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Scientology’s Notorious R2-45 Policy: Is There a Smoking Gun?

Colt_45Jon Atack is the author of A Piece of Blue Sky, one of the very best books on L. Ron Hubbard and Scientology. He now has a new edition of the book out, and on Saturdays he’s helping us sift through the legends, myths, and contested facts about Scientology that tend to get hashed and rehashed in books, articles, and especially on the Internet.

Jon, we have to admit that we’re pretty skeptical about Scientology’s “R2-45” policy, which was mentioned on this blog earlier this week. Supposedly, L. Ron Hubbard instructed his followers that to use the R2-45 method was to eliminate church enemies with the use of a Colt semi-automatic pistol (with .45 caliber ammunition). What’s the evidence that LRH ever really invented a policy of murder?

JON: “R2-45” did become a code in the cult. Outside of the Guardian’s Office (the church’s original intelligence unit, 1966-1981), no one took it seriously — at least for a moment.

R2-45 came about while Hubbard was exploring some new “creative processes” (actually visualization, borrowed directly from his “very dear friend” Aleister Crowley), which were gathered together in The Creation of Human Ability. R-2 is “route 2” and was supposed to result in superhuman powers for those brave enough to travel it. Sadly, as with all Hubbard’s promises of supernatural powers, it failed. It is said that Hubbard took a Colt pistol on stage and fired a shot through the stage to make his point that there was a simple and effective way of “exteriorizing” the being (or “thetan”) from the “meat” body. As the text says, it is a method that is “frowned upon”:

“AN ENORMOUSLY EFFECTIVE PROCESS FOR EXTERIORIZATION BUT ITS USE IS FROWNED UPON BY THIS SOCIETY AT THIS TIME.” (emphasis in the original)

This becomes rather more sinister in the light of Hubbard’s 1967 policy letter, “Responsibilities of Leaders”:

When you move off a point of power, pay all your obligations on the nail, empower all your friends completely and move off with your pockets full of artillery, potential blackmail an every erstwhile rival, unlimited funds in your private account and the addresses of experienced assassins and go live in Bulgravia and bribe the police. And even then you may not live long if you have retained one scrap of domination in any camp you do not now control…

When you’re close to power get some delegated to you, enough to do your job and protect yourself and your interests, for you can be shot, fellow, shot, as the position near power is delicious but dangerous, dangerous always, open to the taunts of any enemy of the power who dare not really boot the power but can boot you. So to live at all in the shadow or employ of a power you must yourself gather and USE enough power to hold your own — without just nattering to the power to “kill Pete,” in straightforward or more suppressive veiled ways to him as these wreck the power that supports yours. He doesn’t have to know all the bad news and if lie’s a power really he won’t ask all the time, “What are all those dead bodies doing at the door?” And if you are clever, you never let it be thought HE killed them — that weakens you and also hurts the power source.

“Well, boss, about all those dead bodies, nobody at all will suppose you did it. She over there, those pink legs sticking out, didn’t like me,” “Well,” he’ll say if he really is a power, “why are you bothering me with it if it’s done and you did it. Where’s my blue ink?” Or “Skipper, three shore patrolmen will be along soon with your cook, Dober, and they’ll want to tell you he beat up Simson.” “Who’s Simson?” “He’s a clerk in the enemy office downtown.” “Good, when they’ve done it, take Dober down to the dispensary for any treatment he needs. Oh yes. Raise his pay.”

THE BUNKER: That is some seriously bizarre writing.

JON: Add to this just one final notion. I interviewed two people who had read all of the Scientology documents seized in the FBI raid. Both were former GO officials. They told me that the FBI had been unable to comprehend the dense Scientologese, so the agency had missed a gun-carrying gang which functioned out of the GO’s Branch One in the US. Bill Franks, one time Executive Director International, has said in an interview that he was asked to kill someone by the GO’s Jimmy Mulligan back in the seventies (he declined). David Mayo has said that he spoke with the hit man hired to kill him. Over the years, there have been many deaths associated with the cult, whether suicide after “processing” failed to live up to its promises, or some other form of neglect or maltreatment (there were at least eight deaths at Flag before Lisa McPherson). But in “Responsibilities of Leaders,” Hubbard gives the nod to “dispensing of existence” and there are certainly some among the followers who may well take that seriously.

THE BUNKER: So, the way we’re reading this, we have some typical Hubbard bluster which maybe was more talk than action. But subsequent events lead you to think it would be a mistake to dismiss entirely the possibility that lethal violence could be done in the name of Scientology. Is that it?

JON: Yes. We return to the same problem every time: Are believers meant to follow Hubbard’s directions exactly, and the answer is a very hearty yes. His tales are told as true and his directives are to be followed to the letter. That is the nature of “Standard Tech” and, according to the “scripture” of Scientology, it is dangerous to do anything other than follow Hubbard’s word precisely. So, when Hubbard says that you should act according to the leader’s needs, he will be taken seriously by the fanatics who make up the core of the group. And that if that means killing someone, they might not hesitate. Hubbard followed Crowley in speaking of the “abyss.” He claimed that his “Bridge” crossed that abyss and that anyone failing to follow the steps exactly would fall into that abyss. This applies not only to the supposed counseling procedures, but to the “ethics” practices of the cult. So, we find the Liability Formula, where members must “cause an effective blow” to the “enemies” of Scientology. In the past, this has frequently meant using dirty tricks against critics. As Scientology has long housed an intelligence agency, it is unsurprising that it keeps its agenda very much hidden. As more former members of Branch One become willing to speak out, I would not be surprised to hear of murders. And many Branch One covert intelligence agents were simply moved into the Guardian’s Office replacement, the Office of Special Affairs — Peter Stumbke and Miles Mellor, for instance — while a great show was made of punishing members of the PR and Legal Bureaux as if they had been responsible for the break-ins and the full-on harassment which all but destroyed the lives of the few people brave enough to speak out.

THE BUNKER: Are former Branch One operatives becoming willing to speak out? If so, we’d like to talk to them. We have a particular interest in those days, and we invite anyone who worked in the GO — in its B1 branch or not — to contact us. Isn’t it time to come forward about what was done in the name of Scientology some 40 years ago?

 
——————–

Video from yesterday’s Narconon raid

In case you missed the excitement yesterday afternoon, here’s last night’s report from WSB-TV in Atlanta…

 

 
Really striking images. But we notice the word “Scientology” is never uttered in this report.

 
——————–

Posted by Tony Ortega on April 27, 2013 at 07:00

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  • Henk de Vries

    I think one of the most interesting cases of a ‘rogue’ Scientologist taking the more extreme writings of Hubbard a tad too literally, is also one of the most underreported – both in the critic community as well as in regular media.

    I am talking about the most notorious hitman in the Netherlands, Jesse Remmers. A few months ago, he was sentenced to life in prison for a series of murders in the Amsterdam drug scene in the nineties. He was a Scientologist as well as director of Crimonon at that time.

    The main witness during the trial, Peter de la Serpa, also was a Scientologist at the time and he gave a newspaper interview in 2008 about the role Scientology played in this saga. He said that Jesse Remmers fancied himself as the successor of L Ron Hubbard and used the more extreme writings such as R-45 to rationalize his transformation from all-round scumbag to professional killer. He also stated that Jesse donated the proceeds of his killings to Scientology.

    I guess the article went over the head of the rest of the media, and it never really catched on in the critic community as someone like Fowler did. But given the topic of today’s post, I felt Jesse deserved a mention here.

    • TonyOrtega

      I’ve been interested in this case — now, if I could only read Dutch…

      • Henk de Vries

        I could polish up a Google translation of the newspaper article in question if you are interested.

        • sugarplumfairy

          Yes!

        • Missionary Kid

          Yes! Please!

        • FistOfXenu

          Yes!

        • California

          Yes/Ja, please.

        • Michael Barger

          Henk, it would be a great service if you would provide a polished translation of the article on Jesse Remmers and post at WWP and other forums along with anything else your research might turn up.

          In addition to other deaths that people have mentioned there are two incidents in Paulette Cooper’s ordeal that are plausibly attempts to murder her.

          More recently there is the murder of Tom Ciancio by Rex Fowler in 2009 that you have mentioned, and also the death of 20-year-old Kyle Brennan in 2007.

          It is widely believed that Kyle’s death was a suicide. However, close examination of the depositions in the wrongful-death suit strongly suggest the possibility that he was murdered and the murder covered up to look like suicide to prevent him from speaking to the FBI about crimes his father had committed.

          • Poison Ivy

            I had that interpretation of poor Kyle’s death as well. And what about Quentin? Also, “(there were at least eight deaths at Flag before Lisa McPherson)”

            HUH? I want to know more!!!

            • Michael Barger

              On Kyle there are several articles at Justice For Kyle Brennan:

              http://justiceforkylebrennan.blogspot.com/

              Is there a list of the names of the eight deaths at Flag before Lisa McPherson?

              Another suspicious apparent suicide at Flag is the death of Scientologist Joel Campus in 2008 exactly a year after Kyle was killed.

              Clearwater Police Detective Steve Bohling has now kept the investigation open for five years so no one can see what has happened and whether there is evidence of OSA involvement in a possible murder and cover up as suicide.

              Bohling attempted to keep his investigation of Kyle Brennan’s death open past the two-year deadline of statute of limitations to prevent Kyle’s family from filing a wrongful death suit.

              The family had to appeal to their representatives in the US Congress to force Bohling to end the investigation so they could file their suit.

            • RMycroft
            • I sent this article to a friend who is in the media, only to be told by him that I should be glad I am out of the cult and it’s probably not “healthy” for me to read forums such as that.
              It is a happy day right now that there are many books covering this subject, Tony’s MOST EXCELLENT blog and such… but if only their was a scn. 101 that really lays out every crime in short form with links attached.

