were some “friends” who couldn’t get their disconnection texts / emails off fast enough.

    One in particular that stands out is the wife of a local member still in who had obviously been briefed at her place of work, Executive Software, that I was now a bad hat. No “what’s the story Martin?” or pleasantries – just a straight short disconnection note. This was the same woman who, some years earlier when her “Clear” husband had been beating her up and was terrified, called me in the middle of the night to come and help – which of course I did, driving straight down from South London where I lived to East Grinstead.

    Another one which stands out was the mother of my eldest daughter’s best friend. I had told her in no uncertain terms that I was about to leave, and that whatever happened disconnection must not impact on our kids’ friendship. She assured me it wouldn’t, and regaled me stories of how she and her husband were being relentlessly pursued for money and she had had enough. Not only did she disconnect and not allow our respective daughters to meet any more, she has now even stopped her own daughter from replying to my girl’s letters! Without a word of explanation. My daughter still, over 3 years later sometimes cries herself to sleep and cannot possibly understand.

    There are many other mini-stories I could relate, but the common theme with all of them is that deep down they all know that there is something cancerous and sinister at the heart of “their” organisation – and many know a lot more than that – but live in fear and under the mind-control. I don’t feel anything much for them except maybe a little pity – they will all find the sunlight eventually one way or another.

    • PreferToBeAnon2

      “the common theme with all of them is that deep down they all know that
      there is something cancerous and sinister at the heart of “their”
      organisation….they will all find the sunlight eventually one way or another.”

      ^^^This and the BFG family are beacons of hope. Keep the survival and personal conviction stories coming–it gets dark in the Bunker sometimes. Live well!

    • Poison Ivy

      So sad about your daughter. What a lesson for a kid to learn, about the terrible things people do to one another.

    • BuryTheNuts2

      I am so sorry for your daughter. Losing a friend, family member or anyone because of this ridiculous
      control mechanism is awful. There is a cruelty in disconnection that just breaks my heart for every Scientologist there is.
      I have never understood how people can discard other people like used tissues.
      I understand the mindfuck,…but understanding it doesn’t make it any less horrible.
      I hope someday your daughters friend realizes how wrong this all is and makes amends.

      • VickiStubing

        Amends but NOT in the A-to-E sense.

        • BuryTheNuts2

          No, just in the humanity sense.

          • clam_in_a_halfshell

            That’s the only sense that matters.

    • Douglas D. Douglas

      I am so sorry to hear that this affected your child. Adults really do have a choice, and understand the consequences. Visiting this on a child is a whole other matter. Just despicable.

    • ThetaBara

      That sucks. Glad you are out and your daughter is safe.

  • ” what’s the worst case of disconnection that you’ve heard about?”

    Every single one.

    • ThetaBara

      Disconnection is SO Why!
      Love your posts BTW.

      Freedom IS right outside the door.

      Freeloader debt IS illegal.

      You CAN reconnect with lost family and friends.

      Don’t route out. Just blow.

  • PreferToBeAnon2

    Claire, I’m so proud that you and Mark stayed strong and believed in
    each other. You have a lovely family and strong friends to show for
    it. Now, THAT is pulling it in! Your new website idea is fabulous and please let us know when it is up!

    May all 25,000 $cientologists left in the world come down with a head cold concurrently.

  • I am unaware of any HCO PL, cancelled or not, that ever cancelled the policy of disconnection. There is an HCO PL cancelling the policy of declaring someone Fair Game, but a later PL clarifies that nothing in the Fair Game cancellation PL changes any policy on how SPs are treated (e.g., must be disconnected from). The only practice that was cancelled was the policy of declaring SPs to be Fair Game as, according to the PL, it causes PR flaps.

    • Scientia

      HCO PL 15 Nov 68 “Cancellation of Disconnection”.

      • FistOfXenu

        Now word clearing “cancellation” ..
        Cancellation: n. [6] when applied to Bulletins, PLs and other issues by LRH, cancellation is [a] a PR exercise or [b] 1 of LRH’s private little jokes that he shares with the troops from time to time or most often [c] both. What? You thought you could really cancel any LRH issue and get away with it? WHAT ARE YOUR CRIMES? Report to Ethics you SP!

        • Observer

          It’s a metaphor.

    • What was cancelled was the use of the words “fair game”; they still did it, just didn’t call it that. Similarly I thought there was some policy letter saying the WORD “disconnection” shouldn’t be used anymore (but the practice didn’t change).

  • Okay, I’m by no means a photoshop expert and it’s been YEARS since I’ve been seriously into photography, but what I noticed was that the shadows on the porch are different lengths in all the pictures and reflections in the windows change in each picture.

    Is the graffiti shopped? *shrug* But I do think the photos were taken at different times.

  • media_lush

    I wonder what goes through a scion’s mind when (if?) they word clear “ethical”; does their brain implode or something?

    • BuryTheNuts2

      Language and words are a funny thing. As soon as you need to use other words and descriptions to define a word you begin to subtlety change the meaning and it becomes more and more nebulous the deeper it goes.
      Defining the word “the” is one of the hardest things you can ever do if you choose to think about it hard enough.
      (Trust me and don’t!)

      • media_lush

        There was an episode of QI in the UK where one of the comedian guests said something similar but for the word “a” and Stephen Fry said something like “oh for christ’s sake….” and rattled off a perfect description immediately. ‘The’ for me is quite easy as I just look at it as the word that goes before a noun. Without looking it up a word like ‘either’ is a lot harder to define.

        • BuryTheNuts2

          Lol, I have been trying to word clear “the” since Jr. High.
          I am not even going to try “either”.

        • “‘The’ for me is quite easy as I just look at it as *the* word that goes before a noun.”
          You used “the” in the definition of “the”. So in order to understand that definition you have to read the definition of “the” again, infinitely.

          • BuryTheNuts2

            Winks at you!

            I warned ya’ll not to go there.
            “The” can lead to an all time epic word chain of MU’s!

      • Douglas D. Douglas

        Hey, we have a former President who wasn’t certain about the word “is.”

        • BuryTheNuts2

          Well that depends on what your definition of “is” is….
          hehehe

    • Vistaril

      You’ve hit upon a vital aspect of understanding Scientology and cults in general. One of the key manipulation devices is the transformation of language. There are all sorts of learned documents on how it works but the short version is: change a person’s language and you change the way they think. When it comes to “Ethics” here’s some of the material a Scientologist reads when word-clearing the concept:

      ETHICS, 1. the term is used to denote ethics as a subject, or the
      use of ethics, or that section of a Scientology Church which
      handles ethics matters. (BTB 12 Apr 72R) 2. ethics actually
      consist, as we can define them now in On, of rationality toward
      the highest level of survival for the individual, the future race,
      the group, and mankind, and the other dynamics taken collectively.
      Ethics are reason. The highest ethic level would be
      long-term survival concepts with minimal destruction, along any
      of the dynamics. (SOS, p. 128) 3. ethics has to do with a code of
      agreement amongst people that they will conduct themselves in
      a fashion which will attain to the optimum solution of their
      problems. (5008C30) 4. the rules or standards governing the
      conduct of the members of a profession. (RCO PL 3 May 72) 5.
      ethics is a personal thing. By definition, the word means “the
      study of the general nature of morals and the specific moral
      choices to be made by the individual in his relationship with
      others.” (AHD) When one is ethical or “has his ethics in” it is by
      his own determination and is done by himself. (HCOB 15 Nov 72
      II) 6. that which is enforced by oneself, his belief in his own
      honor, and good reason, and optimum solution along the eight
      dynamics. (PDC 37)

      ^^^^ L Ron Hubbard Technical Dictionary (1987)

      Can you count the number of twisted concepts and hours of mind-fucking processing required for that gobbledeegook to make clear sense? Start with the “greatest good” dynamic and work from there.

      • Captain Howdy

        This is my favorite definition of scientology “ethics”.

        “In plain English, the purpose of Scientology ‘ethics’ is to eliminate opponents, then eliminate people’s interests in things other than Scientology. In this ‘ethical’ environment, Scientology would be able to impose its courses, philosophy, and ‘justice system’ — its so-called technology — onto society.”
        –Prof Stephen A Kent, Marburg Journal of Religion, Sept 2003

      • media_lush

        good grief

        • You took the words out of my mouth. What a mind-boggling load of claptrap.

