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Jon Atack: The abandoned ideas that L. Ron Hubbard turned into Dianetics

Jon_AtackJon Atack is the author of A Piece of Blue Sky, one of the very best books on L. Ron Hubbard and Scientology. He has a new edition of the book for sale, and for more than a year on Saturdays he helped us sift through the legends, myths, and contested facts about Scientology that tend to get hashed and rehashed in books, articles, and especially on the Internet. He was kind enough to send us a new post.

Jon, it’s great to see you back, at least for a one-off. Please take us on another dive into the history of Scientology and L. Ron Hubbard.

JON: My pleasure. In a recorded lecture, given in June 1950, Hubbard admitted his own addiction to the barbiturate phenobarbital (Research and Discovery, volume 1, p.124, Case Factors, 15 June 1950). His Navy records show that he was prescribed phenobarbital for a suspected ulcer, towards the end of WWII. By the time Hubbard was admitted to Oak Knoll Naval Hospital, this same drug was being used to induce an altered state in traumatised combatants by psychiatrists Roy Grinker and John Spiegel.

When Hubbard boasted of sneaking into the library at Oak Knoll Hospital to read the latest texts, the work of Grinker and Spiegel was likely available. Their first paper was published in 1943. A book followed in 1945 (Men Under Stress, first edition 1945, second revised edition 1963, McGraw Hill, NY). These two psychiatrists were administering barbiturate drugs — which are classified as “hypnotics” — to US airmen who had survived catastrophic events. Once they were in a barbiturate trance, they were led to abreact — or re-live — those catastrophic events, in the attempt to overcome what has since been labelled Post-Traumatic Stress Disorder. Similar work was being done in Britain by William Sargent, who would later be listed by the Guardian Office as the UK’s top Suppressive Person.

Grinker and Spiegel called their work “narco-synthesis” and Hubbard was aware of it — he referred to it in Science of Survival. The two psychiatrists used an old Freudian technique, once their patients were in a barbiturate trance.

Hubbard had been practising hypnosis for some time, so with access to both barbiturates and the new ideas about “battle fatigue” or “shell shock,” it is no great surprise that he came up with Dianetics, though he advocated the use of amphetamines rather than barbiturates in Dianetics: The Modern Science of Mental Health. Like barbiturates, they reduce the ability to reason, so increase hypnotic susceptibility (D:MSMH, p.363; p.389 in later editions).

Dianetics is little more than a technique abandoned early on by Freud, which seeks to abreact traumatic memories. In his Worcester Lectures, given before the First World War, Freud explained this experimental method is some detail (Two Short Accounts of Psycho-Analysis, Penguin books, 1962). The English translation — published long before D:MSMH — gives the terms “chains” and “charge.” It also mentions memories of physical trauma — Hubbard’s “engrams” — as well as the “secondaries” and “locks” of Hubbard’s later reworking. Freud used a counting technique to induce rapport (or reverie, as both other hypnotists and Hubbard call it). He also used the repeater technique.

Don Rogers was with Hubbard while he was writing D:MSMH (his appendices were published as a part of that book). He told me that Hubbard had used only “deep trance” hypnosis in his research, but when Art Ceppos offered to publish, Hubbard decided that deep trance was too unpopular, so, without further “research,” went with the “reverie” or light trance approach abandoned by Freud fifty years earlier. He soon admitted that this technique was hypnotic, in Science of Survival (Book II, p.227). Beyond his extensive terminology, there is nothing original in Dianetics. Freud abandoned the approach, because it caused no significant change in the patient, save for increasing dependence upon the therapist. Which would be useful if you wanted to keep raking in the cash, rather than curing the patient.

Grinker and Spiegel, whose work likely alerted Hubbard to the possibilities of abreactive therapy, republished their own Men Under Stress in 1963, admitting that the high hopes they had entertained for their therapy had not materialised. Abreaction was useful only for those who had been extremely traumatised.

D:MSMH was withdrawn from sale by publisher Art Ceppos, precisely because it did not live up to Hubbard’s promises. The Dianetics craze lasted about six months. 150,000 copies were sold before Ceppos withdrew the book, so plenty of people found that the techniques did not cure short-sight, raise IQ to genius level, eliminate the common cold or raise anyone from the dead, as Hubbard so emphatically claimed. Nor did it cure cancer or leukemia, as he also assured anyone who would listen. Yet, over six decades later, we are still dealing with the fall-out from this money-making scheme. Perhaps it is time to listen to the Great OT himself: “Any time anybody gets enough altitude he can be called a hypnotic operator, and what he says will act as hypnotic suggestion. Hypnotism is a difference in levels of altitude…if the operator can heighten his own altitude with regard to the subject…he doesn’t have to put the subject to sleep. What he says will still react as a hypnotic suggestion….With parity, such as occurs between acquaintances, friends, fellow students and so on, there is no hypnotic suggestion” (Education and Dianetics, 11 November 1950, Research and Discovery, volume 4).

THE BUNKER: Another devastating archeological dig, Jon. Thank you.

 
——————–

Posted by Tony Ortega on July 9, 2014 at 07:00

E-mail your tips and story ideas to tonyo94@gmail.com or follow us on Twitter. We post behind-the-scenes updates at our Facebook author page. Here at the Bunker we try to have a post up every morning at 7 AM Eastern (Noon GMT), and on some days we post an afternoon story at around 2 PM. After every new story we send out an alert to our e-mail list and our FB page.

Learn about Scientology with our numerous series with experts…

BLOGGING DIANETICS (We read Scientology’s founding text) 1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 7, 8, 9, 10, 11, 12, 13, 14, 15, 16, 17, 18, 19, 20, 21, 22, 23, 24, 25

UP THE BRIDGE (Claire Headley and Bruce Hines train us as Scientologists) 1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 7, 8, 9, 10, 11, 12, 13, 14, 15, 16, 17, 18, 19, 20, 21, 22, 23, 24, 25, 26, 27, 28, 29, 30, 31, 32, 33, 34, 35, 36, 37, 38, 39, 40, 41, 42, 43, 44, 45, 46, 47

GETTING OUR ETHICS IN (Jefferson Hawkins explains Scientology’s system of justice) 1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 7, 8, 9, 10, 11, 12, 13, 14

SCIENTOLOGY MYTHBUSTING (Historian Jon Atack discusses key Scientology concepts) 1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 7, 8, 9, 10, 11, 12, 13, 14, 15, 16, 17, 18, 19, 20, 21, 22, 23, 24, 25, 26, 27, 28, 29, 30, 31, 32, 33, 34, 35, 36, 37, 38, 39, 40, 41, 42, 43

PZ Myers reads L. Ron Hubbard’s “A History of Man” | Scientology’s Master Spies | Scientology’s Private Dancer

 

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  • Pierrot
    • i-Betty

      Ty THDNE, nice to have you back. <3

      ^^^^^

  • DodoTheLaser

    Dianetics Defined.

    • Espiando

      Some will regard Jon’s contribution as Dianetics Defiled. Well, tough luck to those people.

      • Missionary Kid

        It’s only appropriate that Dianetics be defiled after being discarded. The concepts were outmoded when they were originally proposed by Hubbard, and even more so as time has passed, but Hubbard went even further and used them as instruments of evil for his own profit and glory.

  • outraged

    This is a first for me. I am officially the SECOND comment of the post.

    Unfortunately I have a migraine and cannot think of a comment.

    Oh – thank You Tony Ortega for your Fearless Fight Against The Dark Lord and His Minions

    • PRenaud

      Oh no Dodo beat you to the second position…

      • Robert Eckert

        At least outraged isn’t off the podium.

    • i-Betty

      Poor thing. Hope you feel much better soon :)

  • Espiando

    And the booming that I hear faintly in the distance is the sound of a thousand Indies’ heads exploding. Robin Remoteviewed has more ammunition for his/her/clam’s one-being jihad against Jon.

    • http://www.crackpots.us/ DamOTclese2

      -heh- Truth does not matter, the indies will continue to demand the lunacy some how actually works. That’s the nature of cults: No amount of reason, science, truth, actual facts can saw a True Believer. :) They’ll just say that Hubbard made it work when the psychs were trying to make it not work. :) Something.

  • joeapple212

    Thank you Jon for another fascinating look into the history of Dianetics and Scientology. Yes, it’s true that early Dianetics has it’s roots in hypnotism. I would like to expand on that idea, but first I would like to talk about the wog concept of ‘alien abdication.’

    Interesting that alien abduction can be explained by multiple personalities…

    Childhood trauma such as sexual abuse can cause a child to form a separate identity, (with it’s own separate memory), to isolate the child from the abuse.

    Later in life, the person may have periods of “missing time.” That’s time they don’t remember, because another personality was in charge.

    “Childhood trauma (usually, though not necessarily, sexual) is especially likely to push a person toward incipient multiplicity. It is possible that the child will progress from there to becoming a full-fledged multiple…”

    “In contemporary America, many hundreds of people claim to have been abducted by aliens from UFOs. The abduction experience is not recognized as such at first, and is described instead as ‘missing time,’ for which the person has no memories. Under hypnosis, however, the subject typically recalls having been kidnapped by humanoid creatures who did harmful things to her or him – typically involving some kind of sex-related surgical operations (for example, sharp objects being thrust into the vagina). Are these people recounting the mythic version of an actual childhood experience? During the period described as missing time, was another personality in charge – a personality for whom the experience of abuse was all too real?”

    – Brainchildren: Essays On Designing Minds – Daniel Dennett

    If being “probed by aliens” is a mythic representation of child abuse, what about Dianetics and Scientology? Interesting that Dianetics focused so much on periods of pain and unconsciousness… Early Dianetic ‘memories’ of prenatal abuse, like a fetus getting poked by daddy’s penis, were later replaced with Scientology space-opera memories, usually involving an ‘implant’ – “a painful and forceful means of overwhelming a being…”

    Auditor: “Was an implant restimulated?”

    Implant? The word itself suggests penetration. Hubbard’s whole history of the universe seems to revolve around ‘implants,’ getting ‘implanted,’ and ‘the implant station.’ From the beginning of time, right? In a universe of superclusters, galaxies and solar systems, that’s a whole lotta implanting going on, isn’t it? If I were to psychoanalyze, I would first want to know if Hubbard was sexually abused as a child.

    “The therapists we talked to were struck by the ‘charisma’ of their patients. Charisma is often associated with the lack of personal boundaries, as if the subject is inviting everyone to share some part of him.” – Dennett

    Remind you of anyone?

    OK. Say what you will about Hubbard, but what about the rank and file? Does Scientology, with it’s intrusive auditing and sec-checking, break down personal boundaries in any way? Does auditing make people more willing to share themselves and their stories? Is it fair to say that exes are often willing to ‘share,’ and that some of them are quite charismatic?

    And if Davey goes to prison, if that’s his final destination, wouldn’t that be a kind of implant station?

    • EnthralledObserver

      RE Davey and prison… and then there will be Bubba. Implants, penetration.. it all fits together so nicely.

      • Peter

        Actually, not something I would wish on anyone, no matter what they had done.

        • Mooser

          “Actually, not something I would wish on anyone, no matter what they had done.”

          People fall in love everywhere. In prison, isolated from women, men must, if they are to gratify the tender emotions, love each-other. If Davey should be incarcerated, I hope he finds the love he needs. Lots of it.

          • Peter

            Love? In prison? Hardly. I’d be happy to see him simply incarcerated for a very long time. Adding the other stuff in is to wish for torture and I don’t advocate that. Nor do I think it’s appropriate in the Bunker.

          • Mark Foster

            Ah, the way to a man´s heart is through his…

        • EnthralledObserver

          I was merely commenting on how the universe has this innate ability to see that things fall as they should with time. Some call it Karma. 😉

          • Peter

            Possibly. I wouldn’t use “nicely” to describe it. And, as I understand the concept, Karma might take numerous lifetimes.

            • EnthralledObserver

              I’m sorry for you if you are a victim of such an event… but some people deserve the crap that befalls them. I don’t wish it on him, that’s not how I roll, but when it comes to Makemerich I really can’t drag up much sympathy if he does indeed ‘pull it in’.

            • Peter

              I have no argument with that view. I find often, though, that “who” deserves “what” is often in the eye of the beholder. There is so much done in this world which is far more destructive and murderous than this little tinpot who almost fell into this situation, taking full advantage when he did. That he took the path he did is surely going to cost him greatly somewhere along the line.

            • EnthralledObserver

              Yes, agree… and of course, I only offer my opinion from my point of view. Makemerich himself, for instance, might see it differently.

            • Peter

              I think it safe to say that we can almost guarantee that! LOL As for being a “victim”, for myself I don’t believe in the concept. I’m one of those for whom scio worked quite well and, though I was in many years, I got out early enough that no lasting damage was done and I was able to get a great deal from it I might never have gotten otherwise. Who knows for sure? However, it was the path that I chose, “fooled” or not. Blaming others for my choices in life is a surefire way to guarantee a wasted life.

            • Andrew Robertson

              The concept of ‘Karma’ is no different than the idea that Scientology or other silly things that some humans are prone to believing in, has any relation to reality.

              If one is powerless and unable to influence events, or right perceived wrongs,then it is comforting to imagine that some mysterious power will somehow intervene sometime in the future in a satisfactory way.

              But the mythical gods are blind to injustice, so wishing for help from them is fruitless.

              “And that inverted Bowl we call The Sky,
              Whereunder crawling coopt we live and die,
              Lift not thy hands to It for help – for It
              Rolls impotently on as Thou or I.”

              Andrew

    • Jimmy3

      Wogs will never truly understand alien abdication. I was King of Zorglon VI. I hated every zorg of it. Now I’m with the wogs. I guess wogs’ age and weight at a wog amusement park and you know what? I guess wrong on purpose, because I love to spread joy amongst the wogs and I love to hand wogs giant stuffed toys. Wogs love this and make wog childs smile. Wog life better than Zorglon life.

    • Ms. B. Haven

      “Does Scientology, with it’s intrusive auditing and sec-checking, break down personal boundaries in any way? Does auditing make people more willing to share themselves and their stories? Is it fair to say that exes are often willing to ‘share,’ and that some of them are quite charismatic?”

      As an ex, I would answer these questions for myself, no, no, and no. If anything, the auditing I received strengthened and reinforced whatever boundaries I had. Some would say that I reinforced my personal defenses. If so, I’m glad that I did. I still work on maintaining and strengthening personal boundaries but using non-manipulative and cost free methods these days. Auditing did not make me more willing to share myself and my stories other than blurting out some sort of ‘win’ or ‘success story’ at the end of an auditing session if I was feeling good about that session. On refection, and with the benefit of hindsight, these ‘wins’ were just temporary feelings of euphoria. These feelings can be produced in many ways, and again, at little or no cost. As an ex, I have certainly not been very willing to ‘share’ and I am in no way a charismatic person. In fact, just my involvement with the cult has caused me to feel hugely embarrassed because of my gullibility in being taken by a huge con. This would be sort of like bragging and ‘sharing’ that you make some insightful investments with Bernie Madoff.

      These personal observations may or may not be true for other exes. But, auditing didn’t work for me. I was never able to find or ‘run’ and engram so I was never able to progress past dianetics on the ‘bridge to total freedom’. Thanks the gods for that. As far as I’m concerned, auditing does not work. Maybe it works for some people, but I’m not one of them and I left a trail of many highly trained and frustrated auditors in my wake. There was also a shit load of money left behind too.

      • joan nieman

        Ms. B. Haven, at least now you can see the picture clearly and that is more of a ‘win’ than anything.

    • Mike Leopold

      This post got me to thinking. Scientology’s “scripture” regarding the Whole Track involves multiple alien abductions, but these are believed to have happened in PAST lifetimes. Scientology has steered clear of positing a belief in THIS LIFETIME abductions, probably because they would be easier to debunk.
      The other possibility is that they will “discover” and market this stuff to their current crop of OT VIII’s
      as OT 9, in which case I will demand a royalty.

    • Drat

      I cannot say much about auditing, but growing up with the idea of overts and withholds, and O/W writeups (I’ve written up a lot), I came to believe that practically anything was or could be a transgression and felt incapable of telling anything but the absolute truth when asked a direct question, even if the answer did not serve me. I have also had to learn what people need to know and what is none of their business and which I am not in any way obligated to share.

      Edit: I would say that being in the group does or can instill an inability to maintain your own boundaries or recognise those of others (willingness to ask intrusive questions, anyone?), and a compulsion to own up to any perceived wrongdoing.

    • Once_Born

      I think the whole ‘alien abduction’ thing has a simpler explanation – it happens when people experience sleep paralysis. Not knowing what has happened to them, they confabulate the ‘explanation’ that they were abducted by aliens from cues given by popular culture.

      A whole sub-culture which has grown up which has elaborated this belief, will provide validation for it, and occasionally practices hypnotism to ‘recover’ supposedly repressed adduction memories (which, of course, only creates false memories).

      Historically, there have been many myths born out of the experience of sleep paralysis, and at least one word – hagridden. They used to be about witches. Now they are about aliens (which look suspiciously similar to the rubber guys who appeared in films before the alien abduction bandwagon started to roll).

      http://www.csicop.org/si/show/abduction_by_aliens_or_sleep_paralysis

  • Observer

    “Dianetics is little more than a technique abandoned early on by Freud, which seeks to abreact traumatic memories.”

    Pfffft, Freud! He didn’t treat anyone who had the kind of lurid case histories the ones in Dianetics did, and Ron cured them. Freud was a rank amateur compared to Ron.

    *pic*

    • Espiando

      But cigars (which are sometimes only cigars) are infinitely more cooler than Kool Non-Filters.

  • Eivol Ekdal

    Thanks Jon and Tony – Very illuminating. I always thought it was hypnosis at the core but just not that “your eye’s are getting sleepy” type. I am no expert on history that is for sure, so it is nice to have the evidence so well presented. I think the power of “reverie” gets magnified by being surrounded by like minded people. Hubbard was a master of controlling individuals but also knew that ‘Mob Mentality” can also be manipulated. The group ‘games’ are an essential component of this approach.

  • RBE

    There is an interesting film on YouTube about narcosynthesis and the treatment of battle casualties of the American army in WW2 (This particular film influenced Paul Thomas Anderson, the director of The Master) https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=kDNoaSMKx0g

    • Eivol Ekdal

      “Abreaction was useful only for those who had been extremely traumatised.”
      and this seem to relate.. i.e .. it don’t work

    • MaxSpaceman

      stumbled on this, RBE, from your link – same film, but picture and sound restored in 2012. https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=uiD6bnqpJDE

      • RBE

        Great find.

      • TheHoleDoesNotExist

        Perfect for today’s lesson and fills in even more background of what Hubbard would have seen and heard and experienced. Interesting factoid: 20% of all battle casualties were neuropsychiatric. 20% PTS? PTS – Post Traumatic Stress? I think yes.

        I was shocked (not really) to find out all the good stuff that Hubbard left out of his fake navy therapy regime: group therapy, sports, record players, ping pong, ice cream sodas, movies, and wait, guitar and mandolin lessons too? We was robbed! Not even drugs. All we got was this lousy hospital.

        http://i.imgur.com/IqOeza8.jpg

        • Missionary Kid

          I’d call it a lousy fake hospital.

          • TheHoleDoesNotExist

            Such nice trees cut down before their time.

            http://i.imgur.com/baFqB6Q.jpg

            • MaxSpaceman

              Indeed, thdnExist. Before becoming part of the Clampire, it was the Cedars of Lebanon hospital in Los Angeles, with the lovely, famous (in L.A.) cedar trees.

            • Sherbet

              Clearing the planet evidently involved clearing the cedars.

            • Observer

              I think someone interpreted “clearing the planet” as “clearcutting the planet.”

            • Sherbet

              Ha! Good one, Observer. (She’s not only clever with shoops; she’s a verbal wit, too.)

            • joan nieman

              And don’t forget clearing bank accounts.

            • i-Betty

              There’s something of a pattern forming here.

            • rom661

              They have a talent for making things ugly. All kinds of things.

            • joan nieman

              so true.

            • Bradley Greenwood

              Is it me, or does the blue paint look like it was watered-down to make it stretch?

            • joan nieman

              Scientologists, the fellers of trees and money.

            • Narapoid

              Used to be nice. Take a wrecking ball to it…*pic*

          • Peter

            How about a real hospital converted to a fake czerch? :)

          • Sherbet

            A REALLY BLUE lousy fake hospital.

        • Sherbet

          TH, you have a way with words, and you should be writing more than pithy comments in the Bunker. You’ve got experience, you know what you’re talking about, plus there’s an undercurrent of bitter humor in whatever you write. I hope someday to read your reminiscences in book form, although you may have decided your best healing has come from simply dumping the past and living in the present. Whatever you write, however you do it, you’ve got a big fan here.