            • BuryTheNuts2

              That would be great Victoria…But short form and L.Ron Hubbard are oxymorons.
              There is just so much bullshit in this Dianetics/Scientology rabbit hole it is almost impossible to summarize it in any decent format.

          • q-bird

            This radio interview has been posted before at the Bunker & it is a long one, but IMO it is well worth a listen to. The subject is introduced at 14 minutes. At 18:50 Victoria Britton’s (Kyle’s Mom) own words :

            http://www.blogtalkradio.com/god-discussion/2013/02/16/blind-justice-a-mother-speaks-out-scientology

        • BuryTheNuts2

          If we are interested?
          Oh, you must have been kidding!!!
          YES!

          • TheHoleDoesNotExist

            JA!

        • 0tessa

          Ja, graag!

      • Henk de Vries

        By popular demand, I picked up a polished translation from WWP: https://whyweprotest.net/community/threads/hitman-in-the-name-of-scientology.9482/page-2#post-220209, which is actually quite reasonable. I actually did find a few related articles by doing a reviewed Google search about the way Scientology was discussed during the trial. I DN’t have time right now, but I will go through them tonight and see if additional information comes up.

        I must say why the police never raided Scientology over this case. Scientology claims that Jesse and Peter never had auditing inside the Org, but that’s not necessarily true. Given that this was the biggest trial case our country has ever seen, it would seem logical to unturn this stone as well.

        • Poison Ivy

          You’d think this would be a HUGE story. A book in itself, Tony!

        • Henk de Vries

          OK, I’ve gone through whatever Google offered me. These were mostly postings to Google newsgroups and a blog which was covering the court proceedings.

          The information I gathered are the following snippets:

          – First off, a correction: most of the murders did not take place in the 90s, but in 2004-2006. Jesse Remmers was head of Crimonon in 2004/2005. Peter went to the police in 2006, Jesse was arrested in 2007.
          – Scientology claims both Jesse and Peter never took Scientology courses with the cult, which is highly unlikely. After all, Peter introduced Jesse to Scientology as early as 1999 and Jesse became active in Crimonon in 2004.
          – Jesse claimed during the court proceedings that Peter DID take official Scientology courses, which was hotly contested by Peter.
          – A former Scientologist, not revealing his actual name, claimed Peter came to the conclusion that he needed to whistleblow after seriously studying Scientology in the Amsterdam Org. I should add that he seemed to base that claim on a newspaper article, not on information he was personally privy to.
          – Peter confirmed he was still a Scientologist in 2008, although he didn’t state he was a member of the official cult.
          – The DA didn’t seem to have much of a clue that about what auditing entailed during the court proceedings. Didn’t Peter tell them all about that?

          So what could this mean?

          One very interesting conclusion from this information, even though just conjecture, is the following:

          Peter la Serpa was sent to the police by the Dutch Scientology church in 2006, which may even have known about the murders for a while. Although off-policy, the risk of a PR flap was simply too great. Peter has since been shielding the cult from outside scrutiny by claiming he never was a member. Jesse, from his side, never had an interest in notifying the police about his ethics file either.

          What do we think Underground Bunker? Are we on to something here?

          • TheHoleDoesNotExist

            Many staff of the front groups were what I would call “fringe” scientologists in that they did have to take courses. Some might have been “illegal PC’s” so didn’t get auditing. Others got little to no auditing. Unlike what Narconon is today, there was little income from these jobs. A lot of grunt work would be done by “volunteers”. The scientology books and courses would not necessarily show up in Kirstie’s list. This is true for Sea Org members too. The best way to find out how deep “in” they were is to find anyone who also worked or volunteered for Criminon in the same time period.

      • 10oriocookies

        Wife does…. If its not too lengthy she will help you im sure.

      • Karin Spaink

        Hi Tony

        I started to reply to this posting, but when my message became too long, I decided I’d better write an article. ExecSum: yes, both are (or were) Scientology members; Jesse Remmers even was the COE of Criminon NL. I have spoken at large with Jesse’s attorney, and sat in on part of the trials.

        My bit is here: http://www.spaink.net/2013/04/29/scientology-huurmoordenaars/ [in English].

        regards,
        Karin Spaink

        • I’ve copied your post onto Tony’s current blog page ‘Scientology Metaphysics: After Death, Will You Go to Mars or Venus?’ Karin as some readers may not spot it here.

          Andrew

        • Henk de Vries

          I left the following response on Karin’s blog and I’ll leave it here as well:

          I am the critic who has made the comments on the English language blog that was the catalyst to Karin’s post here.

          I haven’t gotten around to post a reply before, but I did want to add a few additional remarks. In particular I wanted to respond to Karin’s statement:

          “Scientology didn’t order these murders, and nothing in Scientology’s (admittedly often villainous) policies would ever accommodate for the acceptance of, far less for the motivation for, such killings.”

          The first statement is absolutely true and I never meant to state otherwise. Unfortunately my posts may not have been as clear on this aspect as they should have been.

          The second statement, however, is highly debatable. In fact, this was exactly the question that was being discussed in the blog post that Karin is responding to. Scientology’s writings are occasionally very hyperbolic (R2-45 is one of example, but there are others as well) and these writings CAN be construed as a kind of fatwa that provides a licence to kill.

          The question posed in the blog post was: have such fatwa’s ever been issued? The blog post provided an overview of statements by former members alleging that this indeed occasionally happened.

          The point I was making in my comments was that one relevant case was missing from the blog post. This concerned a Dutch Scientologist named Jesse Remmers, who (by virtue of being a religiously inspired nutcase) concluded that Scientology writings condone murders. Please note that the Dutch Scientology church itself admitted to exactly this in one of the newspaper articles on this matter (Google for ‘Jesse moordt voor wereldvrede’ for the Volkskrant article in question).

          So I don’t think the idea is as much ‘out there’ as Karin’s take on the matter.

          I also wanted to add a further note on the relevance of the Scientology angle in this case. Although Scientology and Peter la Serpa deny this, it is rather likely that both Jesse and Peter have at some point were formal members of the Dutch Scientology church, also taking courses there.

          That would also means that (at least at some point in time) files were being kept on them in the Scientology building. IF those files included either auditing or security checking reports (two forms of a confession ‘Scientology-style’), those files COULD contain incriminating evidence on either or both of them. Whether this is the case, I honestly don’t know. But it is very likely that, again IF, the Scientology church possessed incriminating evidence they would (likely) never tell this to the police, firstly because of a legitimite fear for Jesse and Peter, but also because Scientology doctrine forbids to do so if this creates PR issues.

          And yes, I realise I am just forwarding a lot of armchair internet speculation here. But still. Given the fact that this was the largest trial our country has ever seen, I don’t quite understand why the Dutch police never raided the Scientology church to obtain the files on Jesse and Peter. ‘Baat het niet, dan schaadt het niet’. And they weren’t lacking an excure as there have been questions in parliament in 2009 requesting a raid in relation to the privacy issues surrounding the files that Scientology keeps.

          As a final note, I like to confirm that Karin is a heroin for her efforts in the ’90s when critisizing Scientology was still a dangerous effort.

          And as a final final note: in Karin’s blog post I didn’t use capitals but italic. Just to be sure: I want to emphasize the speculative nature of my post, it’s not meant as yelling.

    • Missionary Kid

      Rogue? I’ll bet that label was put on him after he was discovered. It’s Co$ making its usual moves: do something evil, disavow it by lying about their participation, then portraying those caught as rogues.

      It’s evil, then lie after lie to cover things up.

      “The most ethical people on the planet” if you use Satan’s ethics.

    • California

      Fascinating. Let’s get translations of the articles and contacts with people in the Netherlands……

      • TrevAnon

        I might be able to help with translating Dutch -> English

    • Mighty Korgo of Teegeeack

      Thanks. That one is new to me.

    • Mighty Korgo of Teegeeack

      Thanks. That one is new to me.

    • 1subgenius

      The Fowler story, though, does bear repeating in the media.
      Geez….a Scientology minister and OT whatev, and he blows a guy’s head off and half his own.
      That’s not supposed to happen, is it?
      I think maybe when the media misses an obvious story they pretend it didn’t exist..

    • TrevAnon

      Henk, ik kan eventueel helpen met vertalen Nederlands -> Engels. Ik post het meest op WWP en ESMB. Zoek me daar op

      Henk, Ik might be able to help translating Dutch -> English. I mostly post on WWP and ESMB, please contact me there.

  • Mary Reiser’s
    body was just found in a ditch behind Gold Base. Police were at first baffled
    as it appears that she was beaten in the knees to death. Officer John Smith
    noted small but server fist marks about the knees. He stated “we know it was a
    little person and we think we have a good idea of who did this” and he asked if
    anyone who has any information to please contact his offices.

    • TonyOrtega

      Wonder if she was related to Mary Rieser.

      • Observer

        Ouch!

    • BuryTheNuts2

      Demerit day is back baby!!!!
      No soup for you!

    • TheHoleDoesNotExist

      Check the surround trash cans for prints.

  • According to WSB, Narconon apparently has no affiliation with any other organization.

    • i am still trying to figure out what a “personality jacket” is . Is it made of tweed? Cotton/poly blend ? If it is yellow…that is not a good color for me( washes me out ) and i fluctuate between a six 8 and a 10 ( all depending ) I sure hope my personality jacket does not have a military theme to it like Marty’s old jacket because i do not like gold fringe.

  • Bella Legosi

    Wow nothing says….im a crazy cult when your leader waves a .45 on stage dischargeing rounds! So Hubbard tried to scare the shit out of people and call it exteriorzation! How much more guano can some one get?

    • Bella Legosi

      After further reading I can see why this method of extetiorzation is frowned upon by the most ethical people on planet earth

      • FistOfXenu

        You can? It looks just like the kind of thing they’d do if they thought they could get away with it.

        • Missionary Kid

          That’s their ethics: it’s ethical if you can get away with it. Under those rules, of course they’re The Most Ethical People on Earth.