      • richelieu jr

        I was just listening to an episode of Radiolab on religious fanaticism, and the Muslim guy was saying that when he was being indoctrinated his brother kept saying to him, ‘Have you noticed how much your vocabulary has declined since you started this nonsense? You used to have rich vocabulary. now you fall back on the same catchphrases and buzzwords all the time…”

        I’ve actually noticed the same thing with some family members and FoxNews. They use catchphrases as if they were reasoned arguments…

        • media_lush

          Fox News is my favourite oxymoron

  • Vistaril

    Disconnection is certainly a toxic aspect of the PTS/SP Doctrine, but it is as equally toxic as other aspects. Once a person has been declared an SP they become “fair game”, although the use of that term was stopped. For an idea of how toxic the PTS/SP Doctrine and its concomitant “fair game” condition can be – without regard to the disconnection aspect – consider the consequences for people like Paulette Cooper, Jim Berry, Gabe Cazares, John McMaster, David Mayo, and Gerry Armstrong, et al. I do not want in way to detract from agony of intra-family disconnection, but the wider applications of the PTS/SP Doctrine provide the justification of much of Scientology’s criminal activity designed to protect the central and on-going fraud which lies at its core. As to whether or not “disconnection was cancelled”, well, ask any Scientologist what L Ron Hubbard’s scripture says about maintaining contact with someone who has been declared an SP. While the decision to disconnect may be presented as the wish of the individual, the consequences of their Scientology processing via auditing leaves that same individual in no doubt that by choosing not to disconnect they will themselves be declared SP thus putting at risk their eternity. Extortion, I call it, [/rant]

    As to the graffiti – nah – that’s the work of Scientology itself. The shooping possibility always seemed very flimsy to me and the negative, pretty much, rules it out. Also, how else can Scientology manipulate the HE&R required to garner sympathy from wog authorities if they can’t actually show them the stark “reality” of how they are victimsed. Remember also, Scientology is, and always has been, “at war” and, as L Ron Hubbard said, the first art of war is deception.

    • FistOfXenu

      “the wish of the individual” “personal choice” blah blah blah. You ever see how fast individual wishes and personal choice change when you hold a gun to somebody’s head or jack their arm up their back?
      No I won’t disconnect from my own family!
      You’ll lose your eternity!
      My family? My family’s $cientarCONon!
      See? That wasn’t so hard. Now just write the letter and send it.

  • OTWhat?

    The church says otherwise, but disconnection is not a “personal choice.” A Scientologist cannot say “no thanks, I don’t want to disconnect.” That has never happened.

    Well, actually it has happened. And THAT person gets declared…. and so it goes.

  • Poison Ivy

    “Some, we believe, have now been under this bizarre method of control for about nine years — prisoners of an office complex, in the United States of America. Truly, it’s incredible.”

    Perfectly said, Tony O. In America. That’s what gets me. Not North Korea. Not Communist Russia or China. Not Saddam’s Iraq. America.
    And he gets away with it because it’s a “religion.”
    It pretty much sums up what’s wrong with this country in a sentence. Not to mention what’s wrong with Scientology – why we’re all here.
    Great post, TO & Claire.

    • media_lush

      It’s always been about control…. this little thing popped on my Facebook feed, thought I’d share it.

      • richelieu jr

        Scientology had nothing on Medieval Christianity, that’s for sure. If you were excommunicated, you lost the right to own property or sign contracts IN THE ENTIRE KNOWN WORLD. Not to mention your ‘eternity’..

        I hate $cientology and find it to me a sickening virus in the form of a religion, like AIDS it tricks the organism (read ‘society’) into mistaking it for something accepted (I nearly said ‘healthy’, but I meant ‘Religion’) long enough to metastasize and spread… Little by little it takes over, killing the host…

        So I a not defending when I say– yes, modern Christianity (near-oxymoron there), et al, accept debate, but it took them the better part of 1,800 years to get there.

      • Douglas D. Douglas

        I do not ask people to “respect religion because people believe in it.” Nor do I ask people to respect religion in general. I do ask people to respect the beliefs of others. But I do not expect that “respect” falls into the realm of mindless acceptance. You can disagree and even criticize with complete respect.

      • FLUNK_101

        Richard Dawkins rocks. He’s one of my intellectual heroes. I am not completely opposed to religion, but Dawkins is an atheist I admire. He has a lot of very intelligent things to say on the subject of “beliefs.” Thank you Media Lush for bringing him into the mix. Who’s Timothy Davener? That’s his writing?

        • media_lush
        • monkeyknickers

          I seriously would have sex with him just on principal, so much joy and comfort has this man given me. Ditto David Attenborough. I wonder if octogenarians are into quickly expanding single pregnant ladies. Well – whatever. I’m up for it. 🙂

          • Missionary Kid

            Maybe the down arrows are from someone who’s ultra-religious or a prude.

  • It’s amazing to me that DM & others in Church Management could get away with simply “declaring” someone an SP after an argument or a failed task, or threaten someone with declaration as a tool to get them to behave; as LRH described a process of “Comm Ev” to carefully evaluate a person. Scientologists I’ve debated with even defend the practice of on-the-spot declaration and don’t see the contradiction.
    That this goes on shows how broken Scientology is.

  • John P.

    Interestingly, disconnection defines not only fundamentalist religious cults like Scientology and others, but it also is a key retention tool for criminal gangs and terrorist organizations. A while ago, I read a book called “Radical, Religious, and Violent: The New Economics of Terrorism” by economist Eli Berman. He points out that many terrorist organizations start out as noble, charitable organizations but when money trouble hits, they mutate.

    One of the ways all the major terrorist organizations keep members is through the policy of disconnection, cutting people off from family members to keep them loyal to the group. Of course, in terrorist organizations, the form of “disconnection” practiced for actual members that no longer believe in the organization’s goals is a bit more … final … than that practiced by Scientology against its disaffected members. But that is merely a difference of degree rather than a difference in kind.

    • Poison Ivy

      Chliing.

    • I know another cult which is as evil as Scientology in its practice of disconnection.

      A friend at work had told me that his parents had become Exclusive Brethren, a fundamentalist Christian group, and because he wouldn’t join their church, had shunned him.

      Surprised to see him with a long face a few days after his wife had given birth to their first child, he told me that he’d rung his mother to tell her the news, hoping this might reunite the family.

      “Mum, you’ve now got a grandson!”

      “I don’t have a grandson, nor do I have a son. Goodbye.”

      One reason why Scientology never gained any traction in New Zealand was because of a general abhorrence to its vicious practice of disconnection which occasioned a commission of inquiry making it it clear that disconnection must cease or action would be taken against the organization.

      And of course, the Church of Scientology cannot exist without the power of destroying family and friend relationships.

      ‘THE COMMISSION OF INQUIRY INTO THE HUBBARD SCIENTOLOGY ORGANISATION IN NEW ZEALAND’

      http://www.xenu.net/archive/audit/nzhome.html

      […]

      The commission feels that for the future Scientology should regard as indispensable certain rules of practice. These are:

      . No reintroduction of the practice of disconnection.

      . No issue of Suppressive Person or Declaration of Enemy orders by any member to any other member of a family.

      . No auditing or processing or training of anyone under the age of 21 without the specific written consent of both parents; such consent to include approval of the fees (which shall be specified) to be charged for the course or courses to which the consent is applicable.

      . A reduction to reasonable dimensions of “promotion” literature sent through the post to individuals, and prompt discontinuance of it when this is requested.

      If Scientology in New Zealand has regard to these rules of practice no further occasion for Government or public alarm should arise in respect of those of its manifestations with which this inquiry was concerned.

      […]

      Andrew

      • aquaclara

        Very wise Kiwis.

      • Observer

        I’ve read about the horrendous things the Exclusive Brethren have done in Australia and NZ. Just the name would be a huge red flag to me. “Exclusive” smacks of arrogance, isolation and control.

      • Captain Howdy

        New Zealand had a reputation as a mecca for new age nuttiness, but you guys seem to have dealt with the scientology cult better than a lot of other countries…my home is still giving these rabid doggies a bone…on demand.

    • FLUNK_101

      Disconnection is the worst.
      No one loves you more than your parents.
      Speaking of parents, I used to work for a guy named Michael Karp , who had a recording studio called 39th Street Music . He read Madman or Messiah, and we had a lot of laughs talking about Scientology! His son David, who I met as a child , just sold Tumblr for 1.1 billion dolla

    • Get Chutney Love

      Yes, the Chinese triads and tongs originally started as ‘patriotic’ associations set up to fight the Manchu invaders who took over in 1644. After some time, they evolved into criminal organizations. Chaing kai-Shek was a member of the Green Dragon Tong, and they kidnapped his then-fiance when he didn’t show respect to the head of the organization in Shanghai, China, back in the 1930s.

    • monkeyknickers

      Money is the root of all evil John P?

      🙂

      • John P.

        I see the :-).

        But taking the question seriously may be a teachable moment. I think the issue is not money itself, but the attitude that positive money flow is evidence of God’s favor and approval for what you’re doing. This is the attitude in some flavors of Christianity, including the Puritans, that God will give you signs that you are in the “elect” (i.e., those who are going to heaven) that you can interpret in this lifetime. So if you are rich, it is because God has bestowed special favor on you. This is not at all specific to Christianity; I think it’s in many religions.

