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—————- In anticipation of her biggest day in court yet, Laura DeCrescenzo and her attorneys hit the Church of Scientology with 928 pages of new filings —————- Details from 18,000 pages of evidence show how Scientology manipulated a child to keep her working under slave-like conditions —————- A key document describing DeCrescenzo’s unwillingness to have her coerced abortion is missing from the evidence Scientology was ordered to produce By Tony Ortega Wednesday afternoon, Laura DeCrescenzo filed explosive new information in her four-year legal odyssey against the Church of Scientology, submitting 928 pages of new declarations and exhibits in anticipation of a crucial October 23 hearing in her lawsuit against the church which alleges abuse, including allegations that she was forced to have an abortion at only 17 years of age. Key to the new filings is information gleaned from thousands of pages of previously secret files that the church fought mightily to keep under wraps. But on Monday, the U.

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Scientology Mythbusting with Jon Atack: The Tomato Photo!

Jon_Atack_Blue_SkyWe’re starting a new weekly feature today, and we’re very excited about it. In 1990, author Jon Atack published what is still one of the very best books on L. Ron Hubbard and Scientology, A Piece of Blue Sky. Atack now has a new edition of the book coming out, and it reminded us what an encyclopedic resource he is. So we had an idea. In the world of Scientology watching, we noticed that there seem to be some legends, myths, and contested facts that tend to get hashed and rehashed in books, articles, and especially on the Internet. With Atack’s help, we’re going to tackle these issues one by one, drawing on Jon’s deep knowledge and (who knew?) droll sense of humor.

This week, let’s start out with one of the most iconic photographs of L. Ron Hubbard and settle some facts about its background. Get your alligator clamps ready — it’s time to torture a tomato!

If you’ve spent any time learning about Scientology, you’ve no doubt run into some version of this image…

 
Tomato3

 
Jon, these photographs of L. Ron Hubbard doing something strange to a tomato are pretty famous. There are two slightly different versions that are widely available on the Internet, and they appear to be part of a larger photo session of Hubbard in the greenhouse of his English estate, Saint Hill Manor. But you pointed out to us that because the Daily Mail published one of them in 1968, that date is often ascribed to them, when by 1968 Hubbard was actually at sea and was no longer in England. (Even our man in Austin repeated that erroneous date in his new book, alas. See caption, p. 87.) Also, what the hell is he doing in these photos? Even Hubbard wouldn’t try to “audit” a tomato with an e-meter, would he? We’ve read that he was trying to impress some local reporters about his horticultural knowledge, which was his cover story for why he was in East Grinstead. Is that the truth?

LRH_Tomato2

ATACK: The tomato photos were taken in the greenhouse at Saint Hill Manor in the early years, between 1959 and the UK government’s decision that The Hub was an ‘undesirable alien’ (how true!). The Hub was determined to create ‘Public Relations Officer area control,’ so he gave an interview to a BBC gardening program and courted the local press. Sadly, the BBC didn’t keep the film. It would be instructive for young auditors to see how Hubbard processed a tomato. The Hub said he was irradiating plants to remedy the world’s food problems, pretty much the way Xenu irradiated satans — sorry, forgot the lisp, thetans — to solve population problems. Only this was nice radiation. He claimed that using this state-of-the-art scientific method — as developed by Lysenko, who left the USSR starving — he had created the ‘everbearing’ tomato. Had he consulted a gardening manual, he would have been embarrassed to find that tomatoes are everbearing, or perennial, by their very nature. But gardeners discard plants after a year because they provide less fruit in their second year. The same is true for many plants treated as annuals. As a veteran tomato grower, I can vouchsafe this information: the plant will stay alive through the winter.

Dr. Hubbard’s second scientific enquiry concerned the nervous systems of plants. The crocodile clips are jabbed in and then a nail is used to torture the already traumatised tomato to see if it felt pain (warning: some tomatoes were hurt in the making of this photo). The Hub asserted that when connected to the electropsychometer, you could measure these responses. When it’s quiet enough, you can hear the tomatoes scream. It’s almost enough to put you off your green salad. Curiously, however, the fruit of a plant is unlikely to have any nervous connection to the plant itself, being no more than a capsule for seeds. Something like hair or nails in humans. This is why fruitarians consider themselves the most ethical of vegans, because, as long as they take the seeds out, they aren’t killing anything. (Though, in History of Man, The Hub said people were vegetarians because they’re afraid of being eaten.) It is very likely that plants’ electrical conductivity does change, but calling that ‘pain’ is stretching it. When questioned about his attempt to fill a prescription for barbiturates, Dr. Hubbard said they were for his “horticultural purposes only.” So maybe he was trying to relieve them from the distress caused by his Frankenfood experiment. Hubbard had admitted to non-horticultural uses of barbiturates in an early lecture, saying that it is hard to come off phenobarbitol, and he knew, because he’d done it. But then, as one sage reviewer said of The Hub’s musical album, “You’re supposed to eat vegetables, not listen to them.”