        • Bella Legosi

          True but then nobody likes. 45s waved around and used as well. I bet that sort of stuff is remembered

          • FistOfXenu

            But did that many people remember and care? How many people at that lecture got up and said “I’ve had enough of his horseshit” and walk out? Or just quit later if they didn’t like the idea of turning their back to a nutcase with a loaded gun?

            So what about the people that stuck with him for years? What about the people that kept doing his dirty work even though they knew he actually ordered people to be processed with R2-45? Should we ask Rathbun and Rinder? Would we get straight answers if we did?

            • Bella Legosi

              All good questions Fist! I would think that this is the sort of stuff that makes Kool Aid gulpers of all kinds at the very least question what the hell they are doing there while their guru waves a gun around. Personally, I would find that moment to be the one whre I say to myself, “I like magick and all that, but this guy has really lost his shit!” and also after an inceident like that I would be more openminded should I heard “silly” stuff like the exteriorzation method was researched using loaded guns. I expect little from Kool Aid drinkers, but the self preservation instinct trumps any brainwash, and it would be interesting to note just how many of those “exteriorzation” candidates blew later in life. I bet this “method” was the start of that process!

  • Patty Moher

    The true KSW fanatics take every thing Hubbard said as true and golden. There are definitely degrees of fanaticism in the cult, the Sea Org being the most fanatical of all.

    On one of my trips to Flag, a young Sea Org girl tried to recruit me for the Sea Org. Thank Xenu, I had taken LSD when I was a teen as it made me ineligible for the Sea Org.

    The young recruiter, who had obviously never used drugs, asked if I had seen LRH’s description of an LSD trip. I told her NO, I hadn’t. So she whips out one of the 10 “MISSION EARTH” volumes ( Hubbtard’s Sci Fiction Decology) and has me read a page from this Sci Fi novel of the Hubbster’s describing an LSD trip. Unbeknownst to me, Hubblard Sci Fi was considers to be SOURCE and therefore TRUE AND USABLE TECH!

    So sure, most Scios saw the R2-45 process as a joke or as Ron’s sense of humor, but if fanatics can view his Sci Fi as Source and tech, then R2-45 could be valid tech.as well.

    I remember thinking at the time that this little girl had no fucking clue about LSD and Flubbard’s description was pretty whacked out. I really didn’t want to spend a week or two in ethics for being rude to a Sea Org member so I pulled out the KNOWINGNESS card and told her that based on my integrity and ethics and KNOWINGNESS, I could not join the Sea org as I was certain I had taken LSD.

    At this point I’d like to thank who ever it was that gave me that first hit of acid. It saved me a lot of grief! LOL!

    recruiter, so I told her that my integrity and ethics and KNOWINGNESS. told me that I had in fact done LSD and didn’t want to enter the Sea Org under false pretenses. Like all Scientologists, I was a coward.

    • TheHoleDoesNotExist

      Kids today….they don’t Know scientology, We DO!

    • Missionary Kid

      I can see an ad now: “LSD. It keeps you away from some REALLY crazy shit.”

    • Spackle Motion

      It really goes to show you how twisted and not based in reality the rules are in this cult. Who knew that taking a little acid trip would save one from becoming an actual slave?

      I’m curious as to what Hubbard said (in reference to your comment above) about LSD. Can you provide a link to it, assuming that it is on the Internet somewhere? I need a good laugh this morning and I’m sure that Hubbard will always provide a good laugh.

      • richelieu jr

        In the good ol’ sixties spirit someone should dose the entire SeaOrg, or better, yet, all potential members. Open their eyes, minds and close the door on that little waste of time…

  • “… potential blackmail an every erstwhile rival …”

    Inquiry: The meaning of this phrase?

    • elar aitch

      Methinks ‘an’ is a typo which should be ‘on’

  • FistOfXenu

    This puts a whole different light on some of the stories around some deaths in the cult. I’m thinking of DM’s own mother-in-law in particular. Shot herself HOW MANY times? With a rifle?

    Of course she wasn’t shot with a .45 so that’s out-tech right? Like most everything else DM does.

    • Captain Howdy

      Looking back on it, and knowing something about firearms, it is possible Flo Barnett did commit suicide. The weapon used was a Ruger 10/22 semi-auto .22LR rifle. A 10/22 is short enough to be held at arms length. A semi-auto fires as fast as you can pull the trigger, meaning the first shot was on purpose where as the 2nd and 3rd shots may have been an involuntary physical reaction to the pain/shock of the first shot with her thumb (probably) basically locked on the trigger so the gun kept firing, and the head shot was perhaps caused by her recoiling and attempting to push the weapon up and away from her. Weapons always “climb’ when fired, even 22’s.

      • BuryTheNuts2

        Thanks Howdy. As much as Flo’s death is skeevy and there are a lot of unknowns..
        She very likely “did” commit suicide with that gun.
        That doesn’t mean she wasn’t urged or coerced to do it.

        • TheHoleDoesNotExist

          What we Know: the mother in law of the oh so ecclesiastical leader of scientology, who are the experts on the mind, committed suicide and his wife hasn’t been seen or heard from for years. His mother called him “little Hitler”, his father allegedly joined the Sea Org under threat of being exposed to jail, later escaping in terror, his brother and sister in law fled his compound prison under darkness, and his sister has left what looks like a criminal and potty mouth trail of tears.

          Sounds like the Hole-y Family to me. Also, channelling the Hubbard.

      • FistOfXenu

        I know firearms generally but I don’t know that rifle. I guess “short enough” depends on how long her arms were compared to the rifle.

        I guess you also have to see the exact nature of the wounds to figure out a best explanation how they happened. I read someplace there was a through and through headshot temple to temple plus a couple chest shots? You’re right about weapon climb so that says she was trying to shoot herself in the chest and the headshot wasn’t intended. IF – big if – the headshot was temple to temple and not some kind of random angle I have a harder time with that. Same thing if there’s signs of muzzle being pressed to her temple. To me that would say the muzzle was held to her head instead of climbing with the recoil. That makes me think maybe somebody else did the holding.

        Of course any death can be a suicide if the coroner decides it is or can be convinced to decide it. Susan Meister?

        But even if it’s really suicide I can guess a few reasons why a $cientarCONonist close to the Demented Minibastard could consider suicide a good thing and a few more how they could be pushed into it.

        • Captain Howdy

          I just read the autopsy report again and you’re right about it being a temporal wound that went clean through. So that would mean she shot herself 3x (not 2 according to the report) in the chest and then took the rifle and held it up sideways against her right temple. That is hard to imagine for a middle aged woman in ill health. Unless she was on painkillers, I don’t know what to think now.

      • RMycroft

        There’s also a carbine version of the Ruger, even shorter, but I’m not sure if they were making it back then.

        • FistOfXenu

          Thanks. It would be useful to know those details if we were in a position to investigate this. But I think there’s a lot of other details we don’t have.

        • Captain Howdy

          Are you thinking of the Ruger mini-14? That’s .223 ca.. The weapon was definitely identified as a Ruger10/22. Overall length is 34”

          http://www.ruger.com/products/1022Compact/specSheets/1168.html

          • RMycroft

            No, there is a Ruger 10/22 carbine, but I see that the compact is even shorter. (The important measurement is the barrel length. Add a few inches to reach the trigger.) Last time I looked, I found a site that listed the introduction years for the various 10/22 models, but no luck tonight.

      • ” basically locked on the trigger so the gun kept firing”

        Semi-automatics don’t work like that. You have to let the trigger return to the starting position, and then pull the trigger again, to get another shot to fire.

        • Captain Howdy

          You are correct. What i was trying to say was the pain/physical reaction may have caused an involuntary reaction that caused her finger to keep jerking the trigger.

    • grundoon

      Our host Tony Ortega reported on The Strange Death of Flo Barnett, Mother-in-Law to Scientology Leader David Miscavige in his January 12, 2012 blog at the Village Voice. Tony interviewed coroner’s investigator Debrah Kitchings and sheriff’s detective Bob Havercroft.

      • FistOfXenu

        I remember it grundoon. I came away from it not really convinced about suicide. Doesn’t mean I’m sure it was murder. But I would like to see them take a closer look.

  • ‘Typical Hubbard bluster’ suggests that much of Ron’s silly ideas can be met with a sigh and shrugged off as space opera nonsense from a pompous modern day Baron Münchhausen: “…And here you have this flying crocodile wearing golden horns, which are artificial, and his tail beautifully encased on silk, jumping on a monocycle and going off down this 40 pass highway….” (‘Self-Determinism and the Creation of Universes’, 16th November 1952):

    But the dark and sinister side is very real and I think it unlikely that the truth will remain hidden for ever as Scientology trains its members about the spiritual relief of confessing their sins and memories of this relief may remain to some of those who committed shameful, vile and criminal acts at the orders of their superiors and who may choose to confess again, only this time to law enforcement.

    This is only likely to happen if the retributive power of the Church of Scientology is emasculated.

    There are just too many mysterious cases of death associated with Scientology:

    ‘Deaths at Flag’
    http://www.xenu-directory.net/mirrors/www.whyaretheydead.net/

    ‘They Should Not Have Died’

    http://theyshouldnothavedied.wordpress.com/

    Andrew

    Andrew

  • Northwindhermit

    Damn! I was born in the wrong decade. What an uproarious drinking buddy L. Ron Hubbard would have been. Wild stories, lies and outrageous yarns, comparison of favourite handguns — laughs a million!

    • Missionary Kid

      With his hand in your pocket, trying to extract every penny from you, and trying to seduce your wife, and possibly you, LRH was a sociopath.

      He was an asshole and a leach. Charming, if he wanted something.

      You haven’t missed everything. You can still become pen pals with Charles Manson.

    • 1subgenius

      And discharging those firearms.
      One of my standing suggestions for those dull moments is, “Let’s get drunk and shoot up the town.”