        So a religious organization starts off, they do their thing, and money flows in. They do a little more of that and more money flows in. Then they start to think that the money is evidence that God is smiling on their enterprise. Then for whatever reason, the money doesn’t come in as fast. They think it is evidence that they have lost God’s favor. At this point, fundamentalist religions veer off from other religions: in fundamentalist religions, one of the basic mindset differences is the principle (often unconscious) that “if it doesn’t work, do more of it.” Other groups re-calibrate what they’re doing. But fundamentalists tend to do more of what doesn’t work. So that is how they get more violent and get more dangerous — to get back into the graces of God after they have fallen out of favor (as they imagine it in their minds).

        As far as capitalism goes, we capitalists understand that money is fuel, exactly like the gas in your tank. The goal, which is a good thing for investors and a good thing for society, is to allocate capital to the things that will bring the most return on investment, just like if you are a driver, you want the most miles per gallon consistent with comfort, cargo capacity and the other requirements you have of your car. Those of us who succeed over the long term cannot think like fundamentalists. If what we are doing is not working, we had damned well better not do more of it, we had better do something different. Otherwise, we will be out of the game.

        Incidentally, the above paragraph is not my attempt to argue in favor of the laissez faire crap that got us in trouble in the 2008 credit crunch and in countless other market meltdowns stretching back over the centuries. I do not trust this industry to self-regulate. I would like more regulation, and far better enforcement of existing rules as well as new ones. I really like Sen. Elizabeth Warren and her message of holding banks accountable. They have enriched themselves by stacking the decks in ways that cost me money every day as an investor. I personally would be happy (and richer) if the SEC got 10x the budget and if the DoJ put 10x the number of white collar criminals in jail.

        • Missionary Kid

          The scam artists and the people who want to stack the deck against the truly competitive system must HATE Elizabeth Warren.

        • monkeyknickers

          My life is a long string of teaching moments. 🙂 I welcome them.

          But.

          Your argument only makes sense if you (one) accepts modern capitalism as the one and only “framework” and paradigm for society. Gas is a good example. I live in LA and pay 4.20 a gallon. We all bitch and moan about it. Then someone says, “well, that’s the market for you. They have us over a barrel and we’ll pay for it. The nature of capitalism.” And then we all nod our heads brokenly in agreement, agreeing – ” Yep, that’s the inevitable and only social structure that exists, and we’re destined to be fucked.” It has the same ring of unthinking resignation as when people greet the news of an unexpected loved one’s death with, “Ah well, it’s not for us to wonder why. God has a reason.”

          Capitalism is a construct, with – as Hubbard himself put it – “axioms that are demonstrably true.” Of course it works. So do nuclear bombs, but we none of us want to weave them irrevocably into the fabric of daily life and how we regulate morality.

          Also, I sometimes think that it all went horribly wrong when we learned to be abstract thinkers about exchange.

          Also ALSO keep in mind that I never went to college and have distinct difficulties figuring out how to open the childproof cap on Ashleen’s eczema meds.

          Just a thought.

          🙂

          • BuryTheNuts2

            Uh huh, you also said your brain was the size of a cashew!
            Miss liar!!!

            • monkeyknickers

              I never lie BTN! 🙂

              I consulted with the fetuses on this one. They’ve been discussing a ton of social philosophy and stuff recently. I mean, they’re together 24/7 and you have to do SOMETHING while you’re cooling your heels growing a spleen or two.

              You should see them at scrabble !

          • John P.

            I am not a “religious” believer in capitalism like some of these “free market” types. I’m much more pragmatic. Other economic systems that have been tried have typically collapsed into smoldering rubble fairly quickly and demonstrably work less well.

            Regarding the resignation issue around fuel prices: people always have a choice in their actions. If one doesn’t like the price of gas, then the short term choice is not to drive somewhere. When I lived in the suburbs and gas prices started to ramp up around 2002 or 2003, I started to notice just how often I got in the car and drove 6 or 8 miles round trip for some stupid errand. When you figure that total cost per mile of owning a car is around $1.00 (way more if you drive a Capitalist Roader mobile like I do), I was shelling out $10 or $12 to go to Dunkin Donuts to buy treats for the family for Saturday morning breakfast. We started keeping a grocery list and planning the day so that we drove fewer miles. As a result, even though I lived up in the green leafy hills a long way from shopping, my annual mileage dropped from 15,000 to slightly more than half that. And my lifestyle didn’t change.

            Longer-term, one can buy a smaller car (I drive a gas-guzzling Suburban for vacations, a Prius around town, and a whole stable of “supermodel magnets” when I want to see and be seen at the waterfront estate; the Prius gets the most use). One can also move to an area where one can walk to stores (hard to imagine in LA, but eminently possible in some parts of town as the West Side gets more crowded). It turns out that if global demand for gasoline drops by just a few percent due to conservation or due to the Chinese economy blowing up, gas prices will quickly drop to about $2.50 or $2.75, which is the inflation-adjusted price that has been relatively constant for the last 30 or 40 years until the commodity bubble of the last few years.

            You are exactly right: it is very tough to be an “abstract thinker about exchange.” That’s why a lot of the paranoid right want to return to the gold standard, which would be a complete and utter disaster for the global economy: they are uncomfortable with money that doesn’t have some “intrinsic value.” As you point out, capitalism is a construct; money is even more a manufactured idea than capitalism. It turns out, however, that the field of “behavioral economics” has shown that people do actually have innate sense to make rational economic decisions in many areas. Where it gets foggy is that most people have very little idea what the true cost is of the most expensive stuff they buy in life.

            Most people, for example, have no idea how much it costs per mile to drive; they think it’s only the gas. I have worked out how much per mile it costs for each of my cars (only takes about a half hour to do on one piece of paper) so I can easily say whether it’s worth it or not to run over to New Jersey to shop the sale on Brioni suits at the Neiman Marcus at the Short Hills mall (with the Holland Tunnel toll now at $13.00, it is almost never worth going to New Jersey just on principle, unless you have front row seats at a Springsteen concert).

      • Missionary Kid

        Actually, the correct biblical quote is, “The love of money is the root of all evil.”

  • richelieu jr

    I in no way want to demean her intellect, storytelling ability, amazing life-experiences and lovely family, but it must be said- – That Claire Headley is a real cutey!

    • BuryTheNuts2

      She is the whole package, isn’t she?

      Of course, so is Marc.

      If I ever get my cloning lab back up and working (after the explosion)…I am going to make all of us bunker women their very own Marc!

      • You’ll have to send one my way so I can take some time off!

        • BuryTheNuts2

          Ha! Busted.

      • ThetaBara

        Much as I adore Marc, one husband is plenty for me!

  • Off topic: Are the buildings at the Int. compound subject to California building fire codes?

    • Ze Moo

      All buildings in any legal jurisdiction are subject to building and fire codes. Many buildings are ‘grandfathered’ in for some things like sprinklers and thickness of insulation. The new Portland Idle morg spent a lot on ‘earthquake proofing’ the structure.

      Photos of the Hemet compound show a lot of different roof types. I have no idea if they are compliant with current codes. ‘Grandfathered’ in perhaps???

      • In the mention of the hole today I thought about the windows being barred and all exits blocked save one with any number of people in occupancy at one time. I recall someone mentioning ( I believe it was D.D.D.) that for the opening of the Portland org. the fire code might be questioned. I wondered if anyone had tried that with the hole.

        • BuryTheNuts2

          The bars and blocks have been removed from the hole.

      • Missionary Kid

        The problem with any building on the compound being inspected is that first, a complaint has to be lodged, or that code enforcement has reason to believe that building or remodeling has taken place without a permit then, second, getting access.

        For the original Golden Era Productions movie studio that LRH had out in the Coachella Valley (I can’t remember off the top of my head if it was in the area of Indio or what city), to get on the property for appraisal was a matter that the Riverside County Assessor’s Office had to ask the sheriff’s department for aid just to get on the property for assessment purposes, and they didn’t know initially that it was a $cion enterprise.

        Can you imagine how many problems a building inspector would have?

        Buildings are only grandfathered in if they were constructed when earlier codes were in effect and no remodeling has taken place and no laws regarding the necessity of upgrades have been passed. (Does that sound legalistic enough to carry my B.S. through?)

  • Xenu, Lord of Kobol

    Rather than comment on such a sad topic, I’d like to share a story that is also sad but one of inspiration.

    The story of a high school senior who, on his way to an inescapable death, provided an outstanding example of how to live life and inspire others.

    http://www.twincities.com/localnews/ci_23281898/zach-sobiech-whose-song-clouds-touched-many-dies

    Clouds by Zach … http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=sDC97j6lfyc

    Celebrity cover … http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=7zxXAtmmLLc (warning … you will see Jenna Elfman)

    • Ze Moo

      Great song.

