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Prepare to Be Audited: Claire Headley Takes Us Through Scientology’s “ARC Straightwire”

Wise, Beard Man?

Wise, Beard Man?

Claire Headley is taking us on our journey to train as Scientologists. She and her husband Marc were Sea Org workers who escaped from Scientology’s International Base in 2005. She spent years working with Scientology’s “tech,” and was trusted to oversee the auditing of Tom Cruise. Go here to see the first part in this series.

We’re excited about this next step on the bridge, Claire. It’s time for some auditing.

CLAIRE: The next stop on the processing side of the Bridge is the first of the “expanded grades” and is called “ARC Straightwire.”

“ARC” because it deals with the subjects of affinity, reality, and communication — Scientology’s notion of understanding.

“Straightwire” because it mainly consists of simple recall processes.

I thought it might be interesting to give an insider’s view of what one would expect when sitting down to an auditing session. (And this is the first auditing that involves the use of the E-meter.)

THE BUNKER: Please do.

CLAIRE: You go to an auditing room, a small room with a table and two chairs seated across from each other. An E-meter is set up, with cans and a shield. The shield is to cover up the worksheets, where the auditor records everything said and done in each session.

Whether or not you see a camera, the room will be rigged to record the session. This is a much more recent development in terms of the history of Scientology. My understanding is that all auditing rooms were equipped with video and audio surveillance systems beginning in 1995.

Up_The_BridgeThe next thing you will notice is that the auditor has his back to the door. This is to ensure he’s in the most strategic position to prevent you from leaving the session. As we’ve discussed earlier, these are the rules of auditing: Get the “preclear” through it, “what turns it on will turn it off,” and “the way out is the way through.” In other words, the auditor won’t let you out until you’ve got where he wants to get you.

A sign, “In Session,” is placed on the door while you receive auditing. It is a “High Crime” in Scientology to interrupt an auditing session.

The auditor will seat you and make sure you are comfortable.

Then you will be asked to do what’s referred to as a can squeeze, where the auditor sets the sensitivity of the E-meter for you by having you gently squeeze the cans.

Next you do a metabolism test. “Take a deep breath, hold it for a moment, and let it out through your mouth.” This will produce a fall of the needle if you are well fed and rested. (And you’ll then be asked if you are well fed and well rested.)

Then: “Is there any reason not to have a session?” And then the auditor will say, with Tone 40 (a strong, steady voice): “This is the session.”

The first step is to get your “rudiments in.” Specifically, you will be asked:

— “Do you have an ARC break?” That’s Scientologese for, “Is there something you’re upset about?”

— “Do you have a present time problem?” For example, some problem keeping your attention elsewhere.

— “Has a withhold been missed?” In other words, have you done anything you don’t want known about.

Each of these questions is checked for a read — a reaction of the needle on the E-meter in response to the question. If it reads, you will be asked another series of questions depending on which item you reacted to.

You will become extremely familiar with the rudiment process in your auditing career, since these questions are asked at the start of every single auditing session.

Once you have a floating needle, and VGIs (very good indicators), you are ready to run your first process of ARC Straightwire.

The auditor asks a question. It might be, “Recall a time you felt affinity for someone.” If there’s a reaction on the E-meter, then that process will be “run.” (The question will be asked again and again.) Otherwise, you move on to the next question…

Has anything been suppressed?
Has anything been invalidated?
Is there anything you have been careful of?
Is there anything you failed to reveal?
Has anything been misunderstood?

And so on.

If any of the above questions react, you will run the process. The auditor will give you the command over and over again and acknowledge each answer you give.

And this will be repeated until you have a cognition, have very good indicators, and have a floating needle on the E-meter. When you’ve finished the process, the auditor will tell you he is going to end the session. “Is there anything you care to say or ask before I end the session?”

“End of session,” said in Tone 40.

And you go to the examiner, who will make sure you have a floating needle and very good indicators. The stated “Ability Gained” for this level on the Bridge is: “Knows he/she won’t get any worse.”

Perhaps this is true for some.

My personal experience was that when I arrived at the Int Base and in the years that followed, I became much much worse off than I had ever imagined possible.

THE BUNKER: Claire, was your perception that the needle was actually reading something other than skin galvanism, which can be affected by things like sweat and grip?

CLAIRE: I never questioned the meter, really. After all, several sec check (interrogation) questions are oriented around “Don’t you think the E-meter works?” This question is asked as an accusation, and if you admit that you do question the machine, the next step is to find out what crimes you’ve committed. So I just shut it out of my mind.

I think there is a benefit to real communication, and evaluation of one’s experiences, actions, thoughts etc. But honestly, I felt I gained so much more from therapy than I did from auditing, long term benefits that significantly improved my outlook on life. Probably more so because I was free to think through all aspects, good, bad, and ugly, and question things

In retrospect, it just seemed there were so many variables and a lack of consistency, that yes, I’d think a lot of it was skin galvanism, etc., and the rest of it was a lie detector-type reaction.

Something could react because you had an answer, or react because you protested the question, or react because you were thinking of something entirely different.

I hope that answers your question. I haven’t given this any thought in a really long time!

THE BUNKER: Can you give us an example of one question that might be asked over and over? And what happens to your responses over time?

CLAIRE: An example of a question asked over and over is: “Recall a time that is really real to you.”

I think there were a few times I felt better. Overall, however, there was a lot of repetition and pressure that I felt personally always to feel better and have a cognition. I can remember having the vague feeling of pressure as to what my cognition would be. And also an expectation that I had to feel better or there was something wrong with me.

This is the start of my personal resolution that many things in Scientology reflect a situation of pluralistic ignorance: “no one believes, but everyone believes that everyone else believes.”

THE BUNKER: So, when an auditor asks, “Recall a time that is really real to you,” and he asks it and asks it, do you come up with 20, 30, 40 different answers? Or do you give the same answer again and again, but with slight differences? And how do you get a “win” from that?

CLAIRE: Each time the command is given, it’s a different answer, so 20, 30, or 40 different answers. The idea is that you will “release charge” by recalling past memories.

THE BUNKER: Can you give us an example from your own career when you answered a series of questions and got a “win”?

CLAIRE: For “Recall a time you were in good communication with someone,” I revisited several conversations with my grandmother and it reminded me of happy times, so I felt better thinking about those. Not rocket science by any means.

THE BUNKER: No, but we’re starting to get into rocket science prices. A single intensive (12.5 hours of auditing) for ARC Straightwire, according to our 2001 price list, is going to run us $8,470. [Update: Claire tells me $3,000 is closer to the truth, depending on the number of intensives, so we’ll go with that.] Our total so far: $25,697.

 
——————–

TOMORROW: Prepare For an Epochal Meeting of the Minds

 
HistoryPZ

 
Pharyngula goes whole track! Has PZ Myers met his match in the genius of L. Ron Hubbard and biological evolution, Scientology style? Join us tomorrow morning to find out!

 
——————–

Mission Creep: Los Feliz Will Soon Be Cleared!

We want to thank the tipster who snapped this photo of Scientology’s newest mission, which looks like it’s going to open up any day now. It’s in the Los Feliz neighborhood of Los Angeles, at the corner of Hillhurst Avenue and Avocado Street, and the building is looking lovely after a renovation. Just imagine how much theta flow this place is going to generate for the neighborhood!
 
LosFelizMission

 
Speaking of which, just a few blocks away is a major source of entheta — the home of Karen de la Carriere, where she, J. Swift, and Angry Gay Pope have been making so many great videos lately. Is the power of a Scientology mission going to cause a downward spiral for the video enterprise, or will Karen be free from the mission’s overwhelm?

 
——————–

East St. Louis Toodle-Oo

Damn, we are so jealous that David Love, Bert Leahy, and Colin Henderson are going cross-country on a documentary drive. (We will be fortunate enough to hook up with them this weekend.) Watching this old-school-looking footage at the St. Louis arch, we had the irrepressible urge to watch the Cardinals play the Expos. Hell, let’s play two!

 

 
——————–

Posted by Tony Ortega on August 7, 2013 at 07:00

E-mail your tips and story ideas to tonyo94@gmail.com or follow us on Twitter. We post behind-the-scenes updates at our Facebook author page. Here at the Bunker we try to have a post up every morning at 7 AM Eastern (Noon GMT), and on some days we post an afternoon story at around 2 PM. After every new story we send out an alert to our e-mail list and our FB page.

If you’d like to help support The Underground Bunker, please e-mail our webmaster Scott Pilutik at BunkerFund@tonyortega.org

 

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  • Ruby Grapefruit

    One little detail: “Has a withhold been missed?” actually means “have you done anything you don’t want known about THAT SOMEONE ELSE NEARLY FOUND OUT ABOUT and you’re not sure whether or not they know, so you’re caught in this anxiety of wondering whether or not they know.

  • John P.

    Two quick things to point out then back to a busy morning here at Global Capitalism HQ:

    First, it’s quite telling that one of the first sec checks anyone receives is beating down your resistance to the e-meter by asking if you have committed the Thoughtcrime of failing to believe in the infallibility of this key piece of “the tech.”

    Second, “East St. Louis Toodle-oo” is a rather amusing title for the video footage of David Love and his cross-country cosmonauts, since the official house band of the Underground Bunker, Steely Dan, did a cover of this classic 1926 Duke Ellington tune on their 1974 album “Pretzel Logic.” Take a listen: http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=GdE5ictJV7I

    • sugarplumfairy

      mmmmm.. hot pretzel..

    • Marti

      Love Toodleo-Oo and the growling plunger muted trumpet part by Bubber.

    • Edward Whalley

      It’s also the background music to the “dildo” scene in Naked Lunch…which is also named Steely Dan.

  • Patty Moher

    Thanks Claire and Tony. Great job in explaining the crazy tech of L. Ron.

    • TheHoleDoesNotExist

      Sending Xenu hugs your way for all the glorious SP’s. No, really.

      • Patty Moher

        Massively huge hugs your way sister. Will be missing you. Thanks for all you do and have done.

  • Observer

    The more I learn, the more I despise Hubbard, even when I think I’ve reached the limit. The suppression of critical thought processes Claire describes here is just evil.

    • Hubbard’s Boil

      What’s most impressively diabolical to me is the insistence on digging up something embarassing or sordid. There is a strong presumption of guilt built into the auditing structure. Of course, this makes perfect sense. Sitting in a tiny, closed room, blocking the door, recording the session, asking leading questions, and saving the tape helps ensure the production of incriminating material as well as promoting an extrem sense of authority. I feel clausterphobic just considering it.

      Claire doesn’t mention the auditor informing the prey that the session is being recorded, either. Evil, indeed.

      • Marie Claire Wolf

        True! Diabolical and sadistic.

      • Observer

        As 0tessa once pointed out, every Scientologist is running Hubbard’s case. He had a whole lot of shameful skeletons in his closet, so he assumed everyone else did too, and treated them accordingly. Controlling people through shame seems to be at the core of the “tech.”

        • Hubbard’s Boil

          That is the cult’s true philosophy, beautifully boiled down to a few succinct words, “Controlling people through shame.”

          • Poison Ivy

            Otessa/HB – perfectly stated.

            Really, that is all that shame is good for. It’s a useless emotion, unless of course it’s shame for doing a genuinely bad thing that one has to make amends for in order to change (and not do it again).

            Scientology keeps people on the edge of shame all the time. What a sick, horrible way to exist!

            • Missionary Kid

              But in the end, there’s no making amends, is there, particularly from $cientology.

              To sum up the philosophy, it’s “Fuck You.” That’s true for $cientology towards their followers, and they teach their followers to adopt the same philosophy towards people outside of the group.

            • Poison Ivy

              Yep.

            • Exterrier

              I was gonna say Yep.

        • 0tessa

          Thanks for reminding me!

      • monkeyknickers

        I think the digging-for-sins thing was mainly cuz Hubbard was looking for some new ideas.

        Gets boring after awhile, doing the same evil shit over and over. A sociopath needs VARIETY.

        • Hubbard’s Boil

          Except “digging for sins” guarantees that people will be afraid to leave, afraid to think for themselves, afraid not to comply. This goes way beyond the cult leader getting his jollies.

          • Poison Ivy

            Yes, “digging for sin” is a surefire way to control people. Most people need to be able to believe that they are good people, and most want to be perceived that way by others. This is wired into all of us, even if we’re the types who say, “I don’t give a damn what you think.” No, you do – you just react to that inclination differently than seeking approval (which is healthier, at least from the perspective of a recovering people-pleaser). If you can hook someone by their primal social need to fit in and be approved of – and Hubbard (as well as all cult leaders worth their salt) perfected a system to do that flawlessly, with the love-bombing followed by intermittent reinforcement – you can lock them in under your control without guns or handcuffs.

            It’s so liberating to HONESTLY be able to say, “I don’t care what you think,” and mean it. But most of us really need to hit a sort of rock bottom (or become involved with some really really bad people and then realize it) to get to that state of freedom.

            • Missionary Kid

              PI, you’re on fire today.

            • Poison Ivy

              🙂 MK. I was away last week, and feeling introspective today. A lot of shit going on in my life and I want to procrastinate. Reading the exes’ stories always makes me feel like I don’t have a care in the world.

              To be trapped in a mind-control cult, to me, is the definition of hell. I came close a couple times (not in cults, but in cultish situations), so I always say a little prayer of thanks when I read what you brave exes here write.

            • Missionary Kid

              I hope things turn out all right for you. I’m not an ex, but I know, from my religious background what it’s like to be in something that is all-enveloping, with an eternity of hell on the outside.

            • Poison Ivy

              Some things are hard to get out of when people don’t want you out. I hear ya. But my life’s pretty great overall when I step back and stop focusing on the temporary bullshit.

              Thanks 😉

            • aquaclara

              So true. I hope the temporary BS ends soon.

        • sugarplumfairy

          Lol.. Eggggcellent point..

        • TheHoleDoesNotExist

          Those two channeling Hubbard again? That is scary!

      • Bury_The_Nuts

        There is probably a “religious exemption” for that too!

        Sure seems to be for every other crime they commit.

        • Hubbard’s Boil

          There seems to be no limit to what can be done by attributing it to religious belief. I thought violence, imprisonment, and denial of medical treatment were all well past that line, but Scientolgy proved me wrong.

      • Once_Born

        “I would love to know how the cult addresses this law”. Ignore it. It’s only wog law, after all. The real question is how do they get away with it.

        On the plus side, Claire says the CofS has been recording sessions since 1995. Given they are known for obsessively preserving records of {confessionals} they must have astonishing amounts of media stored away, providing evidence of a n organised and prolonged illegal activities.

        Providing the law stopped tiptoeing around them…

      • Poison Ivy

        Do they address it using their “ecclesiastical cloaking”? I know this is illegal in California, because I used to do a ton of phone interviews for my work during the years I lived there and there was always a big deal made by the lawyers about getting unequivocal agreement before and then after the recorders started rolling. If not getting it in writing first! It was such a big pain that I usually just took notes.
        Very good question HB, how they get around it.

        • DeElizabethan

          One way is they tell you or make you believe that the recording is for technical, training reasons, to check on the auditor that s/he is doing it right. One tends to believe whatever they tell you. If not then ethics again and ‘what have you done’? Insidious to say the least.

    • Marie Claire Wolf

      ARC straight wire…give a break! The old goat used verbiage that seems borrowed/mangled terms from an electronic course of study. His entire sales pitch was designed to look ‘modern’, so that people lured into his cult would have the feeling they had landed the revolutionary means to enhance their spirituality. The whole shebang owes a lot to such figures and things like Aleister Crowley, Gurdjieff, Joseph Smith, drugs, science fiction novels, Popular Mechanics, etc… Name it you got it so long as it fit his design to build himself a perch. Like Obs. I am utterly disgusted by this poor excuse of a human being.

      • BananaSplits8

        “His entire sales pitch was designed to look ‘modern’, so that people
        lured into his cult would have the feeling they had landed the
        revolutionary means to enhance their spirituality.”

        It’s part of the MO of the successful woo woo peddler. Deepak Chopra being Exhibit B.

        From DC’s wikipedia page:

        “Chopra also participated in the Channel 4 (UK) documentary The Enemies of Reason, where, when interviewed by ethologist and evolutionary biologist Richard Dawkins,
        he admitted that the term “quantum theory” was being used as a metaphor
        and that it has little to do with the actual quantum theory in physics.”

        When challenged on the bullshit they’re selling as facts, there’s that “it’s only a metaphor” excuse again.

        Grr.

        • Once_Born

          The positive aspect of Hubbard’s plagiaristic “sales pitch” is that it was fine-tuned for the US in the 1950s, and is becoming increasing irrelevant (and eventually incomprehensible) as time goes on.

          This wouldn’t be so bad for the CofS if they could develop new imaginative lies – but {Source} must not be changed (except by Miscavige, and even then, only a little bit)

          • BananaSplits8

            True. One of my favorites is “Flunk!” during the TR-0s.

            Hubbard must’ve been itching to put “groovy” somewhere as part of his trillion year-old vernacular of wisdom.

            • Robert Eckert

              He was a real swinging cat.

            • He really was hip with his jive.

            • Phil McKraken

              No, his low-slung testicles were swinging cats.

            • Jon Hendry

              I’m surprised there isn’t a 23 Skiddoo Rundown.

            • John P.

              I’m surprised there isn’t a 23 Skiddoo Rundown.

              It is equally surprising that the Sea Org uniforms are not styled after zoot suits.

            • Marie Claire Wolf

              That be cooler than their nazi navy officers duds.

            • Observer

              And where are the fedoras?

            • ze moo

              Not even a Marcab would go for lapels like that. Though Lroon did say they dressed like jack webb. Lroons ‘personal style’ seemed to be a combination of liberace and jack webb.

            • Missionary Kid

              Please, don’t insult Liberace and Jack Webb. 😉

            • Poison Ivy

              Did I hear “Zoot Suits”?
              http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=1IqH3uliwJY

            • Missionary Kid

              That’s just a modern version. The original ones, if you look at pictures, had coat jackets that were as long as raincoats. The music was much more big band style, but I’ll say that I really like that video.

            • Captain Howdy

              Big Bad Voodoo Daddy were the kings/originators of the swing revival scene of the 90’s.

              And the original Zoot Suiters were predominately Latinos and were hated by the whites, which resulted in lots of police brutality that eventually led to riots.

              http://youtu.be/g6ICYbiLIsg

            • Robert Eckert

              “The Los Angeles City Council approved a resolution criminalising the wearing of “zoot suits with reat [sic] pleats within the city limits of LA” ” But is it a crime is the suit does not have the peg leg and the stuff cuff?

            • Observer

              *spit take*

            • Missionary Kid

              *Laugh* First one of the morning.

            • Poison Ivy

              “Groovy” was from the mid to late ’60’s.

              That’s WAY too modern for Hubbard, who was calcified in the post-atomic ’50’s.

              What the hell is a “straight wire,” anyway?

              More “tech” (screaming silently into the morning….)

          • Missionary Kid

            That’s the trap that DM is in. He’s flogging an outmoded product that was outmoded at launch with outdated technology in the form of the e-meter. For the $cions, there’s a huge placebo effect that makes them believe that the e-meter can actually sense thoughts.

            Claire learned to compartmentalize her thinking so she could fool the e-meter.

          • Exterrier

            They actually made an attempt to market to the New Age boom in the nineties…. the Shirley McClaine bunch…as usual a decade or more behind the trend curve. The only time they really nailed the trend curve was 1950, actually, with the fluke and short lived dianetics craze. They told me they tried putting New Age type covers on the books in the nineties, and also made a point of pushing The History of Man, for its past lives speculations. And I remembered they bought ads in the New Age Journals, like Whole Life Times and such. And there was also an attempt to emulate Tony Robbins, who was outselling them vastly, by putting up late night informercials. So they tried the self help line again, as well as the new age.
            I heard from some div six regges that the Navy Uniforms really freaked out the new age people when they did come in to check it all out.
            Actually having a conspicuously workable and helpful and accessible phhilosophy or “product” would expand them easily in this troubled world, but they don’t. So trotting out pampered and deluded celebrities may be all they have left. I think Miscabbage has given up on delivery of services, and actually expansion, and is into looting the dwindling survivors in the cult for donations, and is stacking up money in swiss banks for his final escape to Dubai or somewhere without an extradition treaty.