  • BosonStark

    There’s a percentage of Scientologists who would probably “do anything for Ron,” between exteriorizing to other parts of the guh-lax-ie. Yeah, they kind of worry me.

    I’m not sure the smoking gun will be a gun though. All that’s needed is a video of the tiny one throwing an ecclesiastical fit and slapping an underling.

  • EnthralledObserver

    This is one of the scariest parts of this ongoing (hopefully not for long) tale of $cientology.

  • Bella Legosi

    I hate to admit it but L Ron seems to get weirder and weirder the more I read. His lunacy really has no end does it?

    • FistOfXenu

      Now you’re getting it Bella. Just like we say here “$cientology: it’s always worse than you think” (or can imagine). We could add “L Ron Hubbard: if you still think he had any redeeming qualities, keep reading”

      And that’s true for most people. But it’s worrying when you see Certain People that seem to know LRH’s rantings in detail and even knew the guy but don’t see it. Makes me wonder about them. A lot.

      • Poison Ivy

        “But it’s worrying when you see Certain People that seem to know LRH’s rantings in detail and even knew the guy but don’t see it.” Mike Rinder – who I really think is brilliant and today operates out of the best intentions – does an interview with a German mag on his site and in it he very logically and intelliegently defends LRH. I have respect for Mike…and he’s doing great stuff with his blog – much more accessible to both in-Scientologists and never-ins than Marty’s. Mike clearly sees LRH in an overwhelmingly positive light even now. To my mind, it is almost like a child loyally defending an abuse parent. And he is certainly not the only one (though by far the most articulate and reasonable in explaining himself.) It kind of makes me sad to see really smart people interpret the past like this, in light of incontrovertible evidence to the contrary. But you can’t get inside someone’s head.

        • FistOfXenu

          I get your point PI. I even agree mostly. And I even appreciate how the MRs give some people a stepping stone out of the cult. But I have this little question in my head about how they’re so committed to LRH that it makes me wonder how their commitment taints what they’re willing to reveal. Especially when their commitment has included stuff like committing crimes on his orders.

        • TheHoleDoesNotExist

          Intelligence has nothing to do with any of this. Different brain geography. Brilliant Mad Men abound. Mike has most of his family still in. Anyone who still has most or all of their family still in is questionable even if it is noble intentions driving them. There’s a multibillion dollar industry wrapped around the Woo, which is evidence of plenty of customers. New Age, mysticism, magic have already been around. Investors just got wise and set up shop to sell them what they want.

          • MarionDee

            The fact that otherwise intelligent people can leave the Church but remain committed to LRH, just shows that there’s a difference between knowledge and wisdom, intelligent and enlightenment.

    • Captain Howdy

      I found a notebook on the street back in the 90’s and it was the diary of someone who was obviously mentally ill, probably schizophrenic, and in parts it read just like a lot LRH’s “writings”, like the stuff in today’s article. Looking back, I’m guessing most prophets were either schizo or con men or both like LRH. That would explain a lot history wise.

      • Poison Ivy

        There is a lot in the Affirmations that suggests LRH had a form of schizophrenia.

        • MarionDee

          I have no clinical education, but this lecture in particular sounds paranoid schizophrenic … LRH imagining the grand forces aligned against him, and ready to act out crazy (even murderous) solutions to bring them down. And of course, he believes he speaking as a hero, a specially-enlightened superman. I find it frightening. My ex would be inspired by something like this, so I have to imagine that plenty of other cult types would as well.

      • Bella Legosi

        I couldn’t agree more.

  • Observer

    I have never doubted that Elron was serious about R2-45. Do I think most Scientologists would have done it? Absolutely not. But Mankind’s Greatest Friend knew good and well that some would. R2-45 fits perfectly into the big picture of his megalomania, and is the logical next step in his literally intended (and carried out) “if possible, of course, destroy him utterly” ravings against Scientology’s perceived enemies. I believe the feeble “frowned upon by society” disclaimer was to cover his own voluminous backside.

    And don’t forget that in an HCO ethics order he specifically *ordered* R2-45 to be used against a group of people.

    http://www.gerryarmstrong.org/50grand/cult/hco-ethics-order-30.html

    • SciWatcher

      I agree he was completely serious. He was basically saying, “kill my enemies for me, and don’t tell me about it.” What struck me most was the way he underscored that last part by stressing that to do so would weaken one’s own power.

    • Michael Barger

      Hubbard’s 1968 order for Sea Org members to use R2-45 Auditing Process on 12 Scientologists which you link to at Gerry Armstrong’s site has always struck me as a most damning document.

      I am curious about what attacks they were subjected to and if any of them were attempts to murder them and what has happened to them since they left Scientology.

      None of them appears in the Big List of exes who have spoken out. I am wondering if anyone has information on them.

      They are:

      Peter Goodwin
      Jim Stathis
      Peter Knight
      Mrs. Knight
      Nora Goodwin
      Ron Frost
      Margaret Frost
      Nina Collingwood
      Freda Gaiman
      Frank Manley
      Mary Ann Taylor
      George Wateridge

      • Observer

        I’ve wondered that myself. And if Freda Gaiman is a relative of Neil’s.

        • TheHoleDoesNotExist

          They would all be in their late 60’s to 70’s by now if alive.

          • Poison Ivy

            Time for some detective work!

    • FistOfXenu

      Interesting the order specifies Sea mOrg to carry it out.

    • RMycroft

      Apparently all of Hubbard’s works where he wasn’t serious have special watermarking that says “Ha ha! Just Kidding!” that only True Scientolgists can see. It’s not their problem that we wogs and SPs can’t see it.

      • FistOfXenu

        You have to have special glasses to see it? Or is this one of the sooper powerz? Either way I bet it costs a fortune.

  • Roger Larsson

    R2-45 or R2-26 (the number of letters in the alphabet) where’s the difference?

    R2-45 makes you pick between the money and your immediate life in the mud and R2-26 makes
    you pick between the money and future lives in the mud.

  • elar aitch

    You guys are so literal – R2-45 is just a metaphor….duh!

    • So?

    • sugarplumfairy

      No, R2-45 is an actual process.. now, R2-Tec-9 might be a metaphor..

      • Observer

        I’m pretty sure elar is being sarcastic at Marty’s expense …

        • sugarplumfairy

          I’d have been surprised if he wasn’t..

        • sugarplumfairy

          I’d have been surprised if he wasn’t..

      • TheHoleDoesNotExist

        TR11 is an actual drill, Learning how to Lie for the Greatest Good. Also known in Wog World as Perjury, and Obstruction of Justice, right Mike and Marty?

        • hey now …it is all just hyperbole …or maybe an analogy …or something like that .

    • FistOfXenu

      Totally! Like the gun, the bullet, the hole in the floor and all that stuff about exteriorizing somebody with it. And didn’t somebody post that there were people in $cientology that carried firearms? More metaphors? 🙂

      EDIT: It’s Atack above: ” They told me that the FBI had been unable to comprehend the dense Scientologese, so the agency had missed a gun-carrying gang which functioned out of the GO’s Branch One in the US.”

    • FistOfXenu

      Yup. R2-45 is a metaphor. You can use ANY firearm you happen to have around to do the job. And if you don’t have a firearm, get creative. Push them from someplace high, deep 6 them, OD them on something, put them into babywatch and dehydrate and neglect them to death.

      Oh yeah, some metaphor.

      • Captain Howdy

        The guys who worked for Murder Inc didn’t carry weapons, they improvised. Two Murder Inc guys followed their mark into a movie.They saw where the intended victim was sitting and one of the hitmen noticed a fire axe on the wall….

        • FistOfXenu

          Pretty much what I had in mind. 🙂

  • Dave Mass

    I think it’s wrong to take out a couple of paragraphs out of a 12 pages writing and judge it. LRH might look weird as long as you are not tracking with the all thing.

    I am an independent Scientologist, I have REALLY LIVED Scientology. At the FSO between 2003 and 2009 as a Flag Grad V FPRD bla bla bla auditor.

    Yes Scientology is within the hands of idiots. No Scientology isn’t just a dream or an invention.

    • Susan Meister

      Quite right, but it is frustrating that no one stood up to Xenu. If his diabolical plan had been thwarted all those millions of years ago, there would be no need for Scientology at all.

      • FistOfXenu

        The Tech doesn’t work. It’s all lies and Hubbard-horseshit. They never stood a chance against me. But we are still here and even though LRH wrote way back when that they could handle SPs and and they have all those OTs full of OT powers and blah blah blah, if the Tech was worth a damn we wouldn’t be here. Instead they just bluff and bluster and bullshit along and imagine nobody notices.

        (evil laughter that can’t be written in any Teegeeackian language)

        • Ze Moo

          A very good evil laugh…..
          http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=7edeOEuXdMU

          • FistOfXenu

            Not bad but in my world that’s a sissy laugh. A real evil laugh has to knock hearers unconscious and implant paralyzing engrams.

            • TheHoleDoesNotExist

              Cap’n Howdy…get in here!

          • Captain Howdy

            This is a hard one. The obvious contenders are the 2 movie Jokers and Hamill in the animated version. The laugh were Ledger enters the kitchen is a personal fav. The Vincent Price laugh in Thriller. The excellent Gary Oldman laugh in Dracula.

            But this is my choice for the creepiest, most evil laugh of all-time.I use to walk around the neighborhood imitating this when i was a kid. No wonder I didn’t have any friends.

            http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=XnH5YRkqbns

            • TheHoleDoesNotExist

              I knew you’d come through. I remember that movie. nightmare city as a kid. You walked around like that? You are something spectacular, Cap’n. I haven’t figured out what, but it’s spectacular.

            • Midwest Mom

              I offer for your consideration: George Baillie’s laugh.