          • TheHoleDoesNotExist

            So sweet, Sherb. Maybe I will, what the heck. I think my bitter undercurrent comes from living so close to the hellhole and that cadet org being resurrected. This monster has scourged this earth too long and I knew too many thousands who were harmed or died.
            In other words, I’m getting cranky and impatient!

            • Missionary Kid

              Hell, cranky and impatient? I still join Sherb in saying that I love to read what you write. When you’re not around, I miss you.

            • TheHoleDoesNotExist

              Thanks and the same back at you. Very few perks in getting older. Cranky and impatient are two:)

              http://i.imgur.com/OelRFNQ.jpg

            • Sherbet

              Yup, there’s a lot of crankiness and impatience out here. Hugs, m’dear.

  • TheHoleDoesNotExist

    Quite a few details here I hadn’t heard, some I have. It really fills in the complete picture, like what was available on the hospital library shelves. I hope we get a similar article on “scientologie”. Aren’t you glad Hubbard wasn’t a neighbor, always dropping by on some pretense to borrow everything you own and never seeing it again? Thanks again, Jon. This time period is a crucial crossroads to the future setup. I didn’t know the Dianetics fad was only 6 months.

    Ron’s son described dear old dad feeding him drugs, I believe it was speed, and then recording his ramblings, now titled “History of Man”. Now I’m wondering what he read or borrowed that gave him the idea that he didn’t need to shell out a dime for drugs, just use sleep deprivation and screaming orders for the same hypnotic effect. Maybe he learned that in the Navy too. I couldn’t help wonder when reading Jon’s descriptions around “Men Under Stress” what the heck could have traumatized Ron in the war where he saw no action. Hearing that he was incompetent, a little mad, or simply being told NO?

    In summary, “…useful if you wanted to keep raking in the cash, rather than curing the patient.” Still evokes a shudder and a chill realizing we were all just experimental patients in a maze built by a mental patient released before his time. Like ever.

    • 1subgenius

      “what the heck could have traumatized Ron in the war ”
      Long before the war he took long sea voyages as a child.
      I still suspect bad things happened to him.

      • Sejanus

        Yar’ there be rum an buggery ay be suspectin’.
        Now we be a knowin’ why his cheeks was so rosey ar!

        No doubt thats when he came up with touch ASSists….lol
        OK I am goin to Hell.

        • 1subgenius

          I once (somewhat innocently) asked a guy who worked on sea-going vessels, if he ever played cornhole (the bean bag tossing game).
          He replied intensely (and in apparent ignorance of the game), “I was a mariner for 30 years!”
          True story.

      • TheHoleDoesNotExist

        I still suspect this was genetically inherited and complicated by extreme preemie birth. After listening to some of Jamie de Wolfe’s family reveals, I was even more convinced. Ron’s outbreak of mental disorders erupted in his early teens but was accompanied by stew of odd physical ailments as well. Much more is known about certain conditions today then when he was growing up. But of course any traumatic incidents that occurred in childhood would have only compounded with interest for someone which such native maladies.

        Now that I think of it, the entire general military experience was probably traumatic on many levels for someone who was likely going into the next phase of his ailments by that time.

        • 1subgenius

          “Now that I think of it, the entire general military experience was probably traumatic on many levels for someone who was likely going into the next phase of his ailments by that time.”
          A person with Narcissistic Personality Disorder (which may be related to childhood sexual abuse), and its features of omniscience and “specialness”, would certainly find life in the military, and its authoritarianism, to be rather unbearable.

          • TheHoleDoesNotExist

            I knew of several who went to war when there was a draft. Would not even talk about it.

          • Zana

            1subgenius… I was just thinking of that. What were his mother and father like? My father was a narcissist… truly like living with a monster. Traumatized the whole family. His own father died when he was 2 or 3 and his mother married a stern man who worked on the railroad. I have seen photos of my dad’s stepfather… he’s terrifying. I often wonder what my father would have been like if his own father who, (I found out after I did some research on him) was a very kind, intelligent man) would have been around to actually father him?

            I’m not giving my father or LRH any leeway or giving them permission for being such assholes… even so… I think you are correct. That he was a brilliant kid who was unstable and lived in a fantasy world himself. And could never quite get back to reality. Then when he got into the war, it exacerbated his tendencies and cemented his torments into place and he started raging his own war with everything unlike what he had fantasized for himself. How else could he – with a straight face – look straight into the camera and say that he only had 2 marriages? He was COMPLETELY out reality. He must have made up some doozies in his childhood to make up for an unbearable reality around him. ?? Or maybe he was like David Miscavige…. just born an SP. ?? I have no idea… but your thoughts on the matter start to make more sense out of it.

            • 1subgenius

              I didn’t say much of what you ascribe to me, to wit: ” I think you are correct. That he was…”
              I’ve read nothing that the parents were particularly weird, but they certainly had a more chaotic life than most, and we’ll never know what happened in the homes.
              My take on Hubbard, is that he was pretty ordinary, and probably was molested on the sea cruises he took as a boy.
              This produced the NPD, and other coping mechanisms, and his subsequent experiences, with Parsons and such, gave him the skills to devise an automated brainwashing system that replicates his personality. Information protecting itself by reproduction.

            • Zana

              Ahhhh… that makes a LOT of sense. thank you. Perhaps someone above you said something about the parents…?? Not sure. It was a long, busy day with business and my comment was live on my computer for a long time before I finished. Sorry for inaccuracy. That makes a lot of sense, though, that he might have experienced those kinds of things at sea as a little boy. Thanks. Of course, we will never know… but it starts to give dimension o the puzzle that I’m looking at.

            • Ten Aug

              ‘He must have made up some doozies in his childhood to make up for an unbearable reality around him. ??’

              Yes he did.

              And he never stopped.

              I’d say his most perfected skill, given how long he did it for, was telling stories.

              Whatever anyone thinks of him he certainly perfected the ability make people believe the stories he told… And I think that all started from his earliest days.

            • Zana

              I agree with you.

            • Pete Cockerell

              It’s interesting that on the one hand you recognize that your father and LRH were formed at least in part by their enviroment, the rest presumably being down to genetics, yet on the other , you’re not prepared to give them any leeway. Why not? Once you account for nature plus nurture, what’s left to pin on the actual person? Freewill? His soul? Dodgy concepts, at best. In other words, all things being equal, by what mechanism could your father and LRH have behaved any differently from the way they did?

            • Zana

              Hi Pete, Good question. I have tried to write and re-write answers to you… but they are all gobbledygook. My father was a monster. Lewd, abusive, scary… and totally narcissistic. I spent my life recovering from my childhood. My older brother is not doing well and my younger brother is dead. My mother was forced into being my father’s slave. So… looking back a what I see now as a kind of horror story of a childhood… whether it’s because my father was mistreated as a child or because he was a born narcissist and couldn’t help himself… that is all a speculative curiosity. Even so, I don’t really care to extend any compassion toward him, because that opens me to that whole energy again. That’s what happened. If it were today, he would have been in jail, but at that time, nobody knew what it was and he was left to gleefully abuse the people around him until his health failed him. I have curiosity, but no sympathy. Just curious. It’s something that I’ll never figure out… but the comparison brought up the memories and got me trying make sense out of something that will never make sense.

              Perhaps that has something to do with my fascination with LRH and this whole thing going down. I don’t know. Forgive me if I offended you in some way. The earlier comments just brought the subject up and I rambled. Sorry.

            • Pete Cockerell

              Hi Zana, no you didn’t offend me at all, and I’m truly sorry for everything you had to go through with your father. It’s just that ever since I realized there’s no such thing as libertarian freewill (the kind that Christians say their God gave us that makes us responsible for our transgressions even though He should easily be able to prevent them), I’ve been very interested what our attitude should be to the wrong-doers in society. They have to be held accountable, of course, to minimize the harm they do to others and to keep society on something of an even keel, but beyond that, do we punish them just as a form of retribution?

              Say your father had an undiagnosed brain tumor that made him act the way he did. Would that make it easier to sympathize with him (which I’m certainly not asking you to do)? If so, how do we differentiate between the brain tumor case and the more likely case that that’s just the way he was born and made? I’m being rhetorical, and certainly not expecting to change you view of a man who caused you so much suffering.

              As an aside, one possible way of explaining people’s bad behavior apart from genes and environment would be… body thetans! It’s another way of introducing some dualism between the meat person and a spiritual being that’s somehow in control. Of course, pretty much all religions have something like that.

            • Zana

              Hi Pete… you know, you bring up a really interesting point. I’m in my 60s and literally struggled with the abuse issues all my life. I have had a few amazing men in my life and a wonderful lover for 10 years, however, I was literally phobic about settling down or getting too close… even though I longed to find a partner. That being said…I finally just gave up on the whole relationship thing. When my younger brother died (basically because he drowned himself in alcohol) my grief was such that I couldn’t stop crying for about 5 years. It brought up all the craziness. My older brother and I went to therapy, but I couldn’t stop crying. My life was spinning out of control and I was going down the drain. When I started auditing (with a field group) they literally were able to pin-point what need handling first. I just showed up and answered the questions… and went along with the program. My grief was such (and so long-standing) that I had no way to handle it. What happened next is a miracle… because the way the auditor asked the questions (she was wonderful) and the questions she asked… I don’t know how it happened… but I saw my father from a different point of view. The vision is very clear… he had a lot of snakes around him… like Medusa’s head of snakes. He was a brilliant, amazing guy inside there…but whenever I would interact with him I was interacting with all of these snakes that he was embroiled in. I don’t know if he was into black magic, or whatever… (I know he was into hypnosis). I remember the exact moment in auditing that vision and realization revealed itself to me… and I just saw this nice man with whom I had an emotional tug with drifting off into space embroiled in huge snakes. And that trauma was forever gone. Really gone. And some more auditing helped me to finally realize that my younger brother chose alcohol. I couldn’t go down that path with him. At some point he had a choice… and that was the easy way out for him. And I love him so much. It was a tragedy beyond words… he was a virtuoso guitarist. Literally playing studio gigs with the finest musicians in Hollywood when he was only 18. He should have been famous… but he didn’t have a chance due to the abuse that we all grew up in.

              Because of the auditing I could see those things differently and release them. Just allow them to be. And I was able to create a business that has become very successful and kept me healthy enough so that I can go back to live the life I really want to live. So even though Scientology is going through all this mess and there are so many terrible things going on in the Co$, the bit I got at the end of the “good times” literally shifted my life dramatically. If I paid $100,000 to $150,000 for that… then it saved my life. And because it was for my brother, it was all worth it.

              So now… I’m just watching and trying to see what makes sense in the fog there. I guess that’s my fascination with it all. To step back and watch and evaluate and see what it is for me to learn in all this. There will be a time when I can walk way and be free of it all. In the meantime… it is very important to help those kind-hearted people who have been bamboozled and trapped by the evil crap going on.

              Thanks for being kind.

            • Nik Gibbs

              Pete Cockerell, I love what you have written here. A highlight:

              “Once you account for nature plus nurture, what’s left to pin on the actual person?”

              If you have tasted it already then carry on, my sweet brother, of course. If you have yet not, may I implore you to continue contemplating this observation and not shrink from the conclusions it invites. However sad they may seem, it is rapturous in its fruition.

              I am sorry to deviate from the issue at hand. Good luck, all.

        • chuckbeattyexseaorg75to03

          Reading and enforced believing in DMSMH “basic basics” all having to be heavy attempted abortion incidents, was relieved when Hubbard accepted “better” more “true” basic basics (the earliest engram on an engram chain that when erased, the whole chain and the attendant PTSD trauma aberation would supposedly vanish and thus help the person); if a person only did the DMSMH degree of finding attempted abortions as basic basic, that would stick a person with some very wrong false memories!

          Hubbard in the months and year or so after DMSMH “researching” and coming up with basic engrams in past lives, first on earth lives along the “genetic” (evolutionary) line of one’s past lives, and then thankfully Hubbard finally taking the “logical” plunge and “discovering” that past lives also lead into past space civilizations and all the lives one lived and had engrams there, that’s the current depth level of basic basic engrams.

          Historically, History of Man is limited by the “patient’s” education and beliefs.

          I suppose if you weren’t a sci fi buff, then finding ancient past lives in advanced space civilizations wouldn’t be your first “earlier similar” answers. You’d stick with earth and stick with other live animals’ engrams which you believed were your own earlier similar engrams, following evolutionary thinking.

          Hubbard adopted “humanoid” engram chains, and today, people adopt humanoid past life engram basic basics, and don’t go into 5th dynamic
          engram chains (5th dynamic being all other life forms, which themselves have quad-zillions of their own engram chains).

          Hubbard kept his past life interest on humanoids!

          So Scientology’s engrams (the trauma moments) are cleared by doing humanoid engram chains.

          And missed, still, is the 4th Dynamic Engram. It’s just a complicated engram which is only pealed away because we’re plastered, supposedly, each of us, with ba-zillions of body thetans, and clusters of body thetans, all those body thetans stuck in the hefty famoust Incident 1 and 2 engrams, so we must exorcise those body thetans by getting the body thetans to supposedly deal with their top two engrams themselves, which supposedly causes our body thetans to eject off of us and leave us along.

          It’s all related to engrams in some way, all this Hubbard spiritual crank “therapy”.

          Whole lotta delusion that people accept to foist on themselves. And pay the Hubbard system to learn how to do their tailor made “case” false memories to solve their supposedly connected mental/spiritual problems. People buy this stuff and the hypnotism of Hubbard tells them they are getting better by doing it all!

      • http://www.skippress.com/ Skip Press

        Snake Thompson happened to him on one of those voyages.

        • 1subgenius

          Bingo.

          • Eivol Ekdal
            • http://www.skippress.com/ Skip Press

              He worked him over, all right – taught him to masturbate, etc.

            • 1subgenius

              I’m suggesting much earlier when he was a boy.

            • TheHoleDoesNotExist

              The aunts theater/stage location was by a house of ill repute and/or vaudevillian enterprise, wasn’t it?

            • 1subgenius

              ?????????????????????????

            • TheHoleDoesNotExist

              If I get time I’ll look it up.

            • Lady Squash

              I’m confused. How’d they get from a ship crossing the ocean to the Library of Congress? Good story up to that point.

            • Exterrier

              Whoa!’this is very revealing. Especially self stated Ron’s basis for determining reality. The final statement right at the end of the video.

        • KNMF

          Come to my cabin. I’ll show you my snake.

      • Jon Atack

        He kept diaries on his two Chinese holidays, and there is nothing there that would lead to any suspicion of abuse. He actually seems to have been over-indulged by his grandfather – Lafe Waterbury – who was the head of his household while he was growing up. His aunts even washed his mom’s mouth out with soap, when she was too severe with him. I think it is more likely that he failed to bond with either of his parents (his dad was a drinker) and had too great an expectation placed upon him by his granddad. Sun Myung Moon and Rajneesh were also brought up by indulgent grandparents…

        • 1subgenius

          Thank you for that, Jon.

    • EnthralledObserver

      Ron’s own mind traumatised him… I think there is plenty of evidence of that. And because he could find no help when he asked for it, and could not fight and win the battle himself against his madness, I guess he just ultimately decided to go with the flow and embrace and use his madness. It might be a slight comfort to know his madness pretty much suffocated him in the end though by the stories I’ve heard.

    • joeapple212

      “I hope we get a similar article on ‘scientologie’.”

      http://infinitecomplacency.blogspot.com/2009/06/paris-trial-v.html?m=1

      • Drat

        I think Hole means the book by Nordenholz.

        • TheHoleDoesNotExist

          Correct. Jon always comes up with the details, doesn’t he? Wondered if he had more on this as it has it’s own fascinating background.

          • Drat

            It would be very interesting, and potentially an elementary piece of the puzzle.

        • Once_Born

          You can read the first two chapters of “Scientologie (1934) by Nordenholz at http://www.scientologie.org/e_34toc.htm

          It looks to me like the work of minor, forgotten, German philosopher who was trying to combine science and contemporary philosophical concerns about how /if we perceive the world as it actually is. It seems to have nothing whatsoever to do with Hubbard’s creation

          Nordenholz was not well served by his translator, who came up with words like “Beingness” to embody his ideas in English (where have I heard that before?).

          If Hubbard was aware of this book, he would only have raided it for it’s title and eccentric terminology (because he thought that, if he adopted this obscure style, it would make his sound ‘academic’ and increase his credibility).

          As far as I know, however, there is no evidence that Hubbard read read Nordenholz, and I don’t even know if the book was available in translation. Also, back then, in the days of card indexes and minimal communication between libraries, an experienced researcher would have found “Scientologie” very difficult to find – Hubbard was very unlikely to have been aware of it..

          My intuition is that the title was just a coincidence, and the book a red herring.

          • TheHoleDoesNotExist

            The study of knowing, wasn’t it? Well, if there IS a connection, Jon’s the man who might know. There’s a lot of coincidinks here.

            • joan nieman

              Yes, there are many similarities . I believe if he hadn’t had access to Scientologie, he perhaps had knowledge of someone who did, and gathered bits of lore to incorporate into his own mumble jumble.

            • Once_Born

              Hubbard plagiarised ideas that were current at the time, and emulated the style of serious work. Consequently, we would probably find apparent similarities to his writings in a wide range of books that were around at the time.

              I think it’s unlikely that Hubbard encountered this book for practical reason – because it was:
              > Self-published (and so less likely to be any good, or promoted)
              > Only 600 copies were printed
              > It was written in German and published only in Germany
              > Information did not circulate in Hubbard’s time as it does now

            • TheHoleDoesNotExist

              tks – I did not know that! interesting.

          • Drat

            That is entirely possible. Regardless, it is a book on consciousness that attempts to set forth axioms and proclaim itself (science of science) as the key to all sciences.

            Of course, one should always view such writings in the context of their times. Consciousness and mind-body questions were probably quite popular then, due in part to Eastern writings being translated fom the early to mid 1800s on.

    • ozzybud420

      Although later he fed him lots of drugs the ramblings were recored after feeding LRH Jr phenobarbital. Sometimes with or without his knowledge and permission.

    • Robert Eckert

      “what the heck could have traumatized Ron in the war where he saw no action”?

      The performance reviews “By assuming unauthorized authority and attempting to perform duties for which he has no qualifications, he became the source of much trouble… This officer is not satisfactory for independent duty assignment. He is garrulous and tries to give impressions of his importance. He also seems to think he has unusual ability in most lines. These characteristics indicate that he will require close supervision for satisfactory performance of any intelligence duty.” and “this officer lacking in the essential qualities of judgment, leadership and cooperation. He acts without forethought as to probable results. He is believed to have been sincere in his efforts to make his ship efficient and ready. Not considered qualified for command or promotion at this time. Recommend duty on a large vessel where he can be properly supervised.” would have been written after some interviews that must have been very unpleasant for such a narcissist.

      • Zana

        Wuoooaahhh.. So then he decided to just put together his OWN navy. That’ll show those meatheads who thought he was not qualified and who said he is garrulous and tries to give impressions of his importance. LRH just took the name “Commodore”… and figured that’ll show them. HIS reality is THEIR reality now. Harumph. And so… L Wrong Hubtard, the naval commander was born.

        Now this whole thing is making a little more sense.

    • mockingbird

      This story is great and I feel supports the post ” insidious enslavement : study technology ” over at ESMB

  • Sejanus

    Lil’ Red Hypnotist was truly The Master…..
    when it came to stealing and twisting other peoples works.

    Such a clever grifter, completely unsullied by morals when it came to working over adherents just to get their money.
    What a vile swine.

  • Phil McKraken

    “Grinker and Spiegel … republished their own Men Under Stress in 1963, admitting that the high hopes they had entertained for their therapy had not materialised.”

    This is what real scientists do when they understand that their theories haven’t born out. They retract.

    • Once_Born

      And negative results are valuable too – they signpost the dead ends, enabling other investigators to avoid them in future.

      • DrGreatCham

        Exactly, that’s why even claims of “consensus” need to be carefully considered, since such consensus can change given the fundamental nature of REAL scientific inquiry, c.f. the “butter is evil/fat is bad” fiasco in nutritional science.

  • Narapoid

    What a great article today Tony, Jon. The backstory is getting tighter and cleaner, and great reference to real researchers truly hoping to help others instead of grabbing a ton of bucks from.

    Dianetics: L. Ron Hubbard stole everything that was of some use, repackaged it into his own narrative and did not give any credit. It was the first “self-help book” on the market and likely was fueled to high sales from what we now call PTSD from WWII vets. The first publisher pulled it because it did not do what it claimed to in 1950.