            • Once_Born

              Fascinating…

              They should have realied that new age navel-gazing seems to attract individualistic, (but not terribly discerning) people who tend to flit from one idea to another. The {discipline} required by the CofS is anathema to them. I would have loved to see the new agers being {confronted} by the Sea Org.

              The fact that the CofS does not have a “workable philosophy” did not matter in the early days. They could recruit more than enough people to make up for those who left, disillusioned, because the exes were all isolated – there was no way for them to effectively communicate with each other, let alone the general public (except for the very few, like Cyril Vosper, who published books)

              Today, however, there is the Internet, which enables all the people discarded by the CofS over the years to communicate with each other and the world at large. They have become a powerful group – there may now be more militant exes than there are members.

              I don’t think Miscavige is preparing to bug out. Most con men get caught because they milk the con for too long – and he does not seem to be aware that Hubbard’s creation was a con.

              Since he cannot show that Scientology itself works, he is has become obsessed with buying buildings under the impression that this proves the organisation is constantly expanding.
              It’s like the Wizard of Oz giving the Cowardly Lion a medal. The Lion still doesn’t have courage – but he can show off his medal as if it is the same thing.

              I wonder if that is why Tom Cruise got one…

        • Marie Claire Wolf

          Oh yes, ‘Two Pack Shopping’ is a pet peeve of mine. That he hoisted himself as a spiritual guru kills me.

        • AnonymousSP

          Sadly it still looks modern to those who don’t study or read science. If half those celebtards actually sat through a few general physics courses they’d be amazed and then go build their own e-meter for 20 or so bucks. Hubbard tech? Kill me now.

          • Missionary Kid

            Sadly, analog volt-ohmmeters are now more expensive than digital ones.

        • Poison Ivy

          Yes, Deepak gets away with a lot, being a “doctor.” And he’s definitely all about the money these days. But though he’s become a cash-cow “brand”, he does not dictate any “right” way for people to live their lives, like a cult leader. It may be woo-woo, but it’s food for thought. He’s written nearly as much as LRH but it’s all cherry-pickable. Hey, he gets paid either way.

          • Marie Claire Wolf

            I call that sort of pablum Foufou stuff.

            • Missionary Kid

              Pablum Foufou. A great phrase.

            • aquaclara

              The Master of Pablum Foufou….one for your list. From you.

            • monkeyknickers

              I don’t know either of those words or what it means when they’re put together, but I LOVE IT, Marie!

              I think I’ve found names for my twins!

              (PS I seriously love words)

            • Marie Claire Wolf

              Nicknames maybe…Fou in French means crazy, a double fou is utterly crazy 😉

            • monkeyknickers

              Ahem . . . . maybe I should re-think that one then. 🙂

            • Missionary Kid
            • monkeyknickers

              HA! HA!

              And also:

              Holy shit. I changed my mind. No kids. Sorry.

            • Missionary Kid

              Little late, huh? 😛

          • Missionary Kid

            I enjoy Deepak just for a different way of looking at things. His understanding of science is definitely woo-woo.

          • BananaSplits8

            While it’s true that Chopra doesn’t seem to be attempting to start a self-serving, coercive cult such as Hubbard did, his endeavor is just as reprehensible: despite the fact that he is a highly scientifically trained man, he goes out of his way to (successfully) promote socially damaging scientific illiteracy under the banner and illusion that his tripe IS scientific. He should damned well know better were it not for his greed and quest for personal fame and I’m not convinced that either option (established cult or best-selling woo woo) is worse than the other.

            • Poison Ivy

              I’d have to say cult is far worse, hands down. If you’re reading “woo woo”, there’s nothing tying you to that way of thinking except your free-will decision to pick up another book. You can walk into another bookstore, pick up something different, and change your mind at any time. You can switch from Deepak’s woo-woo to Iyanla Vanzant’s woo-woo to Eckhardt Tolle’s woo-woo without fear of criticism or reprisal.

              There’s a ton of inaccurate shit out there, in every category – political, science, biography, history (Hello, “Killing Lincoln”, anyone? The Ford Theater museum bookstore in DC won’t even stock it – and it’s a HUGE bestseller and now a major motion picture!) – in every bookstore. And it’s all about the same thing – money. What will sell. Major publishers still fact-check, but not the way they used to – they don’t have the peoplepower to do it (know this from experience.) Yes, people are manipulated to buy things. But we’re free to talk to our next door neighbor the physicist who will tell us, “That isn’t how real quantum physics works.”

              In a cult, you can’t be friends with the physicist, you can’t ask questions about the doctrine/info, and you aren’t free to just change your mind and pick up a different book.

            • BananaSplits8

              “But we’re free to talk to our next door neighbor the physicist who will tell us”

              For the sake of clarity, I don’t disagree with you overall. My gripe is that when you say what I quoted above, even though people have the freedom to ask, most people won’t ask scientifically trained people for their thoughts. The woo woo is soothing, is satisfying and science is a little less so. People generally don’t seek out what will contradict what they want to believe. To a certain extent, there’s even an onslaught from the religious and woo communities to treat science with “skepticism” because scientists are arrogant, know-it-alls, narrow-minded and fabricators of a world view they want to impose to the unsuspecting masses. You can talk to them but you shouldn’t believe them.

              You’re right, it’s not cult-like coersion, but it is, imo, encouraging extremely hurtful and socially counter-productive ignorance.

            • John Foytek

              I think that all thought is amorphous and that our beliefs are subject to our environmental conditioning, our biology/physiology and our free will which is arbitrary.

            • GlibWog

              Please refer to post I wrote to Banana Split..

            • Exterrier

              Like the way you think. Another guy I am a fan of is Rupert Sheldrake, a biologist. He has some great stuff on youtube, a wonderful book out, and a banned TED talk you can still find. He expands and connects the Science/woo woo continuum. He had an interesting run in with Dawkins he describes, and Ben Stein made an absolute fool out of Dawkins and his own dogmas.
              woo woo to me is simply the quest of philosophers, metaphysicians, mystics, and yoga panted divorcees to find or even invent a higher meaning and perhaps frequency and connection in the universe that we confront once we emerge from the womb into all this vast dazzle and gloom. What is wrong with that? Far more interesting than following the Ayatollas of materialism, and their meaningless, mechanical random universe. Even if those guys are right, they are awful dull, and in a meaningless universe it does not even matter if at times I sail with Van Morrison “Into the Mystic” fog.
              Scientology is a terrible perversion and monetization and nazification of that noble quixotic quest to understand it all. And ultimately, it is a mechanization and enslavement just as disgusting as the gray dead world the Soviet Union in its athiest ideologue state offered.

            • Peter

              I really kinda dislike the “woo woo” description, a sort of denigrating throwaway. Having gotten some nice “spiritual” wins with scio, I continued on with other things. Some worked, some didn’t. The science got batter and there were some superb books and authors who also helped make the bridge. Your description doesn’t quite fit the journey I and many others have taken on. Yes, there IS a lot of science involved. Try Dr. Bruce Lipton’s “The Biology of Belief”. Or Marilyn Ferguson’s “Book of Pragmagic – 10 Years of Scientific Breakthroughs.” However, if you’re fixated on the concept of “If you can’t see it, it doesn’t exist”, nothing you do or read will be of any value as you’re locked into a viewpoint which automatically discounts and ignores anything else.

              There are many such books and there’s a lot out there which sounds pretty damned amazing…with lots of scientific testing to back it up. The key, for me, is to approach everything with a cautious willingness to discover new things, a mindset of “maybe” rather than “no way!” Just try wrapping your head around quantum physics if you really are willing to discover stuff which seems quite impossible, yet has been explored by extremely competent and credentialed scientists.

            • Exterrier

              Hmmm….. Peter, your response above might not have been directed to me, but some other commenter. There are some people here who go down the Skeptic path, and the materialist bent that is taught in universities. That’s ok, but I don’t share that at all, I am a fan of Lipton, and I certainly recommend Rupert Sheldrake’s book The Science Delusion to you, or that you find him on youTube. In fact, I think it is an amazing startling universe, and that the universities have made science so boring that nobody studies it anymore, and a lot of decent progress and understanding has stopped while we Monsanto-ize and frack it with our mechanistic practical use of science. Tesla and many great original men of science spoke of the mystical connection or continuum. Quantum physics, not as a metaphor but the actual theory, shows how wild the real nature of what we live in is. In fact, the lack of creativity and openness has at times left an open playing field for guys like Hubbard to exploit people’s natural sense that there are great invisible forces at play, the Seeker sense, and turn it to his own ends.

            • GlibWog

              I do want to add. First I agree with PI that the cult is much worse. In ways that we all certainly in the Bunker know about by now.. ( Abuse, Disconnection, Brainwashing .. Financial ruin.. etc.
              ***Deepak.. His Disdain for Western Medicine .. is well known. ( Although he has back peddled a couple of times about this. )
              He also has blood on his hands. I can’t imagine how many have died being convinced that their ” Holistic Alternative Meditation would ” Cure their Tumor. ”
              He sells Bull Shit. How many has he kept away from real medical care while pushing his Fake Science/ Medicine Hocus Pocus. He is Selling HOPE and to me that is despicable.

          • Exterrier

            And he probably lives a happier life than Lron, with no living in hiding and failed attempts at global domination obsessing him. I love woo woo, and cherry pick it myself. Dawkins himself is more of a showman that Chopra.

    • monkeyknickers

      Right on.

      !!

    • InTheNameOfXenu

      Scientology…created by Hubbard but amplified by Miscavige.

    • Peter

      I would respectfully disagree. I left in the early 80s and virtually nothing of what is descried by Claire existed in auditing sessions. There was never any pressure, even when I had Flag auditing. As I’ve stated repeatedly, things changed rather dramatically once Miscavige began his move. By then, Hubbard was pretty much off the lines, if all this history that Tony has discovered is correct.

      I was never kept in session and ragged at, never photographed (I happen to be keenly sensitive to cameras, hidden or not), etc. And please note I am not “speaking out” in support of Hubbard, merely keeping the record straight.

      So from my own direct experience, it was MISCAVIGE, not Hubbard who created all this disastrous stuff Claire is describing.

      • aquaclara

        Hi, Peter,
        When you went through this, were you asked similar questions in your Flag auditing, or has that also changed? How long would a typical session run? Thanks – I am just curious! oh, and glad you’re out and commenting.

        • DeElizabethan

          I’ll comment for my view. In the 70’s this type of auditing was given also in ’84. However I was public and persons in the Sea org may have had it a little differently. Sessions last about an hour , or more till one completes what one’s started.
          Let’s hear from Peter?

          • Peter

            Posted above you.

          • Peter

            Sure sounds like my own experiences. We seemed to get a lot done in a very short time. As well, sec checking was very rare unless bumped into something which wouldn’t seem to budge. Back in my very early auditing, I ran into such a bump and, when we sec checked it, it turned out to be my mother. So I called her and told her I’d have to disconnect. She replied, “That’s fine dear”. I did, we finished up that particular auditing and I called again and reconnected. Got the same reply. LOL Disconnection back then simply wasn’t the horror which it became and still exists.

        • Peter

          Hi, AC: My Flag auditing was superb. I cannot recall ever being asked such questions. There was *never* any kind of pressure nor any sense of intrusion. One of the very best sessions I ever had anywhere was with Quentin. Absolutely terrific auditor. I was in for over 16 years and, during that time, I had exactly ONE sec check. And ONE really bad auditing session where I found the auditor to be so rote, I put the cans down, told him the session was over and walked out. No one tried to stop me.

          This is why I find it very difficult reading all this “everything in scientology was/is evil.” It wasn’t. Did I know Hubbard lied? Yes, as early as 1966 I had spotted a number of instances, not the least of which was SO #1. However, I ignored it deliberately since I was doing so well personally, the reason I’d gotten in in the first place. I also very much enjoyed helping others and felt I did a lot of that in those 16 years. Back then the whole thing was FUN, very social, we enjoyed the late night all hands, brought in refreshments, had one or two staff who played guitar and we did singalongs. It was VERY different from what it became.

          Those who’ve never been in and those who came in around the beginning of the 80s, experienced a FAR different scientology than did most of us earlier. The huge early 80s exodus was caused by the sudden and very disturbing differences, not the least of which was the theft and ransacking of the mission system. I knew Bent and most of the northern California mission holders personally, and I can tell you with certainty that they turned out first rate “product” for decades. They could not have survived without doing so. A refund request was rare anywhere. (I occasionally wonder if Leah had come in 5 years later, would she have stuck it out for 30 years? Dunno, but the whole experience would have been far more negative, I believe.)

          I could go on, but those who are convinced that it was “all evil” will not change their minds. I sort of feel sorry for them.

          And, as I’ve noted here before…several times…I, too, am utterly appalled at what it has become under Miscavige. Yes, LRH set it up to happen, but I don’t believe for an instant that what it has become was ever LRH’s intention. By the time DM took over, I believe LRH had been seriously ill for some time and all the drug taking did him great harm. His journey, his “payment”. Unbalanced? Certainly. Unique? Hardly. DM, however, IS pure evil. What will happen to him is anyone’s guess. I’m quite certain he has more than a few passports and a great deal of money and gold lodged elsewhere. Whether they catch up with him????? In any case, I doubt that there is any love anywhere in his life. That, alone, is a pretty heavy “sentence” which will keep in his own prison for the rest of his life.

          • TonyOrtega

            And gosh, that Guardian’s Office you all had sure was more effective than these wusses in OSA today. Ah, the good old days.

            • DeElizabethan

              Yes let’s not forget all the good ole’ dirty tricks Huboard wrote about and all the secret policies. A regular person doing his ‘thing’ in scio land were usually unaware of such happenings. That’s the most evil part of scientology, the GO, now all OSA activities.

            • Truthiwant

              I’m tired of all these people saying how great it was in the old days.
              The other day I wrote that these people should do some serious soul searching.
              Nobody’s saying that ALL of Scientology was evil.
              Just like not all of Mussolini’s fascism was all evil but for sure I want nothing to do with either of them.

            • Exterrier

              See above reply to me to Peter. When I was in in the nineties, or kind of half in, I wondered how it had gotten so big, cause it seemed so uptight to me at Celebrity Center Hollywood, where I was promoting shows for them….robotic and somewhat uncreative. So I did investigating by quietly asking old timers when it was last nice for them, what was the best time. Universally they said, in a sad, misty eyed way, “When Yvonne Jentsch was alive…She made this happen, she loved and helped us….we had hootenannys, theater, poetry nights”. Her memory has been expunged from celebrity center, and I have had old timers say that it should be her empty desk and office there, waiting for her return, and not Ron. When I was there it was really run, not by thepurported CC Director David Pettit, who is still there, but by a terrible, egotistical nazi witch by the name of Pamela Lancaster Johnson. That anyone as sick as her, a true Nurse Ratched, had so much power, told me that Scientology was sick and authoritarian inside, and to beware of any “healing” organization that would allow that. And the language that I heard her use on her underlings, and the pervasive smoking addiction of the sea orgers, let me know that higher up in the organization there might be some similar characters who encouraged or used such bullying as well. For a while I had a great time there during lonely days after a divorce, but there was always a terrible dark undercurrent of sadness, and of meanness that bothered me. I did more investigating into the old days, and found documents pertaining to a booking agency they had once tried to operate under Yvonne to actually help the new undiscovered talent, and how some scandal developed around it. So now they don’t really help anyone, but recruit from already working talent if they can.
              But the old days were fun and sexy and kind of euphoric for a lot of people I had encountered….mainly when it was run by missions and not DM and his Sea Org slaves and goons.

            • Exterrier

              PS, I am not saying it was ever really good. Tory Christman and you have explained and laid it out so well. I am saying that it was for many, apparently during some sunny and youthful times, and wonderful delusion. There are honeymoon days in cults, especially if you are young and free, before it turns into Lord of the Flies. But judging from Ron Jr’s appearances before bribed, and so much other evidence from people you have featured here, behind all the “fun” was a megalo manic psychopath who was skimming off millions. He knew they would play his games, even from his own “gamemaker policy”. I hope you have printed out his “gamemaker” writings, because it is key to the whole thing, and his whole vision of himself and why he did what he did.
              I had some caring, helpful auditing once, and it was very life changing….so I have a soft spot for the bubble of delusion that can exist for a few brief moments evenin such a bad thing as scientology, where the natural goodness of people can supply some actual solace and help in this cruel world.

          • Studious Judious

            I am reminded of Bokononism from Vonnegut’s Cat’s Cradle

            Bokononism is based on the concept of foma, which are defined as harmless untruths. A foundation of Bokononism is that the religion, including its texts, is formed entirely of lies; however, one who believes and adheres to these lies will have peace of mind, and perhaps live a good life. The primary tenet of Bokononism is to “Live by the foma that make you brave and kind and healthy and happy.”

            foma – harmless untruths; lies that, if used correctly, can be useful.

            • Couch_Incident

              “In the Church of the SubGenius, SubGenii often worship Short Duration Personal Saviors, or ShorDurPerSavs. ShorDurPerSavs offer all of the features and services of regular personal saviors, but are disposable, and thanks to planned obsolescence, no SubGenius worships the same ShorDurPerSav for very long before switching to another one.”

            • Exterrier

              More brilliance.

            • Once_Born

              Although Bokononism eventually went wrong, leading to people really being executed on ‘the Hook’.

            • Studious Judious

              Precisely!

            • Exterrier

              Makes sense. I have observed it in Lientology.

            • Exterrier

              Brilliant….. I totally have to read this! The people who post that Scientology is and was all evil do not get that most people are not evil, and certainly not seekers, even if deluded. I bet some of the freewheeling missions had some good times, as did the public, or some of them for a while. Lies used correctly….with the best of intentions.
              Judging from Ron Jr’s testimony before he was paid off, Lron was an awful, neurotic nasty fraud, but he created a kind of fun game for many people….. I think that universally, if they stayed around, they got caught in the trap, and went to high enough of a level where the cognitive dissonance and fraud and the eventual authoritarianism has made them bitter or damaged and anxious people. Tory can has explained all that so well.

          • aquaclara

            There are likely to be shades of auditing and treatment across missions, orgs, continents, planets, or whatever. And if you had fun, played the guitar and had sing-alongs, it may have been good for you at that time.

            Yet I can’t see how all of Flag was sunshine and flowers back in the 1970’s. Parents were unable to get their kids out, mind-control was in place and happening, intimidation, threats and abuse were flourishing under the LRH rule. There are many with scars and debts to prove that this was so.

            DM is evil. I add LRH to that list as well.

          • DeElizabethan

            How can one know Hubboards real intention when we didn’t see all sides of him. We know he lied, once people were free to talk and prove it. Also his CIA like activities which he is responsible for, on his other side. One has to know the man completely before one can honestly guess his intentions. Good that you has some success but many have not from the same time period. And where all the good ole boys/girls from the past? Disappeared into society for valid reasons, extremely outnumbering those still in.

            • Exterrier

              This is a good conversation. I put posts above about people I spoke to who had great times and good ole days when Yvonne first set up and ran Celebrity Center. Those people are all pretty much broken and destroyed now, from what I saw. Some linger because they don’t know where else to go, but they are looked down upon as flotsom and jettison by the staff, who know these broken people can never afford to “go up the bridge”, and save their “eternity”. It is sad. But there was some goodness and help and camaraderie there for a while….even euphoric for some. That is true of Jonestown and Rashnish, of course. Lron stole from them, and went into hiding, actually.

          • sugarplumfairy

            Peter, this is a comment that was posted here about a month ago by an ex who posts as Conditioner.. It impressed me so much I saved it.. I can’t speak for anyone else, but you’ll never convince me that scientology is not all evil.. It was created by nefarious forces for nefarious purposes and I know that you know that..

            “so true, so horribly true. So hard to face the fraud you’ve become, and sharing this Lie silently, amongst all the other group members. As you’re spewing this BS to Non scientologists, you know they can see right through you. They’re going ‘uh huh -yeah, right’ but are too polite to really challenge the bullshit.
            I hated this so much, having to lie to family members, looking at me like a cancer victim. So glad I’m no longer part of this shit.”

            • Bella Legosi

              Amen!