              My second choice is my oldest sister while she is being tickled. I once taped my sis with my tape recorder while she was in full creepy laughing mode, but my mom made me give the cassette tape to her and she pulled the tape out of the cassette and ruined it. I was also grounded from using my tape recorder for a month!

            • FistOfXenu

              Yes! One of my favorite films of all. And the laugh’s great, but I never got it right.

      • Douglas D. Douglas

        Well, in MY time track. I was around a thousand years before Xenu, and I can tell you that back then, ANOTHER galactic enturbulator made up THAT whole story. There was no Xenu, no volcanoes, and no disembodied Thetans. It’s just a silly story that was implanted in our minds by a diabolically clever dude named… Wait… Who is that behind the… AUUUUUUUUGH!

        • q-bird

          oh! laughing laughing Douglas Douglas!

    • how do you determine who the idiots are ? also ..i thought the tech worked so why would idiots have it ? WAKE UP DUDE and stop trying to con people . What you are doing is wicked and immoral . Shame on you

    • TheHoleDoesNotExist

      Do you have any idea of who you are addressing here? lol

      • Missionary Kid

        Obviously not. He’s as clueless as any non-independent $cientologist.

    • Roger Larsson

      Hello Timmy Higgs or am I wrong?

      • Dave Mass

        Timmy Higgs? are you asking me if I am Timmy Higgs? No, I don’t know who is that. My name is Davide Masserini. Officially SP declared in 2009.

        • my name is Kim ..officially disgusted by LRH , by scientology , by all the Martydites, by every single horrible story of abuse and disconnection that i have been reading about for years and by anyone who makes excuses for it . Shame on you.

          • sugarplumfairy

            Amen!

        • Roger Larsson

          Truth seekers dig in the dirt.

    • Missionary Kid

      Great sarcasm!

    • FistOfXenu

      My wife and I have this difference of opinion about our patio furniture. Think you could do us a favor and exteriorize and come over and have a look for yourself? Give us your opinion about it. Thanks.

    • Is every thing that LRH wrote true and correct, or not? Please explain what these particular paragraphs mean, if you can, and feel free to include more of that document, to provide necessary context.

      Thank you, and happy flying.

      • Dave Mass

        Hello Phil, no I don’t think everything he wrote is correct. You should know that some of the bullettins and policies have been altered or written by others.

        This policy “Responsibilities of Leaders” is quite long. I recall that when I read it I enjoyed it. As soon as I have time I will re-read it and explain the actual meaning of it.

        Whenever you read something you have to think about from what viewpoint you read it. If you start with a critical viewpoint, you will always find something wrong to complain.

        Hope to find the time soon.

        • Thanks for providing some little hope that you will give an interpretation. I have to say though that I’m disappointed that you have jumped to blame me for not understanding it, because I supposedly have a prior critical viewpoint. Seems to me that you’re making excuses and changing the subject. Let’s just keep the topic to LRH’s text, and you don’t have to attempt to read my mind.

          • FistOfXenu

            But he didn’t say WHEN he’ll give an interpretation – in his eternity or ours?

        • FistOfXenu

          That’s always convenient to say the bulletins and policies have been altered or written by others. It’s a lie. A convenient lie I know. But the irony for me is that Hubbard’s the one that shut the door on that lie himself. There was policy and procedure on how to reproduce his stuff. And the things you’re trying to cover for by saying it was altered were in published form for a long time during LRH’s life time. If they’d been screwed with you think he woudn’t notice? And the copies in public circulation around here go back. There’s even people here that were in WITH Hubbard and studied when he was alive. You think you can blow smoke like “it was altered” and not be called out for it?

          Come to think of it there’s only person you serve by perpetuating the whole “all the bad stuff by LRH isn’t really by him, it was altered”. David Miscavige. Since you say you’re an indie would I be right guessing that David Miscavige isn’t your favorite SP?

        • i hate it when a comma fucks up my eternity . ( said no one ….ever )

          • TheHoleDoesNotExist

            That’s a damn brilliant line, Kim!

        • Midwest Mom

          I find it comforting to know that the people whom I have admired throughout my life, as well as historically, had high moral principles, unarguable strengths of character, and the wisdom to practice what they preached to others.

          Look at how many people admire others who are of different religions, cultures, and educational backgrounds than what they are themselves and have sincere respect for them, yet non-Scientologists have never had, and still do not have, respect for L. Ron Hubbard, his beliefs or actions.

          Try to take some time to distinguish the legacy of Hubbard as it truly is to the rest of the world compared to that of others who have actually done so much to improve this world of ours. Hubbard is not respected, and for good reason. He was not a man of high moral principles, he lacked any admirable qualities of character, and he didn’t practice what he preached.

          Best wishes on finding new heroes to learn about and to use as inspiration!

        • EnthralledObserver

          “no I don’t think everything he wrote is correct. You should know that some of the bullettins and policies have been altered or written by others.”
          Okay, maybe this question needed repeating to simplify: Is everything LRH wrote true and correct, or not?
          Not: Is what others wrote…? Not: Is what altered policies and bulletins…?
          LRonny’s original writings perplex and amuse and horrify and sicken us here quite frequently… what we want to comprehend is why don’t Indies react to the same data/writings in the same way?

        • Douglas D. Douglas

          You seemed rather confident in defending Dear Founder’s written material until you were called out on it. Then you merely “recall” that when you read it you “enjoyed it.” And you need to re-read before you can explain the actual meaning? Spare me.

          We are all capable of reading this material and drawing critical conclusions. The word “critical” does not mean negative. (“Criticize” is negative.) It is best to start with a critical viewpoint– to do otherwise merely creates credulous sycophants. But then, that was LRH’s goal, was it not?

    • grundoon

      L. Ron Hubbard’s official church policy, HCO PL 12 February 1967 – Admin Know-How series 13 – THE RESPONSIBILITIES OF LEADERS, studied by all senior Scientology executives on the Org Executive Course (OEC), can be read in its full unabridged deranged glory, starting at page 126 of this court filing: Kyle Brennan Scientology Case – Second Declaration of Lance Marcor 27 Sep 2010.

      Another independent Scientologist who – I’m sure you’ll agree – has REALLY LIVED Scientology, spoke of the day-to-day significance of this policy at the highest levels of the Scientology corporate enterprise. Mr. Marty Rathbun wrote on November 2, 2010:

      I was asked by some people involved, “what makes these people (OSA) think what they are doing is ok”? It prompted me to do a little soul searching on the subject. I knew that I’d do something similar, perhaps not as over-the-top and vicious, if I were confronted with similar circumstances back in the day. What motivated me to comply? What justified my actions in working to destroy other human beings when I set up OSA and worked through it for so many years?

      The answer was HCO PL 12 February 1967 The Responsibilites of Leaders.

      Please note that LRH wrote the Policy Letter for the Org Executive Course, and issued it as Admin (Administration) Know How Series 13. He did not make it confidential. He did not issue it to the Guardian’s Office (predecessor of OSA). The Responsibilities of Leaders is one of the more widely recognized and revered policy letters of the thousands LRH wrote. ….

      Miscavige crammed me and ordered me to cram others on The Responsibilities of Leaders
      many times; all in the context of emphasizing the brutal, blind loyalty requirement aspect of it as outlined in the text cited above. Miscavige and his wife Shelly required RTC executives to read several books on Simon Bolivar (the subject of The Reponsibilities of Leaders policy letter) to drive the point home.

      Did anyone notice that one of the first Miscavige “re-issued” LRH books that was released in the late eighties after LRH’s death was the Ethics book, and that suddenly it had 12 pages of The Responsibilities of Leaders added? From thenceforth, DM’s control manual was required reading and a part of one’s hat, not only for staff but for public.

      John Peeler (“BTs2Free”), another who has REALLY LIVED Scientology, posted on OCMB:

      Miscavige’s chief Policy Letter (which was written by Hubbard and is 100% Standard policy) is HCO PL The Responsibility of Leaders, aka Simon Bolivar policy or “Pink Legs.” Everything DM does, all of his decisions and actions are based on that policy letter alone. I know, because I worked close to Miscavige and how much that PL was enforced on the Int base to follow, duplicate and apply at all times. DM being the Power. If you read that PL, you will see for yourself and understand. It reads like a mafia Don would expect those under him to
      understand and operate with.

  • Chuck Ohl former Guardian’s Office Branch 1 person, I wish Chuck would go public on what he did and knows.

    Tom and Nancy Reitze both would know.

    And of course Jimmy Mulligan, if he surfaced.

    And Jane Kember would know.

    Cathy O’Gorman is still in Office of Special Affairs, she would probably know plenty of 3rd hand reports and stories from her days in the Guardian’s Office.

    And Fred Hare would likely know 2nd and 3rd hand stories too, of any actual more incidents like the one against Paulette Cooper.

    Norman Starkey and Maria Starkey would likely know.

    • TheHoleDoesNotExist

      I had to chuckle when Tony mentioned he’d like to interview any old GO personnel. He could hang out in the lobby today of David Morse & Assoc in California, maybe right in New York too. You could go to just about any of the “techie” scientology companies, lift the door mat, and you’ll find ex GO, like Heldt. Mary Heldt used to work in Clearwater tech companies as Personnel Manager. These companies, btw, harvest all kinds of information on customers, including financial, social sec, and more.

      There are more names on “suspicious disappear” list. GO/OSA are not people with a conscience, folks. Whether it’s the R2-45 reference, Responsibility of Leaders PL as Alonzo pointed out, or any other, psychopaths and/or criminals posing as scientologists will Find a reference that “allows” them to act out their insane impulses. If there Was an interview, it would be something on par with interviewing a Charles Manson or a smooth talking, Hannibal like character. Lol, but it sure Would be Pulitzer fodder!

      Here’s a list of just some of the GO’s operations. You decide if the personnel who’s Job it was to carry out these orders routinely could commit Any crime.

      http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/List_of_Guardian%27s_Office_operations

      http://www.holysmoke.org/mm/mm21.htm

      • California

        Jeff Quiros of the SF Org is old GO/new OSA. Call him, please, Tony.