    • Missionary Kid

      It was announced that he died today.

  • scnethics

    The first time I had to disconnect from someone, and that someone was
    not an evil person in my eyes, I was already prepared for
    it. I told myself that they knew the rules just like I did, and since they had chosen to break those rules, they had chosen to get declared.
    They knew I would have no choice but to disconnect from them, and so
    they had chosen not to be connected to me. And in the future, they would
    have the choice, if they wanted to have me in their life, to take the
    steps to fix their relationship with the church. It’s remarkable how
    once you accept that scientology is good and can’t be wrong, your mind
    will work out for you how it’s OK to do bad things to people.

    It’s important to remember that individual scientologists like me, not “the church”, commit this evil act of disconnection. When I first learned about disconnection, it was in the context of protecting myself from evil, negative people. In time, I learned that someone could be declared a suppressive person without actually being a suppressive person; for something like refusing to disconnect from a declared SP, or temporarily losing their head and joining with critics of scientology. I worked out for myself how this was OK, and “the church” never had to explain it to me. This is the scariest thing about mind control to me: it’s possible to trick someone into controlling themselves, and from then on, they do a really good job of it.

    • richelieu jr

      Excellent and well-said point… It is difficult to not cop out with the ‘I was only following orders’ defense and not accept your personal responsibility….

      The truth abides,however: This starts and ends with you. If refuse to participate, the whole edifice crumbles. All of $cientology is built upon, and in order to, keep people from coming to this realization…

    • aquaclara

      Oh wow. “The first time I had to disconnect from someone…I was already prepared for it.” And of course, they did know the rules, just as you did. From there, it all unfolds. They would have a choice to fix it, of course, as you said. Since you’re following the rules laid out ahead of time. By the COS.
      This looks so logical. And, as you note, your mind works out the next step in the progression, because of course, it’s how it is “supposed to be”. Instead of disconnection, it’s shielding one from evil and negativity. Even when that negativity is well-meaning family and friends who are scared.
      Thanks for sharing this. It’s truly awful, and well, thank heavens you got out.

      • Missionary Kid

        Dipshit downarrow is at it again. Consider it a compliment.

    • Captain Howdy

      Wow is right. Thanks for that excellent explanation and revelation.

    • Missionary Kid

      Have you reconnected with any of the people you disconnected from?

      • scnethics

        I’ve quietly reconnected with people I trust to keep it between us. I’m still “in” as far as most people know and need to keep it that way for a while longer. It is wonderful to reconnect with people, especially the ones you love!

        • BuryTheNuts2

          Good luck to you.
          Shitty position to be in, but as you know…you are among friends.

          • scnethics

            Thank you. This is my warm, comfy spot on the web.

            • q-bird

              You give me much hope scnethics! So good to have you here.

        • Missionary Kid

          Good for you! Isn’t it wonderful to discover that most people, unlike Co$, are forgiving?

          • scnethics

            Definitely. It’s been a voyage of discovery, let me tell you!

            • Missionary Kid

              I wish you the best in your journey. It may not be an easy one.

        • aquaclara

          More, more, more wows. Wishing you much luck as you make your way free. So glad you’re here. If clapping hadn’t gotten such a bad rep, I’d be doing that right now. But you’ll just have to settle for this instead. 🙂
          *jumping for joy*

          • scnethics

            Thanks very much!

        • Missionary Kid

          Oops, I forgot to up arrow you.

        • ThetaBara

          Thank you for taking part here. You have your own mind back now, and actual friends.

    • ThetaBara

      “It’s remarkable how once you accept that scientology is good and can’t be wrong, your mind
      will work out for you how it’s OK to do bad things to people.”
      This, exactly. It’s the Prison of Belief. And it is why we must respond with love. Only love will reach them. Only love CAN reach them.

      • ThetaBara

        Aww. Hi, Downey.
        It isn’t too late.
        You can get out!
        Call 1-866-XSEAORG for help!

  • MarionDee

    It kills me that, in the original Davis piece, “he speaks openly about it [on tape], saying at one point, “It is what works. It is what safeguards the church.” Any church that needs such a policy to safeguard itself isn’t worth the jackboots it’s standing in. (To mix metaphors.)

  • turkeybrain

    I am lucky to have no family in the “church.” When I came out publicly as an ex scilon, my scilon “friends” all disconnected from me. Good riddance … I have plenty of friends now who are also exes and others who were never in the cult. But I do feel for those with family members whose lives are impacted by disconnection.

  • aquaclara

    Every story about disconnection rips me apart. I hate that the COS has been using this to keep people under their complete control, and I hate the destruction we see done to kids, to moms and dads and to families. We see it here with the Bunkerites who have suffered, too.
    Claire, thanks for your powerful words. I look forward to your website. I hope, too, that you and Marc get reunited with your families – they are missing out on something great.

  • Ms. B. Haven

    “when a Scientologist is found to be a “Potential Trouble Source” — for something as seemingly innocuous as a head cold — they are expected to identify which “Suppressive Person” is causing the upset. An “SP” might be a family member who refuses to get involved in Scientology and criticizes the church.”

    In my experience this is a very generous interpretation of an SP. When I was a lowly ethics officer at a lowly mission in the early 80’s, an SP was easily interpreted as being someone who just didn’t take an interest in scientology. For example, if a student on a beginning course was determined to be PTS because they had the sniffles, ‘their SP’ could be someone who just didn’t share their interest in the newfound subject that they were studying. If ‘their SP’ wasn’t interested in scientology’s version of spiritual salvation then they must be opposed to scientology, therefore they were suppressive.

    This came into full bloom very early in the 80s with the concept of ‘subtle internal suppression’. I have not seen this mentioned on this or any other critic’s website, but I remember it as being one of the wildest rides ever in scientology. I don’t have any insiders details and I probably have the facts wrong, but it went something like this:

    There was a mission-holder in Stevens Creek named Kingsley Wimbush who came up with his version of PTS/SP “tech” that was known as ‘de-dinging’. Someone who felt put off or suppressed somehow was being ‘dinged’ by someone who was suppressing them in some way. It was very difficult to spot this suppression because it was very subtle, hence the phase ‘subtle internal suppression’. Everyone was going around accusing others of dinging them and being dinged. In hindsight it was all pretty hilarious, but if I remember correctly it was about this time that Knowledge Reports were born and scientology became a full blown Stasi clone organization. It was also about this time that the infamous Mission Holders Conference in San Francisco took place and David Miscaviage started to make his move to get where he is today.

    I would love to hear from someone more in the know about this era and these events. Perhaps Jon Atack will cover it with appropriate detail and insight to get the facts right, but from my perspective it is the defining moment that makes scientology what it is today; more fucked up than it was even back then.

    • Bleuler

      ‘subtle internal suppression’ sounds a bit like Thoughtcrime to me. Pity the amazing book 1984 is not part of the recommended curriculum for clams, it describes so many things in their organization.

      • BuryTheNuts2

        That is probably because 1984 is where Hubbard stole half of his policy day-ta!

        • Captain Howdy

          Hubbard thought 1984 was a “How To” manual.

          • Christopher Hitchens once suggested that Kim Il-Sung must have read 1984 and thought “Hmmm, I wonder if that could really work?”

  • Mighty Korgo of Teegeeack

    I have had “suppressive” explained to me three different ways by an executive while he was in good standing. One explanation was that a suppressive is a person who was anti-Scientology. A second was someone mentally trapped in a horrible, earlier incident. The last was, “like Hitler”. The three explanations are not mutually exclusive.

    I eventually came to realize that the last definition made sense and that Scientology is a suppressive organization. Its leaders are like Hitler, Goebbels, Goering and the crowd. If Scientology ever got any real power, they would make Nazi Germany look like a minor shift in the history of modern warfare.

    I know only one former executive. He is as charming a man as you could ever meet. He also did horrible, destructive things while a member of the cult. I won’t go into what they are because I don’t wish to identify him. He spent a lot of time in the RPF. Now, a formal jail sentence might have been more sensible, but that didn’t happen. Was the RPF, in his case, unjust, I mean while looking at the larger picture, in a societal context? The people who put him in the RPF were more criminal than he was, but he committed his acts in the name of Scientology, using their methods. Wog justice failed us, but psychoDavey was there, helping the world by punishing him just the same. Am I making sense here?

    I am sure some of the other execs are meritorious individuals but they are “like Hitler” for what they are doing to people. I remember the line from “The Producers”, “Not many people know it, but the Fuhrer was a terrific dancer”. The point being, nobody SHOULD care if Hitler was a terrific dancer. I like that Heber Jentzsch is rotting in some Scientology jail. I would like it even more if he was rotting in Spain where he was handcuffed and would have been tried for his actions had he not skipped bail, but I can’t have everything.