              What is considered “wins” or positives in $cientology really is nothing new that Hubbard “discovered” during years of “research” OR is common sense. If $cientology really was something that actually helped people 1. They would not have to ask for “donations” or reg people out of the religion entirely, 2. They would be able to withstand critics and Jokeing & Degrading, 3. At least some of Hub’s theories would have been backed up by independent scientific minds (I am speaking about the real scientists who are NOT paid by Big Pharma, even though that is the belief among Kool Aid drinkers), 4. The policy of Disconnection and Fair Game would have never come into being or practice…..PERIOD.

          • Exterrier

            Great essay. I don’t know, and kind of doubt if Lron intended it to be as much fun as some old timers told me it was. I was told more than once that, “you missed it, kid. You should have been here in the seventies, it was all parties and sex and people helping each other”. The thing is that people, and I think a lot of the mission holders were like this, too, will take even a bad or poor religion or tech and turn it into something nice and fun and helpful with their own sense of goodness and community. We see some pretty silly religions, and most are, have pretty happy or successful times, until the high priests or ideologues or other psychopaths or ayatollahs like miscabbage bring down the iron hand on the whole thing. From what I can tell, before the wild price increases and the GAT and RTC and such, a lot of people had a blast for a while, and felt like they were on to something special. That was probably missions, which were free wheeling and had nothing to do with the Sea Org and child labor and imprisonment and billion year contracts. I never got to see any of that fun, but the sad nostalgic looks of the old timers who told me about it says that it was real for some.

            • Peter

              Thank you, thank you. thank you. You “got it”, though I couldn’t really speak for the 70s. Your description did fit the 60s very well and would have included the the NY
              org. That one was always cooking and with a close knit group, including public and FSMs. Very “family” feel and no sense of authoritarian rule as developed later. I
              recall we had a few visits from SO members on missions and found them more than a bit “odd”. Mostly, they disrupted the established and successful “flow” and we
              were always very happy to see them leave! LOL (I’ve a great story about one of those missions, but I’ll save that for another time.)

              I felt that beginning in the early 70s, a definite shift had begun and I faded out for awhile. Later got involved with one of the missions, but there sure wasn’t any wild sex going on then though the “family” feel definitely remained. In the late 70s and beginning of the 80s, the military feel had definitely taken over and I quietly terminated any connection.

              And so, for me, the organization which was and the one regularly discussed on this blog, were very different animals getting very different results. I’m sure a lot of crap was going on all the way through, but we didn’t really know about or feel it in the earlier years. If we had, I like to think we’d have exited even sooner than we did, as the many did in 1980 and beyond.

            • Exterrier

              You are welcome, Peter. I do get it, mainly from talking to the ones who had had similar experiences to yours, and some early wins and camaraderie in their youth.
              Those people all became terribly disillusioned or were hurt badly by disconnection or fraud if they hung around too long, or had children coopted by the sea org, I’m sure. But the tale properly told would remind us a bit of Orson Welle’s Citizen Kane, I bet, where there were happy days to look back upon for many, before the darkness of obsession set in. And that is human nature. For most who served in WWll, those days of sacrifice and horror were the best years of their lives, and they sat and told war stories forever…. LRon created, like Barnum, something that seemed like an adventure for a while. I don’t see any of that now, and only caught a faint scent of the old days when I was there, so I asked the oldest ones I knew how it used to be. I am sure that you and I will get slammed a bit for doing this…..and I am willing to put up with that for the price of being honest about it, filling in the whole tale.

  • tetloj

    Well fed and rested? There goes auditing for staff slaves. Does this apply to sec checks as well? If the needle is moving appropriately for those who aren’t well fed and rested, doesn’t that prove the bullshit of the e-meter.

  • Bird88

    Great Insights, Auditing sounds wacky, for some reason i always thought it would be more exciting, like space opera and unlocking the secrets of the universe and life. But never seriously, but that is sort of what you would expect for the charge which is insane, and they claim it will give you all these miraculous abilities like OT: ” cause over matter, energy space and time.” cure all psychosomatic ills, clears don’t get sick. “A scientologist is someone who controles situations persons and environments,LRH ”

    So they keep it all a mystery, and it really does seem a bit like the blind leading the blind. I’ve read alot of the tech bulletins, and the materials, and like reading this it is disenchanting how shit it seems, repetitive questions, asked over and over, and at the end , your supposed to have this cognition. i don’t get it. And this is somehow spiritual.

    Anyway, why i really wanted to comment and check out this blog today was to see if you, or anyone had anything to say about this shenanigans? Its quite cryptic.

    http://scientologycelebrity.wordpress.com/

    Any light on this development, anyone?

    • tetloj

      Butthurt much? This kind of reaction make me think these people must be quite young (big dummy spits about haters when there were only a few negative comments that I recall – and it’s a big tough ol’ internet). Sheesh – get over it divas!! Do it for the lulz and the blood pressure spikes you’re giving Darth Midget and OSA.

      • Studious Judious

        I wonder how many innocent celebs got sec checked because of that site.

        • ze moo

          The target for any investigation would have been workers at a Cleb Center or former CC clams. I believe the Los Feliz house was first ‘featured’ on whyweprotest. There wasn’t much that was new in that scientologyclebrity post. I enjoyed most of their rants. Legal or financial problems may be really responsible for the current state of $cientologyclebrity.

          • Studious Judious

            Thanks, that makes more sense.

            • ze moo

              It’s Wednesday at noon, you are the grand high admiral of security at some CO$ location and you just got a knowledge report on the scientologyclebrity site. You have 6 employees that used to work at a Cleb center. How long does it take you to get all 6 into a security check and to report the results to your supervisor?

              Answer: Thursday by 2pm of course.

              The other mark of bullshit in any organization is the amount of time and effort used to window dress the ‘orgs’ statistics and loyalty. In scientology, you can’t stop at Stalinist loyal, you have to go to full tilt North Korean Jim Jones loyal.

    • sugarplumfairy

      They lull you into submission..

      As for scientologycelebrity, I never got where they were coming from and still don’t.. put me in a state of confusion every time I visited there.. They had some really good stories but then would go into these mean, evil rants.. very scientological.. I felt like it should have been named “WhoIsScientologyCelebrity?”

      • Marie Claire Wolf

        You mean like member of the Soviet Polit Buro who were elite and treated as such, but always in such a chaotic state of uncertainty that rants were used to pump up the level of commitment.

        • sugarplumfairy

          Yah.. Except if you’re a person who is used to informative, reasonable fact-based give and take debate as opposed to evil and hateful name-calling, bull-baiting, knock-down drag-outs, it does exactly the opposite.. It undermines their credibility and loses the argument for the bull baiter..

          • Marie Claire Wolf

            As I recall Stalin used to ridicule, bully and verbally assault his closest minions just for the fun of it: let get drunk and have Khruschev entertain us with a Cosak dance…He stuck it out.

    • Marie Claire Wolf

      It is sort of sounding scientific which was his schtik: make the client believe that so-called tech is an innovative revelation. Poor folk must be so confused and let down once they slowly realize that the more they spend they further they get to inner peace. Awful.

    • 1subgenius

      I will miss that glorious bastard.

    • Robert Eckert

      See yesterday’s post and the comments for the downfall of the “celebrity” site. According to Tony it was really run by an old-guard (i.e. pre-Anonymous) protester. It had a seriously bogus post suggesting that Mary Sue’s old house was where Shelly is being kept; Tony had already pointed out in an earlier post that the {church} does not control that house so it wouldn’t make a good “Hole” for Shelly; then Tony’s post telling all about what’s happening at that house made scientologycelebrity feel exposed and humiliated, hence the shutdown.

      • Captain Howdy

        They’ve altered their “final” post saying that they’re going to have the last laugh on us and Tony..They describe us as “fanatics”. So thanks to Marty and these clowns we’re…degenerate fanatical cult members. Yippee!

        • Hubbard’s Boil

          I missed the Marty stuff. Does he characterize Bunkerites as fanatics? That’s pretty fucking rich.

          • BananaSplits8

            Yep, and degenerate, don’t forget degenerate. Iirc correctly, that came about right after Tony posted a not-so-glowing review of one of his books (the first one I believe).

          • Captain Howdy

            Marty described us as “degenerates” on one occasion, and another time he said that we were members of the Ortega anti-Ron Cult..That was the impetus for creating “ARC”

            • Interested

              Love it. This our new logo. Perfect for a t shirt.

        • Robert Eckert

          I am copying it here in case they delete it:

          “So Tony is spreading bullshit rumours now that we’re “old time critics”? Wow. We never expected that kind of disrespect from him, especially as we directed intel to him over the months. Where your sources for calling us “old time critic”?? Yet another anonymous/nameless source from the “inside”, eh?

          Imagine Tony’s embarrassment (and those of his fanatic followers who dumped on us any chance they got) when he’s forced to eat crow when our identities are finally revealed. All in good time, dear friends.

          In time meantime, now that we’ve stopped this blog permanently & Tony’s most hardcore fans can brag about how we were so totally fail & full of shit, everything can go back to normal now.

          ———————-

          What do we have here?

          TonyO: “Imagine your disappointment when you finally learn it was an old-time critic (pre-Anonymous) just pretending all along. Bummer.”

          How old is this guy supposed to be again? Despite the fact that we did nothing that should earn us his or his fanatics irrational scorn, this is the thanks we get. Pretending! What a fucking douche. We thought we’d seen everything, but motherfucker, who woulda thought?

          We were going to delete this thing completely (we already deleted our Twitter) but now seeing as how he thinks he can scam his readers & get some old-timer critic to take the credit for all this (who the fuck did you have in mind?), we’ll just leave it like this so when the time comes when our identities are leaked, you’ll get confirmation that it’s really us & not some poor schmuck being trotted out to take the blame.

          We never forgive. We never forget. So laugh it up at our expense fuckers cause the joke’s gonna be on you.”

          • Marie Claire Wolf

            Touchy! sounds like too much tech was ingested.

          • Studious Judious

            Sounds like these guys are following the schtick of Morton Downy Jr. Let’s stir up a big pot of shit because people love to argue.

          • sugarplumfairy

            jeeeeez.. It’s flunk..

        • Marie Claire Wolf

          Yeah! we win the title.

        • Spackle Motion

          One good way to trip up an anonymous “source” into revealing clues about his/her identity is to offend their pride.

          Just sayin.

        • sugarplumfairy

          Well.. Who knew they were that perceptive?

  • tetloj

    Don’t know about JR Ewing – had David Love pegged as Joe Buck in the video

    • 1subgenius

      Now I gotta re-watch that masterpiece.
      And look for the line that Hoffman ad libbed when a car went past the barricades for the set and almost hit him.
      “I’m walkin’ here!”
      Or is that a myth?

      • Marti

        Not a myth. A taxi driver drove through the shot even tho it was timed for Hoffman and Voigt to cross the street without walking into traffic.

        • 1subgenius

          Awesome. Thanks.

          • Marti

            Pedantically yours, you’re welcome.

        • sugarplumfairy

          One of my favorite movie scenes ever.. That line gets pulled out every time I’m in NYC..

          http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=c412hqucHKw&feature=youtube_gdata_player

          • Marti

            What a fabulous NYC movie!
            Whatever became of those two? 🙂

            • Phil McKraken

              That reminds me of a story that Charles Grodin told on his TV show he had on CNBC (or MSNBC?). It was the early 60’s, and he came home one day to find Dustin Hoffman on his front stoop, who was there to ask him if he wanted to join a theater group he was starting. As Hoffman left, Grodin watched him standing at the street corner in the rain with that hangdog look he can have, and thought, “I wonder what’s ever going to become of that guy.” (I paraphrase)

        • RMycroft

          I’m trying to imagine Tom Cruise doing such great in-character ad-libs.

          My imagination isn’t strong enough.

    • TheHoleDoesNotExist

      Now if you holler “Joe Buck” downtown St Louis, (they are right by the stadium), they will assume you are talking about the Cardinal’s past announcers.

  • Xique

    “This is the session.” Yikes, I remember it all too well.

  • Eivol Ekdal

    Suppressa Palooza 🙂

  • Sunny Sands

    Bert Leahy got tricked into working for the squirrel busters, now he travels cross-country shooting video protesting scientology abuses. Love it.

    12.5 hours of “counseling” for $8,470. It amazes me that anyone pays this, especially knowing the auditor is reading from a set of prepared questions. Maybe it’s the size of the con that convinces people it’s legit. I think this interview with Claire detailing an auditing session showed better than any other how the thought processes begin to be stopped.

    • Marie Claire Wolf

      I agree with you and want to express again my gratitude to Claire for my education into the ways and byways of this indoctrination, it is priceless to an uninitiated (thanks the heavens!) person like me.

    • Marti

      Bert Leahy’s a good guy. I recognized the name but couldn’t place him.
      Hired to film a “documentary” he changed his life around after hearing, “make Marty’s life a living hell.”

      • 1subgenius

        Once again Scientology “pulled it in.”

    • TheHoleDoesNotExist
      • Studious Judious

        Oh hell yes! The Entheatamobile! Bringing critical thinking to a city near you at speeds 20x faster than you can walk!

    • Spackle Motion

      Bert impresses me too. Not many people would leave a paying gig like that and then use that experience to create an important message. There have been so many other paid Scientology flunkies and goons over the years that it speaks volumes when he’s one of the very few to speak out.

      I’m also glad that he’s speaking out against Rathbun’s obvious hypocrisy. Rathbun is a fair weathered friend of bad moral character, and it didn’t take Bert long to figure that out.

      Bert should get an “SP of the Year” nomination. Tony, you should have another one of your contests for SP of the Year.

  • monkeyknickers

    I got as far as “squeeze the cans gently” and had to stop to snigger myself senseless.

    God – I think my body might be inhabited by a 14 year old boy instead of two tiny girl children.

    And . . . . . . . . . . back to the news folks!!

    🙂

    • Studious Judious

      If I were a better artist I would design a shirt that had two hands grabbing cans, (delightfully located), the caption would be… “Grab the cans, and release some charge!”

      • Marie Claire Wolf

        Lol, you just reminded me of my first university party, having been in catholic girls only convent boarding schools (15 years), I was sort of intimidated by so many guys all around. Standing in a corner with a beer in one hand I see this cute smiling dude come over and he says to me:”Could please hold this for a minute?” he hands me his beer, my hands now full he grabs my breasts and says: “Ah! I wanted to do this for so long.” I was both stunned and sort of flattered. Pathetic teenager that I was.

        • ze moo
          • Marie Claire Wolf

            Thanks ze moo 😉

        • monkeyknickers

          Jesus, I appreciate the value of pushing-the-limit kind of experiences, but mostly I wish I had been there with you to knock the everloving shit out of that asshole.

          Grr.

  • Bury_The_Nuts

    “Recall a time that is really real to you.”

    Does this question sound as stupid to anyone else as it does to me?

    Disclaimer: And yeah, I actually ‘liked” Self Analysis.

    • Marie Claire Wolf

      Having a satisfying moment in the bathroom…

    • Snuzey

      From a logical perspective I would only be able to say “1 second ago” over and over and over. So yes its a massively stupid question, invented by a massively insane twerp.

    • sugarplumfairy

      yes, it does..

    • 0tessa

      I presume it has to do with the intensity with which something has been experienced.

      • Bury_The_Nuts

        Then they should have re-framed the question to emphasize a particular.

        Ok, Now I am just being a PITA.
        Nevermind….

    • Studious Judious

      I’ve been to a lot of Grateful Dead shows where many things were not real.

      • Hubbard’s Boil

        Long live the Dead!

    • Kim O’Brien

      yeah it thought the same thing ! …as opposed to ” recall a time that is not really real to you ” …uh …both questions are just stupid . Like tasting a glass a wine and saying ” aaahhh …yes …this is bold , yet playfully demure ” . As least you can get a buzz off the wine 😉 I am dying to know how indies “recruit ” new people into their new …”hold onto a can ” type book club vibe they are going for.

      • Eivol Ekdal

        …has a slight nose reminiscent of country stables and hint of gym sock.

        • Once_Born

          … a presumptuous vintage, but I think you will be amused by its impertinence.

      • Poison Ivy

        When words mean nothing, it’s easier to manipulate people. It’s the “loaded language” equation. Language becomes a living thing, like the tentacles of an octopus, reaching out to ensnare and control those it touches. “Word clearing” is bullshit – and just a way to sidestep what LRH was really using the language to do.

        • Peter

          I had to laugh at this. From the time I was four, my father (a professional writer) insisted that I “look it up” whenver I asked for the meaning of a word. If I said I didn’t know how to spell it, his reply was “Figure it out”. If that ain’t word clearing, I don’t know what it is. LOL All of my siblings, too, are lifetime readers. I’ve had as many as seven books open around the house at one time. I had learned to love language. Still do.

    • Studious Judious

      I think the ‘beauty’ of this question its open interpretation by the person being audited. (I won’t call them a pre-clear, because I don’t believe in Clears.) Also realize the question was written in the sixties. “Yeah, I saw this cat on the corner and a pig just came up and wacked him with his club, it was so real man.” or “I saw this chick nursing her baby. That was so real man.” One is a negative experience, and the other positive. Both events had some effect on the person being audited. The idea is to find areas of ‘charge’ and then run them. So in that respect the question makes sense. I’m not saying that doing this is going to help the person being audited at all, but it probably does get them to think about something prominent in their life.

      • Marie Claire Wolf

        An excellent way of tightening the screws, that is their entire goal: get as much as you can extract from the client so you can handle him/her with reminding them occasionally of their secret weaknesses.

        • Peter

          And, as noted elsewhere in this thread, I never knew it to happen to me or anyone I knew. Different times, different rules. Almost two separate tracks going at the same time, both with the same name. Hmmmm…. I’d never thought of that before.

    • FLUNK_101

      It’s known that remembering things can make you feel better, but Hubbard was insidious how he exploited this basic human characteristic.

      Claire Headley: “I revisited several conversations with my grandmother and it reminded me of happy times … Not rocket science by any means. ”

      Actually, for those who’re interested, it’s cognitive science … Eric Kandel said that remembering is not like looking at a photograph. A memory is not a fixed thing. It is something RE-created, each time anew … a “recollection” … literally a re-collection of various ingredients that we experience as memory.

      • Poison Ivy

        Which is why it isn’t all that hard to implant false memories in someone if he/she is vulnerable and if you know what you’re doing.

  • sugarplumfairy

    “no one believes, but everyone believes that everyone else believes.” Pluralistic ignorance..

    Wow.. That explains so much.. Possibly the reason that scientology ever took hold in the first place..

    • 1subgenius

      Explains a lot about theism in general.

    • 1subgenius

      I actually believe that no one actually believes in God.

      • sugarplumfairy

        I believe you’re wrong about that.. I know at least a few who believe very sincerely.. They keep telling me they’re putting in a good word for me..

        • aquaclara

          YUP!

        • 1subgenius

          Just my opinion. I shouldn’t have said “no one.” And, since its incapable of being proved one way or the other, there isn’t much sense in debating it.
          Out of curiosity, what percentage of people who say they believe in God, do you think are subject to the pluralistic ignorance that is the subject of discussion?
          I suspect we agree, but differ on the degree.

          • sugarplumfairy

            Of the 100 people I know the best, I’d say less than 25% believe the traditional idea of God.. But of that same group, only one or two believe in nothing..

        • DeElizabethan

          I’m with you on that sugar.

  • Once_Born

    Claire mentions, “Pluralistic Ignorance” – which is a great idea, developed by two sociologists and applied to Scientology in their book, “The Future of Religion” (reference below).

    They propose that almost all scientologists have doubts (for example, about having achieved the state of ‘Clear’ and their lack of long-term ‘wins’). However, they see the confidence of other Scientologists and assume this means that that they have somehow failed – and it will all come right if they persevere. The problem is, of course, that the Scientologists around them, who they are looking up as ‘really clear’, have doubts themselves.

    This process of self-deception only works because (ironically) everyone is afraid to communicate – they do not express their doubts to each other because they will lose status in the group and charged a fortune for the additional expensive auditing required to {rehabilitate} them. No one dares to point out that the emperor has no clothes.

    “The Future of Religion” by Rodney Strark and William Sims Bainbridge pp272-273 (which only has one chapter on Scientology)

    • 1subgenius

      I believe that they are forbidden to discuss their “cases” in detail, which is consistent with this theory.

      • Once_Born

        And you can’t approach another Scientologist privately, because you know that they would be required to submit a {Knowledge Report} on you – and they might actually do it because they think the magic e-meter might detect their {Withhold} dropping them in it with you.