        • Mary_McConnell

          What good would come of him calling the president of CoS San Francisco? He’d never return the call.

      • Poison Ivy

        “These companies, btw, harvest all kinds of information on customers, including financial, social sec, and more.”
        That is fucking scary. Definitely need an investigation on that. No wonder no one can run, no one can hids.

        “The preference over quick murder is slow death by stress, attrition, and bankruptcy. The manipulation methods are pretty much the same: threats, coercion, blackmail, etc.”

        That was their stated intent with Paulette Cooper and it almost worked. You CAN Gaslight a person and drive them mad. LRH would’ve far preferred this type of ‘murder’ to a shot with a gun. What’s the fun in watching your enemy suffering a split-second death? LRH (and COB) are sadists who get off on watching their “enemies” go insane.

        • TheHoleDoesNotExist

          True that, all of it. Also, in the U.S., it is amazing what gets a mere slap on the wrist rather than jail. Outside of sci personnel, I have experienced the MO of a criminal sociopath that always manipulated Others to do the dirty work And went to great lengths so that no one wanted to talk to any of the others, accomplished by smear campaigns on each. Most people back then would Not believe what was happening, too incredulous. Now, there arebooks, articles. websites and every other tv series about these types! Who says TV isn’t educating (and inoculating) kids today.

          As to companies, information gotten through normal business requirements, but scary, yes indeed.

    • DeElizabethan

      Chuck, don’t you have some 3rd hand reports from the days you were associated with Chuck Ohl at Flag? Love to hear them here, also it would help back me up with Chuck as a field leader a couple years from ’80 until he got transfered out when GO changed, then a new guy, Neal took over. You have so much valuable info and are such a great help. Thank you.

    • Mary_McConnell

      Kember is on lines at St Hill, UK, per recent completion lists

  • California

    Another path to pursue is the connection between the DEA and Narconon, as documented by Luke on pages 106-107 in his book, and elsewhere.

    I am a supporter of law enforcement but have looked at the DEA with a dubious eye since the 1990’s when public schools had to use their D.A.R.E. substance abuse education classes, arguably (as numerous research studies have shown, citations available upon request) the worst, except for Narconon Drug Education. When the the evaluation of Narconon Drug Education was beginning to be discussed, there were comments about evaluating D.A.R.E. along with it… but as one senior official said, there were 15 studies at that time, almost all showing that participating in D.A.R.E. made students MORE LIKELY to use, and the DEA refused to change D.A.R.E. Yes, there are some similarities between the D.A.R.E. class and the Narconon Drug Education class. But what the DEA wanted, then and now, was access to kids to learn more about the drug challenges and suppliers from the young. But middle-school and high-school students are not the best informants. And frequently parents do NOT know that their kids are being targeted.

    Anybody with any knowledge of the DEA and Narconon, please let us know what you know, if you can do it safely.

    • TheHoleDoesNotExist

      Didn’t CCHR have it’s plants or at least connections in with DEA too?

      • California

        Yes.

    • Captain Howdy

      Shall the twain meet?

      • FistOfXenu

        I don’t think Twain would’ve enjoyed meeting the nutjob. But I bet he’d’ve written a pretty harsh article about him. Who knows, maybe Twain would’ve been the original TonyO?

  • Mighty Korgo of Teegeeack

    People loathe Scientology but sometimes for the wrong reasons. I think this is true concerning R2-45.

    When I first read R2-45, I was a do-it-for-Ron Scientologist. The way I took it was that a person will be exteriorized in death, which is what many, many religions believe. His further comment about society not accepting the method at this time, I took as a witticism about the vastness of time and space. I did not take it as an invitation to kill. I talked to others about the line and we all viewed it as a witticism.

    Scientology has left a trail of bodies, but they are mostly people who didn’t seek medical treatment when needed. Suicide is number two. I have heard and I believe the allegations of Paulette Cooper, Nan McLean, and Ronald DeWolfe. Nan McLean was unsure if she had evidence of a murder and was appropriately upset that it wasn’t well investigated by the police. Ronald DeWolfe’s allegation was also unsure. Let’s remember that Paulette Cooper’s “attempted murder” though horrible, could also be seen as a scare tactic (in spite of other recent and believable allegations). I think there is a good chance that Quentin Hubbard was killed. I have also heard the suggestion that L.Ron Hubbard himself was killed which I don’t believe. There have been other suggestions over the years but I have to be skeptical.

    Now, we are talking about murder here. The organization has Mafia-like characteristics but they seem to end at murder. I am not closing the door on that possibility but let’s look at a list of people who would have been killed had they crossed an even more sinister organization– Let’s start with Dr. Winter, John W. Campbell, Nibs, Sara Hollister, Cyril Vosper, Robert DeGrimston, Werner Erhard… OK, it is a long list of ex-members, rivals, journalists, critics, politicians and witnesses. These people have been intimidated with an attempt to “ruin them utterly” but they were left breathing.

    So, I will accepted the “mays” and the “coulds” that you and John have in your article. I, too, would like to see someone come forward with more substantial evidence. But until then, I see them as a group not as bad as the Mafia or the bike gangs, but plenty bad just the same.

  • Ms. B. Haven

    Jon is once again, right on the money with his analysis.

    The “Responsibilities of Leaders” Policy Letter (sometimes known as the Simon Bolivar policy) gives a perfect description of life in a Mexican drug cartel or scientology org. From what I remember, this Policy Letter implies that a person in a position of power or someone close to a person in power should protect themselves from external enemies. In my experience it also applied to what was going on within the group. Maybe even more so.

    I was never formally in the Sea Org, so I can’t say what life was like there, but as a staff member in a mission, I can say that missions mirrored what was going on ‘up-lines’ because they operate off the same policies. The only difference is that they are not as fanatic. The only cooperation and collaboration is when someone is manipulating someone else to make themselves look better (trying to achieve a position of power). Add to this the fact that your every move is watched and reported via Knowledge Reports and you have the perfect formula a completely insane group. Scientology groups are only held together by fear. Fear of loosing one’s eternity. That is a mighty powerful threat if one buys into it.

  • Ms. B. Haven

    Jon is once again, right on the money with his analysis.

    The “Responsibilities of Leaders” Policy Letter (sometimes known as the Simon Bolivar policy) gives a perfect description of life in a Mexican drug cartel or scientology org. From what I remember, this Policy Letter implies that a person in a position of power or someone close to a person in power should protect themselves from external enemies. In my experience it also applied to what was going on within the group. Maybe even more so.

    I was never formally in the Sea Org, so I can’t say what life was like there, but as a staff member in a mission, I can say that missions mirrored what was going on ‘up-lines’ because they operate off the same policies. The only difference is that they are not as fanatic. The only cooperation and collaboration is when someone is manipulating someone else to make themselves look better (trying to achieve a position of power). Add to this the fact that your every move is watched and reported via Knowledge Reports and you have the perfect formula a completely insane group. Scientology groups are only held together by fear. Fear of loosing one’s eternity. That is a mighty powerful threat if one buys into it.

    • Michael Barger

      It is extremely difficult for the general public to understand the depth of fear that grips Scientologists and makes them capable of anything including murder.

      The parallel you allude to with Mexican drug cartels is illuminating. I hope it will help the public to understand.

      Scientology = Mexican Drug Cartel

    • Poison Ivy

      Sounds like an episode of Breaking Bad.

  • In 1968, Issue 37 of The Auditor had an ad that went out to Scientologists about a “Racket Exposed” which listed the names of 4 “squirrels” and stating “Any Sea Org member contacting any of them is to use the Auditing process R2-45”

    Here’s the link:

    http://www.gerryarmstrong.org/50grand/cult/auditor37.html

    Look under “Racket Exposed” and read item #7.

    Here is the link to Tom Smith’s Interview with Bill Franks, former ED International of the Church of Scientology where Mr. Franks talks about murder plots and mentions what he believes to be an actual murder:

    http://theedgewithtomsmith.com/a/TheEdgeBFranks1.mp3

    Alanzo

  • In 1968, Issue 37 of The Auditor had an ad that went out to Scientologists about a “Racket Exposed” which listed the names of 4 “squirrels” and stating “Any Sea Org member contacting any of them is to use the Auditing process R2-45”

    Here’s the link:

    http://www.gerryarmstrong.org/50grand/cult/auditor37.html

    Look under “Racket Exposed” and read item #7.

    Here is the link to Tom Smith’s Interview with Bill Franks, former ED International of the Church of Scientology where Mr. Franks talks about murder plots and mentions what he believes to be an actual murder:

    http://theedgewithtomsmith.com/a/TheEdgeBFranks1.mp3

    Alanzo

    • Michael Barger

      Thanks, Alanzo, for the link to Tom Smith’s show with Bill Franks.

      He talks about being invited to join the Guardian’s Office by Jimmy Mulligan, Jane Kember’s “factotum” and deputy in the US, and asked to kill someone to prove his willingness. Segment starts at 0:34.

    • Observer

      So there’s more than one published order to use R2-45. My post links to a different one with 12 people slated for forcible exteriorization.

      • Poison Ivy

        What do we know that is incontestable about Hubbard? That he was bitter, vengeful, never had enough (power or money or followers or adulation) and believed his enemies (or rather, “Scientology”‘s enemies) should be handled without mercy and utterly destroyed. That he believed society’s rules didn’t apply to him (even before Dianetics, we have plenty of evidence for that.) Also that at periods during his life he used drugs and alcohol and was often bordering on deranged in his sadistic punishments and mood swings

        We have hard evidence for all this.

        Taking into account that past behavior is the best indication of future behavior, do we really believe he was just “joking around” when he talked about killing people?