    Hubbard stole failed research and sold it as his cure-all. Thanks Tony, Jon

  • BosonStark

    Freud’s six books written before 1909, including THE INTERPRETATION OF DREAMS and THE PSYCHOPATHOLOGY OF EVERYDAY LIFE, were very readable for any intelligent person. They helped popularize his ideas, which were to reach beyond medicine to the humanities, and influence society as a whole, introducing new terminology as a way of understanding oneself and others. You don’t have to join a cult to recognize the brilliance of his writing and ideas.

    In contrast, Dianutty is unreadable and hasn’t influenced society, except by birthing a peculiar mind-control space cult, driven to minor popularity — cult status, really — by uneducated movie stars.

    • Juicer77

      I can’t put Freud on that much of a pedestal. Some of his theories were decidedly faulty, and certain of his ideas set psychiatric care on a path of no benefit and possibly more harm. I will give him credit for bringing talk therapy into fashion, which did help some people, and opened the door to the legitimacy of mental health care.
      Dianutty is worth less than the paper it’s printed on.

      • BosonStark

        Well, let’s put it this way, even at the height of his popularity, no one put Freud on a pedestal, claiming he had all the answers, and that psychoanalysis would cure all diseases, end crime, poverty, and drug use, and unleash new levels of human ability in people.

        I think Freud wanted people to read his books and debate his ideas openly, and discard what turns out to be harmful, of little value, or not therapeutic. And that’s what happened. In contrast, Scientology holds its convoluted and contradictory crazy to be secret and beyond criticism. Hubbard often threw in the words like “factual” and “research” to add substance where there was none.

    • Once_Born

      Today, I think Freud is credited with inventing many of the techniques of ‘talk therapy’ and introducing a more nuanced discussion of the previously taboo subject of sexuality into psychology and psychiatry. His books are, indeed, brilliantly written and often insightful.

      However, his ideas were often ‘just so stories’ that were unfalsifiable. In other words, the therapist was always right – If he attributes the cause of your neurosis to an experience that you have not had, that’s no problem – you are repressing it.

      The majority of his extensive writings are circular in this way and probably should be characterised as pseudoscience – and the popularity of psychoanalysis may have put the cause of scientific psychology back by many years.

      It’s interesting that the psychoanalytic establishment, headed by Freud, was prone to ‘squirrel’ groups, which struck out on their own, with new ‘just so stories’, like Jung’s collective unconscious, and Reich, who completely lost it, came up with the hilarious ‘orgone’ theory (among other daft ideas)

      • BosonStark

        Freud admitted as much, that psychoanalysis didn’t work most of the time, I think, in letters, later in his life.

  • Missionary Kid

    OT, but, I believe, relevant. Dustin White tells his story of Becoming a Faith Healer: An Insider’s Look at the Business of Revealed Religion in the latest eSceptic. http://www.skeptic.com/eskeptic/14-07-09/

    You’ll find that many of the tricks he learned in becoming a faith healer are similar to what LRH used.

    • Gabbyone

      Thanks so much for this link. My SIL just went to a medical intuitive and I need this to convince her that she should not take this person’s insane dietary advice.

      • Missionary Kid

        Unfortunately, it’s very hard to get someone to discount the advice given to a believer, particularly after they’ve paid money for it.

        I’d listen carefully to what your SIL says, then question her, particularly about the underlying assumptions that quacks use. Then, I’d point her to some science based dietary advice as well, not that it will do much good.

        Another resource is Quackwatch http://www.quackwatch.org/

        I wish you and her the best of luck.

      • Once_Born

        My friend, when he was suffering from undiagnosed clinical depression, went to a “Quantum Therapist”. He asked me afterwards if I thought this was a good idea.

        This character’s leaflet claimed that he “worked on the giroscopes used in Apollo 8”. My first thoughts were “that’s hardly a medical qualification” and “he’s spelt ‘gyroscopes’ wrong”.

        The treatment had consisted of running a program on a laptop fitted with a ‘special’ sensor, and then telling my mate he was sensitive to olives and grains, and would recover if he stopped eating them. Oh… and charging him £30 for a ten-minute ‘consultation’. Good money, back then.

        I told him this bloke was a quack (although I did not use the word “bloke”and may have added an adjective before the word “quack”). My friend, disappointed went ape on me (“at least I’m doing something” was one of the rationalisations he used) and stormed out.

        A few days later, he came back to apologise. Other people had all told him the same thing (in different ways) and the ‘treatment’ was not working.

        I think the best thing you can do in this position is consistently tell the truth and be supportive. Pressing too hard is counter-productive, because the victim will simply avoid you to protect their delusion.

        Some time later my friend went to his doctor. His condition is chronic, but very well controlled. I hope your friend ‘recovers’ too.

        • richelieu jr

          This is why I refuse to sugarcoat the reality, preferring ‘cult’ to ‘church’ and the truth to Indie ‘soft-landing’ blarney.

          I do understand it is traumatic coming out and it is easier to fall into a massive pile of familiar bullshit than hard,unforgiving reality, but you end up covered, if not drowned,in BS, whereas if you survive the first shock, you’re out, and you waste not more time…

          Give me Chris Shelton over Marty and Mike any day of the week.

          • Mark Foster

            Yes. Amen. Thank you…and…one more amen!

  • Still_On_Your_Side

    So, Hubbard cribbed Sargent’s “Battle for the Mind: A Physiology of Conversion and Brain-washing,” Freud’s Worcester Lectures, and Grinker and Spiegle’s work, created a “new” “science of the mind,” and then declared war on psychiatry as the evil destroying the universe. The scam is breathtaking. I wonder how much of Heinlein’s Church of All Worlds in Stranger in a Strange Land was a take off of Hubbard?

    • MaxSpaceman

      “The scam is breathtaking.”

      Truly, SoyS. in 35 years (1950-1985), Hubbard’s business netted him some $650 million (reportedly what he bequeathed the chirch) which in today’s dollars is $1.4 billion. Perhaps the most successful Long Con in history.

    • ze moo

      I thought that CO$ was the Fosterite Church of the New Revelation. The Church of All Worlds was a knock on Billy Graham and other ‘mega church’ types. Heinlein directly mentions CO$ in ‘Friday’, and the character ‘admires’ their ‘self discipline’.

    • Anonymous

      Hubbard cribbed the original research (not the book) done for “Sargent’s Battle for the Mind,” which was published in 1957. The pre-publication research was floating around earlier in several military hospitals where Hubbard was….ummm…recovering from his war wounds.

  • Exterrier

    This is quite an unexpectedly powerful post. Still processing it. Wow. So he packaged and sold a failed psychotherapy method, claiming it as his own “bolt from the blue” inspiration or revelation. And then, after the training and classes and auditing did not work at all as described, kept amending an repackaging “.new improved” versions of it, until finally coming up with the past life and space alien explanation for its failure. And then repackaging all that as a religion, to avoid taxes and also oversight by science and law enforcement agencies. And then repeating that process, adding level after level to,explain why the healing and special powers never occurred, and charging a fortune each and every time.

    • Sherbet

      Nicely put, Exterrier. And what started him on that path? Mental illness + physical ailments + unresponsive doctors. So he took his ball and went home and started his own game.

      • Missionary Kid

        What started him on that path? My opinion is that it was greed and hubris.

        • Sherbet

          I think the greed came later. He seemed to be a grifter in his young years, always trying to survive and support himself and his family. But it doesn’t matter; we’ll never know what started it. My opinion: He had a screw loose to begin with.

          • Missionary Kid

            I don’t think he really cared about his family that much, except as extensions of his own ego. IMO, a grifter always has greed, and in the Hub’s case, as as he refined the con and the opportunity presented itself, the greed grew.

            In scientific parlance, he was fucking nuts.

            • Sherbet

              Your last sentence says it all, Kid, and it’s no less scientific than anything lrh ever said himself.

            • Missionary Kid

              :))))

          • ze moo

            Greed, his 150k sales of Dianetics was the best he had ever done. He stretched that out into the auditing craze and loved the ego reinforcement of his ‘guruship’. All the rest was just protecting and expanding the cash flow. He besmirched the good name of snake oil scumbag.

        • TheHoleDoesNotExist

          Hubbard knew he was in serious trouble when he started having problems in his teens. Remember back then and up until the early 70’s, a person who was deemed mentally ill would end up in a nightmare sanitorium. Families hid them because even family members might have a difficult time getting a job or a spouse and be shunned by society. I think I mentioned people I knew that learned about relatives only after the parents died. They were mentally ill, shipped off and never mentioned again.

          His illness included learning disabilities. I think when he found out he could survive by telling stories and making stuff up, he expanded on it. His obsession with making more money might have been because he feared getting worse at any moment. He saw his own rapid descent into madness. I think he wanted to horde out of fear of ending up in one of those places. He alienated every person who ever tried to help him, including family. I think he was terrified night and day.

          • Missionary Kid

            Fear is a great motivator. He also projected a lot of it on his minions.

          • Panopea Abrupta

            “I think he wanted to horde”

            Beautiful typo, THDNE!
            Or, perhaps, given Jon’s post, beautiful Freudian slip.

            And hordes of ravaging $cilons were let loose upon an unsuspecting world.

            • Mooser

              He wasn’t really a hoarder, tho. L Ron was a spender.

            • TheHoleDoesNotExist

              funnee. And then there was his hoaring years.

          • Missionary Kid

            I doubt that he was that mentally ill. I believe that he was a neurtoic sociopath, whose success at bamboozling people to follow him gave him license to expand his whole con.

            His paranoia was, to a certain extent, justified because he was engaged in, at best, shady activities, and he knew that he could be prosecuted. He believed in the preemptive strike against anyone who stood in his way, and he had learned that the sheer audacity and viciousness of it could silence critics.

            • Jon Atack

              Would you say that he was ‘mentally well’?

          • richelieu jr

            I hope he was terrified, Hole. Every. Damn. Minute. Of. Every. Damn. Day.

    • richelieu jr

      Close, XT–

      In fact, he sold it, possibly believing it worked, but when he fell afoul of the FDA, and went bankrupt, even selling the rights to Dianetics for next to nothing (about what they were worth in reality), he decided to become a Religion and therefore had to come up with some new nonsense.

      He latched onto the past life thign that Freud and Jung (and even he,a t first) had rejected as monkeyshines, and never looked back (or always looked back as he was a paranoid idiot.)

  • chuckbeattyexseaorg75to03

    Altitude of the boss theorist. Hypnotic suggestibility of the seekers, and unethical author peddling a hopeful “new” (borrowed) theory which the seeker gullible types presume has merit and they play along until it becomes painfully evident (sometimes years of suffering the claptrap theory and system) it’s not working.

    And still, today, there are long term members of the Dianetics (“Is there an earlier similar trauma?” diving into their imaginary past lives to find their “heavy charge” engrams) today who claim they’ve obtained life changing gains from the whole shebang. Hubbard at least, in my mind make the talk therapy trauma reduction launch into past lives that were science fiction movies that the person makes up themselves, turning into their own sci fi engram sleuthing explorers! Making it everyone’s co-fault for whatever crazy engrams they find in their past lives.

    Makes me remember the only writing in the red volumes by Mary Sue Hubbard, “The Way Ron Works”.

    She was a long term wife believer and supporter. Watching cripples give up their crutches after a Dianetics trauma reduction “session” by Ron, Mary Sue tells us Ron just couldn’t give up his practice and Ron thought it was worthwhile to continue the whole practice.

    Lawrence Wright’s final pages of his “Going Clear….” are still so underappreciated, where Hubbard admitted failure!

    Great thread Jon, thanks!

    • DeElizabethan

      Yes Chuck, the best part of the book for me, the failure, admitted in the final pages.

    • Observer

      “The Way Ron Works” caught my attention, so I tracked it down. Here it is in full for anyone who doesn’t want to go to marysuehubbard.com . Mary Sue was either Ron’s biggest dupe, or, having lived with Ron and seen firsthand how the “tech” didn’t work, a cynical and whole-hearted participant in the fraud. DISCLAIMER: It is 100% nauseating hero worship.

      ———-

      THE WAY RON WORKS
      By Mary Sue Hubbard

      Many people have questioned me regarding Ron’s research and
      investigation into the human mind. The funny thing is that the majority
      of the hundreds of research cases on whom he worked to give us the
      principles for building a better world were never aware of who he was or
      what he was doing. They had never heard of Dianetics or Scientology.
      All they knew or were aware of was that they felt better, their bad
      eyesight or maybe the limp in a once injured leg was gone.

      Wherever we have been it has always been the same, in England, Belgium,
      France, Germany, Spain, or here in our United States, rich or poor,
      young or old, diseased or insane, there has always been the hidden man,
      woman and child behind the scenes who were helped and who, but did they
      know it, were contributing to the furtherance of a science. To me, the
      most important foundation upon which Dianetics and Scientology is built
      was stated in the First Book, that is, “Man is basically good.” I know
      of no one who believes this as strongly as Ron does. It is my feeling
      that this alone in times of contemptuous press, financial difficulties,
      the betrayal of friends, times when it seemed that all he had built was
      crumbling to pieces, kept him going, kept him persisting to his goal of
      helping MAN.

      In Phoenix after the fall of Wichita, a producer with whom Ron had
      worked in Hollywood came to see us at our small apartment. He was
      offering Ron what would seem to the ordinary man like ice cream and cake
      for eternity. After picturing this dream in the clouds, he said to Ron,
      “Now, really, do you think this Dianetics, this research of yours, is
      worth it?” Ron sat for a very long time silent, his eyes closed. Finally
      after what had seemed like hours he opened his eyes, and said, “Yes!
      Yes I do.” After his producer friend left, I asked him why he had taken
      so long to answer. He replied, “I was watching pass before me a parade
      of all the people I had helped, their expression one of hope and faith
      in the goodness of the future. Nothing can be worth more to me than
      that.”

      And that’s the way he is. His belief in the innate goodness of Man, in
      being able to bring this and Man’s abilities to the fore continues him
      in his research. It enables him to communicate to anyone despite their
      physical disability to do so, or any language barrier.

      His preclears are all over the world. The time he has spent processing
      is too vast to enumerate. Even he does not know the hours; he works and
      there is no time to him. This used to be very disconcerting to me. I
      remember one time in Spain, I had spent the whole morning shopping in
      the market and the whole afternoon preparing dinner on one oil burner
      and a charcoal fire. This was a difficult process for one used to
      supermarkets and a gas range. Ron had gone to the park. Dinner time
      passed. The food got soupy from reheating and the charcoal supply got
      nil. My patience wilted and I went to the park. I found him sitting at a
      sidewalk cafe, a middle-aged Spaniard with him. He motioned me to sit
      down and be silent. He was processing. The fellow had been in the
      Russian army, had fought in the battle of Stalingrad and then had been
      forced into servitude in Siberia. His legs had been so badly frozen that
      they would not bend at the joints. This peglegged walk was to carry him
      through life and to deny him work because of his slowness. After Ron
      had finished, we invited him home to dinner. He walked naturally again.
      His realization of what had happened to him did not come until he walked
      to the door to leave. He suddenly stopped and began shouting, “I walk –
      I walk.”

      There are many such people and many more, you in the field have not been
      idle either these five years. Maybe someday we can realize Ron’s
      Project. Very few know about it, but someday he hopes to have every
      auditor in the field “who is worth his stuff as an auditor” on the HASI
      payroll. They would be given some person, someone in high government
      position, someone in the arts, someone in religion, people who are in
      the public eye and who supply thousands morale in the forms of good
      public works, books, paintings, humor, spiritual aid, to bird-dog until
      they submitted to processing. These auditors could then simply process
      and promote without depending upon public approval or financial support
      which is dependent upon public approval. Maybe someday we can accomplish
      this. It is a goal worth working toward. We, too, will have a better
      world someday.

      It is Ron’s dream and yours and mine.

      MARY SUE HUBBARD

      (from Ability Minor 3, ca. early April 1955)”

  • N. Graham

    It’s hard to tell just what Hubbard’s thoughts were–did he really think he was a genius on the level of Freud (and later a religious leader on the level of Buddha) and therefore was right about all the engrams and hypnotherapy? Or did he know he was perpetrating a big scam by recycling various therapies and just wanted to make more money than writing for a penny a word? I think he thought he was right about some of it at least and just figured a genius like himself could get people to do what he wanted them too and believe what he told them to believe because he was such an expert on the mind and mind control. By the time he got to the body thetans, he might have self-hypnotized himself into believing all the “data” he made up.

    • Mark Foster

      If you haven´t read Bare Faced Messiah and Let´s Sell These People A Piece of Blue Sky, definitely do so. Between the black magic, life-long drug use, native insanity, and a very conscious greed, I believe that skanky motherfucker knew he was scamming people. In the end, I could care less if he ¨believed¨ the bullshit he created.

      • Missionary Kid

        AMEN!

      • Mooser

        What gets me is that so many people were so eager to be used by L Ron, and hoped that L Ron’s ‘tech’ would give them the ability to use others.

      • N. Graham

        Thanks, I read those years ago. But it’s still a mystery to me. I know he knew he was conning people. but he was so crazy it’s hard to know, even if it’s evident he knew he was conning people, if he in the end conned himself also. I know he conned himself into believing he was a good writer.

    • Once_Born

      I don’t think Hubbard created a system of ‘mind control’ (it was a miracle he could control his own bladder).
      He likely suffered from the personality disorder malignant narcissism http://scicrit.wordpress.com/2014/06/18/malignant-narcissim-l-ron-hubbard-and-scientologys-policies-of-narcisstic-rage/ which means he was driven by the need to control people. Money is a means of control, so he wanted that, too.

      What he did was throw endless ideas at the wall and saw which ones stuck. Whenever something worked (brought him money and power) he did some more of it. The end result was a whole organisation which was a reflection of his personality – psychologically manipulative, controlling and greedy. He did not understand what he was doing – he was only concerned with what worked.

  • Jimmy3

    I was so giddy upon seeing Jon Atack’s name in the headline, and then he delivered yet another skewering of LRoon. This guy Jon Atack should have a regular feature here, or something.

    I would like to discuss this, though: “…he advocated the use of amphetamines rather than barbiturates in Dianetics: The Modern Science of Mental Health. Like barbiturates, they reduce the ability to reason, so increase hypnotic susceptibility”

    Is that true? How do amphetamines decrease the ability to reason and how are they comparable to barbiturates in terms of hypnotic susceptibility? It seems that amphetamines, at least in the short term, would make you more aware and less prone to hypnotism. That sounds like just another example of L. Ron screwing up.

    • D.Y.G.

      I’m confused by this as well. I always understood that amphetamines used properly increase awareness and alertness.

      • Captain Howdy

        Depends how much you do, what you’re doing, how little sleep you’ve had and how you do them. Swallowing some bennies or a couple black beauties is a much different thing than shooting meth. I use to tweak so hard I couldn’t talk, I would just sit and stare at the wall for 12 hrs..hey! I was doing TR’s.

        • Sherbet

          You’re an OT, and you didn’t even know it.

          • Captain Howdy

            Operating Tweaker

            • joan nieman

              Captain you made me laugh out loud! That is a great description of O.T. Operating Tweaker. I love it!

            • http://scientoonery.tumblr.com/ Nat-lificent

              Me too.

            • Mooser

              “Operating Tweaker”

              Well done!! Good timing! Bravo!!

            • http://scientoonery.tumblr.com/ Nat-lificent

              You win everything! (refresh)

          • Bury_The_Nuts

            And it probably cost him less money than Scientology…………..
            Or at least I hope so.

        • Jimmy3

          Sleep deprivation is much more detrimental to your thought processes than the actual effects of any form of amphetamine. But that is a side effect. So, you’re right, it would depend on how much you’ve taken and how long you’ve gone without sleep.

        • richelieu jr

          BEt your sock door was immaculate, though, wasn’t it, Cap’n?

    • Drat

      Amphetamines increase focus, which is why I believe they are popular among some students. Heightened focus can also lead to heightened suggestibility.

      • Jimmy3

        There’s a line to be drawn between suggestibility and mind control/hypnotism. And I know this isn’t at all what you were saying Drat, so I’m not trying to put words in your mouth, but there are people who believe television advertisements are a form of mind control because they always show happy people using their products and they are happy happy happy using their happy, awesome products. No, that’s only mind control if you’re an idiot.

        I think the same applies to any sort of amphetamine. Yes, it heightens your focus temporarily, but one would only focus on and fall for a con if they were already gullible to begin with. I don’t see how heightened focus could lead one to fall for something they would be skeptical of while sober.