THE BUNKER: Russell Miller, in Bare-Faced Messiah (a book Atack helped Miller research), says that it was an article about Hubbard using radiation to grow giant tomato plants in an August, 1959 edition of the East Grinstead Courier that prompted a feature in a December 18, 1959 edition of Garden News which carried the sensational headline, “PLANTS DO WORRY AND FEEL PAIN.” That headline then started a bit of a mad rush of reporters to Saint Hill…

It was not long before television and Fleet Street reporters were beating a path to Saint Hill Manor demanding to interview Hubbard about his novel theories. Always pleased to help the gentlemen of the press, he was memorably photographed looking compassionately at a tomato jabbed by probes attached to an E-meter — a picture that eventually found its way into Newsweek magazine, causing a good deal of harmless merriment at his expense.

So there’s our answer. In late 1959 or early 1960, Hubbard was beguiling reporters with his horticultural tall tales and was hoisted on his own petard when he posed for the infamous tomato photo.

BONUS MYTH: Jon, as long as we’re talking about photos, we hope you can clear something up. Last fall, the Los Angeles Times wrote something like the millionth article about Mitt Romney’s love for the Hubbard novel Battlefield Earth. (And perhaps one of the best results of the election is we may not have to hear that chestnut again.)

Anyway, it was the photo that ran with the story and its caption which caught our eye. Here’s the image:

L_Ron_Hubbard_NY

And here’s the caption supplied by the LA Times: “Author L. Ron Hubbard poses for a portrait in a room with a typewriter, a camera and various books and photography equipment on Jan. 10, 1982, in New York City. (Michael Montfort / Michael Ochs Archives / Getty Imag)”

We really did a double-take when we saw that date. In 1980, L. Ron Hubbard went into hiding with Pat and Annie Broeker, and except for seeing a few people who later helped out at a ranch near Creston, California, Hubbard maintained complete seclusion from the outside world until his death in 1986. For the first couple of years of that seclusion, before they settled down in Creston, the Broekers traveled around with Hubbard from place to place, but we’d never heard that they had got as far east as New York. And in their secrecy, would Hubbard and the Broekers really allow him to be snapped by a well known photographer? (Montfort, who died in 2008, enjoyed some notoriety for photographing the poet Charles Bukowski, actor Klaus Kinski, and other musicians and artists.)

ATACK: It looks more like the Queens stay in ’73 with Jim Dincalci. The massive sebaceous cyst is evident (it looks as if it has been popped) on his forehead. Thinking I’d upset a former Hub aide with too much negative material, I asked him, “What do you most remember about Hubbard?” expecting one of those generally self-serving and bogus expressions of “compassion” by the great man. Instead, the former senior Sea Org executive said, “The huge lump on his head.” Being terrified of doctors (who were, of course, all trying to kill him), he just let this lump grow. It was airbrushed out of photos taken aboard ship (by Maud Castillo and others). He also let his teeth rot in his head, for the same reason. When the wonderful Cyril Vosper was stopped by cult surveyors — body routers — they would become starry eyed when he told them he’d known the Great OT. Once he’d got them ready, he’d say, “But he had the most dreadful bad breath, because of his rotten teeth.”

THE BUNKER: We took your advice and checked in with Jim Dincalci, who served as medical director on the yacht Apollo with Hubbard and then traveled with him to Queens in late 1972 when Hubbard became concerned that French officials were about to arrest him. For ten months, Hubbard and Dincalci and Hubbard’s bodyguard Paul Preston lived in an apartment in New York until Hubbard was convinced it was safe enough to go back to the boat in September, 1973.

DINCALCI: That is my photo taken by me of LRH in 1973 in Queens, New York. It was floating around the web after a television interview that Jon Atack set up behind the scenes. I think I let them use the photo but did not give up rights to it, but I am not sure. So the Montfort thing is a lie, unless in some way they were sold it some weird way. But yes, I can prove I took it because I have a similar one (with negative) in storage.

LRH_Queens2

THE BUNKER: It looks like we have another myth busted. Jim’s 1973 photo somehow turned into one taken nine years later by Michael Montfort. Perhaps someone else will track down how that happened. Another shot taken by Jim in that Queens apartment can be seen here, with LRH and his trusty typewriter (and lump).

Next week: We take Newsweek (and many others) to task about Scientology’s beginnings.