        • TheHoleDoesNotExist

          Most scientologists Would draw the line at murder. Acceptable crimes are #1: Financial fraud, a sci specialty. Waiting for a flier for Reed Slatkin prison release party and parade, after his Awards Ceremony. #2: Perjury and obstruction of justice isn’t a crime in scientology, it’s a requirement.

          • richelieu jr

            Of course we’re not talking about ‘most’ Scientologists here, but a fanatic few. Even Charles Manson (noted Scilon hiself) knew to separate his followers into two circles, the doers and those who were kept deliberately int he dark. He also tried the insulated leader/plausible deniability game, with, let us say, less positive results…

            Still, the scenario I fins most credibe would be one of these “Will no one rid me of this enturbulated Priest?” things where a pro-active Miscavige type decides to score brownie points with his Browning.

        • Missionary Kid

          And the little one learned from the Master. LRH begat DM.

          • Artoo45

            They both have the same hole where a heart would normally go . . .

        • monkeyknickers

          I feel exactly the same. And frankly, Hubbard wasn’t some kind of genius mastermind. He was an idiot who was in the right place at the right time.

          I just wish someone had stowed him in the chain locker on the Royal Scotman with a bunch of weed and a big bag of Fritos. I reckon the outcome would’ve been a lot better.

    • Captain Howdy

      Here’s something similar but with an even larger hit list. I’m not going to vouch for it’s authenticity though.

      http://www.skeptictank.org/r2-45.htm

      • Observer

        Oh, it’s authentic. I linked to that original doc on Gerry’s site below.

    • Michael Barger

      This interview is amazing.

      Bill Franks talks about three Members of Parliament in the UK the Guardian’s Office was ordered to murder. He knows that one of these murders at least was carried out.

      Tom is struck speechless at one point. Segment starts at 14:34.

      • Captain Howdy

        Every member of Parliament that has been murdered in the last 50 years was killed by Irish militants, like Naeve was. The two exceptions are one that was killed by the butler (!), and one that was killed by black militants on Bremuda. This is conspiracy rubbish, sorry.

        • Was the butler a Scientologist maybe?

        • EnthralledObserver

          Sadly (and I say sadly because it would be a great flap for Scieno if true) you’re probably right… Bill Franks refused to ‘name’ the MP in question. That sounded dodgy to me even before I googled to see if I could find a match around 1979.

        • FistOfXenu

          Always unfortunate when somebody with a load of reliable data dirties up their credibility by spouting something they can’t back or something that couldn’t be true.

    • Spackle Motion

      Thanks for posting the link, Alanzo. I’d started listening to this last year but ran out of time and then forgot. It is truly an amazing interview, and I was imagining all of the dead agent blathering that would come out of the Indies regarding Franks’ statements.

      I also read several of your blog posts, and I loved the post about Hubbard’s ego blowback. I believe that you explained Hubbard’s psychological disintegration perfectly. I also watched Kumare and found that movie to be incredibly telling about how easy it is to become a cult leader. I still laugh at Vikram taking on his grandmother’s accent and making up yoga moves, which were never once questioned by his “followers”.

      I recommend that documentary to any Bukerite because it illustrates how easy it can be to get sucked into a cult. I watched it recently on Netflix, if anyone here has Netflix please watch this documentary. It is fantastic.

      • Artoo45

        I loved that film. Fortunately, Vikram is deeply ethical and humane. Unfortunately, most cult leaders are sociopaths.

    • Mary_McConnell
  • BuryTheNuts2

    That policy letter seems like ‘intentional’ gibberish on LRH’s part.
    It sounds insane, but he makes his point……(while sounding insane).
    So If a normal person reads it…we think it is just crazy…to the point of harmless.
    Not so for a hard core Scientologists.

    There is nothing that is ever harmless in LRH’s verbal vomit.

    • FistOfXenu

      Sounds like his way to put a buffer between him and anybody that does what he wants. It’s not a new trick but it works.

  • TickTockDM

    In Chapter 9 of “Lonesome Squirrel,” Steven Fishman describes a home invasion and a rape. Has this story ever been independently confirmed?

    • TheHoleDoesNotExist

      Um, it’s Steven Fishman, so….

    • villagedianne

      I believe there are some credibility issues re Steven Fishman.

    • Captain Howdy

      Steve Fishman as far as I can tell is responsible for the… David Miscavige had 2 sisters and one committed suicide after doing OTV and the other left the cult and became a crack head prostitute. Utter rubbish.

      Some of these old timers are like your Dad telling stories.Some are true, some are..WTF?

      • FistOfXenu

        “like your Dad telling stories”
        Is that how our kids and grand kids think of us? Is that because we’re Dad or because we’re old?

    • i am not going to read anything titled “Lonesome Squirrel ” unless it is a kids book

      • BuryTheNuts2

        How about dancing squirrel?

        • LOL ..i can’t help but wonder …is that a squirrel penis there ? am i looking at rodent shlong ? …

          • BuryTheNuts2

            I am thinking both!

          • FistOfXenu

            Miscavige: “Squirrel, what a big shlong you have!”
            Squirrel: “The better to screw you with, my dear!”

            • Bella Legosi

              I object to the degrading way in which squirrels are portrayed here! Tree rats never did anything but infest trees and knock out transformers!

        • sugarplumfairy

          Is it my imagination, or is he mocking JT’s moves?

          • TheHoleDoesNotExist

            No, sugar plum, that’s the Raid Squirrel, commanding Narconon to Open That Door!

            Here’s JT, the Dancing Queen…

            [IMG]http://i44.tinypic.com/zoiyx.jpg[/IMG]

            Not to be confused with Mr Impossible, TC, the Flying Machine…

            [IMG]http://i44.tinypic.com/5chv05.jpg[/IMG]

          • FistOfXenu

            Not your imagination. He’s singing “Staying Alive” too. Wait 5 min and he’ll break into his “strut”.

    • ParticleMom

      I’d love a Fishman debunk.

      • ThetaBara

        Me, too. One of the more challenging sources out there.

      • FistOfXenu

        TonyO, is that a possibility? Somebody that could separate out the fish tales for us? Somebody that could provide documents and sources so we don’t spend the week after trying to decide if we can believe it.

    • grundoon

      Steven Fishman freely mixes truth and fiction, so far as I can tell. He wrote concerning sisters Lisa Gibson Sandweiss and LaVenda Gibson Dukoff Van Schaick. According to Lisa, the rape alleged by Fishman did not occur. Questioned by critics, Fishman has responded, inter alia, here and here.

  • Ivan Mapother

    My life will be complete if the Phoenix Org would release a video of Dede with a Colt .45, the semi-auto pistol or the beverage. In fact, I’d sent money for a video with both.

  • Ze Moo

    Any organization has a few nutjobs and sociopaths and Lroon had a use for them. Killing pets, spreading rumors and black propaganda, following and intimidating others, the loons have a use in keep ‘discipline’ in any large scale scam. Miscavige knows enough to keep using those who’ve drunk the kool-aid deeply. Always watch your back when raiding a mOrg and keep the cameras rolling. The entire scamatology experience is built on getting others to do nasty things for you, in the name of the scam, to further your position in the scam. Al Cappone would proud…..

  • Sidney18511

    Margery Wakefield has said that she would of killed for the COS when she was a believer.

  • 0tessa

    I have no doubt that the cult having as a guideline ‘the end justifies the means’, would kill very dangerous opponents, or has killed indeed. Remember Margery Wakefield’s experiences.
    There are skeletons in the cupboards, oh yes.

  • Don’t forget that the insane loon also came up with ordering customers who were threatening to go to the authorities or had other issues that would expose his frauds to “end cycle.”

  • Truthiwant

    Scientology is no more than repressive Stalinism dressed up in a pseudo-religious vest.

    • Ze Moo

      Stalinism tried to be a religion on its own. Eventually, it fell down and couldn’t get up.

      • BuryTheNuts2

        And Scientology has developed a very noticeable limp!

        • sharon brown

          I see a pathological fracture in their future, maybe Daney’s head from all the recent enturbulation ! Tom save humanity !!!

          • Missionary Kid

            Was that Daney’s head or Davey’s head?

            • sharon brown

              It was supposed to be Davey ‘s head , lol. Guess that’s what I get for hanging out with some of the most intelligent people that Don’t miss a thing ! Thanks for keeping me on my toes MK !

  • MarionDee

    Way off topic. My apologies. But I didn’t know where else to post this. Anyway, for anyone interested, Slate has a review of Cruise as an action hero (mentions the NYT piece, and not positively) and relates his choices to Scientology. The author has read Wright’s book.

    http://www.slate.com/articles/arts/culturebox/2013/04/tom_cruise_autobiography_his_recent_movies_oblivion_rock_of_ages_and_jack.html

    • wow – they even made a crack about his ” gleaming teeth ” . thanks for posting this …i am laughing my ass off right now !! pretty much calls him a fruitcake …oh the joy .

      • Artoo45

        But no mention of his new Young Pierce Brosnan face . . . nobody seems to be talking about that.

      • ThetaBara

        Have you seen the Egg Roulette video, yet?

        Surely someone with Super Powers could tell a raw egg from a hard boiled one! Or, am I missing something?

        http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=y6jb0cOYqAI

        • FistOfXenu

          He’ll have even more egg on his face when he finally understands that he’s part of a criminal slave-trade organization and he’s been enjoying the products of slave labor.

    • sharon brown

      Great article! I Really get Tom now, at least the persona he portrays right now.. You know $cions, they video tape their Most private (self-auditing too ?), seesions, but Tom is kind enough to reenact his inner Emptiness on screen for 15 bucks a pop ! Great deal compared to COS !

    • Ze Moo

      “He’s a persona, a pseudonym made flesh, just like the one adopted by Thomas Mapother IV.” Great review…

      • MarionDee

        Yes, despite the intense gaze and good moments here and there, Cruise is vacuous, because the intensity is generic, not genuine to a particular moment. He uses it whether he’s romancing a woman or switching gears. I bet he did very well staring intensely at rocks, pens, etc..) Otherwise, he seems so empty he frightens me…. especially since he’s giving me everything he’s got. It’s all inauthentic..