    Anyway, I am not surprised that David Miscavige is identified by PTSs as an SP. He is an SP under the “like Hitler” definition. But I think that the primary result of L.Ron’s gift to mankind, is turning people into paranoid, aggressive, misdirected individuals who will stop at nothing to get their way. Many of the others, perhaps most of the others who are following L.Ron’s orders are SPs too. They have neither Miscavige’s power as the custodian of Scientology or his responsibility to keep convincing the governments of the world that a criminal enterprise is simply a religion. If other executives had that role, some of them would do things that could make Miscavige look like a choir boy.

    I understand that Tom Cruise is another terrific dancer. Travolta too, for that matter.

    • Missionary Kid

      I just pictured short TC dancing with a much taller JT in drag, and laughed.

    • John P.

      Regarding that former executive who “is as charming a man as you could ever meet” now, but was a brutal, amoral sadist when in the cult: I am presuming that he is Canadian. Given the stereotypical politeness that is part and parcel of being Canadian, can you imagine what a sociopath he would have been like if he were American?

      • Mighty Korgo of Teegeeack

        Hi, John. Thanks for the thought provoking comment. My friend was very charming within the cult as well as before he was in the cult (and he continues to be charming today). I am not sure that he was amoral, but I am sure that his morals were distinctly lacking. Brutal wouldn’t be the word for him but he did a lot of things that hurt people. I don’t want to be overly general but he wants his interaction with all that is Scientology to be completely finished. If I said much more he would be identified and a little part of his personal nightmare would start again. I have to respect his desire to stay away from both sides of the issue. He is managing very well in a world where the word Scientology just never comes up.

        I think “sociopath” is wog-speak for suppressive. The word has become a too frequent part of the lexicon in the last decade or so. It seems to mean equal parts charm and something, almost anything, the accuser doesn’t like. I know there are horrible people in the world who will use every path available to take people for, if possible, everything they have. But the word sociopath can’t be used lightly even in describing them. I think, had my friend been born American, his charm might have taken on a different colour but I don’t know if it would have been greater or lesser.

        As with Tory Magoo, Mark and Claire Headley, Jason Beghe and a hundred others, I am just glad he has left, and not just for his own sake. It is harder to fight an organization that is chock-a-block with intelligent, charming, hard-working people. The above mentioned are on our side now. My friend would love to see Scientology crushed like a walnut under a flatiron, but he has spent enough of his life interacting with it. At this point he just wants to be off living in peace.

        Anyway, I am trying to explain myself more fully while sticking to certain generalities. Your comment is not only welcome, but I feel honoured by your reply. Your comments are always top rated because they are consistently the most interesting and illuminating ones on the blog.

        To reply to your statement in a simpler and shorter way, “Yeah, and think what a sociopath he would have been had he not only been an American, but a New Yorker!”

        • ThetaBara

          Sociopaths are, sadly, very real. Their definiig trait is a lack of empathy. You know, the kind of kids who like to pull the wings off of flies.
          (Although, like most things I do think it is a spectrum.)

    • ThetaBara

      ALL of them are SPs, as long as they are promoting the cult and working towards its nefarious goals.

      • Mighty Korgo of Teegeeack

        When I became a member there was a certain point where I started to lie. I lied to my brother about what Scientology was about when I went it. I lied to a friend about my experiences when I was in. I was prepared to lie to wogs-on-the-street when they made me a body router. On that last one, I was instructed to do so by the division head. I think when I started lying I became something more than a poor sucker, taken in at a weak moment in his life. Looking back, I have be be responsible for what I did when it was no longer L.Ron lying, but me. I was an SP at that point.

        I am not one now. I’d like to think I have made up for my deceptions and have become a force for good. Since that time, many years ago, I have never urged anyone to disconnect, buy a course, be audited or seek an unrealistic goal through Scientology. I also refrain from kicking dogs, stealing candy from corner stores, defacing walls (even ones owned by the cult) and stealing money from collection plates.

    • FistOfXenu
      • Mighty Korgo of Teegeeack

        Thanks. A white suit and it would be Travolta.

        • FistOfXenu

          This is 1 of his later films? 🙂

  • aquaclara

    For the people at the Tucson mission, they are doing a very thorough job fixing the damage caused by an irresponsible and seemingly irate visitor. Over and over again. This looks like a small mission, and to have to both confront the hate that’s expressed in the messages plus the clean-up work, well, that’s not what anyone would describe as a good day at the office.
    Defacing a building is NOT going to persuade anyone to leave. It just makes people angry. Now, STAY AWAY from the birds.

  • Disconnection is a terrible practice that ruins families and lives. There are many things I find horrible about the business of Scientology, but I find their disconnection policy particularly despicable. Scientology will never get rid of the policy because disconnection is key in being able to manipulate their parishioners. Scientology must continue to try and keep it’s followers in the dark about the truth regarding LRH, the tech, COB, mass defections, etc…. I don’t see how this strategy will work over time as we have already seen a steady stream of Scientologists (SO, Staff and Public) blowing for good.

  • Douglas D. Douglas

    This article was in the LA Times just yesterday. It’s about a young woman who fled the Westboro Baptist Church, and how she is dealing with disconnection from her family. As I was reading it on line I immediately thought of Disconnection– and here’s Tony’s post today.

    http://www.latimes.com/news/nationworld/nation/columnone/la-na-westboro-church-defector-20130519-dto,0,7242930.htmlstory

    • Ian

      Disconnection is very common tactic in all kinds of religious movements. It is practised by everyone from the Amish to Jehovah’s Witnesses to ISKON (Hare Krishnas), even for many evangelical Christians. When I lost my faith, my wife (at the time a relatively liberal evangelical) said that she knew she was supposed to leave me, but couldn’t bring herself too (she left evangelicalism instead).

      It is usually dressed up in purity and solidarity language. How can you remain pure and focussed on the mission, if you’re surrounded by satanic voices?

      It is a pretty obvious mechanism of control that has left millions of relationships in tatters.

      • Douglas D. Douglas

        I am sorry that you and your wife were put through this. I have been involved in a couple of different Christian religions over the years, and none of them have ever required any shunning of any kind. The scripture about being “unequally yoked” is usually cited for seeking relationships– not to dissolve an existing one. If anything, the churches to which I have belonged have advised the believer to remain in the marriage and uphold their partner in prayer.

        I belong to a small accountability group now. One couple has been very upset over their daughter’s decision to live with, then marry, someone outside the faith. We all counseled them to accept her decision, love her new husband, and provide a Christlike example.

        Christians are called to be Christlike. I cannot recall Christ ever disconnecting from anyone.

      • Bella Legosi

        I have always felt that if a religion engaged in any type of disconnection they have some major fundamental problems with their core beliefs and severe distrust in the flock and potential adherents. Cuz if only takes some silver tongue sentences to “confront and shatter” a person’s faith……….maybe just maybe………that faith really isn’t worth it. Cuz if you really are a true believer in any Kool Aid, what those say should hardly matter, unless what is being said is pure truth. I know I would trade in any Kool Aid for a nice glass of aged Truth!

        • BuryTheNuts2

          I feel the same way about a nice crisp Reisling.

      • FistOfXenu

        That’s ALL kinds of fundies. An old buddy of mine, not a religious guy, got involved with the Tea Party when it started out. From there they joined some other right wing weird shit too. I didn’t know any of this til I said something about some nutjob he was watching ranting on the TV. The conversation got real chilly after that, and that day was the last time we met up. Him and his wife wouldn’t even take calls after that. Always busy.

        But then last summer I got a call. His wife was asking us over for Thanksgiving. When we got there we were early. It wasn’t because we got there too soon, it was because they asked us over ] earlier than everybody else. Long story short, they wanted to apologize. They got all tied up in just about every right wing extremist bullshit you can think of and even though they never got religion they swallowed the rest of Teh Crazy going. You know, Obama is a muslim, no wait he’s a commie, no wait, he’s a nazi, no you’re wrong, he’s all 3 at once, and oh yeah he’s gay and he hates black people and he’s not even an American, and on and on. They went for all of it. And even though never got religion they even believed the guys that were saying God predicted this guy or that guy should be elected.

        The thing that finally did it for them was when some of these people started saying that Obama stole the election and the way to deal with it was “the 2nd amendment remedy” I think they called it. That woke them up and they started seeing the rest of it.

        What you said about purity and solidarity language is why I’m telling this here now. When I asked my friends why they cut us off, they said it was because they got the idea from some of the people they knew that if they kept mixing with the wrong people they’d get their ideas confused and watered down and they’d start talking like all the spineless liberals they used to be friends with. And it was hinted that they’d be traitors to the Constitution and the country. A slogan they mentioned was that an army can only march to 1 cadence.