        • TheHoleDoesNotExist

          It actually was news to me that now you get “checked” to see if you have doubts about the meter. I never had that question. Now I think I know why newbies leave so much sooner. Miscavige seems to have figured out many ways to weed out the less gullible from the start, especially the non wealthy ones.

          • Once_Born

            Don’t give Miscavige the {credit}. This sort of thing is characteristic of abusive {religious} groups, and seems to emerge spontaneously from the darker side of human psychology.

            ‘Shunning’, as practised by the Exclusive Brethren (among others) emerged to prevent members leaving when the group was under heavy pressure from the world outside. The same can be said for disconnection. Hubbard wasn’t a genius manipulator for coming up with this – the practice has a long history.

            Similarly, fringe religious groups under external pressure tend to spontaneously come up with more-or-less paranoid ‘loyalty checking’ procedures – e.g. be very careful you only express the correct opinions and only behave in the correct way, or you will be shunned, and lose your family, friends and contacts.

            Scientology seems to formalise this checking, but this is only because everything important is done formally {in session}

            • Eivol Ekdal

              Luckily these tactics are antiquated now as the internet has given people a place to turn when they are shunned, thanks to people like Tony!

            • Once_Born

              Indeed they are.

              Scientology seems incapable of understanding, let alone dealing with the Internet. Their first encounter with it, when they tried to censor an early newsgroup, led to their one of their most serious footbullets and, eventually, the rise of the Anonymous campaign against them.

              I wonder how Hubbard would have (tried) to deal with the ‘net…

            • John P.

              Hubbard might have tried to deal with the net more cleverly than Miscavige at first, but then would have realized that it broke the chains of thought control very quickly, and he would almost certainly have put Internet companies on the same spot on the spectrum of evil as the “psychs.” Vinton Cerf, Sergey Brin and Larry Page would be equivalent of Karl Jung, Sigmund Freud and Abraham Maslow in the Suppressive Hall of Fame.

              Incidentally, just a few minutes ago, Mike Rinder posted an article on his blog pointing out the hypocrisy of the cult’s Internet strategy, re-printing an IAS fundraising e-mail designed to get people to support the “straight up and vertical” Internet strategy. Link is here: http://www.mikerindersblog.org/scientology-loves-the-internet-but-for-wogs-only/

            • Studious Judious

              I generally enjoy Rinder’s blog. He is succinct in cutting through the marketing speak and exposing the inherent fallacies of Scientology’s verbiage. And he doesn’t pontificate on philosophical rhetoric endlessly.

            • Missionary Kid

              IMO, Rinder doesn’t treat the new things that he’s learning as if he’s the only one who knows about it, like Marty does.

              Marty is like a kid who’s watched adults drive trying to explain how to do it to a professional driver. He’s full of himself, and his ignorance shows to anyone who’s been exposed to a range of modern therapeutic techniques.

            • Poison Ivy

              Yes, it’s amusing to watch Marty re-inventing wheels that the rest of us have been riding on for decades. It’s a natural thing to do, I suppose, if you’ve spend most of your adult life in a mind control cult and are just now opening your mind to new things. But it’s obnoxious when you trumpet it to the world as if you’re the first to discover all this.

            • Missionary Kid

              Amen.

            • Marie Claire Wolf

              Marty is a sour puss of a guy. He thinks he is so serious, all together it is a veil attempt to camouflage his deficits.

            • Missionary Kid

              Kinda like DM, huh?

            • Davka

              It reminds me of when i was in college and “discovering” everything. That said, at least he’s reading and at least trying to think about these things outside of just reading Hubbard. Every once in awhile, he hits on something that makes sense!

            • Missionary Kid

              In the Movie, Good Will Hunting, Matt Damon’s character takes apart someone like that in a bar scene. It’s classic.

              Revealing to a pre-clear clam what lies ahead without anyone catching pneumonia has got to be one way of getting to them.

            • Robert Eckert

              My contention is that the economic modalities of the pre-Revolutionary southern colonies could best be characterized as agrarian pre-capitalism.

              http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=ymsHLkB8u3s

            • Missionary Kid

              Thanks.

            • Johan

              Sure, but unfortunately its mostly a case of TL;DR

            • Johan

              I stopped trying to read his stuff, it’s too much hard work. It’s true – he takes himself far too seriously, at least Mike is a bit more to the point and he has a sense of humor.

            • Peter

              Indeed, and has also been know to take a pot shot at himself now and then. 🙂

            • DeElizabethan

              Your right on PI. I’ve noticed that and hardly read him or comments now because he is just writing to himself. Telling all of what he is discovering like no one else knows this stuff’. But hey, maybe they don’t and at least he is learning or they, and I give him that, but it’s not interesting for me to read anyway.
              Rinder keeps more on topic and news.

            • Interested

              Yep. My personal impression. Well put!

            • TheHoleDoesNotExist

              The mind meld creates an emotional regression that seems to set at juvenile ages between 12 to 14. That’s about the age when Hubbard started to burst out with all manner of physical and mental symptoms. From what I can deduce, it is also about where he parked his emotional age. Some enter scientology already thwarted or stunted, but eventually, those who stay too long do seem to regress to that fun and frothy age of puberty. Next time you see a video of a member, check it out for yourself.

            • Once_Born

              Hubbard spent his life promoting his most trivial {insight} or second-hand idea as ‘greater than the invention of the wheel, or of fire’. This was an recurring theme on Hubbard’s writings, which Marty (who seems to have read very little else, up to this point) is apparently still emulating.

              This is either because he genuinely still thinks that this is the way you learn, or he just can’t adjust to the facts that his knowledge of real-world psychology is so far behind, that it takes hard work to catch up, and he does not posses a super-intellect.

              Go back to College, mate, and get yourself a real education – it would only take a little humility.

            • Missionary Kid

              Amen.

              It looks like his education on the workings on the mind is scattershot. There are big holes in his knowledge. Even if he disbelieves what he learns in Psychology classes, at least he understands the framework, and that the field isn’t monomaniacal, like $cientology, and that the knowledge base is growing all the time.

              Marty is like someone with the Wright Brother’s knowledge when they first started flying trying to work on a Boeing 777.

            • monkeyknickers

              What a perfect way to put it.

            • Poison Ivy

              Good catch JP

            • Poison Ivy

              The internet didn’t make it into 1940’s/1950’s science fiction. So Hubbard had no framework for working it into his machine.

            • BananaSplits8

              He would’ve claimed his expertise was sought when TCP/IP was established (by the FCC with Ronald Reagan present, of course) and that he confused the crap out of it and everyone in the room when he talked to himself in a chatroom… on the same dial-up.

            • Peter

              Yeah, but they keep on voting long after it’s clear that it doesn’t matter which party is in; the people get screwed. LOL

            • Poison Ivy

              Many non-religious groups practice various forms of “shunning” to keep their members in line. Certain political groups do so for those who don’t adhere closely enough to the party line (“RINOS” and “DINOS”)

              There have been studies that “bills” shown to groups of Republicans who were told that the bill was written by Republicans were looked upon favorably, even though the bill was actually written by Democrats.

              Ditto Democrats, when shown proposals supposedly written by Democrats, generally approved – even though the actual bill/proposal was written by Republicans.

              If that isn’t “groupthink,” I don’t know what is.

            • Robert Eckert

              A friend of mine once called it the “cocker spaniel syndrome”. Somebody asks you “Did you hear about the candidate who tortures cocker spaniels?” so you ask if that’s the Republican or the Democratic candidate, and if you’re told it’s the candidate from your party, you say “Well you know, cocker spaniels are really vicious dogs.”

            • Poison Ivy

              Cognitive dissonance. Because YOU couldn’t possibly be a person who would support the torturer of a NICE animal!!

            • Missionary Kid

              That’s why I’m not a member of either party. There’s a lot of dogma that lies unexamined.

          • Victoria Pandora

            Yes, I never had that question either. There were two others that have sent red flags though. “Are you hear to find out if Scientology works?” “Do you have an “open mind?”

            • Poison Ivy

              Remember, LRH said there is no half-way committed Scientologist (paraphrased.) That’s why I don’t understand how COB could tolerate the Smith’s and the handful of others who are definitely involved in the cult but don’t go public about it. I mean, I can see in the beginning, as a way to lure them in, but the Smiths have been in CO$ for years and “After Earth” (and funding the Study Tech school) was the closest they ever came to publicly admitting it.

              Isn’t allowing that kind of lukewarm involvement anti-Hubbard?

            • Studious Judious

              Scientology treats celebrities different than staff or other public. Yes, it’s a double standard.

            • TheHoleDoesNotExist

              It’s the Gold standard in scientology. It’s almost like it’s a for profit scam.

            • TheHoleDoesNotExist

              Celebrities (which in scientology is mostly about D-Listers, a handful of A-Listers, and Trust Fund famiies) get an entirely different, exclusive set of rules and penalties.

            • Missionary Kid

              “Cash trumps coherence in Scientology.” – Vance Woodward

            • TheHoleDoesNotExist

              That’s another keeper!.

            • Missionary Kid

              It’s on my next list on $cientology, due out in the next couple of days. Today’s, if you’ve seen it is on LRH. Post a reply to it if you can think of something. Contributions welcome, and I rarely don’t put something on the list.

            • Peter

              Oh, you believe he cares about anything anti Hubbard??? LOL

            • TheHoleDoesNotExist

              Ah, the open mind dilemma. I never could buy into that one. I just scooped it up and hid it in the back of my mind along with other secret evil rebellious thoughts. They never did find out about That secret mind. It has Definitely gotten more and more paranoid. And I would Never Ever have done any auditing if there were cameras or video. How could you possibly feel comfortable? And I sure as hell would never have paid these crazy prices. Almost $9,000 for one intensive? It has to be true that scientology today is for the Rich and Clueless Club…only.

            • Victoria Pandora

              Hell yeah! VIDEO cameras in the auditing room? I would have been so out of there. And I was reassured many times that nothing specific was being written down by the auditor. And that was how it was in my own auditor training. I was meant to keep very accurate record of what items read… but writing up every little thing the PC said in the course of cleaning up that item was not considered that important. Of course since Ron was a blood brother to the BlackFeet tribe. Hey, little white brother, want to know how to steal someone’s soul? HAHAHA. Video;)

            • TheHoleDoesNotExist

              I just don’t get it. What is In It for those who are Still in, especially this last decade? Between the crazy money drain and the constant crazy strain, kids writing up mommy and daddy, and all the rest. What is In it for them? I don’t get it.

            • Peter

              The highest I can remember and 12.5 hour intensive was $1250.

      • DeElizabethan

        Right, even without detail, period. Of course some new one’s do with mixed results.

    • Robert Eckert

      This is how the Soviet Union kept going so long too. When Gorbachev let people talk to each other, all of a sudden they realized that NOBODY believed in Marxism.

    • TheHoleDoesNotExist

      You have to “learn” how to be audited, what to expect in general, and what to expect specifically for each process. But above all, you learn to keep your trap shut about it except to say “gee, it was great, I feel so much lighter”. In fact, if you Don’t smile and say something insipid, you will have to do more auditing.

      It’s almost as if it was a cult.

      PZ Meyers is getting dressed for History of Man? Let the Lulz begin. Speaking of which, will we have a pre party for Tonight’s TomKat show?

      Great first laugh is hearing Canadian David Love trying to “y’all”. I hope you three know that St Louis is the home org of the likes of Bonnie Wood, Virgil Wilhite and Duke Snider (Operation Snow White conspirator). Virgil had a small printing operation in his home basement and used to run through gallons of ink for org pamphlets and newsletters and various flyers (yes, kids, ink, google it).

      Here’s a picture of the original org on 4445 Lindell Blvd. I think Bonnie attended one of the many lofty, historic universities close by for her pscyh courses before getting sucked into the org. I know, right?

      The org used to be a home for wayward wimmen who got pregnant (families had to hide their daughters’ shocking silhouette’s back then, there were many such wimmen before the pill, and what the heck else do you do when there’s no cable tv or internetz?). The 2nd picture is the current org on 6901 Delmar Blvd, which used to be a primarily jewish community and near a shop that had the perfect knishes. Can’t wait to see the videos guyz…. especially when the staff (all 2 of them?) get a load of the Xenu Van!

      http://i39.tinypic.com/1zdn60h.jpg

      http://i39.tinypic.com/14wt6yg.jpg

      • Bury_The_Nuts

        That old org was freakin cool lookin.
        Looks like one of those scary old Psych hospitals.

        • TheHoleDoesNotExist

          That area was lined with historic magnificent old buildings. Naturally, the org ran the place into the ground from neglect. It was drafty cold in winters though and really spooky!

          • The latter address on Delmar Blvd is close to Washington University, where I took my undergraduate degree 3 decades ago. I doubt that they have many recruits from there. Also, Blueberry Hill is just down the street, if memory serves me, that’s a lot more interesting place than any Scientology org could be.

            • TheHoleDoesNotExist

              Wash U, Blueberry Hill, yeah, it makes no sense whatsoever, and no traffic in those doors. Which Makes it an Ideal Org indubitably! How are these orgs paying the electric bill?

            • Missionary Kid

              “How are these orgs paying the electric bill?”
              Regging.

            • TheHoleDoesNotExist

              Don’t you need customers to reg?

            • Missionary Kid

              😉

            • Not to mention the heating, some of the Wash U buildings used steam for that purpose, and those kind of plants are probably hard to maintain and repair compared to more modern systems.

            • Victoria Pandora

              I visited the STL org a couple of months ago. There were about four cars in the parking lot, and the front door was open. (I am thinking no air conditioning.) Most of the staff appeared to be siting on the basement steps out back, smoking. Even though we were on the front porch making silly poses in front of the free personality test sign, no body routing occurred;) We decided to help them out with some good PR $cientology style!

            • It’s an old building, and unlike here in CA, you can’t use a big swamp cooler because of the humidity. When I first flew there to start classes in August, or “Elvis-Groucho Day”, by the afternoon I thought I was in a steam bath. Give me a dry heat anytime over Midwestern heat and moisture.

            • Missionary Kid

              I’ve run a crew in 123 degree heat in the Palm Springs area. I’ll take that over 90 degrees and 100% humidity any time.
              I’ve lived in Florida and the Midwest, so I know the difference. When you sweat, it barely evaporates.

            • Yeah, I had a summer job for a mosquito abatement district here in Tulare County. I would start each day with a frozen half-gallon container of water, and by the end of the day it would be empty, and that was after refilling with at least another quart or two of water from a convenient school fountain. The Jeep I drove had no air conditioning, but with cold water and common sense I was able to keep it going during a summer of 90 degree, 20% humidity weather.

            • Missionary Kid

              What is bad in the Coachella Valley, is the Salton Sea close to the water during the summer. There’s relatively more humidity, and there’s sun reflection off of the water. One day, I went through two gallons of melted ice water, two large iced teas, and two cans of Pepsi. It all came out in evaporation.

            • Exterrier

              I used to build pools in the High Desert…… on those 112 degrees you don’t pee at all. it just evaporates from you, though you are guzzling liquids constantly.

            • Anonymookme

              St. Louis in the summer with no air conditioning? Torture!

            • Mark

              What a waste of a perfectly good Masonic temple. The Great Architect Of The Universe is displeased!

            • Poison Ivy

              Love it!

            • TheHoleDoesNotExist

              That is priceless pic! Love the headless rider. Did he suffer from ethics “Head on a Pike” order? hah. So four cars, four staff. One to call all their members who no longer answer their phones, one to dust the books that all their members already bought 4 times, one to oil the soup cans that are rusting from the humidity because they can’t afford air conditioning, and one to make sure the other three don’t blow.

              Another Ideal Org.

            • Victoria Pandora

              The org looked really shabby on the outside. Although that is a fascinating building. One would think they were just buying up landmarks for some other purpose! The third story windows were stacked high with boxes. And when you think about how much floor space there is in a building that size, it does make you wonder. Why so many boxes, and full of what? It looked very “out PR”. Put some blinds up at least to cover up the eyesore. I feel like these poor org staff are just on the outposts of the wog world.
              I wish I would have had the nerve to confront them. But it was WEIRD. I was really nervous that they would try to interact with me. Maybe because I am just not SP enough. I make fun of them, but deep down, I want to save them as much as I used to want to save the planet.

            • TheHoleDoesNotExist

              Thanks for this, Victoria. As I understand it, Miscavige insisted on historic buildings as a status symbol of sorts. Renovations for historic buildings are so much more expensive and time consuming and intricate. It seems he might just be letting them all go to hell though. Imagine the maintenance and operating expenses involved in all these near empty orgs. Since he didn’t pay for them, you would think he would want to at least keep them in fair condition.

              I imagine those boxes are filled with all the Do Over Basics books that Miscavige orders one and all, including the orgs, to buy. Individuals have their garages and basesments full, and the orgs have entire floors of them.

              I don’t blame you one bit being anxious about interacting with them and I never would suggest any person try it unless they had other people with them and cameras and vids running. Any staff who is still in those buildings, seeing what they see, and hearing what they hear, have to be terrified or maniacal or very depressed … in other words, highly volatile and unstable. The Reckoning is Not going to be pretty. Not all will be saved.

            • WildaBeast

              It sounds like a “How many (insert group to be mocked here) does it take to change a lightbulb?” joke…

            • aquaclara

              Look, it’s a very grand re-re-re opening!This is great. And I love the ode to the headless one with accompanying shooped balloons!

            • TheHoleDoesNotExist

              Hey, I hear Freedum Magazine is hiring! She could get a lot of Recommends here.

            • aquaclara

              especially with the “accidental” obscure references to all things FAIL. LIke headless bodies!

            • GlibWog

              OMG…Victoria.. hahahhaha I love it.. The balloons and the headless man.. Perfect..

          • Poison Ivy

            Is the building still there?

            • As of last year, according to Google Maps. There weren’t a lot of cars in the parking lot, FWIW.

              It’s a bad location because there won’t be a lot of foot traffic even before you get to the University CIty Library and then the City Hall, and they have nothing but residential houses on the other side of the buildings. I believe at least one or two of my professors lived somewhere behind that building, and there are probably some living there to this day and they walk or bike to work passing the place.

              Even if they got into a place next to the Starbucks in the commercial strip down the blvd, they’d still have a lot more foot traffic for much of the year then they do now.

            • Missionary Kid

              {But don’t they just postulate new recruits in?}

            • Yah know, I thought of a gimmick they could use to increase the foot traffic by turning their liability of being near a residential area into an asset, which I’m not going to go into for obvious reasons.

              Heck, even the Hare Krishna place had a free veggie meal on Sundays(the cafeteria system was shut down after Sunday afternoon at Wash U) to lure people in past the door.

              The overall strategy of being near where there is a significant population of young possible recruits is fine, the execution is very shoddy indeed. The Moonies and Lyndon LaRouche tried to recruit from us, we had one guy who was a Moonie and tried to use his computer via some sort of primitive phone connection to show us stuff about the price of gold, when it failed we kidded him that obviously MI-5 was on to him that night.

              In some ways, opening a business in a local area is like doing sucessful social work, you have to look at the condition on the ground and what kind of sizzle to go with your steak.

              The con man, having nothing but sizzle to sell, just doesn’t understand that concept.

            • TheHoleDoesNotExist

              Just got back. My husband wanted to be fed, Again! I went to look, PI and it sure looks like it is gone and new buildings in that spot as part of an extension of the university. Surprised because I thought it was designated historic like so many in that area. St Louis University campus is spectacular. I forgot that the org was originally at 3730 Lindell Blvd, and I forget why, but they moved to 4425. Oh, and SLU’s Law Center building was down the block, heh. And many churches. It was a very Catholic area for some time, with the Jesuits running SLU. I believe the Ursula order of nuns ran the Home for Wayward Wimmen. Talk about no sense of humor group.

            • Robert Eckert

              Fed? Again? Didn’t he eat yesterday?

            • TheHoleDoesNotExist

              That’s what I said!

            • Robert Eckert

              Why are you saying things, instead of getting him a sandwich?

            • TheHoleDoesNotExist

              Im a multitaskers. Also, I made breakfast, lunch and dinner and protein smoothies all at one setting so I’m good to go.

            • I just checked the Lindell address, there’s nothing left of the original structure. Probably was hopelessly out of code, so it was easier to demolish it and build anew.