        • Mooser

          “There’s a line to be drawn between suggestibility and mind control/hypnotism”

          That may be true, but it is incontestable that there’s a line between love and fascination, hard to see on an evening such as this. And, moreover, they both give the very same sensation, when you’re lost in the magic of a kiss!
          Everybody knows that.

          • richelieu jr

            For the last time– Get your hand off my knee.

        • Drat

          See my edit.

    • richelieu jr

      I know the Nazis did experiements in which they claimed a temporary 10 point IQ gain amongst soldiers taking speed before battle (as all SS did- That or Cocaine, their equivalent of the water glass of vodka Russian soldiers were given, I suppose)

      My subjective experience is that I learned more quickly, had increased hand-eye coordination, and was able to integrate difficult concepts easily (some of which I had really broken my teeth on before).

      This, of course, is anecdotal.

      I also began to develop signs of psychosis.

      • Jimmy3

        Was the psychosis due to the drug itself, or due to sleep disruption caused by the drug? It may seem like nitpicking, but there is a major difference.

        • richelieu jr

          I was up for an awful long time. Repeatedly, Jimmy…

          • Jimmy3

            I know it well. I have taken long vacations away from remland, too. I have stories that are hilarious, and I have stories that are painful and embarrassing.

      • Mark Foster

        You forgot to insert the barbiturates in the regimen for, um, balance…

        • richelieu jr

          My bad, Mark.

          • Mark Foster

            Wait, you are French? Wine and Speed!

            • richelieu jr

              Yes, I am French.

  • Panopea Abrupta

    $cientology: turning water into whines since 1952
    $cientology: turning wine into vinegar since 1952

    And to paraphrase the apocryphal Freud quote, sometimes the cans are only a con.

    • Mark Foster

      Yes, cancel the can con.

  • chuckbeattyexseaorg75to03

    The heavily pitch-saturated Scientology followers need one more new pitch,

    “Try Real Life!!
    “It’s the new product that all Scientologists have been missing!
    “Cheaper than paying your money to make up imaginary past life engrams!”

    • chuckbeattyexseaorg75to03

      If I had access to the Refund/Repayment stats, I could do an ad for the back pages of the Advance Mag and Auditor Mag, saying:

      “Highest Ever’s In Refund/Repayment Delays!”

      “Highest Numbers of Apathetic Quitters Denied the Standard Hubbard Quit Fast Option!”

  • Zer0

    Carl Jung also tried using abreaction therapy on his patients, but gave it up because of false memories:

    “Many traumata were so unimportant, even so normal, that they could be
    regarded at most as a pretext for the neurosis. But what especially
    aroused my criticism was the fact that not a few traumata were simply
    inventions of fantasy and had never happened at all”

    • Alanzo

      Yes. When you are visiting a person and paying them money to find and “run” traumatic incidents so you can rid yourself of whatever is eating you up inside, there is a lot of pressure to come up with a traumatic incident to run.

      Soon you will start creating them automatically in order to run them so that you can get the relief that you so desperately need. This will happen especially when you have been trained to go with your first impressions in order to “develop” the incident.

      Pretty soon you are running space opera and blowing up planets, and feeling guilty for all the people you killed.

      That’s when signing a billion year slave labor contract sounds like a pretty good idea as your whole track amends project for all the planets you’ve destroyed and all the children that you have murdered.

      This is how the mindfuck works.

      Unlike Jung, Hubbard went with it.

      That’s what makes Jung a well meaning psychologist, and L Ron Hubbard a piece of shit.

      Alanzo

      • Jimmy3

        I’m sorry that I stood by and watched while my grandfather killed your grandfather on Zorglon VI for stealing a Snickers bar. I could have spoken up. I am sorry.

        Jimmy3

        • richelieu jr

          So where’s my fucking snickers, war criminal?

          • Jimmy3

            That’s why I feel so bad about it… A decent Zorglon was executed, and the Snickers bar in question was in my zorg pouch the whole time. I stole it. I did. And I never even ate it because it had melted. As everyone knows, Zorglon VI gets almost as hot as Zorglon II was before the Psychs blew it up after that unfair FDA ruling. It’s definitely not a planet suited for storing a declious, chocolatey, nougaty candy bar in your zorg pouch. But no matter which planet you are on, a melted Snickers bar is gross.

            • D.Y.G.

              I will eat your melted Snickers bar.

            • Jimmy3

              Hahahaha if you knew what that meant on Zorglon VI… wow…

            • richelieu jr

              “Gross..” …and REPLACABLE, I think you mean! Hand it over!

      • KNMF

        “”That’s what makes Jung a well meaning psychologist, and L Ron Hubbard a piece of shit.””

        Yes yes.
        And Hubbard had such a specific endgame he was happy to discard whatever
        didn’t fit into his scheme, and was able to add stuff like TRs to
        really soften-up his subjects for command and control.

      • Zer0

        False memories. One of many ways that Scientology creates a false reality for its victims.

      • DeElizabethan

        Right Alanzo. I had guilt for years thinking I helped blow up a planet, tho I had to justify it over and over. Then found out hey, wasn’t me just some clinging vines. Oh, and I saved about half a million $. What a piece of shit L Ron Hubbard was and his written stuff is, for sure!

    • richelieu jr

      I thought of this immediately when I heard of Dianetics, Zer0.. Which book is hta tin, again? It’s one of the basic Jung texts,as I recall– Perhaps even his exchanges with Freud?…

  • Victoria Pandora

    Seems the big goal of Scientology was to be in present time. Anyone else feel a huge wave of dread when Broeker announced that this is how far back we would all be going to achieve that goal?

  • Victoria Pandora

    Lets try that again.

  • Panopea Abrupta

    Christianity: faith, hope and charity
    $cientology: fake, broke and vanity

  • kemist

    The use of hypnosis for “therapy” has another very interesting consequence for someone whose aim is mind control : it is known to make subjects fabricate very convincing memories simply by repeated suggestive questions or commands.

    This was not widely known up to the “recovered memory therapy” fad in the 80’s, when a series of court cases about imaginary satanic ritual crimes ( the Satanic Panic) prompted psychologists to investigate the method.

    It is now understood that the problem in traumatic stress is not that you’ve forgotten what happened, it’s that you remember too much.

    Perhaps Hubbard became aware of this as he used his followers as guinea pigs.

    • TheHoleDoesNotExist

      This

  • chukicita

    Wow. Thank you, Mr. Atack and Mr. Ortega for this thought-provoking piece.

    I’ve always wondered about the Sciento-illogical premise of memories of bad experiences getting in the way of achieving godly goals. How exactly does that work?

    I was taught that bad experiences usually contain important lessons. Like, sticking your hand in the fire will burn. If you don’t retain your bad memories or are *completely* desensitized to their meaningfulness, how the hell do you survive?

    i would have made a lousy Scientologist.

    • richelieu jr

      So did Hubbard.

  • Anonymous

    I had been reading some Freud and Darwin when I first heard about and began reading Dianetics. In retrospect, because of the legitimacy of the two mentioned authors, when I encountered ideas similar to theirs in Dianetics it created a turning point. One the one hand, I should have been suspicious and realized Dianetics was a rehash of already covered ground…instead, I simply assumed that Hubbard had done some advanced work along the lines of more established investigators and had refined that work into something more streamlined. Sheesh.

    As many others have mentioned, in my earlier days it also never occurred to me that someone would boldly lie in a book about important topics. Sheesh again.

    As an aside, bleow is an image of the first page of Volume 1., Number 1 of the seven page Foundation Bulletins (sic). This one was issued immediately after Hubbard had recovered all the trademarks and copyrights to Dianetics following the battles and collapse of the original organizations. The full document is classic Hubbard…bizarre, rambling assertions explaining the otherwise ordinary elements of reasserting control over a lost enterprise, snark about competition and of course (because it’s Hubbard) pleas for money and several things for sale.

    As far back as one cares to look, Hubbard was busy being Hubbard.

    • lucille austero

      This is very interesting! “Signalizing” is now my new word of the day.

    • Bob

      I went to my old Science of Survival book book II page 227 and could not find what Jon Atack was referring to. Anyone find that in their SOS book. The new version of the book has completely different page numbers. What chapter is it in?

      “without further “research,” went with the “reverie” or light trance approach abandoned by Freud fifty years earlier. He soon admitted that this technique was hypnotic, in Science of Survival (Book II, p.227). Beyond his extensive terminology, there is nothing original in Dianetics. Freud abandoned the a……….”

      • richelieu jr

        He’s pretty careful about identifying which edition he’s speaking of in APOBS…

        Jon, are you around to clear this up?

        • Jimmy3

          Sometimes Jon Atack will come and respond to comments, but it’s usually a few days after the article is posted.

      • Anonymous

        Bob – speaking of pain and such…I just can’t bring myself to wade through Hubbard’s drivel again to find the reference that Jon is discussing.

        Here is a link to Science of Survival as a PDF…possibly from 1951. It is a version that no longer carries a dedication to Hubbard’s daughter Alexis as did the first edition (the dedication has been changed to another daughter, Diana) but still includes the even later removed mentions of great thinkers from history.

        http://www.e-reading.ws/bookreader.php/133980/Hubbard_-_Science_of_Survival._Prediction_of_Human_Behavior.pdf

        My advice: Don’t spend too much time trying to make sense out of nonsense.

        • Bob

          Anonymous, thanks. I have that PDF and I have the current book. I agree it’s probably not worth trying to find. He contradicts himself so much it can be pretty exasperating.

    • TheHoleDoesNotExist

      We are in a much more sophisticated, educated culture today and able to spot fakes with ease. Also, Google.

      [IMG]http://i.imgur.com/plqFOVS.jpg?2[/IMG]

  • villagedianne

    Hypnosis is still used as a therapeutic tool:

    http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Hypnotherapy

    Hypnotherapy is another modality that Hubbard re-used, mis-used and ab-used.

    • KNMF

      And very importantly, Hubbard the liar denied he was hypnotizing.

      In fact he said he was doing the opposite. He always re-labeled.

      • villagedianne

        Yes I remember Scientologists insisting “It’s Not hypnosis!”

        • KNMF

          Hubbard said his processing woke people up.

          • Mooser

            Funny thing, a hynotist at a party was unable to hypnotize me (it happens) and he asked me “Do you smoke pot?” and when I said “yeah” he said “That’s why, I’ll try somebody else.”
            I haven’t stopped smoking pot since. I’m not letting nobody take over my mind!

            • KNMF

              I kind of let mother nature have her way with me also, but she doesn’t have an agenda.
              I think Dennis Erlich’s exit counseling for cult victims might have real merit.

        • KNMF

          “An engram is actually a hypnotic suggestion…Dianetics wakes people up. It is not hypnotism, which puts people to sleep. Dianetic therapy wakes them up. Hypnotism puts them to sleep. Can you ask for a wider difference in polarity?”

          L. Ron Hubbard
          Dianetics: The Modern Science of Mental Health

          • villagedianne

            I’ve been hypnotized. I was not asleep. I was in a very relaxed state. My eyes were closed but I was aware of my surroundings. I could hear noises in the room and traffic noises outside the window. Hubbard seems to have played on peoples’ ignorance of what hypnotism is. People thought it was all like stage hypnotism.

            • KNMF

              And he taught people to hypnotize and told them they were auditing. He industrialized hypnosis, but he never could have done it if he used the actual word “hypnosis.”

  • 0tessa

    A commenter named Valery wrote something interesting as a reaction to the posting of Mike Rinder of July 8th.
    She described how Hubbard experimented with drugs (barbiturates) on her and others WHILE THEY WERE IN SCIENTOLOGY and how they were pressed to never talk about this for the rest of their lives. But she decided to talk about it nevertheless. She describes how badly it affected her.
    So apparently Hubbard continued with his drugs experiments even on scientologists. This was completely new to me.

    • richelieu jr

      Link please!

      • PRenaud
        • 0tessa

          Thank you. I didn’t know how to do that.

          • Missionary Kid

            Otessa, how you copy a link is from Disqus (at least in Windows based computers) is to point at the time stamp that says how long ago something was posted, then right click on it. A menu will appear with choices like
            Open link in new tab
            Open link in new window
            Open link in incognito window
            Save link as..
            Copy link address (I added the boldface to that choice)

            When you left click on Copy link address, that address is saved to your notepad. All you have to do is open up a reply or a comment, and comment and paste that link address to it from your notepad.

            I hope that isn’t too confusing.

        • richelieu jr

          Thanks!

  • Panopea Abrupta

    Has anyone ever entertained the idea that perhaps Lord Hubris of Tilden was not a narcissistic greedy cruel dishonest manipulative self-centred crook but merely dyslexic?

    What if those voices he heard were saying:

    “Ron, you have been chosen by Dog.”

    Body-thetans?

    Pshaw, it was DOG who was talking to him.

    • Jimmy3

      When my dogs talk to me like that, I put them in their crates. They hate when I call them crates, too, because as my one dog said, “WTF do you mean by ‘crate’? That’s merely a PC word for ‘cage’, you jerk. Give me a goddam biscuit right now and I won’t kill you.”

      He got a lot of crate time for that remark.

      • Mooser

        I got up this morning, and found my dog masticating the last of last night’s dinner, a BBQ rib steak. She is so good at ignoring food until we get complacent about putting it out of her reach.

        • Mooser

          Wife came home for lunch, we checked with each other, yup, in between when she left for work, and when I came upstairs, Dora got the rib-eye.

  • Missionary Kid

    OT. This is for Baby, about the Insane Clown Posse Juggaloes: http://www.huffingtonpost.com/2014/07/09/insane-clown-posse-juggalos-gang_n_5570088.html I think she’ll love this.

    • D.Y.G.

      I don’t really have an opinion of Juggalos as a street gang, but the ACLU is representing them so it might just be an unfair label. That said, the whole lot of them are just ridiculous.

      • Missionary Kid

        It’s an excuse to act like assholes. the quote that made me chuckle included the phrase, “clear their name.”

        • D.Y.G.

          According to Baby, they are total assholes. And they’re armed with Faygo.

    • Hingle McCringleberry

      If not for the ICP, my coworkers and I wouldn’t be able to shake our head solemnly and declare ‘Fuckin magnets. . .’ any time a situation pops up that doesn’t make immediate sense or requires even remotely complex thinking. National treasures, Shaggy 2 Dope and Violent J.

  • ze moo

    Well said Jon, puts the 1950 setting in context and shows where Lroon got his woo. ‘Blue Sky’ is wonderful book, I look forward to the updated version.

    • Mark Foster

      The updated version is EXCELLENT(SO WAS THE ORIGINAL)…Atack is an engaging writer with a subtle, dry wit. Get it! :)

  • http://twitter.com/Scientology_411 Scientology_411

    Many thanks to Jon and Tony for this absolutely fascinating and eye-opening information.

  • Anonymous

    An interesting opinion piece in last Sunday’s New York Times titled “When Belief and Facts Collide.” It is worth the read and a link is below.

    An excerpt:

    “Mr. Kahan’s study suggests that more people know what scientists think about high-profile scientific controversies than polls suggest; they just aren’t willing to endorse the consensus when it contradicts their
    political or religious views. This finding helps us understand why my colleagues and I have found that factual and scientific evidence is often ineffective at reducing misperceptions and can even backfire on issues like weapons of mass destruction, health care reform and vaccines. With science as with politics, identity often trumps the facts.”

    The full piece is here:

    http://www.nytimes.com/2014/07/06/upshot/when-beliefs-and-facts-collide.html?_r=0

    • Mooser

      “evidence is often ineffective at reducing misperceptions and can even backfire on issues like weapons of mass destruction,”

      Gosh, I would think that subject is one the Times would like to avoid.

      • Anonymous

        It is a true observation that the author’s own anecdotal examples of the very phenomenon he describes, gives insight into his own political leanings.

        Still, the article provides a reasonable big picture framework for understanding why some seemingly clear settled-science issues are not accepted within certain circles.

        • Mooser

          “Mr. Kahan’s study suggests that more people know what scientists think
          about high-profile scientific controversies than polls suggest; they
          just aren’t willing to endorse the consensus when it…”

          …contradicts what all the loud bullies and bigots and ignoramuses are shouting, and since they’ve been validated by major media sources, well, what’s the use?

  • http://www.skippress.com/ Skip Press

    Jon, I wonder if you’ve ever heard or chased down the rumor that someone at Oak Knoll died and left behind a manuscript that Elwrong absconded with. Two men who had been in the hospital with Bigmouth told me that he was never very sick, but was well-known as a gigantic pain in the ass hypochondriac, and one of those men was a PhD when I was in touch with him. Anyone who’s ever done the OT-TR-0 or TR-0 practices on the first part of the old Communications Course, who also knows about hypnosis, can easily see that these are simply preparatory conditioning exercises for the brainwashing that goes on later “up the Bridge.”

  • Mark

    So the whole farrago could be said to have started out with the malingering Tublard’s “suspected ulcer” being treated with a tranquilliser, essentially as a result of two well-intentioned psychiatrists straying beyond their specialism into gastroenterology?

    These days he’d probably be treated with a receptor-blocking drug like ranitidine, possibly an antibiotic, and maybe a bit of talking-therapy if he kept on complaining. He’d have had much less chance to bullshit a group-therapy session rather than an individual psychiatrist – though most of the shrinks at Oak Knoll seem to have seen through him quickly enough. Thank goodness for medical progress!

    • richelieu jr

      They give him a Tums or a Tagamet if necessary and send his cowardly hypochondriac ass back to the front where he’d hopefully be shot and improve the world greatly.

      • Mark

        The Tagamet might work as an antihistamine if it really was a stress-related ulcer, but a simple antacid like a Tums would be useless if it really was a stress-related ulcer. I don’t think it was a stress-related ulcer at all, but a greed-related ulcer, considering how tubby Tubbo Tublard got in the late 40s…

        • jeff

          But ulcers are now known to be mostly caused by heliobacter pylori, a bacterium that is easily cured with antibiotics.

          • Mark

            Barry Marshall bravely drinking a petri-dish full of helicobacter culture! But that was more to do with chronic gastritis and not so much stress ulcers: they’re a symptom rather than a cause.

          • Mooser

            “But ulcers are now known to be mostly caused by heliobacter pylori, a bacterium that is easily cured with antibiotics.”

            Stress may, and food might, and certainly alchohol does seem to have a lot to do with making the ol’ tum-tum (I like to use the correct technical terms) susceptible to the heliobacters hovering in the stomachular region.

        • richelieu jr

          Exactly— I suspect it was a ‘laziness’ ‘fear of being found out as a fraud’ ulcer after his naval misadventures… That was the real thrust of my post…

    • Mooser

      And they would probably inquire into his drinking habits and suggest he stop, perhaps even note that drinking is contraindicated with ulcer medications and therapy. But you never now.

    • grundoon

      Lt. Hubbard’s ailments seemed to be of the kind that would render him unfit for combat yet could not be disproven under the closest examination by Navy doctors. Perhaps the medicos, unable to find anything physically wrong with Hubbard, referred him to the psychiatrists. The psychiatrists gave him phenobarbitol to quiet him down and stop him running around the hospital sticking his nose into everyone’s business and telling them how to do their jobs.

      • Mark

        Oh, if only Thorazine had been available back then!

  • Richard Grant

    I think this ongoing series of posts by Jon Atack — along with contributions by other posters, including Tony — are having a significant effect. Not just by making us all more aware of Hubbard’s biography and the evolution of his ideas, but by shifting the whole discussion among ex-members and church critics from a narrow focus on Dave M’s misdeeds to a broader appreciation of the true nature of Scientology from the get-go.

    Just yesterday, for example, there were notable posts on the two other most prominent Scientology blogs that exemplify this new style of thinking. Mike Rinder posted a leaked e-mail announcing a campaign to hard-sell another batch of Hubbard’s writing — but *fiction* this time: a curious story collection called “Hell Job” that purportedly is drawn from the various heroic things that Ron did on the hard road to godhood.

    Mike finds this insane. And he levels a rather devastating comment, aimed at, I’m pretty sure, those of his readers who still believe in the goodness of LRH and the Tech:

    “This is part of the craziness that opens the door to those on the other side … who point to this and then use the lies he told about his life to “prove” there is no value to anything his name is connected to. Scientology keeps pushing the line that he led a miracle life of astonishing accomplishments and feats.”

    Meanwhile Marty Rathbun put his finger on a problem that seems to affect many former church members, which has been mentioned lately here:

    “If one buys into the indoctrination that the causes of his problems of consciousness or awareness are ‘over there’ one is in for a long, painful and wheel-spinning haul. Unfortunately, many former cult members simply continue to abide by the enemy-assignment mental machinery. They just change the target of their wrath.”

    This is a different sort of discussion than we were having just a couple of years ago. So thank you, Jon and everyone else who has gotten us here.