        I didn’t ask as many questions as I’d’ve liked. It’s still a tough topic and we don’t mention it any more. They’ll talk when they’re ready. But whatever they got into they finally got out of again.

  • Douglas D. Douglas

    I recall reading or hearing an interview recently in which a defender of the CoS claimed that when dealing with Suppressive Persons, the Church “offers tools” that can be used, but that it is a matter of choice. These are more examples of how language can be used to describe any number of monstrous things in an innocuous manner.

    But it does go to one truth– it IS a choice, ultimately. One can, indeed, choose not to disconnect. The consequence, of course, is to be cut off from the CoS. That’s the choice.

    • Bella Legosi

      I asked Bury the other day that according to the guidelines in identifying PTS and SP’s wouldn’t everyone in OSA be considered PTS due to exposure to entheata and SPs?

      She said that technically yes, but that the church prolly bent this policy to meet their own means rather then be fundamental about it. “For the greater good and greater Dynamics” was how she put it.

  • Douglas D. Douglas

    And in the Things That Make You Go Hmmm Dept. Our friends over at the South Coast Mission (where auditor Kara is Disconnected from her heartbroken mother) posted this on their Facebook page last week:

    “So that is the basic lesson that anybody learns in this universe. They learn to keep their mouth shut, and it’s the wrong lesson. When in doubt, talk. When in doubt, communicate.”
    ~L.R.H The Phoenix Lectures

    Yes, Kara’s mom had doubts, she left the CoS and the message they communicated was: You are dead to us.

    Nice.

    https://www.facebook.com/southcoastmission?hc_location=timeline

    • VickiStubing

      Sick twisted disturbed evil monstrous mean offensive perverted scary disgusted vile putrid slime.

      (Boy, are my kids glad I’m not in charge of their vocabulary list this week.)

    • Ze Moo

      I had to slide down 3/4 of the page before I saw it was scientology. Not very upfront and honest.

    • noseinabk

      Scroll down the page and you see congrats to a young girl for doing the purif and again for starting her TR and Objectives.
      🙁

      • noseinabk

        Later in the postings:

        CASH
        for
        GOLD and SILVER
        PARTY!!

        Sell your GOLD and STERLING SILVER for cash!!
        Will beat any written offer by 5%!!!
        March 7, 2013 – 6:00pm to 8:00pm

        Come join us!!!!

  • ThetaBara

    I wanna give a shoutout to Our Bob today. I believe his situation is that he is only still “in” due to family and the disconnection policy. Hi, Bob! I hope you’re ok.

    This is a part of why I have only love for the still-ins. They are trapped. Even that rat bastard Allender. They have quite literally lost their minds and they fear losing their families. 🙁

    • Douglas D. Douglas

      I agree that we should show love to everyone. But Allender doesn’t get quite the same pass, since he engages in such egregious activity against those who disagree with or criticize the CoS.

      • BuryTheNuts2

        I even gotta cut Allender slack.
        If I was a Scientologist, and still on the kool-aid….I would probably be acting like Jenna Elfman!

        • VickiStubing

          No. No. No. Because underneath it all, you are a decent human being. She’s missing something even without the kool-aid.

      • ThetaBara

        True. However, I kinda doubt that this is really what even he joined scientology to do. That’s what really pisses me off the most. They play on people’s good nature and then they twist it around into their evil Bullshitness.

        • ThetaBara

          Hi Downsey.
          Is this really what you joined Scientology to do? And if so, why don’t you just postulate us all away?

      • Douglas D. Douglas

        MY FIRST DOWN ARROW! AT last. I feel like Sally Fields when she won her second Oscar.

        You dislike me. You REALLY dislike me!

    • BuryTheNuts2

      I am with ya sista!

    • monkeyknickers

      All you say is true. All those souls trapped in this bullshit and subsequently guaranteed years of self reflection and shame after they blow. Wonderful system.

  • N. Graham

    My strange tale of disconnection has a happy ending (for me). I had a roommate who was in $cientology and was told to disconnect from me since I was so obviously SP. So he left and moved in with about 12 fellow Scilons and left me with all the utility bills and his portion of the rent. He curtly informed me he would be using the money to go up the Bridge. Unfortunately (for him), his VA check came the next day, a nice one with some extra back pay. And it was sent to his old address-my address. We had mailboxes that had a little window where you could see the contents and his check was there, plain as day. As soon as he found out his check came to my place, he ran over and demanded I open the mailbox (he had turned in his key) which of course I refused to do until he paid me what he owed me. Instant Karma! (I got my money!)

    • juliusstahl

      Wogs rule!

      • Missionary Kid

        You’ve been down-arrowed by a dipshit. Consider it a compliment.

    • Missionary Kid

      Dipshit downarrrow is at it again. That’s a compliment, as far as I’m concerned. 1 down from him = at least 3 ups from everyone else.

      • ThetaBara

        Downey is just misguided. One day he or she will join us!

        • Missionary Kid

          Good point.

  • Although I have never been in Scientology, I have experienced a type of forced disconnection and brainwashing. I know how painful it can be. My heart breaks for Lori and Karen, who have been through hell and back because of Scientology disconnection policy. I can’t wait for the day, that Scientology implodes upon itself and those that blind can see the truth again.

    • Are you new? Welcome! I’ve never been in any cult (though a friend of mine was love-bombed by Scientology once, he escaped) but we have a woman who lost her husband to Lyndon LaRouche and some veterans of fundamentalist sects. And don’t worry about the down-arrow: Downboy is a Scientology infiltrator who just goes around distributing downvotes randomly some days.

      • No I’m not new, I’ve been here for a very long time. I don’t post as often as I used to but I’m still here,every day, reading everything! Mr. Down Arrow seems to like me. No matter what I post on here, he always gives me a nudge with his arrow! Lol

  • Greg Stoner

    All I can say is I am ready for some updates on the real news- the Garcia’s fraud lawsuit, the latest on Narconon, etc. I’m ready to see this sinking ship straight up and vertical taking on more water while Tiny Fists orders the deck chairs to be straightened some more.

    • TonyOrtega

      Working on it, working on it.

      • Greg Stoner

        I don’t intend to sound greedy asking for more news. You have reported so many stories here lately, that I find myself checking for updates seemingly every hour. There is no site that I visit more on a given day. I appreciate the time and effort you put into this, and I hope you are being compensated accordingly. I look forward to your book. My dream is that my son visits here and stays long enough to learn what he has gotten himself into.

        • BuryTheNuts2

          Ah Man,… good luck to you Greg.

          • Greg Stoner

            Thanks!

        • aquaclara

          Oh, no. another one. So sorry. Hope he knows you’re here for him when he’s ready. Good luck!

    • Legal cases move like molasses until a big day happens once in a while. Tony has spoiled us lately with several bombshell posts in a row but we can’t expect that every day.

  • I’ve said it a billion times but ill say it again,I simply adore Claire. She’s one of the most incredible people I’ve been blessed to know!

  • Davka

    Mostly off topic but kinda not, has Midwest Mom left the Bunker?

  • Bella Legosi

    Off topic here, but I did want to ask those smart people in England or Wales what they think of the new disclosure policy affecting police amd journalists. On Daily Mail they reported that a new rule would compell any police to disclose their friendship or relationship.

    Is this a dressed up response to the Murdock scandel? Just curious. Would love some UK imput!

    • media_lush

      The Daily Mail has a knee-jerk reaction to anything that curbs the Police or smacks of impinging on press freedom. The fact that the terrestrial news barely mentioned it [if at all] goes to show how it’s regarded by the norms [people like me, I hope]. I’ve mentioned before that I like going to the Daily Mail site as it has an open chequebook with regards to its picture budget and is second to none when it come to covering a news story ‘visually’.

      However it’s ideology is a lot to be desired and by keeping total idiot column reporters like Richard Littlejohn and Amanda Platel on it’s books it’ll never be taken seriously for “news”. Those two make Fox look like the BBC.

      There is a vibrant and varied Daily newspaper culture in this country that is unique in the world and it really does run the gamut from left to right. If I have the time I read The Sun, Daily Mirror, Daily Mail and Guardian every day and feel I get a pretty good idea of what’s what.

      News becomes proper news once it hits the the terrestrial broadcasters – Sky, BBC and ITV (Ch 4, barely). Sky is closely watched to make sure of no Murdoch meddling and I can confirm this is the case – it’s definitely more impartial than the BBC which has a left-wing slant if anything.

      Once the former editors of News of The World and others go to trial then this topic will be front and centre of every paper…. right now it’s only the Mail getting it’s panties in a bunch.