        A bitch from moi, self-proclaimed film historian: The NYT’s author tried to use the fact tthat Cruise does his own stunts to some rare cinematic achievement. But, IMO, watching someone really accomplish a physical marvel is always more thrilling than CGI. (Remember the extraordinary runner in one of the Bourne movies? And in silents, Harold Lloyd and Buster Keaton combined thrill and comedy with daring and great physical skills. Keaton, who directed his work, told the cameramen to keep the camera rolling “til the shot was over, or he was killed.”) Cruise pales in comparison. 



        An actor makes his choices for a reason. But It was only when Oblivion opened that Cruise’s move to sci-fi action and the influence of Scientology struck me. ( From a review describing the back story : “Some years earlier the human race fought a total war against an alien race known as the Scavs. These invaders had first blown up the Moon”… Wow, I’m slow.) Someone should compare what titles Cruise has shot since he received that award from DM (and gave him the generic intense gaze, natch).

        Celebrity is a bubble. Scientology is a bubble, a “prison of belief.” This means Cruise is locked in twice, and irretrievably lost … until, perhaps, he finally reads links like this one, and Tony’s open letter in particular. I can’t imagine what kind of breakdown would result, but better to go to his grave as a man who says “I was blind, but now I see” than to just continue with (sorry) tomfoolery.

        • ThetaBara

          I am not so sure he can even read well enough to become informed.
          I would LOVE to be wrong about this! You never know!

        • FistOfXenu

          … and Tom Cruise is a bubble.
          FIXED

  • OTVIIIisGrrr8!

    It is the policy of the modern and official Church of Scientology to use the Founder’ various statements in order to place all of the blame him for our present time cruelty, greed, or violence:

    It is always the Founder’s fault you see!

    What is wrong with the modern and official Church of Scientology is not our fault at all. In fact, you can have it your way: We are simply, and only, programmed robots acting on the Founder’s scripture.

    Therefore, it is wrong, offensive, and hateful to blame the Church of Scientology for its conduct when we actually have no choice in the matter.

    When we swindle people out of their last dime; lock people up until they die; use slave labor; or Fair Game SP’s until they are bankrupted and disgraced, then we are only obeying the scriptures. And given that we have religious status and tax exemption, why then there is nothing you or anyone else can do about it.

    We get bad press but who cares? We get away with murder and have billions of dollars and lawyers.

    We think nothing of it as we sit here in the RTC Building looking through train schedules, perusing confessional folder data, and targeting inferior wog religions for conquest using the Tech.

    Now please leave.

    We in RTC are busy sending Volunteer Ministers to the scene of a natural disaster as we Scientologists are the only people who can help.

    http://i1284.photobucket.com/albums/a563/OTVIIIisGrrr8/volunteer-ministers_zpsd4084ebc.jpg

    it is always the fault of the Founder and his policies.

    • sugarplumfairy

      Thanks for keeping us up-to-date on RTC’s activities.. Have your perusals yielded any good confessional folder data lately??

    • TheHoleDoesNotExist

      Is that a picture of Narconon International crumbling to pieces? Let us pray.

      • OTVIIIisGrrr8!

        Hardly.

        This is really a tempest in a teapot.

        For all we know, Mary Reiser will plead no contest to a reduced administrative matter and that will be that.

        • TheHoleDoesNotExist

          Tony’s gonna get you for that. Extra demerits on Saturdays, you know.
          Also, where’s Rena?

        • 1subgenius

          True.

        • ThetaBara

          Plead No Contest?
          To Miss Cabbage? Or in a court of law?

    • Artoo45

      Hey, I like train schedules . . . and traffic lights.

  • richelieu jr

    Somehow, the scenario I find most credible would be one of these “Will no one rid
    me of this enturbulated Priest?” things where a pro-active Miscavige
    type decides to score brownie points with his Browning…

    At any rate, you just know that would have been Hubbard’s defense had he been called to account by a Bugliosi like his disciple Manson…

    • TheHoleDoesNotExist

      Thank goodness! I was starting to understand some of your posts and beginning to worry.

      • Captain Howdy

        I understand the Cardinal perfectly and we have always lived at the Castle.

      • richelieu jr

        Here, let me explain:

        In a very, very famous incident, King Henry II of Rome was complaining about his ex-BFF, Thomas of Beckett, whom he had appointed Archbishop of Canterbury and who had become a pain in the ass, competing for power with the throne.

        He is said to have said, “”Will no one rid me of this turbulent priest?” in front of some advisers who promptly when out and stabbed Thomas à Beckett in the cathedral. When Henry was accused of the murder, his overzealous subordinates were said to have been guilty of the crime.

        I merely substituted ‘enturbulated’ for ‘turbulent’ to place Hubbard in the place of Henry II, because I found the situations so similar (and the words were similar as well).

        Perhaps I over-estimated how famous the incident was in the States, but in Europe it is easily considered one of the ten or twenty greatest events in Western history; Ref ‘Beckett’ with Peter O’Toole, ‘Murder in the Cathedral’ by T.S. Eliot, etc…I apologize for any unecessary entrubulation… 😉

  • Bella Legosi

    Hey guys, I just remembered……..so what are staff doing at Narconon Georgia today? heh prolly not a damn thing cuz all their paperwork and computers have been taken away *Gary Oldman laughter and clap*

    • Captain Howdy
      • Bella Legosi

        yup……exactly…….I had this moment myself while I was makeing coffee…….thankfully those around me have already been used to Bella breaking out in creepy laughter for years ….or this whole scene would have been uncomfortable with strangers.

    • TheHoleDoesNotExist

      Job Interview for Chief Tool?

      http://youtu.be/U5QqSZYffF4

    • ThetaBara

      Searching Craigslist Help Wanted!

    • DodoTheLaser

      “..so what are staff doing at Narconon Georgia today?”

      Writing up their overts and withholds, I’m pretty sure.
      They all gonna get SP declared regardless.

      Funny how “wogs” are “putting ethics in” on scientologists.

      • DeElizabethan

        Luv it!

  • Just got back…. tad the worse for wear…. switched the old espresso machine on…. let’s see what develops…. my first thought:

    One thing that Larry Flynt was/is famous for was making offers in his magazines of millions of dollars for definitive proof of things like batshit anti-gay/porn/abortion etc (predominately Republican) politicians, evangelists etc being caught en-flagrante doing exactly what they were campaigning against. Surely the time is right to make it well known that there’s big money for the first scion/person to provide definitive proof of Miscavige behaving like a definitive prick/breaking the law big-time {ie something that gives a jail sentence}/beating someone up/frottaging with Tommy Girl or any other celeb/just being a cunt in general [has to be video for this one]….. now, I don’t think we can drum up a million dollars but it would be fun to create a “public” fund payable to the first scion/person to come up with stuff [it has to be out there]…. sort of like a donate button but more along the lines of a “pledge” button that is tied in with temporary joint media ownership of the incriminating info …. the point is to create a buzz amongst all remaining members that there’s money to be made if you can blow with good stuff/incriminating docs.

    WILL (continually) COME BACK TO THIS AFTER ESP/XO TIME

    • PreferToBeAnon2

      whoa m-l! all of this after just one little raid? this really did get your mojo goin’!

      • it wasn’t really the ‘raid’ but more the delightful mega-lucid zone you [well, me and possible others] have before the lucidity turns into “wtf was I thinking”, er…. stuff

    • 0tessa

      Was it Nespresso expresso or …? Wow.

    • BuryTheNuts2

      You fucking rock!

  • Artoo45

    Needless to say, I approve of this article . . .

  • grundoon

    L. Ron Hubbard’s practical demonstration of R2-45 took place at the “Unification Congress” held in Phoenix in December 1954, as reported by Alphia Hart in the pages of The Aberree, Volume 1 Issue 9:

    DIANETICS ABANDONS ILLS AND ENGRAMS AS GOAL OF PROCESSING

    Dianetics, as a psychotherapy, is no more. Instead, it was announced non-surprisingly at the “Unification Congress” held in Phoenix December 28-31, that Dianetics, like Scientology, henceforth will concern itself only with the study and understanding of man.

    “Unification”, or the adoption by Dianetics of the goals and aims of Scientology, took up only the first few minutes of the opening lecture. From then on, emphasis, both in lectures and in group auditing, was on the value of two-way communication, especially between the auditor and his pre-clear. …

    Today, a “clear” and “theta exterior” mean the same thing, but the goal now is obtained without the erasure of engrams….

    A one-shot “clear” can be obtained only by applying the business end of a .45 to the forehead and

    pulling the trigger, Ron demonstrated — firing a blank cartridge into the floor behind him. This, he called “a

    workable process reserved for psychiatrists.”

    In the same issue of The Aberree, p.14, Tido Churchill reported:

    Ministers of the Church of Scientology were introduced and made an impressive showing, the men wearing charcoal colored suits with the medallion of the Church on a purple ribbon around the neck. The women were wearing black skirts and white blouses with smaller insignias of the Church pinned to their blouses.

    Another highlight was when Ron quite unexpectedly and convincingly demonstrated his much talked of .45 one-shot technique by brandishing his revolver and shooting a blank into the floor. A mass exteriorization took place.

    An auction of the tapes Ron used to dictate DIANETICS, 1955, was conducted… and were acquired by Peggy Conway, after some spirited bidding, for $355.

    Contribution from a visiting Scientologist: “Entheta is any other viewpoint.”

  • Mary_McConnell

    A true KSW’er will always take what Hubbard says 100% seriously, even if he meant it in jest.

  • ahnonymoush

    oh look it’s my video thank you hosting it tony, I’m honored. glad to deliver.