    • Mooser

      “Unfortunately, many former cult members simply continue to abide by the
      enemy-assignment mental machinery. They just change the target of their
      wrath.”

      The only way Rathbun can remove himself from that awful cycle is by stopping the suit. I get the feeling that’s what he’s been working himself up to. He may feel he has more to lose by winning.I guess we will see.

      • chukicita

        The lawsuit? It’s not his suit. It’s Mosey’s, right?

        • http://frankdisalleisadummy.wordpress.com/ Get Chutney Love

          Yeah, legally only she could end it unless she was declared mentally incompetent(which was probably part of the MicroTyrants tactics aimed against her: To drive her out of her mind.).

          • Mooser

            “Yeah, legally only she could end it”

            Absolutely true, Mrs. Rathbun will have to be the one who actually pulls the plug.
            I just have a bad feeling about what Marty’s been publishing on his blog. Maybe I’m wrong.

    • richelieu jr

      I agree ont he merits of this discussion, but I think you give far to much credit to Rinder in this instance. Even by mentioning ‘the other side’ he is doing what Marty is speaking of. The goal is to prove that Hubbard did produce something of merit…

      The Indies resemble more and more to me the rag-picking Gypsies I see in the dumps by the highway here in France, picking up scraps of crap and then trying to foist them on tourists as baubles and ancient relics.

      They will build a giant idol of Hubbard if they have to do it out of their own blood, money, scraps of stolen books, their dreams and the bodies of their children.

      50 Million Hubbard Fans Can’t Be Wrong! Hitler loved his dog, right?

      • Juicer77

        Sure did, right until he had her poisoned. True story.

        • richelieu jr

          Wow! Do tell! Was it in the Bunker?

          • Captain Howdy

            He didn’t want the ruskies getting their hands on her.

          • Juicer77

            Yes along with her pups, I believe to test its efficacy for human suicides. Excellent book by James P. O’Donnell called “The Bunker.” Grim reading but very interesting.

      • http://frankdisalleisadummy.wordpress.com/ Get Chutney Love

        It’s a psychological trap. In the guise of setting peoples minds free, they merely encase them in a LRH gilded cage made of gibberish and psychopathology.

        From “The Notebooks of Lazarus Long”:

        God is omnipotent, omniscient, and omnibenevolent-it says so right here on the label. If you have a mind capable of believing all three of these divine attributes simultaneously, I have a wonderful bargain for you. No checks, please. Cash and in small bills.

        • Once_Born

          Also from ‘The Notebooks’

          One man’s theology is another man’s belly laugh

      • http://www.tingleff.org/jensting/muslinger/ Jens TINGLEFF

        Rinder has come a way, and he is allowing very antagonistic comments (i don’t know if this is a change). He still has a long way to go, IMHO, but several of his commentards make him look like a model of wisdom…

    • Mighty Korgo of Teegeeack

      Thanks for your balanced and insightful comment,

      Richard. If your icon is a picture of you we are about the same age. I got into this mess before Miscavige reached puberty. When I got out, two years later, and reflected a bit, the only person to blame was Hubbard. While Miscavige has his own way of being cruel and deceitful, Hubbard was the master. I tend to think that people are harder on Miscavige because they experienced the ugliness of the cult through him, just as I did through Hubbard. If it wasn’t for Hubbard, Miscavige would probably be a crooked bond salesman for a medium sized company.

      Miscavige was raised in it, like Michael Corleone. What more could anyone expect of a cult leader? On the plus side (and from their point of view) he has cowed the IRS and taken in Tom Cruise. He “found” the “inaccuracies” in Hubbard’s books and removed them from later editions. He got their real estate fixed up. He socked away at least two billion dollars, enough to make the cult almost invulnerable.

      When people leave the cult it is too painful to say, “I messed up”. They need somebody to blame it on. So, as I have seen time and again, they go into “L.Ron is great” mode, and blame the fix they are in on internal politics. They join the Freezone. It takes a long time to be able to say, “I made a horrible mistake. How could I have let this happen to me”. Many never say it.

    • Jon Atack

      My pleasure. The broader debate concerns the actual ‘workability’ of the ‘tech’. When Blue Sky went to the publisher, he insisted on removing a chapter that suggested that Hub’s life and times were irrelevant to the scientific analysis of the ‘tech’. I pointed out that Freud had made up about half of his case studies in The Interpretation of Dreams (and we no longer dare mention Cyril Burt on inherited intelligence!).

      It isn’t whether the fabulisms about the Hub bring down bad publicity, as Mike’s site suggests, but to what extent the claims of scn are true. I tend towards Nibs’ idea that the tech works not as his father said, but as his father intended.

      I’ve said it often enough – the claims are false. There were no clears back in 1950, nor were there any after McMaster was ordered to attest in the sixties. There are none now, either. There are also no OTs, no Communication, Problems or any other type of releases. The tech doesn’t lead to ‘success in any walk of life’ – often as not it leads to catastrophe, bankruptcy and ill health. It does follow the usual hypnotic formula – using repetition, perceptual fixation and mimicry it brings about a ‘reverie’ state, an obedient, euphoria which becomes addictive. I’ve mentioned ludic loops in another comment. I’m currently fascinated by the ability to entrain a routine into an individual. Chinese School, anyone?

      Hubbard said that if you want to control someone you introvert them, and scn does exactly that. It does not lead to super-IQ, total resistance to disease, the cure of all ills or a love of humanity. The only attempt made by Hub to scientifically assess his procedures is reported in part in Science of Survival (he says that pain-drug-hypnosis was used to implant an engram, the content of which was not recovered using dianetics). He realized that scientific assessment would undermine his fanciful claims (leukemia is caused by an engram containing the phrase ‘it turns my blood to water’, for instance). If there is anyone out there who really wants to check this stuff out, they should set up the standard testing systems used for psychotherapy and see how it performs. And if it doesn’t, there is an end to the debate!

  • Jeff Jacobsen

    LRH just sucked up all the theories around him, let them slush around in his brain, and decided that what spilled out was genius. I tried to gather some of his sources here; http://www.xenu.net/archive/lrhbare/lrhbare08.html

  • http://umbraxenu.no-ip.biz/mediawiki/index.php/Main_Page RMycroft

    News flash from tomorrow in downunder: Scientologists ‘eyeing’ $35m lab July 10, 2014, The Australian.

    THE Church of Scientology is thought to be close to buying the National Acoustic Laboratory site on Sydney’s north shore for about $35 million.

    Since Sydney was already made an Idle Org in May, this real estate deal would make less sense than usual. *shrug*

    • richelieu jr

      SNAFU:

      SCIENTOLOGY: Always Making Less Sense Than Usual.

    • ze moo

      Or is the clampire hiding money in plain sight? It’s a self help pyramid scheme, it’s an alien brain cootie exorcism cult, it’s drug rehab scam, it’s a tax exempt ‘religious’ real estate portfolio. It’s everything but a floor wax or desert topping.

      • Juicer77

        Helloooooooo, IRS? The real estate portfolio thing is getting pretty transparent, don’t you think? Legal minds in the Bunker please tell us if there is any way this would prove they are not a “public benefit” group in court.

        • ze moo

          Unfortunately, the IRS has never had a ‘public benefit’ test.

      • richelieu jr

        Have you tried it on frozen yogurt? It’s Hitleriffic!

      • http://umbraxenu.no-ip.biz/mediawiki/index.php/Main_Page RMycroft

        It’s possible that the property owners are trying to drum up interest in a dud property. “Is thought to be close to buying” sounds awfully vague. You could make any kind of story sound believable if you include Scientology.

        It’s like Toronto’s Rob Ford: Just how crazy would a Rob Ford story have to be, that most people would immediately say “Wait, that can’t be true!”

  • richelieu jr

    I am always amazed by some of the tremendous intellects that Scientology managed to suck in…

    I will forever be grateful that Jon Atack took the bait, for I find his perceptions often to be absolutely revelatory. If you ahven’t read A Piece of Blue Sky, do.

    • DrGreatCham

      It held the promise of uniting scientific principles and mysticism, what C.S. Lewis called being a “materialist magician,” i.e., doing away with talk of “spirits” in favor of “forces,” or “thetans” in this instance. Con men often like to target intelligent yet egotistical people and the cynical. They often prove to be the easiest to fool if you have a good grasp of practical psychology:

      http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Kansas_City_Shuffle

      • richelieu jr

        All con men target egotists…

        • Mark Foster

          and idealists…

      • richelieu jr

        Well put, Doc.

    • FromPolandWithLove

      Being sucked in something evil disguised as good is unfortunately faith of a lot of idealists. In my country a lot of great minds were supporting comunist regime after 1945. At least in the beginning.

      • ze moo

        After the failed Warsaw uprising in 44, there were no ‘Poland will be independent’ people left. Behind the Red Army there was the NKVD, and they just shot anyone who supported the Polish government in exile. When the writing is on the wall in big red letters, you get the idea very quickly.

        • FromPolandWithLove

          Partialy You have right, but Lubelski Goverment ( Pro Soviet) wasn’t formed only from frightened people. There were enthusiasts too. Big part of “Poland will be independent” people unfortunately left far away from country on the exile in England, where it was difficult to stay in touch with reality in motherland.

          • ze moo

            Along with the NKVD came the Polish communists who lived in Russia for many years. When the Uprisings Home Army was forced to surrender, there wasn’t anyone left to stand up to the Russians. and Stalin was not going to let any western leaning government take hold. The Polish communists hunted down anyone in the Home Army. Look up ‘Churchills Naught Document’ and see how Europe was split up.

            https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=990N6pXv3UQ

            If there is any one person who is brought down communism and the Iron Curtain, it is Karol Wojtyła, John Paul 2. I give great credit to Solidarity and all who helped them too.

            • http://www.skippress.com/ Skip Press

              True that – if you ever saw the documentary about it that Newt Gingrich exec produced (I’m not crazy about him, just the doc), the conclusion is undeniable that John Paul II made it happen – the commie authorities realized they couldn’t control the people.

    • DrGreatCham

      Speaking to that, here’s an interesting blog post on William S. Burroughs’ relationship with SCN:

      “So what are we supposed to make of all this? On one level it’s hard to
      say, but what ought to be abundantly clear is that Burroughs took
      Scientology quite seriously indeed for the better part of a
      decade—during what was arguably his most artistically fertile period.
      Burroughs clearly had his own uses for Scientology. Gysin once quipped
      that Burroughs was probably the first person to make more money from
      Scientology than the organization made from him. This may be true, but
      Burroughs wasn’t investigating the Church cynically. Today, where so
      much attention focuses on the science fictional origins of Scientology,
      it is easy to forget how seemingly in harmony the Church was with a
      whole range of countercultural, “New Age,” and anti-psychiatric
      practices in the Sixties.”

      http://io9.com/5800673/william-s-burroughss-wild-ride-with-scientology

      • richelieu jr

        The recent book, WM S Burroughs and The Strange Cult (I Think?) is a great book, if a bit of a dry read (especially if you’re not a Burroughs fan.)

        Still it really goes into what passes for a brief flirtation in most bios, but really lasted more than a decade with Burroughs even attesting to ‘clear’…

  • FOTF2012

    Fascinating. On another blog just yesterday I had shared that at this point I don’t think Hubbard had any original ideas — at least none that would stand up to scientific research.

    A couple other tidbits I’ve come across:

    Precursor to the e-meter? In a large tome entitled, Experimental Researches (1937, Princeton Press), Carl Jung recorded dozens of psychological experiments using the “Galvanometer” and the “Pnemograph.” Jung reportedly abandoned the use of such devices because he did not find them useful and perhaps not accurate.

    Dianetics theory is that you go over an incident repeatedly until it either “erases” (moves from the reactive mind to the analytical mind with a release of charge, good indicators, and a realization) or you find an earlier similar incident and keep going down a chain until you find the “basic” on that chain. This can actually have a positive effect in various cases (in my own experience as a “PC” and an “auditor”). However, it turns out that in some types of PTSD and maybe other cases, this repetitive rememorization and review of an incident serves to consolidate the memory — to make it more prominent. (See for example the informal article at http://www.american-buddha.com/begley.spotmind.htm that gives some research leads.)

    Presumably a more consolidated memory would show up as increasing in charge on the e-meter, at which point the auditor would look for an earlier similar incident. At that point the only way the PC can proceed, if there is no current life incident, is for the mind to create a previous life incident. In Scientology, this is called “going Whole Track.” After 60 years of auditing records, Scientology has had ample time to produce reams of documentation about well-researched and validated past life memories that would stand up to objective research. The fact that it has not produced compelling evidence indicates another possibility: Dianetics, as abreactive therapy, does not work in resolving chains of incidents in a person’s life; therefore the mind derails into creative past life memory, which opens the possibility of every kind of “memory” imaginable. The fact that PCs can go “Whole Track” then becomes proof not that Dianetics works, but that it does not work.

    So it appears that Dianetics built itself on abreactive therapy which proved unworkable, used an electronic tool similar to that Jung had experimented with and found not useful, uses a technique that can consolidate painful memories that it claims to “erase,” using Training Routines that can in some ways regress a person psychologically and make them more suggestible and controllable, and use a technique that prompts the mind to create probably imaginary memories — evidence for the “imaginary” part being the lack of scientific corroboration.

    Mr. Hubbard, in the school of life, gets the following grades in my estimation:
    Science — F
    Dianetics — F, plagiarism, not citing sources
    Analytical reasoning and critical thinking — F
    Research techniques and verifiable records — F
    Ethics — F
    Smashing his way into history — A
    Creating a religion — A
    Organizational theory and practice — F

    I truly wish it could be said otherwise. How awesome it would have been if the actual states of Clear and OT would have been achieved, as Hubbard originally described them!

    • richelieu jr

      Wonderful!

    • Mooser

      “Upon solid evidence of any true Homo Novus or OT, I will be the first to eat my words.”

      Extraordinary claims require extraordinary proof. To start debunking an extraordinary claim before extraordinary proof has even been offered is to dignify the extraordinary claim far beyond its wont, and a waste of time.

  • Artoo45

    On my way to The Amazing Meeting in Las Vegas. Scientology will come up in my meetings about next year’s schedule. I think a panel with our host as moderator would be quite riveting.

    • Dancing Cranberry

      YESSS!

    • Missionary Kid

      TAM is something that I’d like to participate in some day. It’s got some of the leading skeptics around, including James Randi and Pen Gillette, both magicians and hard to fool. http://www.amazingmeeting.com/
      I’d sure like to see Tony there, too some time.

    • TheHoleDoesNotExist

      I’d like to see one of Hubbard’s and one of Miscavige’s videos including in the entertainment media section of the conference, just for fun.

      • Missionary Kid

        A video like that would create laughter borne of incredulity, punctuated with eye-rolling and snicker-snorting, as well as wise-ass, but appropriate comments.

  • Alfred_E_Noumenon

    This reminds me of the John Huston documentary film that I think is titled “Let There Be Light” from the 1940’s where they filmed abreactive therapy. Y’all are probably familiar with it already. I have it on VHS in a box here somewhere. I just found this online…

    http://youtu.be/kDNoaSMKx0g

    • Alfred_E_Noumenon

      Well, I finally scrolled through the rest of the comments and see someone already posted this. oops!

      • MaxSpaceman

        It’s all good, Alfred EN. RBE posted it, I stumbled on the restoration and posted it and you’ve posted it. More peeps get the opportunity to catch it !

    • richelieu jr

      This is an amazing film, only recently available, Check it out!

  • http://askanex.wordpress.com/ Derek

    When I go see my therapist she has explicitly stated, “I would never want you to relive that stuff or to have to feel those feelings again.” In my two years in therapy, I’ve never had to re-experience any of the trauma that I went through. It’s much more important to reflect upon it and understand how it affects your real world responses today.

    • richelieu jr

      I suppose she just isn’t concerned enough about your eternity, is she, Thetan?

    • Once_Born

      I have often thought that cognitive behavioural therapy (which takes a similar approach) might be a good option for those recovering from the experience of Scientology (especially if started when they were young, or lasted for many years).

      • Lady Squash

        I found help in my recovery in reading a great many books on the subject of the mind and the human spirit. One, “Learned Optimism”, was very helpful and so was “Man’s Search for Meaning”. Focusing on past trauma I realize now is a very dangerous way to go and I agree, that the benefit is to the organization because of the dependence it creates. What a trap!

        • DodoTheLaser
        • Jon Atack

          Frankl’s Man’s Search for Meaning is an excellent book. You might take a look at his The Doctor and the Soul, too. It is very important to understand the hypnotic nature of scn. But we seem to be phobic of understanding the simple reality – the ‘reactive mind’ was ‘discovered’ through hypnosis (as Hubbard sometimes admits). In fact, it was discovered long before Hubbard. He simply chose some of the notions of hypnosis – such as ‘reverie’ – and included them in his reworded system (reference Propaganda by Redefinition of Words!). Singer and Lalich’s Cults in Our Midst or Steve Hassan’s Freedom of Mind give vital information about our susceptibility. Neuroscience has ventured into the territory of ludic loops – where behaviour becomes compulsive – which explains a lot about our inability to quit addictions (such as auditing). As a comparative religion text, I recommend The Common Experience by Cohen and Phipps. On persuasion, Cialdini’s Influence remains a classic. Focus on past trauma is occasionally helpful – as Grinker and Spiegel found, it can help those who have been severely traumatised (in their case, airmen who had been caught in a burning plane, for instance), but more recent work with ‘debriefing’ people immediately after an incident has tended to show that this actually fixes the trauma, rather than relieving it. Hubbard said something similar when he lost Dianetics (he sold it for a dollar to Don Purcell) and had to find something else to sell. So ‘straight wire’ was born. Usually, it is better to use your ludic loops and entrain a new behaviour – which is the objective of cognitive behavioural therapy. Best of all is understanding what happened and being clever enough to stop doing it… no hypnosis required! Of all psychological theories, the most important, and best researched, is cognitive dissonance, which shows that the stronger the evidence the greater our ability to resist it. The first book published on the subject, When Prophecy Fails, from 1954, was a study of a scientologist who had predicted the arrival of an alien Noah’s Ark to rescue her followers…

    • http://www.tingleff.org/jensting/muslinger/ Jens TINGLEFF

      As Jon points out, the approach taken by Hubbard is mainly suited to maintain the victim in a state of dependency. This is what serves the criminal organization known as the “church” of $cientology.

  • Science Doc

    We are getting more and more details about how Hubbard made this all up and where he stole his ideas. My favorite recent revelation along these lines was the Targs nonsense on the tape of him and Mary Sue. I suspect this type of stuff will be useful in disabusing exes who still venerate Hubbard and his tech. For me, there is a limit to how deep I want to follow the mind of Ron through his fabrications in the forties and fifties. I’m much more excited about how this abomination is entering its end times.

    • http://scientoonery.tumblr.com/ Nat-lificent

      . . .

    • Sarah James

      +1
      So am I.

    • BosonStark

      When I read several of Freud’s books in the early ’70s, I thought they were brilliant, fascinating, and I lamented that it was all theory that didn’t work in practice very well. Except for maybe a few hardcore Freudian psychoanalysts hanging around, everybody knew that.

      But to read horseshit like Dianutty, and pay for and practice Hubbard’s crazy so devotedly — go on and on about what it means to be a Class XII auditor or an OT whatever — it was almost inconceivable to me that people were doing that into the ’70s. But now?

      For their time, Freud’s ideas were radical and plausible, until time showed they didn’t work very well in practice. It would be one thing if Sciloontology advertised itself as a Crowley-like cult, but instead they market it as simple tools, and all very sensible, practical and well-researched.

      • Missionary Kid

        I look at Freud’s ideas, and what I say is that he took the old spirit world explanations of behavior, like a person is “possessed with a spirit of (insert name here),” and described aspects of a person’s conscious and unconscious behavior in terms of id, ego, super-ego, etc. IMO, Freud gave a modern terminology to the mind for descriptive purposes.

        Of course, that’s just my take on his theories.

  • richelieu jr

    Interesting occurrance outside the Paris Celeb Centre yesterday.

    I was speaking to a Staff member who wa sinsissting the bad PR was unfair and it wasn’t a cult. We discussed the difference and I said that for me a cult was where there were photos of the Dear Leader in every room (she flinched) and no one dared disagree with his opinions; She siad she cojuld,a nd did constantly; I asked for an example, First she said she jsut was really amazed by his intellect and the amn (bla-bla)-bla) and didn’t feel like nitpicking. WHen pushed (meaning: offered examples) she chose to say that she thoght there might be some mismanagement, too much focus on money and — wait for it– THat DM might be guilty of mismanagemnt (she refused to bite on violence)…

    I said, “And you’re free to believe this?”