      • Bella Legosi

        Many thanks to you sir! Thank you for the perspective. I do love how you commented that in your country you have a very impressive press history! I envy England for that, especially that your country’s news print business are several, instead of how in the US you can count those business on your hand (John P. I am giving Capitalism HQ the evil eye for this >P). I personally get a lot of my news via BBC, Sky, AP, Reuters, AFP. Occasionally I will digest American journalism, but if I want a world wide perspective I go to those (mostly online).

        But I asked an Englander/Wales locals on this topic, because it does strike me quite Draconian to have to report to superiors if you have a friend or family working in the journalism business. Does this also include the occasional freelance journalists and bloggers? Is this being done to ensure a deterrence for media leaks (paid or unpaid)? I am asking rhetorically! I think I need to find me a UK forum! 🙂
        Thanks again Lush! Now where is Hog? I would love your input here as well ya sexy intelligent minx you!

      • Bella Legosi

        And how can you not respect a country where this show was conceived and filmed?

        😀

        http://youtu.be/Rc9BGSsU_ZU

        El Presidente- The Young Ones (MTV UK 80’s)

  • pronoia

    Reading this explanation by Claire — for the 1st time, I understand the “logic” DM uses to lock people up at the Int Base. He is obviously incredibly paranoid that he will be toppled by other execs and he is using this so-called tech or policy or whatever it is to keep anyone who has any knowledge about him or his management isolated from everyone else. Very Stalinesque.

    And totally off-topic, but Katie Holmes has been all over NYC of late filming a new Spike Lee movie called Mania Days. And it is about 2 people with bi-polar disorder who meet in a psyche ward and fall in love etc. Talk about embracing the role of SP with gusto!

  • BiggBardda

    I was just curious, has Tony every reported on the fact that Vivian Kubrick joined Scientology and disconnected from her family?

    • PreferToBeAnon2

      Never knew that!

    • TonyOrtega

      I haven’t written about it because that story’s been done. If you know something new about it, I’m all ears.

      • BiggBardda

        I was just curious, I hadn’t heard about it until recently and was shocked. I’m a lurker, and haven’t read every single one of your articles. Clearly, I have homework to do.

        • Bella Legosi

          Tony has tons written. I lurked nearly for 2 years, back when he was at Village Voice. Whenever I have googled “scientology” in the news section, his name is the one that pops out the most and with on point, interesting, and informative pieces!

          • BiggBardda

            I shall clear my social calender!

    • noseinabk

      Thanks for posting your ? I had not seen this before.

  • 0tessa

    Sacrament? I prefer to call it a weapon.

  • OTVIIIisGrrr8!

    So it was a “former employee” who vandalized the Tucson Mission?

    Sounds like another grassy knoll theory from the criminally suppressive wog internet.

    Well then we in RTC are to play this game we must assume that it was a “former employee” who kept attendance to 500 people at the Portland Ideal Org grand opening.

    We in RTC must assume that it was a “former employee” who created a tidal wave of entheta against COB RTC.

    And so it follows that a “former employee” have created the huge sinkhole that suddenly opened on the main production floor of Bridge Publications International:

    http://i1284.photobucket.com/albums/a563/OTVIIIisGrrr8/sinkhole_zpse04ec22e.png

    • Artoo45

      That’s no sinkhole, it’s a portal to its twin at the Fifth Invader Force Quik-ee-Print™ shop in East Cydonia Planitia.

      • OTVIIIisGrrr8!

        Yes, and that is exactly what so worries us in RTC: An inter-dimensional publishing portal that prints altered Scientology books and throws the world into confusion and disaster!

        Please donate today to the BPI Emergency Sinkhole Repair Fund!

        We need at least $100,000,000 to fix this deadly problem!

    • Captain Howdy

      It wasn’t a “former employee” that created the sinkhole. guess again..he’s coming for what’s owed to him.

      • Ze Moo

        Hi Uncle Olaf!!!

      • FistOfXenu

        LRH: “ahhh, my friend, my good friend Aleister Crowley”

    • Observer

      Now if only a sinkhole would open up directly under COB’s mansion …

      • Bella Legosi

        I read at Angry Gay Pope’s site that Int Base is located on some pretty shaky grounds. As in Hub purchased said land so damn cheap, cuz if there is “the big one” the ground will open up and swallow what rests upon it.

        Who wants to join Bella in a dance to entice Earthquake Gods? Fire and marshmallows always in stock and provided!

        • BuryTheNuts2

          No, Bella no! Lots of livestock in the area!
          Save the cows and Emus!

          Edit: can I still have a marshmallow?

        • The fault line goes right through the Cine Studio called the “Gym”. The rest of the fault line goes through the entire property but mostly on roads and grassy areas. No livestock on the property.

          You can bet if there is an earthquake and the property does get gobbled up, Dave will blame it on the staff there. That is exactly what happened in 1990 when there was a catastrophic flood. All of the Int Base Staff were assigned a condition of “Confusion” for several months and we ate beans and rice all summer!

          • Bella Legosi

            I remeber reading about his reaction to the flood now that you mention it. Thanks for the elaboration!!

            By the way I have written coast to coast asking Ian to have you on again! Great show you did too! Do you think if I empolyed some Shawshank Tech long enoght they would cave? I would have to demand Claire went on with ya this time.

            🙂

          • anonymous

            ok Marc, that is just nuts.

        • Missionary Kid

          It’s not that the ground will open up, but that the earth hat is above Int. Base to the East is unstable, and a landslide is possible with a shaker. The problem is that geological time is much longer than human time. An incident like that could happen tomorrow, or in a hundred years.

      • Jgg2012

        That sinkhole was created by an OT7 moving a boulder with his mind.

  • JustCurious

    Forgive my ignorance, but I’m relatively new to Scientology and its excesses. But what I don’t understand is how anyone can keep people in a prison for many years without the police investigating. There have been so many reports from people like Mike Rinder, Claire and others about how they escaped from the base and the hole. Why has the police never raided the complex and check on the condition of the people in the hole?

    • sugarplumfairy

      Lawrence Wright called it ‘the prison of belief..’ the FBI was advised against a raid because those that had already escaped felt that those still in, if given the option, would choose to stay in scientology, even if it meant staying in the hole.. I think..

      • Bella Legosi

        That raid would have been a disaster. The people in the Hole would prolly have been the most adament and willing to speak out on just how wonderful they are being treated. Mind control 101. Not to mention that the Co$ would have had a feild day with the media and jump on that story like a tick. I am glad they didn’t do a raid on Int, cuz it would end up being Co$ were the real victims, when we all know they are in fact the perpetrators.

        I still want to believe FBI and other alphabet agencies have learned their lesson in dealing with Co$ in the 70’s. So when the time does come to bring them down they will have concrete, irrefutable, evidence to do such a thing. I hope I get to see that in my life time, I am already telling what teens I know to watch out for the impending demise of the Co$ as we know it today!

        • anonymous

          I love you!! so so true.

    • Welcome. Stick around for a while it gets better and better the longer you stay! In this Blog that is.

  • Artoo45

    It must be exhuasting down-arrowing 300 comments. But then again, not as exhausting as running around a pole for 12 hours and eating table scraps . . .

  • Artoo45

    Off topic and in another cult far, far away, there’s trouble a-brewin in the senate . . .

  • ParticleMom

    Here is a story about Jewish disconnection:

    As a teenager, I used to babysit for one of my high school teacher’s little girl. They were Orthodox Jews and only allowed Jewish babysitters. Years later, a friend of mine bumped into the teacher and she asked how I was doing. My friend told her I was doing great, I was married (my first husband) and pregnant. She asked about my husband and he told her he was a Muslim. She was HORRIFIED and asked if my family sat shiva for me! (Shiva is a Jewish tradition of mourning someone who had died.) She told him she would sit shiva for me and then refused to talk about me anymore.

    A side story: I stopped babysitting for her 7 year old after the daughter and I were playing with Barbies and she made up a story line where Ken raped Barbie! I was horrified and told her mother (gently) what happened. She didn’t seem concerned at all, but never called me back.

    • The Dakini

      PMom, I am sorry to say that I LMFAO when I read your post!!! I had two Jewish neighbors that wouldn’t talk to each other. One was Hasidic, one orthodox. Both Rabbis and we all lived with backyards facing each other. When I asked one (the one who shook my hand and handed me his baby boy the first time we met so he could pet my dogs) why there was such tension, his reply was “Some people rather be a zealot who does no wrong, than human being who can admit to it.”

      • ParticleMom

        Don’t worry, I laughed when my friend told me the story. I wasn’t sad or hurt personally. I just felt bad for her closed view of the world.

  • Taco Bell

    Scientology is for assholes

    • BuryTheNuts2

      Fuck that! Did you bring Taco’s?

    • Mmmm tacos. We take our tacos (&caek) very seriously around here. If you don’t have any I’m going to have to declare you an SP.