          • Poison Ivy

            BTW, THDNE, “It’s almost as if it was a cult.”

            Brava.

        • DeElizabethan

          Much more character than the new one. Also looks bigger so they downsized?

    • Missionary Kid

      Excellent. It’s peer pressure, that’s kept up because people are afraid to communicate. So much for “comm.”

    • Poison Ivy

      There is a saying for overcoming this in twelve step groups that I have found extremely helpful in my own life quest:

      “Don’t judge other people’s outsides by your insides.”

      Scientology hinges on its adherents doing just that.

      • It’s also known as attribution error:

        Psychological research into attribution began with the work of Fritz Heider during the early years of the 20th century. In his 1920’s dissertation Heider addressed a fundamental problem of phenomenology; why do perceivers attribute the properties of an object they sense,
        such as its color, texture and so on, to the object itself when those
        properties exist only in their minds? Heider’s answer was to consider
        the object being perceived and the physical media by which it is
        sensed – the ticking of a watch causing vibrations in the air for
        instance – to be quite distinct, and that what the perceiver’s senses do
        is to reconstruct an object from its effect on the media, a process he
        called attribution. “Perceivers faced with sensory data thus see
        the perceptual object as ‘out there’, because they attribute the sensory
        data to their underlying causes in the world.”[2]

        Heider subsequently extended his ideas to the question of how people
        perceive each other, and in particular how they account for each other’s
        behavior, person perception. Motives played an important role in
        Heider’s model: “motives, intentions, sentiments … the core processes
        which manifest themselves in overt behavior”. Heider distinguished
        between personal causality – such as offering someone a drink – and
        impersonal causality such as sneezing, or leaves falling. Later
        attribution theorists have tended to see Heider’s fundamental
        distinction as being between “person (or internal) causes and situation (or external) causes of behavior.[3]

        http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Attribution_%28psychology%29

        • Poison Ivy

          Fascinating, Chutney!

    • Peter

      To me, a very simplistic argument/explanation. I was happy for others who’d gone clear, but hardly worshipped them. I didn’t take my opinions from what others were thinking very much. When I did go cldear, it was not in session or on the CC. It was much more a sense of leaving a huge weight behind, though I could not now tell you the specifics. I never expected to become Superman…nor have I done so. But a huge mental weight was lifted, never to return. And, like most clears I knew back then, we really didn’t care what others thought or believed. We got what we got and were happy for it. Then moved on to the next target. It was all quite personal and I can’t recall anyone “lording” it over others due to their own auditing achievements. Maybe there was less “ego” being fed back then? I really don’t know.

      • Once_Born

        I’m not suggesting that this is a complete explanation in itself – but I do think it is a significant part of one. Neither did I suggest that anyone was ” worshipping”, “lording it over” or “expecting to become Superman”.

        Both Claire and I are suggesting that a lot of people suppressed their doubts because they appeared to be the only ones not experiencing ‘wins’ when, In actual fact, hardly anyone was really seeing any benefit.

        You have have a good subjective experience (a ‘win’) which endured for some time, but his does not mean it was brought about by Scientology practice. I have not yet heard a coherent description of a ‘win’, let alone an explanation of how Scientology might achieve this.

        There are other,simpler, better, explanations for ‘wins’. For example, in an emotionally charged, closed environment, people often become more suggestible, and take emotional cues from each other. You expect a good subjective experience, because that is what you are being prepared for. You believe that you are thinking independently, but you are not. This thesis is supported by a lot of psychological research.

        You attribute your ‘win’ to Scientology, because that was what you were doing at the time. In actual fact, it was probably a release brought about by an extended an enjoyable social interaction – from what you say there seems to have much more of a ‘friendly family’ atmosphere in the early days.

        It’s a very good feeling when (for example) social anxieties fall away – but this experience can be brought about more cheaply and easily that through Scientology practice.

        Finally, I doubt either of us will change our opinions…. but it’s good for both of us to try and understand the other.

  • Mark

    “…many things in Scientology reflect a situation of pluralistic ignorance: ‘no one believes, but everyone believes that everyone else believes’.”

    Once more, Claire pithily sums up a basic truth about the cult – why such a gimcrack scam continues to fool its dupes by making them fool themselves.

    For all that the E-meter is a quack device, it’s the only piece of proper ‘tech’ qua technology that $cientology has (Hubbard’s use of ‘tech’ is an ignorant mistake for “technique”). But even the Co$ doesn’t know how to use an E-meter properly.

    IF they employed it as a crude biofeedback device, where the person holding the cans could see the needle’s movements – well, then it might be some slight use for relaxation/meditation purposes (alpha-waves and whatnot) – though far more effective if it emitted some audible signal.

    Hubbard’s only idea was to use it as a lie-detector to “weigh people’s thoughts” – which it can’t do. The sole REAL use for an E-meter is a stage-prop for long-term blackmail.

    • Marie Claire Wolf

      And it looks so scientific, but what a dud.

      • Mark

        I think there’s some accurate psychology behind it – but that of the criminal ‘Long Firm’ or ‘Find the Lady’ con-tricks, rather than anything science-based.

        • Marie Claire Wolf

          To be sure LRH knew how to blend his cocktail, which makes Co$’ stance against psychiatry-psychology totally ironic: they use some real scientific stuff including well known therapeutic techniques and twist and mix with whatever suits and voila! A brand new approach to spirituality.

          • Mark

            Hubbard must have been really annoyed when those Navy and Vet Admin shrinks saw straight through him. Hell hath no fury like a sociopath scorned!

            • RMycroft

              Every person is the hero of their own story, but Hubbard was the God of the private fantasy world inside of his head. He hated anyone who pointed out that his god not only had feet of clay, but was standing knee-deep in horse-shit.

            • Missionary Kid

              I am the lord thy god and thou shalt have no other gods before me. Sound familiar?

        • Kim O’Brien

          i agree….the con is put in place but the real sweet spot is that the person just continues to con themselves. And throw in a celebrity …who is so self centered to begin with , and has “yes men ” around them all the time …and voila …you get a life long scientologist. Or a really obnoxious twat like Tom Cruise

          • Robert Eckert

            “you get a life long scientologist. Or a really obnoxious twat” reminds me of
            “Suppose you were an idiot, and suppose you were a member of Congress; but I repeat myself.”
            Mark Twain

            • monkeyknickers

              Mark Twain is my main man. I am working hard in the lab after hours trying to find a way of reconstituting him. Then he and I and David Attenborough will live in a fluffy cloud, eating lime popsicles and sauerkraut and watching awesome nature vids and exchanging witty one liners.

              Sigh.

            • Missionary Kid

              Some time ago, I saw Hal Holbrook’s portrayal of Twain. It will be interesting to see Val Kilmer’s. I understand that at the end, he takes questions from the audience while he takes off his makeup and wig and transforms himself back to Kilmer.

            • Robert Eckert

              Did you realize that Hal Holbrook played Mark Twain for longer than Samuel Clemens did?

            • Missionary Kid

              That blew me away, so I had to check. You’re right.

              Twain used the pen name for about 47 years. Hal has been performing using it since ’54. According to Wikipedia, the last time he played the role was in 2005. (There could well be later performances) That would mean he played the role for at least 49 years.

            • Peter

              I knew Hal in NY. Not only a brilliant actor, but a very warm and charming human being.

            • Missionary Kid

              That’s nice to hear. He’s now about 88, I believe, and he’s been on his own since Dixie passed away.

      • Studious Judious

        Coming from a background in electronics, the first time I saw an e-meter, I chuckled. I took one look and thought, it’s an ohmmeter, and a cheesy one at that. I would have been much more impressed had they used an oscilloscope, and if the sensors were attached, like in a hospital, instead of being held in the hands. That was a factor in my deciding that Scientology was bogus.

        • Robert Eckert
          • Studious Judious

            Yep! I’m a nerd. Although I prefer the term geek. However according to A Girl’s Guide to Dating a Geek I’m actually a microgeek.

            • Eivol Ekdal

              I still have my Fluke 77 from 1985 and my Dad’s Bakelite Heathkit Ohm Meter.

            • CraftLass

              That’s actually a book? Wow. What’s a microgeek?

              I like to say I’m a geek Jekyll who sometimes transforms into a nerd Hyde, going by this: http://www.buzzfeed.com/scott/nerd-venn-diagram

              Hehe

            • Studious Judious

              You betcha!

              http://www.amazon.com/A-Girls-Guide-Dating-Geek/dp/1435713184/ref=sr_1_1?ie=UTF8&qid=1375889082&sr=8-1&keywords=girls+guide+to+dating+a+geek

              The ‘Geek Test’ determines just how geeky your boyfriend is. To my girlfriends delight I only qualified as a microgeek. I believe the other levels were, not-a-geek, full-geek, uber-geek.

              Basically, I like electronics, and play with rockets, but I don’t collect comic books, or watch The Big Bang Theory.

            • CraftLass

              Well, that’s just silly. Rockets and electronics are way geekier than any pop culture geekism. lol At least, in this girl’s opinion. Easy to find non-geeks who are into comics and TBBT is the most popular sitcom on TV, how can that be the measure? But, rockets, now that is about as geeky as it gets. And I say that as someone with a model Falcon 9 sitting 3 feet away as I type this during a break from working on a graphic novel website. 😀

            • Studious Judious

              I agree. I thought I’d rate higher than a micro-geek. Also my statements about electonics, rockets, comic books and TBBT, aren’t actual questions in the test. I was just being glib.

              I also qualify for the ultimate mark of geekdom, D&D. Yep… still do it.

        • Marie Claire Wolf

          What I sense is that a lot of people who get involved in Co$ have less than sterling education. Knowing a bit of physics and bio-feedback methods an individual sees through this instantly. Most not college educated, here I most certainly include the Hollywood crew who know nothing but their craft, things like the use of the cans may seem quite amazing. Especially since the material collected from sessions is later used to cow them.

          • Studious Judious

            I agree completely. And I’m saddened by that fact.

          • Studious Judious

            But I still ask myself, how is it that a Ph.D. or M.D. gets sucked into Scientology. They should know about the scientific method. They should know critical thinking.

            • 1subgenius

              Always avoid always.
              I suspect that there is an inverse ratio between the level of education and being a Scientologist.

            • Missionary Kid

              There’s a heavy correlation between being in flux in one’s life and joining. There are some well educated people in, because they’re basically emotional, IMO.

            • 1subgenius

              I believe both correlations are true.

            • Missionary Kid

              I agree.

            • Once_Born

              Education does not compensate for a lack of judgement. I have known several highly educated, capable people who have fallen for the lowest forms of woo-woo.

              I suspect that (in proportion) there as about as many PhD’s in cults as there are in the general population.

            • Studious Judious

              When I hear myself saying ‘should’, ‘ought’, or ‘must’, I remember a college psychology course where my instructor enlightened us all that those three words generally mean ‘want’. (i.e. “you should clean your room” means “I want you to clean your room”)

              He called it Musterbation.

            • Poison Ivy

              GREAT STUFF!

              I always think of the phrase “should have” as one of the most useless in the English language. Well, perhaps not for schooling purposes (“You should have used the value xy instead of x”) but in life.

              “Should have” means you didn’t so shut up and move on already.

            • Marie Claire Wolf

              Should have: failure.

            • Peter

              Dr. Wayne Dyer was quoted as saying, “You can’t ‘should have'” since the thing in question is already in the past. 🙂

            • Marie Claire Wolf

              Come on Studious J. don’t tell me you never ever encountered an addled academic? I have known quite a few. Higher education is not necessarily a warranty against insecurities and a sign of a sound mind.

            • Studious Judious

              I’m just trying to stir up conversation. I actually worked in academia for years as staff, not faculty. When I do ask myself how Dr.’s get involved in Scientology my answer is usually the same as why anyone gets involved in Scientology. And I think LRH Jr. said it best. Scientology doesn’t go after your soul (thetan), it goes after your ego.

            • Poison Ivy

              Actually, I recently learned that this is how con people/narcissists/sociopaths reel in very smart people – they appeal to the innate narcissism in their marks. Come on, we all want to think we’re smart and special. Yes, we do. So when someone finds our soft underbelly and plays to our egos, validating us in a way that we’ve always wanted to be validated, we are often temporarily blinded to their manipulations.

              Egos are dangerous. Especially our own. Approach with caution.

            • Marti

              ego

            • Missionary Kid

              It’s because the emotions and beliefs are more powerful than intellect and critical thinking.

              One of the reasons that I started on my way out of my fundamentalist Christian background was that I noticed that the people who accepted the beliefs who were educated tended to be more of the tech background. Engineers, for instance, who were very well educated in their particular field, such as electrical engineering, but who emotionally or culturally disregarded the cognitive dissonance of their beliefs. if the bible, interpreted by our sect or preacher said something was so, that’s what they believed.

              They didn’t look at the cultural context that the bible was written, and they ignored the conflicting passages in the bible, even though they believed it was the accurate, exact, word of god.

              Another example is Linus Pauling, who won his first Nobel Prize in Chemistry, yet his extreme advocacy of vitamin C was quackery. He’s a prime example of belief overcoming critical thinking.

            • Peter

              Emotions have always trumped intellect. They always will. I read something recently that the heart, for instance, send far more messages to the brain than the brain does to the heart. In truth, we don’t yet know squat about much. Science is whatever the current thought is based on what is now known. It keeps changing as i always will. Science is not static, as many believe.

              Pauling won 2 Nobel prizes, neither shared, the only one in history to have done so. He was a briliant man who overdid it in one area. Not a bad record. 🙂

          • Poison Ivy

            If you’re in the Sea Org, they’ll see to it that you barely have any education, in the commonly understood sense.

          • 0tessa

            As a matter of fact I knew (35 years ago) quite some graduates and even psychologists doing Scientology training and auditing then.

        • Missionary Kid

          There’s a circuit diagram out there in the web.

        • Couch_Incident

          Brother, if you’re looking for something a bit more impressive than the e-meter, let me introduce you to the 1940 Electro-Metabograph.

          “This device was sold by [the Art Tool & Die Company] in Detroit, which claimed that it could cure diseases with radio waves [while the user held his or her hand on a metal plate]. Each button was assigned to treat a different ailment [e.g., #13 cures jealousy, #17 impatience, #42 nymphomania, etc.]. and the patient would supposedly be healed by the radio waves generated by it. However, the machine did not actually have any radio transmission circuitry and this fraudulent machine was seized by the FDA in 1965 [two years after FDA’s seizure of e-meters].”

          This fine machine is housed at the Museum of Questionable Medical Devices, eventual resting place of the e-meter.

          • Studious Judious

            I love me some high-tech snake oil. I own a Violet Ray electrotherapy set. (for entertainment purposes only)

            • Couch_Incident

              Great stuff – my EE brother has one of those UV sets too from a flea market ages ago. As a kid, I used to enjoy spooking out my friends with it (he would have killed me if he knew I brought it out and fired it up).

          • Mark

            Love all that veneer and Bakelite!

            • Robert Eckert

              And all those dials, knobs, and toggle switches!

          • Interested

            17,,,! Love it.
            LRH must have been so upset not to have made this!

  • Missionary Kid

    IF YOU WISH TO ADD SOMETHING TO THIS LIST, JUST PUT IT IN A REPLY.

    I WON’T ACKNOWLEDGE YOUR REPLY, BUT GIVE ME A COUPLE OF HOURS TO ADD IT.

    MY DECISION TO ADD YOUR SUBMISSION OR NOT IS PURELY ARBITRARY ON MY PART.

    L. RON HUBBARD NICKNAMES

    Blubbard

    Blubtard

    Dr L. Ron Crankenstein

    Dr. Scrubbard

    El Lardo Butt

    Elwrong

    Etron (turd) à la Persil

    Fat Bastard

    Fat Fraudster

    Fish lips

    Flubhard

    Ginger-Haired Gastropod

    Hub Tubbery Tub

    Hubbard the hole

    Hubbarf

    Hubtard

    L. Con Hubbard

    Liar Ron Humbug

    Liar Ron Humpty

    LiarRon Humptydumpty

    Liver lips and a sebaceous cyst

    Loony Rotten Huckster

    Lubb-lard

    Marquis de Fraud

    Mr Tubs

    The Great Hubbardini

    The Hub

    The Hubster

    The Tubster

    Tubbard

    Tubber Hubber Man

    Tubby

    Tubsterino

    . RON HUBBARD’S WRITING AND SPEECH

    Bloviating berorrhea

    CLAMidia

    COBbastic (Goes for DM, too)

    Codswallop

    Dianuttics

    Dianutty

    guanophrenic (Batshit crazy)

    Logorrhea

    putrid verbal pus

    Snake Oil

    Verbiage

    Wordwank

    The L . Ron Hubbard Law of Commotion

    For every Scientology process, procedure and scripture, there is an equal and opposite process, procedure and scripture.

    • Mark

      Slubbard, Sluggard.

    • Snuzey

      These are so horrible – I love it!

      • Missionary Kid

        They come from comments made by Bunkerites that I’ve gathered at random.

    • Marie Claire Wolf

      Loopy Retched Humbug

    • i-Betty

      D’Doo Ron Ron.
      Flubtard

      Etron (turd) à la Persil <— my favourite on the list.

    • tetloj

      I’m sure there is one Jabba the Hutt related – Hubbard the Hutt? Jabbard the Hutt?

      • Artoo45

        Jabba the Hubb.

    • Maureen49

      L Rabid Wanker

    • Couch_Incident

      LiaRH

    • Robert Long

      faiL wrong tubblard

    • Nevermore

      El Loon. Ginger Slugtard.

    • Captain Howdy

      ElRon ElRey

      Long Con Hubbard

      Mother Hubbard

    • WhereIsSHE

      Long wRong Huckster

    • aquaclara

      Mk, you’re on a SCILON streak this week! Here are some more.
      Sebaceous Squid
      Theta Tomata
      L. Capitan

  • Couch_Incident

    That was a fascinating piece. Aside from the space opera and confessional aspects (which can be used against you in the future), it really drives home the old idea that “auditing” at best is a (very) crude form of psychotherapy, hence the “wins” that get people hooked and keep them in.

    Wikipedia has a good overview of psychotherapy in all its forms (including studies on its efficacy and what factors influence outcomes). “Psychotherapy is a general term referring to therapeutic interaction or treatment contracted between a trained professional and a client, patient, family, couple, or group. The problems addressed are psychological in nature and can vary in terms of their causes, influences, triggers, and potential resolutions. Accurate assessment of these and other variables is dependent on the practitioner’s capability and can change or evolve as the practitioner acquires greater experience, knowledge, and insight.” http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Psychotherapy

    Bruce Wampold, a mathematician who went on to become a psychologist, claims the following about psychotherapy in a 2000 book:
    1. psychotherapy is indeed effective,
    2. the type of treatment is not a factor,
    3. the theoretical bases of the techniques used, and the strictness of adherence to those techniques are both not factors,
    4. the therapist’s strength of belief in the efficacy of the technique is a factor,
    5. the personality of the therapist is a significant factor,
    6. the alliance between the patient(s) and the therapist (meaning affectionate and trusting feelings toward the therapist, motivation and collaboration of the client, and empathic response of the therapist) is a key factor.

    To be clear, I’ll note that even if one gets some wins from auditing, they are better off getting conventional psychotherapy that doesn’t have the cult elements of SCN.

    • Bleuler

      These points are fairly well established and confirmed by several studies. That is real scientific studies with verifiable data not “research” from a sci-fi writer.

      If I were to start a new religion, let’s call it Thinkology – “Making the clear more clear in their thinkingness” and start with healing sessions these points would determine my success. If i have my disciples in “session” and listen to their problems, methodically explore what ails them, confirms and soothe them they would have “wins”. This is one of the reasons that I do not dispute the fact that many clams, current or former, had gains from auditing. This does not in itself make the rest of the potemkin village that is scientology any more valid though.

      • Marie Claire Wolf

        Religion is the opium of the masses. K.M.

      • Couch_Incident

        Absolutely agree – any of the “wins” are far outweighed by all cult nonsense which just gets worse (and more expensive) the longer you are in it. My note above was more to explain the “wins” some claim than to validate SCN (something I’d never do). It struck me that a lot (not all and maybe not most) of what Claire described in the sample auditing session could be a part of any psychotherapy session (after being stripped of the lingo and control dynamics).