    She said, “Of course, we’re in France, and it isn’t a cult…)

    I said, ‘So let’s go inside and let me hear you say the same thing in front of your supervisor.

    Apparently the supervisor was out unfortunately, but she surely would have done it.

    • Bury_The_Nuts

      Poor sucker.

    • ze moo

      Some daylight is getting through the cracks. Her ‘WTF’ moment may have arrived.

      • richelieu jr

        Let’s hope; I’m not so sure…

    • Dancing Cranberry

      Well done. I suspect she’ll run that conversation again in her mind. She may realize that she is not quite as free as she claimed. Here’s hoping!

    • valshifter

      she talks like an Indie, I would not be surprised if the French split into their own group, into something that is more acceptable to the French people, that phrase “of course we are in France” that means they are not afraid of the American bully of the board, to express their feelings in spite of policy.

      • Mooser

        Let’s see, I’m French, and I could go to, say, Notre Dame, Sacre-Coeur, Sainte-Chapelle, St-Sulpice and that’s just the start of the list.

        But instead I’ll go to the Org? Don’t see it.

        • Missionary Kid

          You can get away with saying anything you want about the French because you’ve got a lot of Savior Fairy.

      • http://www.tingleff.org/jensting/muslinger/ Jens TINGLEFF

        Or she speaks like an OSA handler…

        Although the entirely unfounded rumour of the French clams splitting off on their own was one of the better psy-ops that Anon ran a couple of years ago :)

    • FollowTheMoney

      You’re a brave man. You’re surely on OSA’s radar now.

      • richelieu jr

        Well, they’ve got my picture s often as I’ve stuck my head in there to see if there was anyone around— There generally isn’t.
        I’ve been at this quite a while, I think they’ve got bigger fish to fry. At least I haven’t seen anything yet.

  • Panopea Abrupta

    Red-X Red-X Red-X

    Sorry about the delays with the cheques from Big Pharma for all the Red-X Gang.
    They promised to put it right by Thurs. at 2:00.
    However you do have a fascinating message from Fishypants (mod) and interesting offer of 9,000 internets here:
    https://whyweprotest.net/community/threads/taking-down-co-on-craigslist-co-ads-on-craigslist.113779/page-100#post-2470535

    CL ads are here:
    https://whyweprotest.net/community/threads/taking-down-co-on-craigslist-co-ads-on-craigslist.113779/page-100#post-2470531
    ty Obs

    • Pierrot

      A fresh crop of ads in SF
      http://sfbay.craigslist.org/search/eee?query=%22510+540+4789%22|%22650+218+1012%22|%2263+shat*%22|%22510+342+9121%22|%223137+castro+val*%22|%22415+459+0150%22|%221+simms%22|%22650+366+6084%22|%22234+marshall%22|%22415+661+9494%22|%222501+judah%22

      And the 10,000 internet bonus from Big Pharma

    • Kittery

      All blues purpled.

      WTF ad of the day –

      Are You Tired Of Being Human?
      We have some interesting ideas about that!

      Boy, they sure do. Fucking batshit cult.

  • villagedianne

    Yes I remember Scientologists insisting “It’s NOT hypnosis”.

    • richelieu jr

      Yes, it’s The OPPOSITE of hypnosis! We’re waking people up!”

  • nottrue

    Ok you look ready to up your I.A.S status now…….

  • nosce

    “Freud abandoned the approach, because it caused no significant change in the patient, save for increasing dependence upon the therapist. Which would be useful if you wanted to keep raking in the cash, rather than curing the patient.”

    I NEVE, EVER imagine I would ever say this but I now have more respect for Freud than I do for Scientology and its diminutive leader.

  • http://www.crackpots.us/ DamOTclese2

    “Yet, over six decades later, we are still dealing with the fall-out from this money-making scheme”

    Law enforcement has abandoned their basic charter. They claim that being rooked and swindled by these criminals is a civil matter and one must sue, even when the dollar amount exceeds $10,000 the FBI will rarely bring the case to their DA’s office.

    If a rich asshole or a politician parasite goes complaining to the cops, they’ll get charges filed and they’ll get their money back. No so the little people who fell for these frauds, woke up, and went running to the cops.

    It’s like the grand juries. Scientology has killed a long list of little people, powerless people, and Federal prosecutors did nothing. When the crooks were well-documented committing insurance fraud and credit card fraud, rich assholes started losing money and then prosecutors decided they had better do something about it.

    • http://umbraxenu.no-ip.biz/mediawiki/index.php/Main_Page RMycroft

      I dunno. Sen. Thomas Eagleton was being blackmailed by a culty niece, so she could give the money to Scientology, and yet the lawyers for both sides ignored the big elephant in the small room.

      The church was never mentioned in the trial and jurors were carefully screened about their knowledge of Eagleton’s comments.

      http://www.digl-watch.info/weigand_archive.htm

      It makes me wonder how his medical record got leaked when he was running for VP…

      • http://www.crackpots.us/ DamOTclese2

        Politics piled on to politics, it may be that the senator didn’t want to get splattered by the stink and mud of having a Scientology cultie niece. Could have just disowned her. :) Well that would also be political hay for the tabloids.

        • http://umbraxenu.no-ip.biz/mediawiki/index.php/Main_Page RMycroft

          I suppose it was like the Rex Fowler case: Scientology was involved in it everywhere, but it would have sidetracked the criminal case against Fowler.

      • ze moo

        The Republicans were out for blood that year, NIxon was running the ‘plumbers’ and dirty tricks abounded. Not that different then todays ‘Obama is Muslim homesexual worst president ever’. I saw Eagleton give a speech in 1973, he was witty, profound and got a standing ovation at the end.

        • http://umbraxenu.no-ip.biz/mediawiki/index.php/Main_Page RMycroft

          To be sure, the Guardians Office wouldn’t be my first suspect for underhanded dirty political tricks in 1972. Still, “psych” records, especially of electroshock would have been high on their priority list, but I don’t see a motive. I think Hubbard hated Nixon, but then he hated JFK too.

      • grundoon

        Sacred Cult Scripture™

        HCO BULLETIN OF 24 APRIL 1960 – CONCERNING THE CAMPAIGN FOR PRESIDENCY

        A person named Richard M. Nixon will enter his name this Fall at a convention as a citizen aspiring to the Presidency of the United States. Many Scientologists think he is all right because I once quoted him. This is very far from the facts and I hasten to give you the real story why Richard M. Nixon must be prevented at all costs from becoming president.

        Two years ago in Washington this man’s name appeared in a newspaper article as uttering an opinion about psychology. I called attention to this opinion as a matter of banal interest in an article. Shortly two members of the United States Secret Service, stating they had been sent directly by Nixon, entered the establishment of the Founding Church of Washington, D.C., armed with pistols, but without warrant or formal complaint, and with foul and abusive language threatened the girls on duty there. Hulking over desks, shouting violently, they stated that they daily had to make such calls on “lots of people” to prevent Nixon’s name from being used in ways Nixon disliked. These two men stated they were part of Nixon’s office and were acting on his express orders. They said that Nixon believed in nothing the Founding Church or Scientology stood for. Their conduct before the ladies present was so intolerable that Mary Sue, having heard the shouting and curses from her office, had to come and force these men to leave, which they finally did, but only after she threatened to call the police. As Scientologists were present, much information was obtained, of course, from these agents as to their routine activities. These were not creditable. Nixon constantly used the service against the voteless and helpless people of Washington to suppress the use of his name.

        I am informing you of an exact event. It convinced me that in my opinion Nixon is not fitted to be a president. I do not believe any public figure has a right to suppress the use of his name in articles. I do not believe a public figure should enforce his will on writers or organizations by use of the Secret Service. I believe a democracy ceases to exist when deprived of freedom of speech. I do not believe any man closely connected with psychiatry should hold a high public office since psychiatry has lent its violence to political purposes.

        Would you please write your papers and tell your friends that Nixon did this and that his actions against private people in Washington cause us to defy his cravings to be president. It’s my hope you’ll vote and make your friends vote. But please don’t vote for Nixon. Even his own Secret Service agents assure us he stands for nothing we do. I do not tell you this because Mary Sue came close to serious injury at Nixon’s hands. I tell you this because I think psychiatry and all Fascist-Commie forces have had their day. We want clean hands in public office in the United States. Let’s begin by doggedly denying Nixon the presidency no matter what his Secret Service tries to do to us now in Washington. It is better, far better, for us to run the risk of saying this now, while there’s still a chance, than to fail to tell you of it for fear of reprisals and then be wiped out without defense by the Secret Service or other agency if Nixon became president. He hates us and has used what police force was available to him to say so. So please get busy on it. I am only telling a few friends.

        L. RON HUBBARD

  • http://scientoonery.tumblr.com/ Nat-lificent

    . .

  • Jgg2012

    Carl Jung, a student of Freud’s, also used something called the Wheatstone Bridge, which is like the e-meter. He also had various charts and groupings, similar to a tone scale. The problem with regression therapy is that it implants false memories; LRH, of course, would later say that these memories were real, and happened in a previous life. LRH was also inconsistent: he went from blaming problems on repressed memories early in life, to memories from the pre-natal stage, to memories from earlier lives, to body thetans from aliens.

    • Once_Born

      Jung used only a very sensitive galvanometer and a battery, to measure Galvanic Skin Response (GSR). This equipment was widely available at the time, and was the ancestor of the e-meter. Jung rejected it as a therapeutic tool because it was very insensitive, difficult to use, and told him nothing he could not see for himself.

      Volney Mathison added a (valve / tube) amplification stage. http://scicrit.wordpress.com/2014/07/04/the-story-of-the-e-meter-part-3-back-to-the-future/ so the “Mathison Electropsychometer” was more sensitive and easy to use. When Mathison become associated with Hubbard, and would not part with his ‘invention’, Hubbard hired people to reproduce it using the new transistor technology – and the Hubbard e-meter was born.

      As for regression therapy and false memories – dead right mate.

      • MaxSpaceman

        … F5.

      • Gabbyone

        That was a fascinating tidbit of info. Thanks for that post.

    • ze moo

      And thus, the moving target part of the scam was born.

  • Mark

    What a pity Sigmund Freud didn’t live long enough to catch L Wrong Hypnofraud out (refresh):

    • Jgg2012

      I think he would say something similar to what Alistair Crowley said about LRH, Jack Parsons and their attempted love child.

      • Mark

        Aleister: “I get fairly frantic when I contemplate the idiocy of these louts”.

        • stanrogers

          Even Crowley said that that was a spelling mistake. But say whatever else you might about the man, he had the balls to stick with it.

          • Mark

            There’s some argument about that: Crowley is either supposed to have deliberately misspelt it that way with only one ‘a’ to ensure his full name scanned as a dactyl followed by a trochee (like the other great poet born in Warwickshire, William Shakespeare); or else he adopted it under the pseudo-Celtic sway of Golden Dawn leader Samuel ‘Macgregor’ Mathers, self-styled Comte de Glenstrae – who would have had rows of recondite magical and numerological reasons for the spelling, instead of the normal Gaelic ‘Alasdair’ (though by the time Crowley got to know him, Mathers had already hit the bottle and may simply have been pickled).

            • stanrogers

              I’ll take what he wrote himself as the likely truth of the matter. Just a quirk of mine.

            • Mark

              I’d take what he wrote (or rather dictated to Leah Hirsig) in the Confessions with a big pinch of salt, especially when he confuses a trochee with a spondee 😉

    • Missionary Kid
      • Sherbet

        It’s amazing to me that the nicknames keep on coming. I guess when it comes to criticizing, the snark pool is bottomless.

        • Missionary Kid

          The lists could probably be cut in half because many entries are reformulations of existing ones, but yes, the snark pool is bottomless, especially for Dirt Magnet. (That’s a new one. I’ll put it on the list, but post it later. That makes 985 for him.) They have slowed down because there are so many already. I may quit when the list gets to 1001.

          • Mark

            Then comes the book: 1001 Rude Names for L Ron Hubbard 😉

            • Missionary Kid

              Published online, of course. LRH only has 227. DM 985

              There’s got to be close to seven hundred entries for Things Said about $cientology. Both of those lists raise the most ire.

            • Sherbet

              You’ve got the patience of Job.

            • Missionary Kid

              Not really. All it takes is a few keystrokes.

            • stanrogers

              Well, Job wasn’t really all that patient. He just took it out on the wrong guys for a long time.

            • Mooser

              “Well, Job wasn’t really all that patient. He just took it out on the wrong guys for a long time”

              That’s why I won’t have anything to do with him.

            • Jimmy3

              If by ire you mean they are being removed, re-posting a certain amount of identical text is catching Disqus’ spam filter. Vistaril confirmed this with Disqus staff some time ago when everyone thought clams were flagging the posts with craigslist links.

            • Missionary Kid

              No. I’m aware of that. All it takes is the change of one letter on any post, and it will go through. I had one entire list several moths ago get deleted. I simply added another comment and posted the list to it. There’s no answer why it got deleted. All I do with the lists is edit them when a new item is added. That doesn’t trigger the flagging/deletion bot.

            • Jimmy3

              Adding or changing one character does not evade the spam filter, that has been demonstrated. Time is a factor, too. You may have posted the list and re-posted and edited it within a certain period of time that triggered its removal. If it were taken down due to flagging, you would see the comment listed as under moderation before it was removed.

            • Missionary Kid

              Your ETA is probably what happened. Thanks. My lists are in a new place now.

          • ze moo

            Combined with the other lists it’s sure fire coffee table book.

    • kemist

      Careful, you’re dangerously close to offending the almighty Hypnotoad here

  • Panopea Abrupta

    $cientology: it’s not hip gnosis

    • Sherbet

      Pan, you’re a gem. Now if you’d just change your avatar, I’d be happier. I’m not sure what it is, but it looks clammy.

      • Kittery

        Clammy…I saw what you did there!

        • Sherbet

          😉

      • Panopea Abrupta

        My avatar is of Panopea Generosa (geoducks), stir-fried with scallions, ginger and shoyu.
        If you’ve never eaten ’em, you have one hell of a treat in store:
        https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=NgNR-nAlWaw
        Love me some clams, linguini vongole or fried, baked, sashimi-style, ….
        Panopea Abrupta is an extinct species of clam, similar to Generosa.

        • Sherbet

          Wow, that is one major clam! But when it comes to scientology clams, I like knowing they’re getting their butts boiled one way or another.

          Bon appetit, Panopea.

        • Captain Howdy

          Gee thanks, I’m going to be tasting and smelling fried clams all night but eating scrambled eggs instead. Oh joy.

        • Mooser

          Isn’t the “geoduck” the official Washington State bivalve? Some unfortunate states do not even have a bivalve to call their own.

          • Missionary Kid

            There’s even an amphibian airplane named after the geoduck, but the spelling is phonetic: gweduck. http://gweduc.netfirms.com/gweduck.com/index.shtml

            For an amphibian, it apparently performs quite well over the original plane it is somewhat based on. It’s built of composite materials, so it doesn’t corrode.

            The name is kind of an in joke. Grumman aircraft, when they were manufacturing amphibian planes, often named them after ducks and other water birds: Goose, Widgeon, Mallard, etc. The people who designed the gweduck wanted to have a duck name to honor the predecessors, but they also wanted to honor Washington State, so they named the plane Gweduck (pronounced gooey duck).

            • Mooser

              I knew there was a reason we were discussing this, besides the pleasure of absorbing those interesting facts about the amphibious airplane, for which thanks,
              It caused me to remember we have some frozen geoduck in the freezer, and we should take it out defrost it and eat it. It won’t keep forever.

        • Juicer77

          http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=iZhQLoYIbJ4
          Dirty Jobs and the geoducks

    • Missionary Kid

      “Scientology: it’s not hip gnosis,” is now on the list, THINGS SAID ABOUT $CIENTOLOGY & DIANETICS at http://tonyortega.org/2014/06/12/more-proof-of-kerri-kasems-scientology-involvement-and-laura-prepon-lies-like-a-rug/#comment-1439059448

      I had to look up gnosis.

  • nottrue

    Thank you Mr Atack. As usual you were extremely enlightening and awesome.

  • http://scientoonery.tumblr.com/ Nat-lificent

    False memories implanted in mice

    min. 3:40-5:30

    http://www.technologyreview.com/video/528401/the-cross-section-of-memory/

  • Truthiwant

    An OT 8 is said to be Clear on all the dynamics.

    Today’s quote from The Perception of Truth Lectures just shows how powerful an OT can become.

    All you need is a bit of will power while auditing out your Body Thetans and look what you could achieve…

    • Observer

      What’s with the medieval lace-up shirt? That Ron, such a fashion plate.

      • Truthiwant

        I’m glad you agree that his fashion choices are really cool.
        But of course, fashion really means nothing to such a great being. Just look at the guy. He is deep in profound thought thinking about the next million $, I mean, the next OT levels.

      • 1subgenius

        I’m not saying he was a repressed homosexual, but he was.

        • Todd Tomorrow

          I don’t think he could ever get in the shape to be a homosexual.

      • D.Y.G.

        Ahem. It’s a ghillie shirt. Elron loved him some Scotland.

    • ze moo

      It’s like the puffy shirt.

      http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=cOE3CYeMNC8

  • Panopea Abrupta

    So help me but JJ in Boston is one predatory little spamming bastard, trying to scam ESL students.
    I do like how he can’t write the language he ostensibly teaches.

    Helpful English Classes – fast service! (Boston/Cambridge)

    Real, professional coaching for English comprehension. Choose from
    three different levels of English courses. Each are designed to enhance
    understanding and the application of English in everyday life!

  • DodoTheLaser

    Happy Birthday, Derek! :)

    • Missionary Kid

      Derek’s birthday today? Well add me to the list of congratulations.

      • http://askanex.wordpress.com/ Derek

        Thank you! 8 months later. Sorry about that!

        • Missionary Kid

          *Laughs* Hey, contact me at skepticalmissionarrykid at gmail dot com
          Sometime, when I come into L.A., I’d like to meet.

          I’m sure you enjoyed Going Clear. I can’t wait to see it on cable, and that’s after seeing it at the ArcLight. I understand you got to see it in the Dome, you lucky dog.

    • http://askanex.wordpress.com/ Derek

      Oh my god I just saw this. Sorry for the 8 months of lag time. Thanks for the birthday wishes! LOL

      • http://www.tonyortega.org/ DodoTheLaser

        Hahaha! No prob. You are very welcome!

  • http://www.xenu.net/archive/ronthenut/ L.Ron Hubbard

    I did it you non-believers ! I Made the History channel:

    http://www.history.com/this-day-in-history/l-ron-hubbard-publishes-dianetics

    “Living is a pretty grim joke, but a joke just the same. The entire function of man
    is to survive. The outermost limit of endeavour is creative work.
    Anything less is too close to simple survival until death happens along.
    So I am engaged in striving to maintain equilibrium sufficient to at
    least realize survival in a way to astound the gods. I turned the thing
    up so it’s up to me to survive in a big way . . . Foolishly perhaps, but
    determined none the less, I have high hopes of smashing my name into history so violently that it will take a legendary form even if all books are destroyed.”

    • D.Y.G.

      So did that crazy “Aliens” guy and the Illuminati. Congratulations.

    • KNMF

      “”The entire function of man is to survive.””

      This is the exact same quality that man shares with the noble dandelion. If a dandelion could ruin you utterly it would. Anything goes in the survival game.

      • stanrogers

        As a sufferer of severe hay fever as a child, I tell you truly: dandelions are out to kill us.

        • Missionary Kid

          Ohhhh! I feel for you. I’m mildly allergic to oats. I have to be careful around horses, especially camping or hiking where there are horse trails. I get sinus headaches that are nearly disabling.

          • Jimmy3

            Are horses made of oats

            • Missionary Kid

              They eat them, and shit them all over the place, leading to the growth of wild oats. If I’m going to be around horses, I take medication.

            • Mooser

              Jimmy, lambs eat oats, and does eat oats, and little lambs eat ivy. A kid will eat ivy, too.

            • Bury_The_Nuts

              Wouldn’t you?

  • Panopea Abrupta

    From Cowboy, over on ExScn, on the last years:

    “Hubbard was, if anything, unpredictable. In moments he could be charming, in
    others…. insane.
    His paranoia was extreme, which led to his constant fear of being found. But he
    also worried of things beyond merely being arrested. Violence. Theft.
    Conspiracies and plots.
    One night, worse than others, I slept on the floor outside his room, listening to
    his snoring all night.
    Morning broke and within minutes his angered voice bellowed through the
    household. I was, literally, called on the carpet.
    “I thought you slept outside my door last night,” he said.
    “I did.”
    “Then explain this!” he screamed. He threw down one of his brown half boot
    shoes. “Someone entered in the middle of the night and stole one shoe and
    replaced it with a smaller one. They’re trying to make me think I’m insane.”
    I looked at the familiar shoes, which he wore every day. Both shoes were the very
    ones I was familiar with. The old man’s face trembled with suppressed rage. He
    continued to berate me, screaming at my failure to protect him from the plots
    against him.
    Just another day in paradise.”