      • stateofcircle

        I have leftover birthday caek, anyone wanna come over? Best buttercream this side of marcab!

  • Bella Legosi

    I find it very irritating when Co$ tries to say that “disconnection” is a canceled policy, yet in the same breath defend it as a “human right”, THEN back that up by saying, “Scientology is just doing what other religions do!”

    There is soooooo much hypocrisy in that statement, it really makes your brain stop for a second. Remember in school where they showed you a couple sentences and said, “Find the mistakes?” lol I find so many in the statement above. Quick we need Tommy out here to tow the party line………oh wait that’s right…….

    • Captain Howdy

      I get the feeling you’re feeling better.

      • Bella Legosi

        Sorta……..medications and coffee can make anyone think they are feeling better! lol I think I am past the I think I am going to die phase!

        • BuryTheNuts2

          Good to hear!

  • L. Wrong Hubturd

    Reading the TC disconnection posts earlier made me think of this photo. It’s been around on other places, but I don’t remember seeing it here. Do you think she’s prepping for a TC “casting call”?

    • Captain Howdy

      No, she probably thinks “Ups & Downs ” is the latest Vivid porn script.

    • media_lush

      a comment I made here 9 days ago:

      “And on a slightly different topic some of you might have noticed that I posted some stories about an Ex-Page 3 girl getting suckered into the cult on my bollocks blog…. high quality ‘posed’ candid shots of her reading a big Hubbard book on an LA beach. Given that Page 3 girls are (a much loved) part of British culture and also a big part of newspapers owned by Murdoch I smell a big feature story coming up where she’s interviewed and tells of her “Brainwashing Hell” or some such…. bet on it!”

      http://scientologybollocks.blogspot.co.uk/2013/05/sun-page-3-girl-brainwashed-into.html

    • FistOfXenu

      That’s TC on her lap isn’t it?

  • “during the 14 years I worked at Scientology’s International Headquarters near Hemet that when staff members were labeled as PTS, in their PTS interviews the person they were found to be PTS to was David Miscavige. ”

    This raises a question begging to be answered (I don’t think I’ve seen it discussed here) – when was the last time David Miscavige was audited, and what’s the best guess as to who would be allowed to do that?

    • David Miscavige was last audited in 1993. Shortly thereafter, he broke his leg in a basketball game. The RTC person over Qual blew shortly thereafter. Probably knowing that she would be blamed for the “out-tech” on Dave’s case.

      The entire time I was at the base since 1993 there were many efforts to train up someone to be able to audit David Miscavige. This was an effort headed up by Shelly Miscavige. Ray Mitoff, John Eastment, Hansuli Stahli, whoever it was they never made it. They would usually get busted after someone they had been auditing for years would blow the base.

      David Miscavige was mid-OT 7 in 1993. When I left in 2005 not one single person had ever been able to audit David Miscavige. This included any of the people that LRH himself left in charge of the technical or auditing areas for scientology internationally. Even though they were okay for L Ron Hubbard, David Miscavige would not permit ANYONE to audit him.

      David Miscavige was a self proclaimed expert “stalled cases”. As someone who has not been in session for 20 years he is probably more knowledgeable on stalled cases that most.

      Pretty sure the closest David Miscavige has come to being in session in twenty years was watching Tom Cruise’s sessions either while they were happening or after the fact.

      I look it at like this – If you were the one who oversaw the installation of the secret recording devices in the Oval Office, the last place you would take a clandestine meeting would be in the Oval Office. So in David Miscavige’s case, if you were the great collector of secrets and blackmail info through auditing sessions, the last place you would be caught would be in an auditing session!

      David Miscavige is the J. Edgar Hoover of Scientology. Tom Cruise is his Tolson and Laurisse could be said to be his Dorthy Lamour. I don’t have any direct knowledge of any cross dressing, but I wouldn’t rule it out. I know he does have more shoes than you Imelda!

  • jensting

    Excellent article and thanks to Claire for digging into a subject that must be difficult.
    What the criminal organisation known as the “church” of $cientology cannot dig into, even as it admits that members can “chose” to disconnect, is that Hubbard blamed “SPs” for all problems from bad health to absence of sooper powerz. So, any clam who does not get x-ray vision and who does not start to move mountains with the power of their mind needs to start to “find the SP” and get on with some disconnection.
    In that way, disconnection is more than optional shunning, it’s built into the “bridge” in reality since nobody actually does develop the claimed powers (of “OT” or even “clear”).

  • DodoTheLaser

    I shared part of my story before, here and elsewhere, but I believe it’s pertinent and worth repeating for lurkers.

    As soon, as it was confirmed by OSA that I was posting on ESMB 2 years ago, my wife and son were given 4 hours to decide if they going to stay with scientology and disconnect from me or… you know.

    (Notice how me posting on ESMB was instrumental in that and suddenly all my “crimes” came to light.)

    4 hours? Really?! Never mind we were together for 20 years. DSA also suggested to my wife, to inform me that I should find some other place to stay, as of that night. (Ironically and sadly, that DSA’a own family fell apart shortly after and ours is stronger then ever.)

    And the most painful part, they forced my then 16 years old son in a position where he had to choose between his father and all the scientology kids he grew up with since he was 5. He called me crying that day, I assured him that we will get trough it, while hardly holding myself together. This is pure evil. But I’m a fighter.

    They failed miserably and had to declare my wife too, for choosing to stay with me.

    My son still misses his old friends, but he also made many new ones AND met a wonderful girl!

    As for me and my wife – we are in touch many wonderful Exes, some good-hearted Indies, under radar friends, really cool new non-scientology friends and most importantly – we are really in touch with each other and the world around us, as never before.

    Oh, and our son loves us back, with a daily kiss, smile and a hug – truly.

    Life is good out of scientology’s confinements.

    Dodo/Stat/Andrei

    Former Supervisor, Qual Sec, Class V Auditor

    Former Scientologist

    Presently Human Being.

    Love to all.

    • What a wonderful and heart-warming account, Andrei! I’m so delighted for you and your brave and loving family

      The malignant evil of Scientology’s vile disconnection policy can be overwhelmed when those involved cast their eyes to the sunny uplands and leave the foul-smelling and fetid stench of the swamp far below.

      Best

      Andrew

      • DodoTheLaser

        Thank you so much, Andrew!
        It’s really good to know you.

    • aquaclara

      Oh, Dodo, this is such a lovely story of connection. Your parents, your wife, your son…plus new and old friends. It must have been a traumatic experience just to get to this place. So glad your son made the decision to go too-when of course, the church should have stayed away from trying to pressure a kid, or in breaking up a family. Unbelievable. So glad for you.

    • FistOfXenu

      Wow. Just wow. I’m glad for you Andrei. And your wife and son. Reading your story just made my breakfast taste a whole lot better. Now I just have to be able to swallow again.

    • BuryTheNuts2

      We love you to Dodo!

    • John P.

      Thanks for the reminder of what’s possible when one stands up to these soul-destroying thugs. Even a hard-hearted analytical capitalist like me loves a happy ending.

    • ThetaBara

      Beautifully said. This is Why!

    • Bella Legosi

      Read this one a day late, but thank you for doing what ya do, saying what you say, and living life! Let it never be said that this Disciple of Castiel never gave an Ex some wuv! If I thought you were an Indie, my hug wouldn’t be as tight, but a hug none the less!

    • DoDo/Andrei—Congratulations on sticking to what you knew to be right, and getting your entire family OUT! To your son: “My son still misses his old friends, but he also made many new ones AND met a wonderful girl!” I’m so glad he has a new GF. If you want, remind him of what Andreas (from Norway) said to me when I told him (In 2000): “I’m not sure if I can take this. If I leave…I will lose ALL of my friends, and my husband of 27 years”. He wrote back: “I’m crying reading this. I’m SO sorry you are having to go through this but I have to ask you this one question: What kind of friends could those BE, IF they’re going to LEAVE YOU because you changed your MIND?” (caps mine, certainly not his 🙂 I escaped out shortly after that, and have been making new, wonderful friends ALL AROUND THE WORLD ever since!
      Love to ALL 🙂 Tory/Magoo

  • DeElizabethan

    Thanks Tony for clearing up the details on the photos.
    Another exciting chapter with Claire who is appreciated for giving us this.

  • Roger Larsson

    What’s
    $cientology believing in? Di$connection? $lavery?

  • Dave Roberts

    Miscavige’s decision to declare his leadership group “SP’s” shouldn’t surprise us. He is a dictator of a cult that relies on extreme indoctrination to rule it’s membership. Think of Stalin – he killed his top lieutenants every five of ten years. Why? He was afraid of being overthrown. Miscavige demonstrates an identical paranoia.

    Absolute power corrupts absolutely.

    Dave