        An educated consumer seeking help for personal issues would run from Scientology.

      • Robert Eckert

        How can I ever thank you enough? — Well, you can’t…

        http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=DxrlcLktcxU

    • Peter

      And you think, even back in the 60s and 70s that THAT wasn’t expensive???? And could easily take years, too?

      • Couch_Incident

        I’m not aware of psychotherapists regging their clients after their session is over. Also, if a client leaves a psychotherapist, they don’t lose their family & friends in the process and I don’t think they’re hounded for years after by the psychotherapist to come back.

        Experienced psychotherapists, depending on their location and qualifications, can make upwards of $100/hour currently (they aren’t working for Sea Org wages after all). Although I’m not one who thinks that insurance payments are heaven-sent, if you have insurance, your
        co-pay would typically be $10-30/session. If you don’t have insurance, your alternatives are as follows: 1. Many therapists offer a sliding scale if you don’t have insurance; 2. Community mental health centers have much lower fees; 3. College students often have access free counseling services; and 4.There’s always self-help books and the internet (blogs, forums, and even therapy programs).

        Without opining on the wisdom of Obamacare, it will expand mental health services to the poor as states are coerced to expand Medicaid coverage.

        As for the amount of time psychotherapy takes, it would depend on the skill of the psychotherapist, the introspective skills and dedication of the client, and the nature of the issues. In any event, no clients are disappearing for years while on psychotherapy “staff” or when they join psychotherapy “Sea Org.”

  • Ms. B. Haven

    I have to say that this segment with Claire was very ‘restimulative’ to use some scientology jargon. When I got my first auditing back in the 70s I remember it a little differently. After getting all set up to start, and ‘flying ruds’, before the actual process would start, there was the interminable word clearing. Hated it. Here I was spending hard earned money to get some auditing and I spent the first part of the session defining words to make sure that I knew what the auditing commands meant. I could have done that before the session if they would have given me a list of words to look up. The processes themselves were usually boring as hell for the most part and then add to that looking up words…

    I think the most important part of Claire’s interview is—
    …many things in Scientology reflect a situation of pluralistic ignorance: “no one believes, but everyone believes that everyone else believes.”

    This is why you go to examiner and write up a success story. The session may or may not have been all that great, but you are lead to believe that everyone else got these great wins from running this exact same process so you should have too. The entanglement really starts here because you are not allowed to discuss your ‘case’ with anyone so everyone thinks that you have had all these great wins and they will too if they run this process. If they have already run this process they will think that maybe there is something that they missed out on. The whole thing is just a cluster fuck of expectation, hope, suppressed communication, group pressure, group validation, love bombing, boredom, etc. Throw in some ‘reg cycles’ and a bit of ethics handling on top of this and you have the makings of a robot until enough cognitive dissonance kicks in to wake you up from the nightmare.

    • i-Betty

      Damn, that’s eloquent.

      • Verve

        Indeed.

    • Marti

      “…..and I spent the first part of the session defining words to make sure that I knew what the auditing commands meant.”
      What would happen if the person during the audit said, “I don’t understand the question?”

      • Marie Claire Wolf

        I do not think it advisable.

      • Hubbard’s Boil

        I don’t know from experience, but would it not lead to more word clearing? Imagine paying hundreds of dollars per hour to look up words!

        • BananaSplits8

          Imagine educating children using a method, study tech, based on dictionary mining.

          • Poison Ivy

            Jenna Miscavige Hill writes eloquently about how study tech killed her love of reading and learning.

            That to me is criminal.

      • Where’s Shelly?

        They would be deemed too sane for Scientology.

    • aquaclara

      “The whole thing is just a cluster fuck of expectation, hope, suppressed communication, group pressure, group validation, love bombing, boredom, etc. Throw in some ‘reg cycles’ and a bit of ethics handling on top of this and you have the makings of a robot until enough cognitive dissonance kicks in to wake you up from the nightmare.” Repeating for emphasis.
      How hard this must be to understand and sort through. Thanks.
      ^^^^^^^^^^^^^^

    • Xique

      Yes, all the word clearing drove me up a wall. All I could ever think of was the money being spent as the minutes went by. I hate to refer to the jargon, but yes today’s segment is restimulating, to say the least. Only reason I ever went for more auditing was the hope and expectation of something more. I was always, always underwhelmed.
      To think there were cameras in there just pisses me off. Everything right now is pissing me off.

    • Racnad

      Most of the time when I was asked to write a success story I was very relieved that the process was over.

    • Exterrier

      Yeah baby!! Spot on succinct description of the experience. yep.

  • ze moo

    Re the Los Feliz ‘mission’, I didn’t know buildings could or were required to wear burqas….

    • RMycroft

      Too bad that it’s not Los Felix, the place of the cats.

      • Robert Eckert

        That’s Los Gatos, where the Los Gatos org is not actually in Los Gatos.

    • Marti

      Is that Shelly?

  • Racnad

    An interesting column for the future might be a look at what the E-Meter needle actually responds to through galvanic skin response. While it’s obviously not the precise measurement of what’s going on inside the reactive minds of the person holding the cans or those thetans haunting his body as Scientologists believe, it seems to be more than simple hand perspiration as some critics dismissively suggest.

    • media_lush

      My blog post today might be of interest re this question: http://scientologybollocks.blogspot.co.uk/

    • ze moo

      Hand perspiration + holding pressure = resistance. Holding pressure is easy to control, hand perspiration not so easy to control, but some can it. The e-meter is just window dressing for the auditor who is running a process very similar to a ‘cold reading’ in South Parks ‘biggest douche in the universe’. The real hooks and positive reinforcement are the ‘wins’ and ‘cognitions’ the auditor gets the auditee to accept. Salesmanship is the key to auditing.

    • Captain Howdy

      A machine is merely the sum of it’s parts. A machine cannot become magically infused with abilities beyond it’s original construction. A can opener is a can opener.

      • Studious Judious

        That’s true but a machine when combined with a human can become more than the “sum of its parts.”

      • Racnad

        True, but machines can measure such things as body temperature, blood pressure, and even galvanic skin response. I guess the question is what causes the variation of galvanic skin response that the e-meter detects? It doesn’t make sense to me that the moisture level of skin in the hands will vary from moment to moment the way needle movements suggest.

  • Oyster Bay

    What was wrong with the old (always vacant) Scientology Mission in Los Feliz near Franklin?

    • Missionary Kid

      Maybe that one was owned by the local org? Is this one owned by Co$?
      I doubt there’s going to be much foot traffic at this building.

  • TheHoleDoesNotExist

    Suppressa Palooza Tour…already having fun… take a helicopter ride off the riverboat docks, see the unfriendly greeting at St Louis org (notice no straight up and vertical crowds anywhere in sight) and Applied Scholastics, then off to Fagen land…ChickCowgo. Can’t wait to see the interviews later.

    http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=DTiYseN5hXw

    • Bury_The_Nuts

      These guys are da bomb!

    • RMycroft

      I’m surprised that they haven’t changed to the Applied Scholastics sign to Nation of Islam’s Camp Kiswah yet. Maybe they hang something over it when NOI is using the place?

      • TheHoleDoesNotExist

        It’s yet another place I do not understand how they are even paying the electric bill. No air conditioning means rust and mold and mildew and it does not take very long. Then you have some serious repair expenses staring down at you.

    • aquaclara

      Isn’t this the best name for a tour?! Can’t wait to see more from the IDEAL road trip.

  • Bury_The_Nuts

    PZ Myers!…. tomorrow.
    I excited!!!!

    • Captain Howdy

      Yes, we need to lay off the drugs and booze and eat a decent meal and retire early so we will all be bright eyed and bushy tailed for our honored guest.

      • Marti

        Captain, I’ll drink to that. Here’s to ya.

      • TheHoleDoesNotExist

        This is one helluva week, the first one of AuGustO!

      • Observer

        I find this pic strangely compelling.

      • ze moo

        Before the invention of tin foil, tommy, brian and bubba experiment with $cientology.

  • RMycroft

    The Los Feliz mission’s web site, http://www.missionoflosfeliz.com, is registered to Narconon Southern California. How odd! I thought there was supposed to be some kind of total and complete separation between Narconon and Scientology?

    Registration change in 3.. 2.. 1..

    • Poison Ivy

      Whoa! Screen cap that and send it to the lawyers, Batman!

    • Unex Skcus

      Good catch!

    • Missionary Kid

      Their eccsleazeiastical lawyers might have it covered, but it’s good thing to look at. They’ll probably say that they purchased the services of NarCONon to develop the website. hopefully, they’ve commingled their businesses so they can get nailed on it.

  • Papa Xenu

    So basically, the only way out of the room is to tell the auditor you had a ‘win’. It’s almost as if the pre clear is being held hostage & a win is the ransom required to leave. I bet the mafia is kicking themselves that they didn’t get into this racquet years ago.

    • Missionary Kid

      The mafia has been using this. It’s called, “I’ve got an offer you can’t refuse.”

    • Papa Xenu

      I probably should apologize, I shouldn’t have suggested the Mafia would get involved in the scams perpetrated by the church of Scientology. Even they have their limits.

      • Missionary Kid

        *Chuckle*

      • RMycroft

        The (idealized) Mafia wouldn’t go after someone at home, or bother his wife and kids. Scientology does.

  • media_lush

    Re the e-meter, my post today might be of interest to some:

    http://scientologybollocks.blogspot.co.uk/2013/08/e-meters-nothing-more-than-galvanic.html

    • Nevermore

      Looks like something you’d buy from Ann Summers…..

  • Michael Leonard Tilse

    Claire writes: “This is the start of my personal resolution that many things in Scientology reflect a situation of pluralistic ignorance: “no one believes, but everyone believes that everyone else believes.””.

    I was just thinking about this in relation to my own experience. The first thing I was convinced of, using the personality test and registration interview, was that my life was a shambles and I was really screwed up.

    I bought into the line they fed me. I didn’t examine critically the evaluation of my life and myself.

    So, one facet of the pluralistic ignorance, for me, was the desperate HOPE that scientology would fix me. I KNEW I was fucked up. So I acted as-if it was helping, in the HOPE it was helping, that it would fix me eventually. The people around me in the Orgs or in the Sea Org seemed to be having great wins, improving their lives. (Except for some blatant exceptions.) I wanted what they had. It never occurred to me that they were in the same state of hope and as-if acting that I was in.

    To applaud someone’s amazing success story while thinking “I hope that is me someday” was a common thing.

    And to be giving an amazing success story knowing it is a ‘version of the truth’ while hoping that the ‘next level’ or course will really make it real was also a regular performance.

    “Scientology works” is a given. To stay in good graces and continue in scientology, it has to work for you. To continue in the hope of it really working, you have to pretend it works for you. You hope so hard you end up actually believing it does work.

    • CraftLass

      It always strikes me that there seems to be a sheen of “fake it ’til you make it” to Scn processes. What you just described here is such a common refrain.

      There is nothing more inherently human than feeling like you are broken in some way. We look at other people and what they project of their lives and can never measure up. In truth, though, those people who look so happy and like they are winning at the game of life usually feel just as broken. The ban on talking about your case is a great way to keep you feeling more broken than other people despite swimming in an ocean of broken people.

      Hope is what gets us all through life. It’s usually a good thing. But when your hopes are manipulated by a lack of access to actual information (and thus, truth), hope can be dangerous. Thanks for bringing that home. So glad you made it out and are good at articulating your experience, I always find your posts enlightening!

      • TheHoleDoesNotExist

        Anything longer than a year or more than $5000 or so changes the concept of Hope into something more aligned with Need. The person needs real mental health counseling at a certain point. I would say even sooner in the raging fanatical environment inside the scientology bubble today.

        • CraftLass

          🙁

          Yeah.

  • Interested

    Claire if you are reading this. Why did you come out worse off? What happened, if it not too personal a question?

  • Bella Legosi

    OMG I can NOT wait for tomorrow’s post! *Does a whirling dervish happy dance* I have been anticipating this new series since Blogging Dianetics ended. I must say I have mentioned the Dianetics series to a couple of people who actually had real interest (and who would more then likely check it out). Still waiting on word to see if they actually did or not. You KNOW when someone has been reading the Dianetics, nobody can resist bringing up the whole “knocking the fetus out via BM” or “these people actually ‘remembered’ their parents screwing……omg that is sooooo f**ked!” lol Since I haven’t heard these two people mention those diddys I shall remind them that they need to do their Bella Homework, cuz I will be quizzeing them! 😉

    And we get Claire today! YEEEESSSS! My day off is starting off right for once! I am putting the phone on silent, I will not be called in today!

    • TonyOrtega

      A History of Man is a very slim little book, so it won’t be a series. Just a one-shot. But what a one-shot.

      • Observer

        I am disappoint. I’d hope the history of my last 76 trillion years would be a multi-volume work.

      • Bella Legosi

        🙁
        I’ll be happy with that one shot! Besides, there are how many books Hub wrote that you and your awesome connections are able to read and blog???

        😀

        I love it! Keep on keeping on Mr. Ortega! I am also seeing about getting my hands on some local Co$ junk mail for ya!

  • nottrue

    Recall a time that is really real to you. How about all the fucking time

    • Bury_The_Nuts

      Now see! That is what I AM talkin about!!!

    • TheHoleDoesNotExist

      Obviously scientology is not for you. heh

  • Bradley Greenwood

    Damn, I hate those days when I have nothing constructive or witty to say.

    • Sherbet

      Those parameters usually don’t stop me from blabbing in the Bunker. Go for it, Bradley.

      • Bradley Greenwood

        You’re playin’ with fire! 😉

        • Missionary Kid

          Burn, baby, burn.

  • Vinay Agarwala

    The following is an inconsistency in the Scientology audting procedure. This may be explained away by Scientologists, but it is still an inconsistency in my view.

    “The next thing you will notice is that the auditor has his back to the door. This is to ensure he’s in the most strategic position to prevent you from leaving the session.”

    Why would somebody who is being helped would try to leave the session. To me this means that the session would not be always addressing what a person wants to handle. It may be addressing what the auditor, the C/S. or Hubbard wants to handle. There is something not right about this situation. This is inconsist with help.

    .

  • Sidney18511

    To my fellow bunkeretts…..I am in serious need of some help here. I watched a video the other day of the IAS song…….and now………IT IS STUCK IN MY HEAD!
    I was actually SINGING it this morning when I went to the store, I’m frightened. I believe I have an engram.
    WHAT CAN I DO?

    • Studious Judious

      Jefferson Airplane – “Want Somebody to Love”
      I’d post a link but YouTube is banned at my work. 🙁

      • Sidney18511

        Thanks for all the help everybody…..I feel a WIN coming on!

    • Sherbet

      That’s easy, Sidney. Substitute another song for the IAS song. I suggest “It’s a Small World” or “My Heart Will Go On” in Celine Dion’s voice. Those are the mothers of all engrams.

      • Marti

        🙂

      • Missionary Kid

        NOOOOOOOOOOO!!!! It’s a Small World is nearly the ultimate earworm. That’s like substituting cocaine for heroin.

    • Observer

      The Wreck of the Edmund Fitzgerald usually does it for me.

      • TheHoleDoesNotExist

        and puts me to sleep. I mean, who ever gets to the end of that train?

        • Studious Judious

          Wasn’t it a ship?

          • Sherbet

            It was a metaphor, StudJud.

            • Studious Judious

              (I was kidding…)

            • Sherbet

              I was hoping you were.

          • TheHoleDoesNotExist

            it has a kazillion verses.

      • Sherbet

        One of the local radio wits wrote and sings a parody called “The Rectum of Edmund Fitzgerald,” and I can never hear the original song without substituting the parody’s lyrics. Even now, it’s in my brain.

        • Studious Judious

          I know that feeling, I can not listen to Bohemian Rhapsody without picturing Wayne and Garth. (or musical chairs)

        • MissCandle

          I do the same thing with Mad’s parody lyrics “Ground Round” to “Downtown.” How old am I, anyway?

    • Mark

      Just think of His Imperial Smallness in that ghastly Hermes shirt going “La-lee-la-lah, la-lee-la-lah” over and over again – a mixture of nausea and embarrassment will soon flush your engram away.

    • nottrue

      i keep seeing Rinder with his little head bob going

      • Sidney18511

        It wasn’t that one. It had Chill in it…..”We are the IAS” …I would post it here, but I love you guys too much to do that and besides in bunkerland it would be considered a “high crime”

    • Captain Howdy

      Try this, it should work, but you have to listen to all 10 hours.for it to be effective.

      http://youtu.be/X1Kc-fAVrXw

      • Sherbet

        I like the Proclaimers. I even own a Proclaimers CD.

        • Captain Howdy

          I’m sure you do, Sherb.

          • Sherbet

            Meanie.

    • ze moo

      Go to Peter Gabriel’s ‘in your eyes’, it drives out all ‘stuck songs’.

      http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=EWvbu5K7MBM

    • Robert Eckert

      You are my sunshine, my only sunshine, you make me happy, when skies are grey…

      We all live in a yellow submarine, a yellow submarine, yellow submarine…

      At the Copa, Copacabana, the hottest spot north of Havana…

    • TheHoleDoesNotExist

      I highly recommend making an immediate appointment with our Cap’n Howdy. He will fix you right up. But hurry while there’s still room in his Intensive Care unit.

      • Captain Howdy

        For a quick fix, Sidney should try a low dose of this, which can be increased as needed.

        http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=2Z4m4lnjxkY

        • TheHoleDoesNotExist

          I knew you’d come through. Good to know we have an on-call Doctor of Mixology here at the bunk. Between earworms, fainting spells, and the endless attacks of disbelief, you are so needed here.

    • Bury_The_Nuts

      Give me 300K and come on over and I will audit it out.

      Or go give yourself a completely different earworm. That is what I do when I get something stuck like that.

      • Sidney18511

        I’m gonna try a little “Grateful Dead” auditing. Casey Jones just might do the trick.

        • Robert Eckert
        • Captain Howdy

          No Sandy No! Anything but the dreaded Dead. You’ll be stuck in an incident which precludes taking showers, includes begging for change and listening to human furballs play the same boring ass jam for hours on end.

          Try this instead http://youtu.be/5TjlC3aWyGU

          • Studious Judious

            Not all Deadheads are members of the Great Unwashed.

          • TheHoleDoesNotExist

            Only because you dissed the Dead, I’m going to have to insert an alternative, just cuz.
            Sheb Wooly and The Purple People’s Eater

            http://youtu.be/X9H_cI_WCnE

            and I’ll raise you with The Tokens “The Lion Sleeps Tonight”

            http://youtu.be/tt9hCQ9sR1c

    • RMycroft
    • aquaclara

      Here’s a good earworm-buster. Sing anything by the Blues Brothers. Fun movie; choice of music all around! best chase scene movie ever made, so you have a visual tour of downtown Chicago, funny dancing and singing to replace the bug in your ear and the scenes from the IAS video.

    • sister wendy

      try a Tom Cruise movie;)

  • Mark

    When faced with strange cultic electrical gizmos, I find much the best plan is to relax with a really good book:

    • TheHoleDoesNotExist

      Hey, are those copper rods from the Hole?

    • Missionary Kid

      Amen.

  • Bella Legosi

    “The shield is to cover up the worksheets, where the auditor records everything said and done in each session.
    Whether or not you see a camera, the room will be rigged to record
    the session. This is a much more recent development in terms of the
    history of Scientology.”== For all the “evil” that Co$ claims that the psychs perpetrate on the masses…….^ this is something that they DO NOT engage in! Sure, they write notes for later transcription, but they do not record on video/audio without informed consent, and sure as hell DO NOT use what they know about patients against them, should the patients end up stopping service or going to another psych! Even if I knew nothing about $cientology, it’s history or process, the moment I found out I was being recorded in this manner would be the time I get up and walk right the hell out! It is unethical and to say that recording sessions is used only for “quality control” is bunk and if they record all of it because “sometimes we can’t remember everything that is said.” would make me wonder why can’t they apply that 100% recall with 100% certainty……again proving this whole process is built on B U N K.