—————-

Posted by Tony Ortega on February 2, 2013 at 07:00

 

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  • 1subgenius

    As if the alligator clips wouldn’t have caused enough pain to measure, he stabs the tomato with a nail.

    • http://www.facebook.com/profile.php?id=664333811 Paul Sheehan

      Hubbard was a sadist and loved to torture vegetables. That is why he created Dianetics

      • Anthony Klinger

        he had to CREATE vegetables first!

    • BosonStark

      And shortly thereafter, the RPF was born.

  • John P.

    Chester the Tomato Molester: Great background on the tomato picture. Atack says, The Hub asserted that when connected to the electropsychometer, you could measure these responses. When it’s quiet enough, you can hear the tomatoes scream. [...] It is very likely that plants’ electrical conductivity does change, but calling that ‘pain’ is stretching it. To feel pain, one needs a nervous system and a brain to process it. Otherwise, it’s one of those “if a tree falls in the forest but no one is around to hear it, does it make a sound?” Zen riddles. Putting a nail in the tomato sets up a galvanic current, because the flesh of the tomato contains acid. It’s like the experiment people often do in grade school science classes to make a battery from a lemon by inserting nails and connecting them. Either Hubbard thought he was getting away with something presenting an ancient science experiment as a bold new discovery of something remarkable and exciting, or he was a complete idiot who didn’t really pay attention in sixth grade science.

    Incidentally, the idea that Hubbard would invite reporters to Saint Hill to be photographed in such lunacy (and then gently “joked and degraded”) shows a PR policy that was far different from the “always attack, never defend” norm that was characteristic for tons of exposes. I wonder if he originally believed in the old saying about “bad press is better than being ignored” and then changed. And if so, was Tomatogate a minor flap or did this help change his views?

    Photos from Queens: I’ve spent a lot of time in operating rooms over the years observing surgery when we at Global Capitalism HQ have been thinking about investing in various companies that make surgical equipment (we have done rather nicely with Intuitive Surgical over the years, for instance). Because I have a fairly tough stomach, I am the guy who the senior partners usually send to scope things out before we start writing big checks. I keep lobbying to be the guy that they send out to investigate restaurant, winery and jet charter deals, but nooooooooo…

    My legendarily strong stomach nearly parted company with this morning’s corn flakes over the description of Hubbard’s sebaceous cyst the size of a golf ball in the middle of his forehead. Especially after the description of it popping; one can’t even imagine the risk of infection from such a thing. Even if one is afraid of doctors, it’s hard to believe the embarrassment factor would not make one seek out a dermatologist. Sebaceous cysts are easy to remove — a couple shots of lidocaine (one of the safest drugs ever used), a small incision, and about five minutes, would be all that is required to take care of something. It would be interesting to know why Hubbard went into hiding in Queens during that period — was it due to the cyst, as much as the threat of arrest from the French?

    It’s not the fact that someone so far beyond OT VIII would lack the complete control over his body to allow such a cyst to emerge that gives the lie to Scientology, but the fact that a 60-year-old man couldn’t conquer such deep-seated fears to burnish his appearance in order to look like more of a superman to his followers. Most modern cult leaders do seem to spend a lot of time managing their appearance, being impeccably dressed at all times. That burnishes their “aspirational” value — in other words, if the leader is somebody you’d like to emulate, you’re more likely to sign up for what they’re selling. Hard to imagine that people, even in the fashionably questionable 70s would want to be like a greasy-haired cyst-displaying tooth-decaying recluse.

    • http://twitter.com/media_lush media_lush

      if you thought the description was bad make sure you don’t google image ‘sebaceous cyst’ as I just did….. bleuurghh

      • Mr. Fabulous

        DAMN ME AND MY LACK OF SELF CONTROL!

    • dagobarbz

      It’s hard to believe anyone would wish to follow a foul, dirty man with stinking breath, rotted teeth, and a big old Human Horn growing out of his forehead. I think this underscores what Hubbard laughed at; followers will follow, regardless of how scuzzy or disreputable the leader might be.

      Other example, Pope Benny the Rat. That hideous old man has Satan looking out of his eyes. He just looks evil. And yet they turn out by the thousands to cheer the Lil’est Nazi.

      • Still_On_Your_Side

        Did followers actually see Hubbard when he looked his worst? If he was hiding so he couldn’t be found by the French gov’t, he probably didn’t care how he looked. At any rate, the glossy, well dressed cult leader-trend appear to have been a product of the affluent 80s when cult leaders discovered that money was the true god.

        • BuryTheNuts2

          Well, I will give Miscavige credit for “dressing for success”.
          He definitely has that part conquered.