    • Science Doc

      Did they ever figure out if he was for real? I read part of the early summary of his posts and it was mostly nonspecific and in keeping with what is well known. I didn’t read much. Certainly didn’t start with any bombshells.

      • Panopea Abrupta

        He was for real.
        Collaborated by other old-timers.
        It’s a great thread – read it ages ago.
        A curious mix of the banal and the horrific.
        Cowboy spoke out because a friend choose woo-woo instead of science when dying and because of the reports of the on-going and actual horrors under the “new” regime.
        It is worth persisting with the folksy tone and the ordinary nonsense as there are nuggets and pearls of great price.
        The quote I took illustrates the EP (in $ciloonspeak) of his whole scam: batshit crazy.
        Clam claims to the contrary will never withstand any doubleblind testing and I would welcome them trying to show otherwise.

    • stanrogers

      Two things working there: dementia and a bit of edema. (There’ve been days when ol’ Cinderfella here’s glass slippers didn’t fit either, and the Parkinson’s brain rot had me thinking weird things about that situation. Evil meds help a lot with that sort of stuff. For now at least.)

    • http://www.skippress.com/ Skip Press

      One night on the Apollo (got this from Jon Ausley) they were in the middle of dinner and Elwrong stopped talking and started screaming that an alien invasion had begun and everyone cleared out. Never said a word about it past that night.

    • Eivol Ekdal
  • ShoopZ

    Totally Off Topic…

    In case any of you guys with expertise in the art of tactful persuasion would like to take a bit of time for some educational activities?

    John Alex Wood (Twitter’s most celebrated Operating Monty Pythetan) tweeted a link to the following pr.com press release seen in the photo below. (refresh to view)

    The email address for the Dr. John Kline mentioned in the press release is available at the bottom of the homepage of the Black Legends of Basketball Foundation. @ http://www.blacklegends.org

    (Update before posting) Looks like Dr John “Jumpin Johnny” Kline worked with Scientology in Nashville last year as well which was noted over at WWP. https://whyweprotest.net/community/threads/nashville-tn-feb-16-2013-5-year-anoniversary-lets-have-a-party.108002/

    • D.Y.G.

      When I think of Black History Month the first things that come in my head are the Rev. Dr. Martin Luther King, Jr., Malcolm X, the Selma March, and the Church of Motherfucking Scientology.

      WTF.

      • ShoopZ

        Yup.

      • Mooser

        “When I think of Black History Month the first things that come in my
        head are the Rev. Dr. Martin Luther King, Jr., Malcolm X, the Selma
        March”

        And last, but not least, and among many other things, music.

        • ze moo

          What, no ‘soul duds’?

          • Mooser

            Sure, fashion, too. Just about everything, of course, but the effect on Americ…. well, the African-American contribution is the one that made it uniquely “American music”. Since 1900 the contribution has been profound and revolutionized American music, and influenced music all over the world.

  • stillgrace2

    I enjoyed the background information Jon outlined in this post … specifically about how it’s always been about the MONEY. We know that LRH usurped Freud’s abandoned techniques.

    This says it all “Freud abandoned the approach, because it caused no significant change in the patient, save for increasing dependence upon the therapist. Which would be useful if you wanted to keep raking in the cash, rather than curing the patient.

    On that note, I want to share a paragraph from Rinder’s blog that gave me a laugh:
    “They will ask for money for ANYTHING. Next year one of the MV 30th anniversary events (close enough) is going to be Dan Sherman doing a presentation on LRH gold panning days and there will be an “authentic replica” gold-diggers kit that everyone will be expected to buy to show how on source they are.”

    What a crack up! Here’s the link to the Rinder quote: http://www.mikerindersblog.org/step-right-up/

    • ze moo

      I’ll wait for the ‘Golden Era of LRH Belly Button Lint.”

      • stillgrace2

        I hope they don’t sell it by the pound.

        • Sejanus

          They will sell it by the Litre…
          not by your filthy wog measurements.
          lol
          it had to be said…sorry. :)

    • L. Wrong Hubturd

      I kind of think that was a little joke, but with Scientology, you never know.

  • Panopea Abrupta

    Red-X Red-X Red-X

    If you could spare a few moments from keeping an eye on the 2 year old breaking broncs,
    wrestling with Kodiak bears and translating the Mahabarata into Venusian,
    while juggling 13 wren’s eggs on a unicycle,
    please click here.
    Rascally Rufous Wrong will appreciate it.

    New Blues and Updates:
    https://whyweprotest.net/community/threads/taking-down-co-on-craigslist-co-ads-on-craigslist.113779/page-100#post-2470615

    Main list:
    https://whyweprotest.net/community/threads/taking-down-co-on-craigslist-co-ads-on-craigslist.113779/page-100#post-2470531
    ty AP

  • Jimmy3

    I’m watchin the footy on my telly and I noticed that a lot of times when the blue team passes the ball, the commentator criticizes them and says MESSY!!! Yeah, guy, it wasn’t a perfectly clean pass, but stop being so negative. I’m rooting for the orange team but I don’t like this negativity.

    • 1subgenius

      Soccer players run as far as 9.5 miles in a match.

      • Jimmy3

        Yeah, but that’s only about 15.289 kilometers, so it’s not very far when you think about it with your metric brain.

        • 1subgenius

          Yeah, its a lot shorter in kilometers, but still messy.

          • Jimmy3

            It’s going to get messy now. It’s a down pour.

            • 1subgenius

              I like the Mickey Mouse gloves the goalies wear.

            • Jimmy3

              Disney must be a major FIFA sponsor.

            • 1subgenius

              Apparently there is a rule against the coaches wearing raincoats.

      • Mooser

        “run as far as 9.5 miles in a match.”

        I could never do that. I don’t think I could do it with somebody else’s possessions in my pockets, and them close behind, a condition which usually spurs my best athletic performances.

        • 1subgenius

          Yeah, I remember when if you saw a runner, someone was chasing them.
          And you don’t have to run faster than the bear/cop, just faster than your buddy.

  • nottrue

    I was in the city of Commerce today so i got a picture of the Church of Scientology International. Was very dead and creepy………

    • nottrue

      The Temple of Doom……..

      • nottrue

        They did come out to say goodbye……

        • 1subgenius

          He he.
          So friendly.

          • stillgrace2

            He (or she) is dressed exactly like the guy that came out to wish me goodbye when I checked out a commercial property for lease next door to the “Los Gatos” org (set in San Jose, CA, mind you). OK, I was snooping, but not vehemently.

        • Sejanus

          If his arms go up he is going to do the Crane attack from Karate Kid..hoof him in the nuts FAST!

        • Bury_The_Nuts

          I hope you waved at him……..with your middle finger.

        • http://askanex.wordpress.com/ Derek

          Sir, I think you may have found my little brother.

          • nottrue

            ……….

            • http://askanex.wordpress.com/ Derek

              I’m 98% sure even with the blurry face. I recognize that hair color and his pose. The facial hair is throwing me off. I’m willing to bet that they had him moved from PAC to there after Garry Scarff called out my name to him one time.

            • Jimmy3

              This will be amazing if you’re right, Derek. I hope it is so, at least you will know he’s okay… To some degree… But what role does it look like he has there? What’s with the patch on the shoulder of his shirt and what’s with the utility belt? Is your lil bro the Sea Org Batman?

            • D.Y.G.

              He looks like a rent-a-cop. Are his pants just really loose or is he wearing something on his right side down his leg? Please tell me it isn’t a baton.

            • http://askanex.wordpress.com/ Derek

              Probably baggy pants..sea org rarely have clothes that fit

            • http://askanex.wordpress.com/ Derek

              And yes he’s a rent-a-cop.

            • D.Y.G.

              That’s a disturbing image when you consider he belongs to a “church”. Damn, I hope he jumps ship soon.

            • http://askanex.wordpress.com/ Derek

              Is there anything about scientology or Scientologists that’s not disturbing. He’s in the same boat as I was. Leaving scientology is like leaving any abusive relationship. It’s gotta be a totally self made decision or you end up going back. Can only hope he comes to his senses like I did

            • Baby

              Oh me too Derek.. Wow.. I can’t imagine how you felt seeing him. I am sorry

            • http://umbraxenu.no-ip.biz/mediawiki/index.php/Main_Page RMycroft

              Ah? Does he have a state of California security guard license?

            • http://askanex.wordpress.com/ Derek

              Good idea. Never thought to check that. I just looked at the BSIS website and no he does not, though a couple of the other PAC security guys do. So maybe it’s not him and I was just being hopeful.

            • Missionary Kid

              Derek, he may not have to have a security guard license, to work security, but I’ll check.

            • http://umbraxenu.no-ip.biz/mediawiki/index.php/Main_Page RMycroft

              It’s not conclusive. Some of their guards do have a license, some don’t. I was hoping if he had one, it would provide a rough location track.

            • http://askanex.wordpress.com/ Derek

              When I look at that picture, I see my brother. So either you’re right, and they don’t all have guard cards, or they hired someone that looks a helluva lot like my brother. I mean even the red cheeks and everything.

            • http://askanex.wordpress.com/ Derek

              He’s doing the same thing he’s been doing since he joined, working sea org security

            • Jimmy3

              If you had to guess, how often has he used his grappling hook?

            • http://askanex.wordpress.com/ Derek

              Haha if you think that the sea org would pay for grappling hooks you’re in for a shock. Sea Org security are more like robins. They have a suit like batman but their only power is to stare threateningly

            • Jimmy3

              I’m just making fun of his utility belt. Someone was upset enough to give me a down vote, which is upsetting to me.

            • http://askanex.wordpress.com/ Derek

              oh I know but you give the utility belt too much credit calling it batman-like! Haha there’s probably a plunger and a snake on it a best.

            • Jimmy3

              So more like the Sea Org Super Mario than the Sea a Org Batman. I see now.

            • http://askanex.wordpress.com/ Derek

              Exactly!

            • stanrogers

              Not exactly what CSI would lead you to believe in, but this is the best “zoom… stop there… enhance” I can manage:

            • http://askanex.wordpress.com/ Derek

              If you stop by there again you can ask his name or try to catch a look at his name tag and I can search it online and direct you how to report unlicensed security activity to the BSIS.

          • D.Y.G.

            Wow, really?

            • http://askanex.wordpress.com/ Derek

              Indeed I believe that’s my brother. They must have relocated him after Garry Scarff confronted him during a protest and mentioned my name.

    • http://askanex.wordpress.com/ Derek

      Wait what. I have never heard of this building before? In City of Commerce? With all the outlets and casinos?

      • Science Doc

        Not the LA one I’m guessing.

        • http://askanex.wordpress.com/ Derek

          I just googled it. This is definitely in LA. Wow learn something new every day!

          • Science Doc

            I’m shocked. At least it’s one empty parking space from being ideal.

      • valshifter

        yeah Bridge publications is also there on Olympic blvd and two blocks from Atlantic blvd, you can see them come out and take smoke brakes every 15 min ,and sit hopelessly on the curbs to smoke… they can just walk away there are no fences, but sadly the young people just run back behind the locked doors and keep on printing books. some of them come out and don’t talk to no one, they just smoke and walk around for a little bit and then go back in. very sad to see.

      • Douglas D. Douglas

        That is the place.

    • http://askanex.wordpress.com/ Derek

      This is a hidden gem nottrue. I am trying to remember my Sea Org history, if I ever went there. I can’t imagine what is there even. They definitely don’t deliver services. It must be storage? I always thought the CSI building was in Hollywood, CA. So weird.

      • grundoon

        It’s the Bridge Pubs printing plant and warehouse.

        • Science Doc

          It’s also where they manufacture uniforms. It’s a sea org sweat shop.

    • D.Y.G.

      The landscaping is attractive. I guess that’s something.

      • ze moo

        The trees know they’re doomed.

    • Captain Howdy

      Wow, one whole car in the lot and it probably belongs to the gumby crypt keeper that came out to give you the fish eye.

      shake, shake, shake..shake, shake, shake..shakers, scilons and moonies!

    • grundoon

      According to the Chruch, it’s part of Bridge Publications. They also have another facility just across I-5, at 5600 Olympic Blvd. https://whyweprotest.net/community/threads/church-of-scientology-flips-the-switch-on-185-000-square-foot-dissemination-and-distribution-center.68358/

      • Science Doc

        It’s called the dissemination and distribution center.

        • Mark Foster

          His Royal Pimpness relocated the dissemination center to Hollywood Blvd.

      • http://www.skippress.com/ Skip Press

        I think that’s where the huge printing presses are.

        • Narapoid

          Div 6 rockin the planet

    • nottrue

      ……..

    • Sejanus

      I like how it looks so pristine..and untouched by human hands.

    • Sunny Sands

      *Like*
      Those symbols on the outside don’t look creepy at all :-).

    • valshifter

      where is the picture?

    • Mark

      Looks like a set from that 2009 version of The Prisoner.

    • Douglas D. Douglas

      Well, this is hilarious. I have driven past this place hundreds of time when we are headed to San Diego on Interstate 5. It is a stone’s throw from the Commerce Club Casino, a weird, tiny piece of Vegas plopped down in the urban sprawl south of LA. They are also near the Citadel, a Babylonian themed outlet mall. And right next door to the 99 Cent Only Store warehouse. And most fittingly, across the street (a block away, anyway) from this:

      • Missionary Kid

        The Citadel used to be the U.S. Rubber plant. It had that Assyrian themed facade to hide the industrial plant behind it. We used to drive past it on our way to Disneyland when I was a kid. (If you read the history, you’ll see how long ago It was when we first drove by it)

        http://www.citadeloutlets.com/info/ourHistory

    • Narapoid

      I would expect it to be crammed with 30 and 40 year old cars. That is an upstat Ford Edge though…There must be vans that take the faithful to work at their Scientologist owned jobs. They don’t need the dental work and the old 200k mile focus anyway. What they need is status

  • Pierrot

    RED X *-* ALERT *-* RED X *-* ALERT

    Boston – Boston – Boston – JJ and the foreign students + English Classes

    http://boston.craigslist.org/search/bbb?query=Boston+%28%28english+coaching%29%7C%28james+kim+korea%29%29-karen+-dog+-academic
    http://boston.craigslist.org/search/eee?query=%28boston+stude*+click+here%29-cila+-math+-tao

    whack them, Zap them, flag them

    • Pierrot

      Refresh to get correct links

      • Sejanus

        Would it not also be helpful to post ads outing the $cilons ads in case they are not deleted?

        • Pierrot

          It would and some people do it, the more the better.
          Get a CL account and start posting counter ads.
          In the ads make sure to include a list of key words like depression, divorce, personality, iq, purification , etc …
          so that people searching for these KW would find your ad mixed with the scilons ad.
          Title your ad as a caution or warning that $cientology is advertising in this category.

          • Espiando

            I’d rather send them to Narconon than to any of Steve Hall’s websites.

          • stillgrace2

            Just a reminder- be sure and use a throw-away email address. You don’t want any scio-craigslist-bastard to get ahold of your real one (or any email account that you check regularly).

            They will put your email address on the most disgusting mailing lists you can imagine and you will receive revolting, crappy, annoying emails by the tons! It’s their form of fair game, from the most ethical residents of the universe.

        • Pierrot

          Not only helpful but more efficient

    • lucille austero

      Done! Appreciate your effort, Pierrot!

  • http://scientoonery.tumblr.com/ Nat-lificent

    Caption contest (refresh)

    • Jimmy3

      Freud: “Dreams are often most profound when they seem the most crazy.”
      Hubbard: “Schemes are often most profitable when they are the most crazy.”

    • Espiando

      Freud: “Masturbation can be a cause of anxiety in young men.”
      LRH: “You think that’s anxiety? Wait until you get sec checked for it!”

      • http://scientoonery.tumblr.com/ Nat-lificent

        We have a winner!

      • http://scientoonery.tumblr.com/ Nat-lificent

        (refresh)

    • DMSTCC

      LRH: “I am the Walrus”
      Freud: “goo goo goo joob”

    • L. Wrong Hubturd

      Freud: My goodness, this idiots stinks!
      Hubs: Oops, I think I shart myself again.

    • http://scientoonery.tumblr.com/ Nat-lificent

      Freud: Sometimes a cigar is just a cigar.
      Hubb: Sometimes a pack of Kools saves you from cancer!

    • Anonymous

      Freud: “A civilization which leaves so large a number of its participants unsatisfied and drives them into revolt neither has nor deserves the prospect of a lasting existence.”

      Hubbard: “Gee, I wish I had thought of that…and tomorrow…I did!”

    • http://scientoonery.tumblr.com/ Nat-lificent

      Freud: A belligerent state permits itself every such misdeed, every such act of violence, as would disgrace the individual.
      Hubb: So?

    • http://scientoonery.tumblr.com/ Nat-lificent

      Freud: If you can’t do it, give up!
      Hubb: If you can’t do it, make it up!

    • Panopea Abrupta

      Freud “The virtuous man contents himself with dreaming that which the wicked man does in actual life.”

      Hubturd “Shit, busted, wasn’t me, I was on Venus racing cars.
      It was Mary Sue who dunnit in the FBI office with the telex machine.”

    • Jimmy3

      Freud: After seeing this Broken Light Bulb Lady, I’m beginning to rethink that whole “all dudes want to bang their mom” idea.

      Hubbard: After seeing this Broken Light Bulb Lady, I’m beginning to rethink that whole “all dudes want to bang their mom” idea… Wait, WTF?

    • Mark

      Siggy: “Vot do you mean, mein kopf looks chust like ein light-bulb? Zuch demned inzolenz!”
      Tubbo: “Aagh! Dat’s da last time I tries ta prove da sun shines outta my ass. Messenger! Where’s dat #@$£*&#$ Preparation H?”

    • Locale

      Freud: My client is fantasizing that he has been to the Van Allen Belt.

      Hubbard: My therapist is myopic and refuses to accept the research and data I have obtained on the Van Allen Belt. He also doesn’t acknowledge my beautiful feet.

      • Narapoid

        I had to upvote for the facts, but Hubbard would never accept the fact that he didn’t know everything.about everything.

    • Sejanus

      F. This is your brain speaking.

      H. this is your brain on drugs speaking.
      Xenu, Thetan, wog, Purif, Teegeeack

      • Baby

        Hahahahah… Winner Winner Chicken Dinner..

    • Sejanus

      F. He is looking at me again isn’t he?

      H. I love when you say everything relates to sex, cuz that turns me on.

      • http://scientoonery.tumblr.com/ Nat-lificent

        “F. He is looking at me again isn’t he?”

        Love.

    • Sejanus

      F. Being honest with oneself is the best exercise.

      H. I never exercise.

    • Sejanus

      F. Flowers are restful to look at. They have neither emotions or conflicts.

      H. I hooked up tomato plants to a lie detector once and I wasn’t even drunk in college!

    • Sejanus

      F. Just watch him very closely. Just before he makes outlandish claims he opens his mouth….observe…

      H. So there I was in full armour getting ready for something somewhere in the past, when WHAM, I was hit and killed by lightning. The next thing I knew I was standing at the baggage recovery line in LaGuardia with a pickle jar of my mothers urine under one arm, a human kidney in a cooler in dry ice under another arm and a miniature scale model of Grants Tomb under my 3rd arm. I know it sounds simple doesn’t it? Anyone can do it.

    • Truthiwant

      I’m a bit late to the game, but anyway here’s my offering…

      • Truthiwant

        Here’s another one…

  • http://scientologybollocks.blogspot.co.uk/ media_lush
  • L. Wrong Hubturd

    Great news everyone. I’ve got some leaked footage of DM’s recent birthday party. Man, he can really down some cake!

    http://giphy.com/gifs/t4aBVelzr49qw

    • outraged

      The Little One eats his cake with one side of his mouth but talks out of both sides.

  • Panopea Abrupta

    $cientology: The con science of the conscience-less

  • Jimmy3

    Completely off-topic but the Country Music Channel (CMT on your TV) is running Ron White’s latest standup routine. Ron White is the funniest living standup comedian.

    • Captain Howdy

      Sorry Jimmy, he’s not quite as funny as Jeff Foxworthy or Larry the Cable Guy. ; )

    • aquaclara

      Thanks. Just put on my list to dvr this morning. I love Ron White.