    “A sign, “In Session,” is placed on the door while you receive auditing.
    It is a “High Crime” in Scientology to interrupt an auditing session.”====Before I really knew my boss at the mental foster care home was into $cientology like she was, this sign was one of those hard learned lessons. I had to talk to her about something important regarding one of the residents, it really couldn’t wait. So, I went to her room and saw a sign like the one Claire describes. I walked away and came back 5 min later. I knocked and nobody answered. Waited a minute and cop knocked this time. Still no answer. After the session her Auditor came down with her, gave me a disgusted look and walked out. My boss flipped out on me. She began berating me for interrupting her “session”, how much damage it could have caused or did (apparently they had to start over, thus making the auditor more hourly wages), then began saying, “How would you like it if I just burst into a session with your shrink???? That is the same fucking thing! When you see that sign it means STAY OUT! I don’t care if the house is on fire or if one of the clients run away! That is why I pay you! Deal with it! Jesus Christ!” after her tirade I calmly told her I knew NOTHING about what her “sessions” entailed (which she turned around on me, because she knew I was not remotely interested in $cientology/Dianetics) and that I hadn’t seen a shrink since high school (to which she again got pissed and called me a “smartass” and ambiguously threatened my employment by saying, “You are lucky I put up with your smartass mouth! Most people wouldn’t employ smartasses with isms like you!”) Fuck’s sakes, reading this stuff brings back a lot of memories. I have pretty good recall, hell who can forget something like that? This was my crash course in $cientology and those who participate in it!

    • BananaSplits8

      “Before I really knew my boss at the mental foster care home was into
      $cientology like she was, this sign was one of those hard learned
      lessons. I had to talk to her about something important regarding one of
      the residents, it really couldn’t wait.”

      She was getting scilon auditing during working hours?

      • Bella Legosi

        No, not that I witnessed myself. I was a “respite caregiver” who came in and stayed in the home (of 5 residents) from supper time Friday until Sunday night. She would get her auditing in while I was there. I do have a healthy suspicion that the sessions did stretch into her workdays, but when the residents were out of the house during the weekdays. That would have been the only time she could not be interrupted. But, since I was only there on weekends I can only speak for the time I was there to witness the auditor come in. However, I did start to notice more billable hours to her auditor when I would do her books. When I asked some of the residents they told me that the lady (they didn’t know she was an auditor) came in when they were gone to various activity places during the week.

    • TheHoleDoesNotExist

      Did you report this person to someone, anyone higher up? Sounds like she gave you an order to ignore emergency conditions, as well as quite a few other behaviors and activities that should have gotten her fired and kept out out working any kind of patient or home care work ever again.

      • Bella Legosi

        No, at this time I really knew NOTHING about law, procedure and stuff like that. This was my crash course in those things, because when it started getting really bad I just looked up the laws and procedures myself. Remember I had talked to many of the residents about her behavior and they were scared to death of me reporting. They believed this home was the best home they had ever lived in and would back up anything this woman said to keep her in business. I had discussed some of these issues with a DHS rep who came in once a week (usually when I was not there, but a few times I was present) and brought up some of my concerns. I was told that it is a tricky thing because this was the Owners “religion” and because I was the one on duty it wouldn’t matter if I couldn’t bother her, the responsibility was on me, if I had witnessed this behavior during the week, maybe something could be done, but I wasn’t there during the week and the rep knew it. The only other recourse was getting the residents to back me up and say what she did made them feel unsafe; which would never happen and never did happen even after multiple talks with them about it.

        Not reporting her is one of my biggest regrets and taught me a hard lesson. I am no longer timid and eager to please superiors. I took this experience and tried to better my response to any concern or potential fuckery that I may see on the job. I feel like shit and prolly always will that I didn’t do anything to stop what was going on. The only thing I can do is make sure something like this never goes unanswered for again. No matter the consequences.

        • TheHoleDoesNotExist

          ahhh, she was the owner. And certain people get miffed when I say there is no such thing as harmless scientology. pffft

          • Bella Legosi

            yup……that is why I am sooooo anti-Co$. I have seen it in a dispicable form…….and all this was done by a “Public”. Not the execs or SO that so many horror stories are about.

            I tell people about this experience and stress, “If this is what $cientology is like with someone who is only a ‘member’ just imagine what it is like in the organization itself.”

            • TheHoleDoesNotExist

              I do have to say, Bella, that the majority are Not fanatics or psychos or narcissists. However, I have to amend that statement with “I’m not so sure about those still around today”. But still, even nice, soft spoken well intentioned people trying to treat people, no matter what labels they try and use, if they are not skilled, educated and licensed to diagnose and treat, then it has potential danger in it every time. This boss you talk about sounds like evil wacko material.

            • Bella Legosi

              It agree completely with you. Unfortunately, my experience was not with a normal person. This “Owner” was very very self centered and manic. A control freak who got worse the more auditing she paid for. Her dauggter told me she gotten into $cientology back in the early 80’s and apprently went “clear”, but after getting to “clear” stopped. She could be very cold hearted and evil at times. There were sometimes where she could also be a really wonderful person, when I met her and began doing odd jobs around her house, she was kind. When I became her caregiver she had told me her boyfriend had dumped her for a younger woman. She began a downward spiral and decided to get back into $cientology “to deal with it”. That is when shit got worse and worse. I lasted only a year or so before I found another job. I kept in contact for a couple months and then dropped all communication with her (Nordies started working me 3 day shifts and 2 graveyards a week and I would pull 60-90 work weeks). At the very most I think she had a self serving personality. If it benifitted her in some way she would be open to that, but if it cost her or was purely out of the goodness of her heart she would say,”Why should I do that? I dont get anything out pf it and it costs ME money/time!” That is really how she treated Co$ IMO. It really came off as solely for her benifit……..as is that is exactly what $cientology was about and in a way that is correct. $cientology claims to be a “religion” to cure mankind of madness and destruction; but when you get down to it the processes are foucused not on Man, but the individual and “fixing the abberated individual”. Very narcisisstic stuff, but when you Consider The Souce that comes as no surprise!

        • aquaclara

          wow, Bella. What a story. Don’t feel like shit, ok? It wasn’t your fault and nobody trains people in how to avoid tangling with Scientology. The definition of a cult is to ensnare people through whatever means possible. And we know, sadly, that they are good at it. Your story is one more example of why they are evil and dangerous.
          Thanks for sharing it with us.

          • Bella Legosi

            Thank you. This experience is the reason I avoided researching much about this cult up until about 2 years ago. When I read the stories written about Stacy and Alex, that is when I went into overdrive and became vocal. I will always regret that experience, but I turn that into determination for that to never be allowed to happen again. That is really all I can do about it now. That is why I do encourage those who were “in” to speak out. By not speaking out eventually one will realize that they had an opportunity to do something about it and never took the chance. That sort of regret will stay with you all your life. I do not advocate that! That is why I do praise those who do speak out, even if they may be Indie. As for Luke and Eric, they may not feel that they contribute much or should do “more” but really they have done A LOT and continue to do a lot everytime they speak out about the abuse that goes hand in hand with this cult!

            Thank you very much Aqua……..It is much appreciated

            • MissCandle

              Just like a playtex living bra, I support you all the way 24/7, Bella. No regrets — No more!

            • Bella Legosi

              Thank you hun! This is why I am so damn vocal and have no problem saying why. When I get the line, “What has $cientology/$cientologists done to you personally?” Oh boy they do get quite the answer.

            • aquaclara

              It’s time to end the madness. See, if everyone who had a bad experience as a result of Scientology held on to even a smidgen of guilt, there would be many, many, many more damaged souls out here in this world. And Scientology has done more than enough damage already.
              It’s time to end the chain, and break their power. I don’t want them to have even a teaspoon more power than that which they have already unfairly and criminally claimed. Enough is enough.
              (inserting Ten Oreo Cookie’s best quote evah)
              F*ck the cult.
              Now go have some cake!

            • Bella Legosi

              Damn skippy!

              Now would you like a slice of the Hubbard caek or DM caek?
              😛

        • sister wendy

          wow, that story is so upsetting for so many reasons…thank you for sharing it. I’m so sorry you were treated that way, and that you had a boss that was a shitty leader. You’d think if is was THAT important to her, that she would have explained more and taken the time to troubleshoot what might come up. Or talked about alternative ways to get through for a real emergency (like a note under the door). I really don’t like it that all people have to do is toss around the R word and then suddenly everyone is expected to tip toe on eggshells. It sounds like you really made the most of a shitty encounter. I would have yelled or burst into tears;)

          • Bella Legosi

            Thank you very much, Wendy! I worked almost two years at that home and a year and a half was spent as a respite caregiver. I have talked about this at some length here at the Bunker. That was about a year or so ago when I began posting. I did break down and cry a couple times, but not because she treated me like shit. I am pretty tough in that department; I broke down out of guilt. Not being able to speak up out of fear and knowing that the tesidents there lived under a self centered loon. This was 10 years ago. I had just turned 19 and lnew nothing about Co$ at all, until South Park aired “trapped in the closet”. Even that diddy didnt go into some of the abusive culture that Co$ policy can create. A lot of what I heard and experienced didnt make much sense until I really began reading books and sites highly critical about this organization.

            • sister wendy

              Wouldn’t it be great if bad things just traveled with permanent theme music? Then we could here the nuttiness right away. I had no idea how bad the church was until after I left…I was afraid I would actually implode and die when I left orginally(!) No lie! It sounds ridiculous, but I went through a long period where I thought there must be something really wrong with me and that I must have a “missed withhold” that I would leave. It was so helpful to do the research and see that it wasn’t me at all….

    • Nevermore

      Bella, I don’t care how many ‘isms’ you might have, I’d employ you in a heartbeat! Just the fact you went out and started looking up laws and regulations on your own is the kind of thing any sensible employer would be impressed by – that makes you smart, and the possessor of common sense AND initiative, 3 great plus points. Not only that, you kept your temper. I would have exercised the traditional right of a redhead, and punched her!
      And the psychotic hag ex-boss will get her come-uppance some day!

  • danlocke

    I have audited these processes on people who had zero indoctrination about Scientology; people with no experience with the subject at all. I audited these people very informally, without the use of a meter. (The processes here were originally intended to be delivered without a meter and they run nicely without one.)

    The people I audited with these processes had good wins and there was no pressure on my part to get them to say so. It was in a completely informal environment.

    You can look up ARC Straightwire on the net, find the processes and try them out for yourself. Find a friend who you enjoy talking with anyway and give it a go. It won’t hurt you. Very easy stuff, and fun for a lot of people. You’ll see, once you have read all the processes, that they’d be fun.

    There’s various reasons why people stayed with Scientology for years in spite of all of the crazy things that are emphasised here and elsewhere. One of them is the workability of processes such as this.

    From my point of view, all of Claire’s auditing was received in an environment full of pressure and problems. If she had received this auditing in a friendly and supportive environment, she’d speak differently about it. Hard to believe, if all of your experiences with this is through Tony’s blogs, or some time in the SO, but there have been friendly environments with supportive people where these processes were delivered; usually in the homes of field auditors (auditors not working in an org or mission.)

    It might be a good idea for Tony to also interview someone who has left the Church but is not also sour on the whole subject.

    • Captain Howdy

      That’s all good and well Dan, but the fact remains that the reactive mind, engrams and past lives don’t exist, so what’s the point?

      • Roger Larsson

        I’ll tell you how lies, how false data can make it all the way up to the top.

        In the middle of 80’s I had done some book one auditing, the success through communication course and when I did the “ups and downs” I really had a cognition that lasted.

        I had a dream. In the dream I was in a ship watching Ron Hubbard, a grey appearance as if he hadn’t got any spirit left in himself. There wasn’t any shining around him. A boy played with a toy at his closeness. It shined around this boy.

        When I woke up two questions were alive.

        1. Had I gone exteriorized while sleeping in my bed?

        2. Had LRH the fat guy parked his body and picked up a 4-5 years old boys body?

        Hubbard hadn’t been seen the last 5 years.

        The management maybe hadn’t any lust to show up the fat body of LRH without a thetan.

        I advanced from the bottom to the top in my bed.

        I wrote a letter to Ron in where I mentioned that I had seen him in a dream.

        Through letters I made 50 000 bucks to the org I belonged to and I had LRH personal offices closed down all around the world with an exception of one kept in LA.

        Lies, false data, gets things done, in comparison with the incompetent OTs in $cientology.

        • dbloch7986

        • sugarplumfairy

          Never fear, Roger.. Lrh didn’t park his old gray body and pick up a new 4-year old body.. He died and went to hell.. Or, maybe he was reincarnated as a bottom-feeding sucker-mouth catfish and is now cleaning the algae off the bottom of one of grant cardone’s tropical fish tanks..

      • Anonymookme

        Captain, I think I’m in love with you! Exactly what you said!

      • Bob

        CH, You say that with such positive absolute conviction. I would have to say there are a hell of a lot of people other than scientologists that would beg to differ with you. they have just as much conviction that the states of existence and similar unconscious mind do exist.

        I would not state this area in terms of facts. On this site it is popular to think that everything about Scientology is BS. But much of what Hubbard taught has been around and practiced for thousands of years. What Dan saw was definitely true for him no matter whether past lives, engrams and the reactive mind exist. But the possibilities that they do exist or don’t exist have been conclusively proven depending on what study you are looking at.

        • Anonymookme

          Hey Bob, everything about Sciloontology is BS. And evil. And silly. And embarrassing. And the epitome of dumb-assery.

          • Bob

            Most of the time that some one makes a statement using “everything” or “never” it makes me smile. I wish I were so certain.

            • Anonymookme

              Hey bob, my “wins” don’t cost me thousands and thousands of dollars. My “wins” aren’t monitored by a goon squad. My “wins” involve spending time with people I love and care about and who love and care about me. Oh, and as a bonus, I am free to disagree with those people without any fear of being written up and turned into Big Brother. Or shunned. Imagine being so free! Not fake Sciloon free. Genuinely free.
              In other words Bob, everything about Sciloontology is greasy, skeezy and evil.

            • Bob

              AMM, I am not attacking your approach to your spiritual growth or your freedoms.
              I do however find incredible, persons who with full alacrity make statements that are so general and absolute like, “everything about Clamatology is greasy, sleezy and evil”.
              You have a perfect right to your opinion, but in a public forum don’t expect “everyone” to agree with your statement.

            • Anonymookme

              But, but, but…If it’s true for me, it’s true for me, amirite?
              It’s true for me that Clamology is a con, fraud and a joke.
              Your mileage may vary.

            • Bob

              For sure. I happen to agree with your general assessment of where it sits right now. I just don’t put the “everything and all” label on it. I can’t stand the pure BS that I see going on in various places. But I see some positive areas as well although they are more sparse.
              Honestly what you or I say about it changes very little. What we do about it is the important thing. Each of us has a choice of how we approach that.

            • Once_Born

              I’m not certain. This is the point I was trying to make about science, earlier – that it always tentative.

              Show me evidence and I will seriously examine it.

        • Once_Born

          The ‘reactive mind’ (aka ‘the unconscious mind’) was just Freudian psychoanalysis with the serial numbers filed off, and some (severely dated) computer analogies thrown in. Typical Hubbard plagiarism.

          Belief in evil spirits, ghosts and fairies been around for thousands of years. This doesn’t make them real.

          I don’t understand the final part of your argument. A claim cannot be said to be true if there is no evidence for or against. To say it’s ‘true for you’, only means that you arbitrarily choose to believe. However, why should anyone take this claim seriously – it amounts to “That’s what I think, despite any evidence or argument’.

          By the way, Science cannot (and does not claim) to conclusively prove anything, ever. It works by taking a theory, then applying a fair experimental test designed to disprove it. The longer the theory hold us against these attempts, the nearer the truth it probably is. When the theory fails, it is improved or discarded for a new, better idea. Rinse and repeat. For ever.

          Real science is always tentative and never, ever claims to be absolutely true. This gives it a humility that is lacking in ideologues, including Hubbard, who always know the absolute truth.

          • Peter

            “Belief in evil spirits, ghosts and fairies been around for thousands of years. This doesn’t make them real.”

            It also does not make them false. The jury is always out.

            “Real science is always tentative and never, ever claims to be absolutely true.”

            Really? Tell that to the AMA, for instance. They dictate what is and is not true in medicine.

            I don’t think Copernicus would have agreed with your statement, either.

            “Real science” is always dominated by PEOPLE, many of them with fixed and rigid points of view, zealous and jealous of those views and willing to defend them viciously, at all costs. It is not a pink fairy castle.

            • Once_Born

              The jury is always out. Agreed. Show mean evil spirit, ghost, or fairy and I will take those claims seriously. Until then, they deserve neglect and obscurity, along with the infinite number of other unprovable claims.

              The AMA? Couldn’t comment. I’m English. Over here we have different conspiracy theories.

              Copernicus? Vested interests may oppose the advance of science, but never prevail. Copernicus won in the end – and he was persecuted by religious fanatics in any case.

              Real Science is composed of people and open debate. The people with “fixed and rigid points of view, zealous and jealous of those views and willing to defend them viciously, at all costs” (a pretty good description of Hubbard, by the way) inevitably fall by the wayside.

              Science is not perfect. No human enterprise is. However, it’s power is demonstrated by the existence of… so much… take your pick – MRI scanners, 747 passenger jets, the computers and the Internet that we are using for this conversation…

              What has Hubbard left us with? Only a few vague claims of {wins} and delusions of being a starship pilot in a previous life.

          • Bob

            In the final part of my comment I mentioned that depending or what particular study or treatise you are looking at either point of view could be considered valid. Not based on just opinion but other people effort to document what would be considered as facts.

            • Once_Born

              Let me see if I understand this – you are claiming that anything that anyone says or writes can mean what it says, or the opposite of what it says, depending on who is looking at it.

              Sounds like wishful thinking to me.

        • Peter

          Bingo! Thank you, Bob. Dissing millions of people down through centuries has always pissed me off a bit. So many of the folks here hear (not hear hear!) only the bad stuff. Never having experienced any of the good…they then claim there wasn’t any. No we weren’t all uneducated youngsters, we didn’t all think we’d gotten taken to the cleaners, yes we did have (for many of us) significant wins and gains and life altering new ways of seeing things which (we felt) made us better humans. And yes, many of us continued on with other modalities digging deeper into the world of spirituality. You don’t believe we’re all spiritual beings? Well, good for you and I honour your beliefs. I ask, though, that you not diss mine.

          • Bob

            Peter,
            I would not diss your beliefs. But I did not state what I believe or what I know for myself to be true in my comment. I happen to consider the whole aspect of past lives to be true. That is based on my experiences ands the shared experiences of others. I think there is a very strong spiritual world. But if people don’t believe it, or have any first hand experiences with that I would not criticize them or consider they are stupid or unaware.

      • Peter

        Past lives don’t exist? What’s your source on that, please? A fact???

        And what Dan is describing is one caring person using some words to help another who is looking at something s/he want to know more about. I’ve written of this, too, since I saw it in action many, many times.

        • Once_Born

          “Past lives don’t exist? What’s your source on that, please? A fact???”

          The good Captain can’t point to a fact which shows past don’t exist because you haven’t given him any facts to work with, only claims of a subjective experience.

          If knowledge of past lives could could provide information that could be tested in the real world (and why did you bury this treasure, Cap’n Morgan?) it might be different – but even Hubbard failed in this, despite sailing all over the Caribbean looking.

          There are an infinite number of possible claims based on subjective experience, like this. Why should anyone else believe your particular claim until you provide some testable evidence to support it?

          In other words, would you buy a used car on these terms?

    • nottrue

      you call that FUN

    • Anonymookme

      See, this is what really pisses me off. Most of us “wogs” have had what Sciloons call “wins” as well. Our “wins” are a sweet feeling of well being and affinity we get after spending time with family and friends, shooting the shit, reminiscing, sharing stories, laughing and being and feeling real, authentic, emotion.
      No soup cans were involved. No person of authority sitting across the table from us keeping some foolish chart, no woo woo. No money changed hands, no interrogation involved.
      I’ma pretend for a minute that ARC is a real thing and ask those who think LRH’s phony “tech” is da bomb how in the hell do you think normal people feel affinity, reality and communicate?
      Or are you all so deluded that you think that normal people, wogs, (ima pretend that means something in real life too) can never feel these things?
      I still think that a genuine ‘win” in normal people and real life is nothing more glamorous or deep than having a really good day. No one needs LRH’s goofy, silly, evil “tech” to experience that.

      • DeElizabethan

        EXACTLY!

      • Peter

        Has anyone on this list, especially me, ever said otherwise? Have I ever implied that you could not have wins doing many other things? Did anyone on the list say or imply that you can never feels these things? Has anyone on this list said you *need* scn auditing to experience such things? Really, you’ve created an entire argument out of your own head just to prove what your BELIEFS are about scio.

        • Anonymookme

          You would rather spend thousands of dollars to achieve the same thing millions of people achieve every day for free? Sorry, but that is crazy.
          News Flash! Your silly “wins” are not superior to the very good days us lowly wogs enjoy. Your silly {religion} does not make you superior to those of us who don’t drink the Kool Aid.
          You would choose to have your “wins” (good days) validated and charted by an authority figure rather than enjoy them freely?
          You folks waste a boat load of $$ trying to achieve “wins” and chasing your tails in the effort to gain Sooper Powerz.
          I don’t get it. When do you just get to enjoy life? You can enjoy your friends and family only as long as they guzzle the Kool Aid. If they choose to step away from the Kool Aid, bye-bye family and friends.
          When your family and friends confide doubt in your silly {religion}, you write them up and turn them in? WTF?

          • sister wendy

            The money is ridiculous, and it’s not a good idea to have everything written down;) And Sci-bot land sucks! But a win in auditing, in my experience is not like having a good day. It’s more like the release you get when you figure something out finally, or suddenly stop feeling a pressure you had. It’s like you get your own personal “Eureka” moment on something- and for me, anyway, the feeling around it stayed. It’s different than the feeling you get from being listened to when you are talking to friends who are listening or even a good therapist. I’m sorry that you experience people involved or who like auditing (or had some good experiences with it) are somehow being snooty or better than people who weren’t in or didn’t audit. Probably the terms WOG and Fresh meat or meat bodies don’t help. It’s just another way of putting people down, which is what seems to happen in this organization, even with people who don’t intend to start out that way…. I do think you have such a good point when you talk about “when do you just get to enjoy life?” The set up for this group is not to enjoy life:( Even if you get wins on something, it’s designed for you to think you are always broken, always need help and always need to be spending money:(

      • sister wendy

        I can say after auditing, some significant therapy (with both good and bad therapists) as well as many alternative practices that nothing helped me in the same way as auditing did. It was not at all the same rush as talking to someone and having a good time. There were definitely specific things it helped me with in ways that therapy never has. For me (with the auditors I worked with) it was the only reason I got in and stayed…and didn’t want to leave for a long time. The first time I was audited, I thought everyone would be happier using it. I also thought it should be free (or affordable) for everyone. It made me angry that there was something that could work so well and so easily be so expensive and held onto so tightly. Do I think it’s the only thing? No. Do I think it’s for everyone? No. Does it always work, all the time? Not always and not with everyone. But when it does work, and you have a great auditor, and you’re dealing with some problem you really want to solve, for me it beats therapy hands down in terms of solving a problem.

    • Missionary Kid

      I’m going to step in here, because I have experience with a much modified offshoot of $cientology. I was involved with Reevaluation Co-counselling for a several years over 20 years ago. Two things made it very different. First, it was nearly free, (except for a small fee for materials and to keep the local organization running – all voluntary) and second, no one was set above another. You took turns being the auditor.

      It was based on active listening. Sessions lasted for an hour. Each person would take turns talking for half an hour, and the co-counselor would listen. The focus was on the person who was talking. The person auditing only spoke to keep the person being audited focused on their emotions. At the end of half an hour, the roles were switched.

      There were very strict rules about confidentiality. If you saw the other person out somewhere else, you didn’t talk about what was said during co-counselling or, if they didn’t want it, acknowledge you knew each other.

      There were also strict rules about socializing with the person one co-counseled with – unless one had a social relationship before a session, one didn’t have one afterwards. Co-counseling with close friends or relatives was highly discouraged.

      The movement (unbeknownst to me -this was pre-internet) had a big scandal because the founder used co-counselling to seduce a number of women. He was then kicked out. Probably that’s why there were so strict about fraternization.

      As a matter of fact, we were encouraged to find a partner to co-counsel with that was a stranger. That way, it was unlikely that they would have a pre-conceived notion of what our difficulties were, and the two people involved tended not to be restimulated by the other’s “material.”

      The person listening was called an auditor. Their job was to listen to the other person, and not to inject their own “material” into what the person was talking about, and to keep them focused on their feelings to “discharge” them. They did use the term “engrams” as I remember it, but those were only feelings that had an emotional charge to them. The auditor often used phrases such as, “How do you feel about that.” or “How are you feeling,” If a person started to talk about events instead of feelings. Also, if a person seemed to be avoiding a particular subject, the auditor was to ask them if they were avoiding it or felt uncomfortable talking about it.

      The choice or what direction the auditing session took was always the person being audited. if they wanted to work on a topic they felt uncomfortable with.a on a particular subject, that was their choice. The auditor was never in control.

      If a person being audited wanted to sit there, quiet, for their time, that was their right. My experience is that people didn’t stay quiet for long.

      I had a number of different co-counselors. Having a different one would bring different insights. Often, it was a matter of scheduling who I co-counseled with. The only fee was a small one to keep the group going, and there were occasional meetings where everyone attended to refresh ourselves to handle problems or to pair new people with more experienced auditors.

      I can say that I had a lot of “wins,” and that I didn’t have to talk about them. The only thing that was done was at the close of a session, the auditor would ask, the person talking what they had learned and what they were looking forward to.

      IMO, it was not as effective as a good psych, but it certainly took care of clearing a lot of the psychological underbrush we all deal with.

      Look ma, no cans.

      Research has shown that the most important characteristic of a therapist is not the schooling or method of counseling they use, but the amount of empathy they have and the trust they engender.

      • sister wendy

        that is a really interesting alternative experience. Thanks for sharing that.

        • Missionary Kid

          Neither my sister or I were aware of the scandal involving the founder.

          It helped me a lot of the time, and even though she lived in L.A. at the time, it was a huge help to her when her husband died. For a while, she was co-counseling nearly every day, and it enabled her to deal with a lot of the grief.
          There was no agenda, except to help ourselves and others by listening.

          • sister wendy

            haha! Well there is something to be said for listening, isn’t there?;) It sounds like it really helped. It also sounds like the creator either was or had contact with sci-bot land at one time- because of the similarity of the format and use of the word auditor. Did you ever look up and see if the group is on the “official SP” list? Imo a lot of people came up with alternative things that they found worked as well or better, and then the church jumped at the opp to label yet again.

            • Missionary Kid

              It turns out that “Re-evaluation Counseling” does have some elements of a cult, according to critics. I didn’t sense it when I was using it.

              In the Wikipedia article about Harvey Jackins, this is what is said.

              In the early 1950s, Jackins became acquainted with L. Ron Hubbard’s theory of Dianetics. In 1952 Jackins formed Personal Counselors Inc. to “engage in, conduct and
              teach the art and science of Dianetics.”[2] While practicing Dianetics, he developed the concepts of “re-evaluation”[2]
              and “discharge” and came to believe that they could be encouraged by
              the “exchange of aware attention” in the “co-counseling process”.[6]
              At this time, Jackins used some of the terminology of Dianetics, such
              as “clearing up patterns”, “rationality”, “present time” and “passing
              distress by contagion”.[7] Psychiatrist Richard M. Childs claimed that Jackins’ book The Human Side of Human Beings (1965) plagiarized Hubbard’s Dianetics (1950), saying that Jackins “paraphrased Hubbard’s terms by recasting them in his own jargon. Hubbard’s ‘Engrams’ became Jackins’ ‘distress patterns’, ‘release’ became ‘discharge’, and ‘to become clear’ became RC’s ‘to re-emerge’.”[8] In 1957, Hubbard’s Scientology organisation claimed that Jackins was describing himself as a “Dianetics Auditor”.[9]

              Here’s the Wikipedia site about the group. http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Re-evaluation_Counseling

              Here’s the web page: http://rc.org/

              Here’s the article on the founder, Harvey Jackins : http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Harvey_Jackins

            • sister wendy

              Interesting….I bet he is on the SP list. Thanks for the info

            • Missionary Kid

              He may not be on an SP list, because not only is he dead, but he
              apparently was associated with Dianutty, the predecessor of
              $cientology.

              The biggest problem with RC, as it’s called, is that it’s nearly free. It also makes no claims about being therapy.

              I’m going to check into it again, just to see if it’s available where I live now. If the local group has any cult feel to it, I won’t participate.

            • sister wendy

              yes- check it out and let us know. But if he did associate, as you said, with Dianutty, and started his own group, he would be considered a Squirrel, and would indeed be an SP. The entire EST movement and Landmark are all on the SP list.

            • Missionary Kid

              I wouldn’t know how to find the SP list, I’m a wog. If EST is on it, probably RC is, too.

  • dbloch7986

    Tony,

    Which org is your price list from? $8K for an intensive sounds like AOLA prices.

    • aquaclara

      Derek, I like your “new you” – nice pic!

      • dbloch7986

        Thanks! The shark represents the COS and the fish represent the rest of us 🙂

        • Missionary Kid

          I wrote this nearly 50 years ago:
          In the sea of sharks and little fishes,
          ultimately,
          it’s the little fishes,
          that determine,
          how many sharks there are.

          • dbloch7986

            That’s right on point!

            • Missionary Kid

              Thanks. Glad you liked it It makes me feel like I’ve been saving that all those years just for you.

            • dbloch7986

              Maybe you have? The universe works in mysterious ways!

          • aquaclara

            Lovely.

            • Missionary Kid

              Thanks.

    • sister wendy

      I can’t believe how fast those prices add up….just saying

  • aquaclara

    Saw this – I’ll call it “signs that you’re in a cult” on a site.It’s NOT a scilon site, but the address is http://www.scientology-london.com/
    I’ll have to add to this Claire’s Pluralistic Ignorance (“no one believes, but everyone believes that everyone else believes.”). I was shocked at how many tactics are used in the cult.

    Verbal Abuse: Desensitizing through bombardment with foul and abusive language.

    Hypnosis: Inducing a state of high suggestibility by hypnosis, often thinly disguised as relaxation or meditation.

    Uncompromising Rules: Inducing regression and disorientation by soliciting agreement to seemingly simple rules which regulate mealtimes, bathroom breaks and use of medications.

    Replacement of Relationships: Destroying pre-cult families by arranging cult marriages and ‘families’.

    Sleep Deprivation & Fatigue

    Change of Diet: Creating disorientation and increased susceptibility to emotional arousal by depriving the nervous system of necessary nutrients through the use of special diets and/or fasting.

    No Questions: Accomplishing automatic acceptance of beliefs by discouraging questions.

    Flaunting Hierarchy: Promoting acceptance of cult authority by promising advancement, power and salvation.

    Isolation: Inducing loss of reality by physical separation from family, friends, society and rational references.

    Guilt: Reinforcing the need for ‘salvation’ by exaggerating the sins of the former lifestyles.

    Peer Group Pressure: Suppressing doubt and resistance to new ideas by exploiting the need to belong.

    Love Bombing

    Rejection of Old Values

    Confusing Doctrine: Encouraging blind acceptance and rejection of logic through complex lectures on an incomprehensible doctrine.

    Removal of Privacy

    Time Sense Deprivation

    Disinhibition: Encouraging child-like obedience by orchestrating child-like behaviour.

    Dress Codes: Removing individuality by demanding conformity to the group dress code.

    Chanting and Singing: Eliminating non-cult ideas through group repetition of mind-narrowing chants or phrases.

    Confession [auditing]: Encouraging the destruction of individual ego through confession of personal weaknesses and innermost feelings of doubt.

    Financial Commitment: Achieving increased dependence on the group by ‘burning bridges’ to the past, through the donation of assets.

    Finger Pointing: Creating a false sense of righteousness by pointing to the shortcomings of the outside world and other cults.

    Controlled Approval

    • Lunatic Posse

      …blocking the door so you can’t leave.

      • aquaclara

        adding this one to the list…and recording things, too. sick, isn’t it?

      • sister wendy

        I know this is probably true and supposed to happen, but for most of the auditing I had, the auditor didn’t block the door at all. In a few cases, I was next to the door.

  • Truthiwant

    I love your sense of humour, Claire “The next stop on the Bridge” instead of “The next step”!

  • Truthiwant

    They used to say during rudiments at the begining of the session

    “Have you had alcohol in the last 24 hours or taken drugs in the last week?”

    I often liked having a glass of wine but it was hell when I was being audited. How can you have a glass of wine in the evening and be audited the next day?!

    • DeElizabethan

      You can’t and you’re suppose to know that to be session-able as they say. The rules are given ahead of time and people abide by them or not get audited that day. Go to ethics next step!

    • Larry Moore

      I got seriously drunk one night before an auditing session (on purpose, tone 40 intention). Had a hangover from hell the next day. But hey, by then I had learned how to float the needle as easily as a 7 year old child taking candy from a baby. Factually. And that’s exactly what I did. Had the needle floating in no time flat. Which is part of the reason I concluded the engram theory was a theory concocted by some science fiction type of writer. Which it was.

      The down side (which didn’t last long) was the fact Hubbard had said something to the effect: anyone that has a constant floating needle is a tweety wheety or some other type of nonsense. So, my auditor spend way too much time trying to find something I had charge on, which ended up costing me big time. Lol.

      Two last points: causing a needle to float is easy (and fun, lol). In scn parlance it is the equivalent of going exterior, which in lay-mans terms means focusing ones attention on the absence of sensation, sound and motion. In other words, focusing on the total silence from which all sound arises and falls back into. Ditto motion relative to stillness. And sensation relative to emptiness.

      The last point being: there is value in consciously recalling and revisiting/re-experiencing a rather broad amount of past trauma’s. If you repeat any experience in vision, over and over and over again, it factually becomes boring. Which boredom Hubbard called release.

  • DeElizabethan

    Claire, that was fun. But for me, not Reeaaly! A good reminder of the crap one goes through. Educational article to be sure, for people to get an idea of auditing.

    David, Bert and Colin are doing a great thing. Can’t wait to see more.

  • Bella Legosi

    Auditing seems to me (and I reserve the right to be wrong) that when someone goes in who is generally happy, who doesn’t have much to regret or dwell on, could potentially have moments during the session where what they thought they had handled on their own, really wasn’t handled; as in the auditing process looks for incidents in the past to cling on to and exasperate, removing any progress the person had done themselves. Is that not too far off? Also, should someone go in for auditing who has severe regrets or past traumas, it seems to me that the auditing process not only drags the healing process out, but with the repetition adds more negativity to the whole experience. Is this where the Hub word for “enturbulation” stems from?

    All in all I can see what people mean by “release” but I don’t see how the process itself really helps anyone really get over their traumas in a more productive way, with less trauma going back thru the trauma that they were there to “release” in the first place!!!

    • DeElizabethan

      Hopefully I will answer very simply. If you took the time or had someone to listen to you go over your trauma, and really look at it, you may see it in a different light and feel better about it. Relief can be accomplished in different ways if you really are bothered about a certain trauma without eelron’s auditing.

      • Bella Legosi

        Thank you that was way more simple and articulated far better then what I had said!

        🙂

        Danka you wonderful woman!

  • USA MRIID

    “Claire Headley is taking us on our journey to train as Scientologists.”

    What’s amusing is that it costs actual customers some $360,000 to learn these frauds and yet we get them for free. 🙂 Must make that insane conman dwarf shit his little pants in frustration. 🙂

  • I am

    I am not sure of the cause, but I do notice the Sn’s on this blog do spell and communicate rather well. Any feedback?

    • nottrue

      read roger larrson great com

      • I am

        Where does one read Roger Larrson?

        • nottrue

          30 comments down

      • Missionary Kid

        English is not his language.

      • Captain Howdy

        He’s Swedish and he’s a good guy and people shouldn’t be making fun of his english skillz.

        • nottrue

          ok

    • Peter

      Not all were kids when they went in, many with solid educations as well as business experience. And education, back then was far better than it has been over the past 40 years or so. If we couldn’t do the work, we didn’t move on to the next grade! LOL Oh, how times have changed!

    • 1/10

  • USA MRIID

    “Can you give us an example of one question that might be asked over and over? And what happens to your responses over time?”

    Sure! How about, “Do you think that David Miscavige if a violently insane psychopath who only wants to rook and swindle the marks, rubes, and idiots out of as much money as he can?”

  • USA MRIID

    I sure hope that the new Los Feliz business office has an oilleness table! I need a fucking oil change!

  • J. Swift

    Tony Ortega asks about the new Scientology Los Feliz mission: “Is the power of a Scientology mission going to cause a downward spiral for the video enterprise, or will Karen be free from the mission’s overwhelm?”

    The answers are revealing:

    1. The old Scientology Los Feliz Mission never had any impact whatsoever on Karen, myself, AGP, or anyone else in the local community. Speaking as a resident of Los Feliz — and my neighbors include Mark Ebner and John Roecker — I don’t think anyone around here even knew the old Los Feliz mission was there or even cared.

    2. Based upon the old mission being a dismal failure, the new Scientology Los Feliz mission promises to be another bland and featureless Scientology failure that is nonexistent for all intents and purposes.

    3. I don’t see how the new Los Feliz Mission can interfere with our video production unless it recruits Jenna Elfman and a few others to stand outside of our home and scream. And even then we would video Jenna and her screaming coreligionists and feature them in a few of our videos.

    4. Sadly for the mission holders of the new Scientology Los Feliz mission, the Complex and Celebrity Centre International are only a few minutes away. How can a tiny insignificant mission possibly compete with Celebrity Centre? If I were a jaded Los Felizian looking for Scientology’s help, I would go to Celebrity Centre so I could hang around with thousands of movie stars between sessions. It would make no sense to do TR’s in a drab little mission when all of those movie star Scientologists were down the street.

    • Missionary Kid

      What was the building before Co$ took it over. I’m assuming that Co$ owns it, and not anyone local.

    • aquaclara

      “Bland. Featureless. Insignificant. ”
      YES!!!

  • Bradley Greenwood

    A march on the Los Feliz Org, and BBQ at Karen’s afterward? All I need is five hours to get there. If we are infiltrated, we can play pin the tail on the OSA spook. A hammer should “pin” it very well.

  • I am

    Most were kids when they went in the sea org. I really do think the work and study tech helped many of them to write better.

    • Missionary Kid

      Study tech is just as bankrupt of science, learning or knowledge as any of the other ideas that sprouted out of Dr. L. Ron Crankenstein’s fetid skull.

      It actually inhibits the natural curiosity that kids have and replaces it with misinformation.

      • misinformation and the need to inform about the thought crimes of others

      • I am

        I agree that looking up words is an old idea, and I am old. It was not from the skull of LRon. It was standard procedure in schools when I was in public school. It works.

        • Missionary Kid

          Study tech isn’t just looking up words. The problem that I have with it is that words have context, and they don’t seem to explore the different uses.

          Also, everything that LRH touched was all oriented towards his definitions, as well as his concepts of science, which are not science. It is a lot of rote learning, which is not good in itself, but is is rote learning of false “facts” that were created by a man who really couldn’t do math, failed physics, and made up a lot of shit.

          If you learn shit, your life is shit, IMO.

          • HelenNPN

            Agree. Garbage in, garbage out.

      • I am

        I agree that looking up words is an old idea, and I am old. It was not from the skull of LRon. It was standard procedure in schools when I was in public school. It works.

    • better than what?

      Given the complete absence of people who were victims of the criminal organisation known as the “church” of $cientology from childhood who are outstanding at anything in the academic world (before they leave, anyway), I think I’m happy to keep proper school and stuff for the time being.

      Anyway, I would rather read the detail in Jenna Miscavige-Hill’s “Beyond Belief: My Secret Life Inside Scientology and My Harrowing Escape” than read your vague generalities here. Jenna has some fascinating insight into her aunt, Shelly Miscavige’s character. Which reminds me

      W H E R E _ I S _ S H E L L Y ?

  • John

    That’s crazy you gotta pay 25 grand just to get to the level where you can do an auditing session in Scientology.

  • I am

    I do not know what 1/10 means. Clarification, please.

  • I am

    I do agree the children of the sea org were abused. How can any sane person disagree with that!
    Proper school is fine for me. I taught for 40 years. Thus, I have read a lot of essays. My “generalization” is really my opinion based on many years of experience. The people writing on this blog would be in the top ten percent of any public school class.