  • Tony DePhillips

    Interesting stuff.

  • http://scientologybollocks.blogspot.co.uk/ media_lush

    I’m sure Poison Ivy will have some comments about this…. anyway – co-stars for MI5 have been chosen and they’re pretty 3rd rate!

    http://www.deadline.com/2014/07/mission-impossible-5-female-lead-goes-to-rebecca-ferguson/

    here is the comment I made [yet to see it appear]:

    “dear me, bit of a come down from Jessica Chastain… and as for Alec Baldwin, well I guess you’d have to call that scraping the barrel. This site is known to be Cruise friendly and hints at an ‘Edge’ sequel … but interprets $340 worldwide as being good enough to warrant this… yeah, right; $90m shy of it’s production budget domestically is not a good look for a ‘blockbuster’ after almost 5 weeks and the writer should know that overseas figures only really go into the black was they pass double the production costs… throw in the extra $100m ad spend the studio threw at the opening then Edge is pretty much a failure.

    what no one seems to address is that the critics loved this film but it still failed big time… that chick flick creamed it for 4 weeks in a row [not just the first week which this site hinted at]… if you can’t clean up a tent-pole weekend which all the critics love then you have a major problem on your hand… that problem is Cruise and his continual connection to his toxic cult, scientology!

    simple as that really; he’s a done deal unless he leaves it publicly in a big way!”

  • Lady Squash

    Jon, thanks for filling in some details on the abreaction therapy. I researched it but could not find much. Wikipedia has a short article on it and according to that post, the US military discontinued the use of abreaction therapy because of its long term effects. Apparently, the therapy was effective at first but with continued use the “patient” became worse. That parallels my experience of Dianetics auditing. At first it was great, but then there was a tipping point and it became a liability.
    BTW, love your book. Thank you for writing it.

  • Pierrot
    • Graham

      JJ purpled at 8am UK time. The Bunker never sleeps!

      • Pierrot

        Graham, always reliable, faithful and on duty. Good morning to you.
        If you have got the time and have not done so already go through the list looking for blues and purple them!

    • Observer

      Got ’em

  • Pierrot

    *** RED X +–+ RED X +–+RED X +–+ RED X *** Thursday the 10th of July

    Statsday daily list is ready for your enjoyment, coffee or tea is served with some nice caek.
    Bring the kids with you and let them have a nice game of whack a mole!

    https://whyweprotest.net/community/threads/taking-down-co-on-craigslist-co-ads-on-craigslist.113779/page-100#post-2470838

    Ty AP

  • Krew13

    URGENT – YOUNG ACTRESS IN NEED OF PROTECTION!

    Swedish actress Rebecca Ferguson has been cast in the forthcoming motion picture MISSION IMPOSSIBLE 5. This will bring the young woman into direct contact with a unhinged and potentially dangerous individual who actively recruits for his BFF and has been known to use the casting of actresses as a way to get himself a new wife to show the world what a totally hetero ladies man he is. Recent targets Nazanin Boniadi and Anette Iren Johansen had lucky escapes, though the former got to experience some of the insanity and cruelty that living with this imbalanced man would have entailed.

    They are now safe, but Ms Ferguson needs our help. Search parties are headed out to find her to get her to safety and prevent her from becoming another victim of this lunatic and his BFF’s moneymaking scam.

    http://www.comingsoon.net/news/movienews.php?id=120362

    • http://scientologybollocks.blogspot.co.uk/ media_lush

      from what I’ve heard [very] recently she’s an actress willing to er…. “roll any kind of dice” to get ahead {this came from some of my friends who are from some of the younger ‘soaps’…. }… what is more interesting is that Alec Baldwin is being considered for the ‘Head of C.I.A.’ role…. behind the scenes he’s almost as toxic as Tommy Girl himself… the fact that a franchise that scored close over half a billion has to resort to these kind of co-stars shows what trouble it’s in! [IMO}

      • DodoTheLaser

        What’s wrong with Alec playing the head of CIA?
        He is a Hollywood icon. I don’t get your point, m_l.

        • http://scientologybollocks.blogspot.co.uk/ media_lush

          I know what you mean/think and, if truth be told, I would love him to play this role… however…. I say again….. however… in the gossip world [it’s a real thing] and the other one [not too sure of that one] it’s well known that he’s pretty much burned all his bridges as far as ‘proper commercial’ film roles go’; his wife has turned him into a walking talking Mel Gibson variation of “Fuck Your Jewish Sugar Tits” machine… aye caramba and all that.

          The point being is that it’s quite well known that his agent has been trying to find a gig for him for ages now and, conversely, this is what happens when no one wants to work with you… [CRUISE/BALDWIN…. OH THE HUMANITY!!!]

          • DodoTheLaser

            See, that’s the thing – no matter the gossip world, regular people still dig him and the studios producers know it. This is a very successful franchise and tons of folks will pay to see the sequel regardless. We need to focus on TC’s scn-related bs, that’s all we can do, imo.

            • http://scientologybollocks.blogspot.co.uk/ media_lush

              nope, and nope… they’re having to resort to a guy who is incredibly famous for using the “F” word… not once, or even twice but on numerous occasions.. RECENTLY!… putting out that Alec Baldwin has a possible major role in MI5 is admitting defeat!

              The one FUCKING HUGE ELEPHANT IN THE ROOM that no regarded media outlet has bothered to address (yet) is that Cruises’s ‘Edge of Tomorrow’ had terrific reviews… probably better than any of his other movies this past decade… but… B… U…. T… no one wanted to watch it!!… they’re either in denial or Xenu Ju-JU actually works…

              …anyway, not sure if this needs more answer but just looked at the clocj and I have to go to bed… hepp, hepp!

            • DodoTheLaser

              Using “F” word in NYC is too often a substitute for “Good morning”. Later.

          • DodoTheLaser

            Who do you think should play the head of CIA instead of Alec?
            Sure, there some great folks, except they are really old or not as recognizable.
            I don’t think they picked Alec for a major franchise because he is desperately jobless.
            There are investors behind and they want their returns. This was thoroughly calculated.

        • D.Y.G.

          Oy vey. He’s a toxic drama queen. I bet he’ll play a bad guy really well.

      • Missionary Kid

        I happen to like Alec. He’s a fairly good actor, is able to do improv very well, and throws himself into a part with abandon. At least, he doesn’t take himself too seriously. Yes, I know, he can be outrageous.

        • http://scientologybollocks.blogspot.co.uk/ media_lush

          me too… he was just the perfect ‘bloke’ on the Dave Letterman Show… too many stories I’ve heard that he’s quite the fucker behind all that; which doesn’t dissuade me for wanting to have a drink with him… which surely is the problem of everything…

        • MaxSpaceman

          Perhaps his best performance, 1990’s Miami Blue. Outstanding. Not many actors can do drama as he does and then skillfully handle comedy, as he also does.

          As a person, he’s trouble, yes.

        • Juicer77

          He’s Shatner Redux.

          • Missionary Kid

            Shatner had a reputation for hubris, but now he makes fun of himself.

    • DodoTheLaser

      Simon Pegg will save her. He did “The World’s End” and “Shaun Of The Dead”.

    • Jerseygram

      Just looked her up. At 31, she’s a bit old for said unhinged individual. If one goes by his marital past where wife #2 was 11 years younger than wife #1, and wife #3 was 11 years younger than wife #2, then the next victim would have to be about 25 today.

  • http://scientologybollocks.blogspot.co.uk/ media_lush

    thought I’d share this…. total dickhead of a neighbour has been trying to sell his house for ages now [with no luck]… this was someone who borrowed all my gardening stuff back in the day and never returned [yes, a real Ed Flanders/Homer moment]… and I’ve since found out that his ‘tax situation’ is total bollocks… it was originally a private sale but he’s gone public and I’m getting a lot of emails asking me to ‘rate my neighbourhood’ – for want of a better way of explaining it… I love where I live and a big part of what do and keep my finger in is ‘real estate development’ and this guy has totally fucked up… over 9 months of a total rehab he went through 6 different General Contractors; the first one quit over successive late payments, second one the exact the same thing… 3rd… they just disappeared… anyway – it’s amazing what you find out by being a good neighbour [squeaky door handle – please fix… here’s a cup of tea…or would you prefer a beer… £40 in pocket]… subsequent visits and the guy told me that the new ground floor toilet was impossible to use if you had a waist higher than 32″]… looking back … well, all I can say is sorry for being off-topic

    • Missionary Kid

      We all have our anti-$cientologist lives, as well as our meat body lives. My real life problems don’t usually intrude, but occasionally they do.

      Note: add one alcoholic conspiracy theorist neighbor who can be very rational, until he gets on his chemtrails/fluoride-added-to-water/you-name-it-conspiracy/love-Alex-Jones kick. If I keep him off of the conspiracy theories and talk to him sober, he’s O.K. Otherwise, fuggedabout it.

      At least he’s not an asshole, and he returns everything he borrows.

      • http://scientologybollocks.blogspot.co.uk/ media_lush

        if you know how to destroy/kill a 30m Leilani with no evidence please let me know…. I’ve heard that if you hammer copper nails into the base it will kill them… but in about 5 years or so

        • Missionary Kid

          What’s a Leilani? I’m thinking it’s a tree, but hearsaying the word didn’t get me anywhere.

          • Observer
            • Illinoisian

              “Two parent trees both from North America, one from Oregon, one from
              California. They wouldn’t normally meet in the wild – put them in a
              nursery over in Leightonhall and they get together and create Leyland
              Cypress”

              Tree experts say we still have not seen the ultimate height for a leylandii.
              “We don’t know [how tall they could grow],” says Chris Reynolds.

              In the plant world, this sounds like the equivalent of the crazy accidents that gave us Spiderman and the Hulk.

            • Mark

              Or triffids.

            • Missionary Kid

              Apparently, that’s the one.

        • Mark

          Just be thankful it’s not a pyracantha – what they used to use as hedging round lunatic asylums – inch-long thorns. If you want to murder it more quickly than copper nails, stealthily injecting weedkiller into small holes drilled into the leylandii’s trunks works a treat; I speak from experience, having had to wreak vengeance on both irksome species :)

        • Missionary Kid

          I believe that salt or a saline solution injected into the trunk will kill it. If there’s grass around it, make sure you don’t spill any on the grass if it’s surrounded by it.

    • Espiando

      Why does your neighbor sound like fodder for a series hosted by Dominic Littlewood?

  • DodoTheLaser

    Dianetics was Hubbard’s best work of fiction. He just “forgot” to label it so. Because the money kept coming.

    • TheHoleDoesNotExist

      And here I thought it was an autobiography. Live and learn. Speaking of learning, finally got a smartphone. Spent the day with how-to videos and manuals. I was lured in by voice talk. Teeny tiny keyboards annoy the hell out of me. I used to type 120 words a minute. This pecking on baby corn rows seems just right – for 4 year olds. Found it weird talking to my phone, out loud. Between it and the Windows 8.1, now that I am hooked on all manner of conveniences, and fascinated with shiny things, I think I’m ready to hear the truth:

      Google. It’s a cult, isn’t it?

      • Espiando

        Compared to Apple, Google is by far the lesser of two evils.

        • TheHoleDoesNotExist

          True that or at least it was. It’s just that now I find I Must be one with google if I want to do much of anything. It even stalks and harasses me because I refuse to let IT know where I am. “Where are you? Would you like to tell me now where you are? Are you sure?” It’s really starting to creep me out. It all started when Google touched a collective nerve, a benevolent corporation that would do no evil. Just fill out this little survey. No personality tests, But, they have their algorithms or some such stuff in the background constantly compiling one. It’s getting so, so, so scientological!

          • Techie

            Don’t worry, THDNE, they know where you are even if you don’t give them access to the GPS. Even if you use an Apple device. Google knows all, sees all, serves ads to all. They even want to Drive Your Car. Just remember, they promised to Do No Evil. I am sure there is nothing at all that can go wrong go wrong go wrong go wrong. Voice typing creates the most hilarious and inappropriate typographical errors known to humankind. Almost as good as Google Translate.

            • TheHoleDoesNotExist

              I already see it as a source of daily entertainment.

            • kemist

              The algorithm does not need a GPS to locate you. Cell tower data is sufficient to do that.

              There are even experimental software which can do it using your pictures.

          • Espiando

            To be honest, there are only three dead people I hate with the burning passion of a thousand suns: my father, L. Ron Hubbard, and Steve Jobs. So maybe I’m a bit prejudiced in favor of Larry and Sergei in this matter. So says the owner of a Samsung phone and tablet.

            • Techie

              I guess Bill Gates isn’t dead enough to share that list, Espi. I have a very divided love-hate relationship with all three Big Software projects, Android, iOS and Windows What-have-you. It is great that so much work has been done to make it possible to do so many things, but why couldn’t they spend just a wee bit more work to make the feature I need for my project stable? I know it can do x, would it be so hard to make it do y without hacking deep into the kernel only to have the kernel change in some mysterious way on the next revision? Such is the life of a developer. At least Android is pretty transparent about what they are doing, if you have the intestinal fortitude to dig deep enough into the documentation. The same cannot be said for Samsung et al.

            • TheHoleDoesNotExist

              I’ve been watching “Halt and Catch Fire”. I knew some of the original nerdites. Very interesting bunch as well as the space program engineers – all one and the same.

              Here’s a clue: they couldn’t tie their shoestrings right or remember to take out the trash or much of anything really, but their synapses fired 24/7 on anything labeled “A Problem You Can’t Solve”. I don’t believe in aliens, but this bunch tempted me.

          • Juicer77

            Just say NO. Really, you can. Be persistent, but it’s possible. And don’t fall for all those “we’ll link you up quicker with (Facebook, Twitter, etc). Create an independent login and password.

            edit: They’ll still track you down anyway but you’ll have the satisfaction of resisting.

            • Techie

              Well, to really go off the grid with a Samsung product you would have to root and replace the software. Even then they would track you again as soon as you do a search. And you would be missing a lot of features, like localized search, maps. The carrier still knows who you are and where you are anyway. There’s no real privacy in our connected Brave New World.

            • TheHoleDoesNotExist

              Hate FB and I’ve avoided it and Twitter. Hard to keep the ads off tho no matter how I try – they come back and that adds to the creep factor. Like Kemist said, they can be way off too. Based on searching is just dumb.

          • kemist

            Google ads classify you into a target demographic according to your search history.

            I saw mine once and it’s wayyyyy off.

        • D.Y.G.

          I’m still a member of the dying cult of BlackBerry.

      • aquaclara

        Now, can voice talk Red X, too? Hmmmm. This could be fun.
        😉

        • TheHoleDoesNotExist

          Hmmmmm.

      • NOLAGirl

        I have to make the change to smartphone soon too. Not really looking forward to it. I’m ok with change around me, but with my personal stuff, I’m more resistant to it.

        • TheHoleDoesNotExist

          If you’ve used a tablet, it’s not as much a learning curve. I learned here at the Bunker to use DuckDuckGo and from there read up on how to stay private as much as possible.

          • NOLAGirl

            I have a little tablet experience so I’m hoping I’ll get used to it, I just hate those damn phones that are so touchy they freak out with one swipe. I don’t know, maybe I’m just weird, but I love my old laptop. :) Tried & True, never fails me and takes the beating I put it through. *sigh* But, I shall allow my husband and son to drag me into this century.

      • Juicer77

        You know, with a smartphone you can visit the Bunker even without Wi-Fi (through the data connection)? 😉

      • kemist

        No.

        But it will achieve conscience and kill us all eventually.

        • TheHoleDoesNotExist

          Now I feel so much better:)

  • Pierrot

    Tony O is officially late.
    I hope that some RedXer will be able to post today’s link.
    My schedule does not allow me to hang around.
    Here is the link
    https://whyweprotest.net/community/threads/taking-down-co-on-craigslist-co-ads-on-craigslist.113779/page-100#post-2470838

  • FromPolandWithLove

    I just wanted to say hello to Everybody in The Bunker:). I’m sipping my coffe and waiting for new post. I wish Everybody: (The Propietor, Bunkeritas, Bunkeritos, Exes, Ex-SOs,RedXers, Never-ins, Lurkers, OSAbots, UnderRadars, OnFences, ) great day :)

    • N. Graham

      Don’t forget the Trolls!

      • FromPolandWithLove

        And Socks:):):)

  • N. Graham

    The new post reminds me a lot of yesterday’s.

  • TheHoleDoesNotExist

    Don’t know if this was linked yesterday in the comments, but this ABC interview with Leah Remini about her new reality TV show, “Leah Remini: It’s All Relative” just now caught my eye.

    I’m perplexed with the mixed signals she is sending.
    http://abcnews.go.com/blogs/entertainment/2014/07/leah-remini-scientology-split-still-not-easy-as-time-goes-on/

    • D.Y.G.

      Confusing, yes, especially when you compare to her earlier comments during DWTS. I think what you see here in this video is what it’s going to be from now on. Maybe someone suggested she keep it mellow because of her career. She’s just not going to become an outspoken champion against cult abuses like everyone hoped.

    • Sunny Sands

      I took her remarks to mean that she’s surprised both friends and the public are so interested in her departure. Some non-sci friends have even said to her that they always wanted to ask about her involvement in scientology, but didn’t until now.

      Leah grew up in it, and she’s also been in the bubble portion of it for many years. She may not even be interested much in the beliefs and so-called tech. She just knows her friend Shelly is missing and it stinks to high heaven, and they charged her $300,000 in sec checks at Flag or whatever it was because she asked about it.

      • BosonStark

        Leah read Blown for Good, or at least she carried it around. (LOL)

        Anyway, she should realize from reading that book, that she and her family lucked out. A lot of cult kids like Marc just got stuck in the trap, and spent what should have been the best years of their lives working 100-hour workweeks on a compound, to sell a scam. I think it is time for Leah to speak up for those people, many who were not as bright and skilled as Marc, and who got scarred even more deeply by being enslaved in the organization.

    • BosonStark

      Leah says, “You’re so in it that you don’t really see the fascination.”

      Oddly, when she says fascination, she’s referring to her split, in particular. Getting in trouble for asking about the wife of the cult leader, whom he “disappeared” is pretty damn fascinating. Being sent away for “security checking” or “processing” on that point is outrageous.

      Apart from her experience, a Pulitzer Prize-winning author has written a book about Leah’s cult, and its relationship to celebrities. She was a scilebrity, probably in the #4 scilebrity position in the cult. L. Ron Hubbard was one of the most fascinating fraudsters of the last century.

      Of course she would like to get on with her life and become an even bigger celebrity, and not be held back by something her mother foisted on her.

      Celebrities have a disproportionate influence on society, and Leah will never be able to escape the fact that she was indoctrinated, became a shill of sorts, even though she probably drew in a tiny fraction of the people Cruise has drawn in through his involvement and advocacy for them.

      If Cruise ever left and started speaking out about Scientology being a trap, the media would trample Leah to get to him and his story. Right now though, looks like she might be their top dog celebrity SP.

      Maybe Leah should work on getting Alley or Travolta out, so she can can relinquish that position.

  • AmoVolare

    In my accounts, Tony O was 1 day early since yesterday (remember a day with 2 official posts?) so, until tomorrow, he is on-shedule! have a nice day….

    • Techie

      Very forgiving, AV, but we needs our Bunker fix NOW.

    • NOLAGirl

      At the tone, the Tony Time will be……

      I know…I’m shutting up now. :)

  • Snake Plissken

    “Freud abandoned the approach, because it caused no significant change in the patient, save for increasing dependence upon the therapist. Which would be useful if you wanted to keep raking in the cash, rather than curing the patient.”

    Freud abandoned the approach, because it would result in Scientology.

  • Panopea Abrupta

    If the Freewinds went to Mexico, would Tony’s headline say Can Con in Cancun ?

  • Walter Mitty

    While we are waiting … (picture – refresh)

  • Tony Ortega

    New post up!

    • MaxSpaceman

      The Headley quote: “… is almost identical [to] the ‘orgs’ and the…” – the copy editor might’ve missed the “to” or…

  • InterestedObserver12

    I am always bothered by those who use $cientology to attack $cientology (as Jon does in this analyses). Maybe I am bothered because I would rather write the whole thing off than be forever haunted by blowhard LRH’s occasional 100-monkeys-typing bits of truth. Unfortunately (truthfully?) I know that abreactive therapy has value because it turned me inside out. I know that it is dangerous because it sometimes turned my PCs (as I suspect it turned LRH) outside in.

  • Lady Squash

    Jon, I am a big fan and have a question for you and would be honored if you could email me at ladysquash10@gmail.com. Looking forward to hearing from you.