          • stillgrace

            I think he can shop in the little boy’s department, and be assured an excellent fit.

            • PreferToBeAnon2

              He wears cadet sizing. Pun intended.

    • Bob

      John P. it was always a conundrum to me why he had that cyst. He usually wore a captains cap to cover it. He was very conscious of his appearance and normally dressed meticulously. It is a simple medical procedure to get rid of the offending protrusion. I could never understand why he didn’t.. His fear of doctors answers the question. Truly this is another cyst buster, I mean myth buster.

    • PreferToBeAnon2

      “… the idea that Hubbard would invite reporters to Saint Hill to be
      photographed in such lunacy (and then gently “joked and degraded”) shows
      a PR policy that was far different from the “always attack, never
      defend” norm…”

      See, I think you are wrong there JohnP. He was torturing the tomatoes first–before the rotten variety came flying at him. He knew damn well the little buggers were coming.

    • N. Graham

      The reason my icon wears the party hat is to cover up the cyst.

  • http://twitter.com/media_lush media_lush

    “What do you most remember about Hubbard?” expecting one of those generally self-serving and bogus expressions of “compassion” by the great man. Instead, the former senior Sea Org executive said, “The huge lump on his head.”

    LOL …. truly the perfect epitaph

  • http://www.facebook.com/profile.php?id=664333811 Paul Sheehan

    It is when the god damn tomatoes talk back to you, that you need to worry.

    http://barbaraschwarz.files.wordpress.com/2011/02/tomato.jpg

    • BuryTheNuts2

      Ooh thanks. I haven’t had a babz fix in a while.

    • http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=PBeU2utihwM Deckard Cain

      I just realized that Marty Rathbun has to live the rest of his life with this insane Babbles Schwarz Internet footprint (there’s some tiny level of justice for his shitty deeds right there). Not that he hasn’t created his own gawd-awful Internet footprint……but…….this is the website of a crazy stalker that will follow him wherever he goes.

      • Unex Skcus

        Wow, just had a peek at her home page, what a fruitcake!

  • Vistaril

    What a good idea this series is. Thank you.

    All things behing equal, I’m wondering if it was the sebaceous cyst which grew an L Ron Hubbard, rather than the other way around?

    • http://www.facebook.com/phil.mckraken.58726 Phil McKraken

      LOL! I was wondering the same thing!

    • BuryTheNuts2

      Rimshot!

  • BosonStark

    Sebaceous cyst? No way!

    I was there in Dr. Hubtard’s research laboratories, on Venus, when he chose to grow that remarkable subcutaneous tomato on his head, which is certainly one of the greatest horticultural feats of the last one billion years.

    “Were you there?” (Tom Cruise) “You were not there!” (John Sweeney) I was there, and I “know,” although this particular portrait of me (see icon) was taken on Teegeeack.

    • http://www.facebook.com/people/Robert-Eckert/100002715429426 Robert Eckert

      It wasn’t a tomato: it was a body beetan!

    • SP ‘Onage

      Forget “Big Being.” He’s the “Biggest Cyst” on the planet!

  • TheHoleDoesNotExist

    And to think scientologists still fork over hundreds of thousands of dollars to be sec checked (interrogated) over and over and over to find out if they are harboring any unkind thoughts about Hubbard.

    Thank you, Jon Atack, for tidying up all things Hubbardian. Sure looks like he needs some tidying up, organization tech, doesn’t it? Also, could use a little tech to help his paranoia and delusions, maybe some kind of talk therapy? Definitely needs some tech on getting off narcotics, right? How about some guidance on ethics so he wouldn’t have to constantly be on the run?

    If only the FBI had shared their file notes with future Hubbard customers so many years ago when Hub was tipping them off to impending invaders…”Appears Mental”.

  • Ziontologist

    Thank you my man Tony for bringing Jon Atack into the fold. He’s great. I like him because he’s an “X” who not only knows the subject inside and out, he can laugh about it. He really made my day when he referred to Ron as “the Great OT”.

    • stillgrace

      FYI: I answered your post to me in “Blogging Dianetics, Part 5″.

    • http://www.AlanzosBlog.com/ Alanzo

      YAY Jon Atack!!!

      What’s great about all this is that there is so much information out there that needs correcting! And what’s so great about that is that there is so much information out there at all!!!

      I will be following this series very closely, and reading every word that Jon Atack writes!!

      He’s an OT 5, you know. He can read your mind, Tony.

      That. What was that thought?

      That.

      That!!!

      Alanzo

  • Flunk101

    All I can think of when I see the picture of Hubbard with the tomato is something JohnP said back in September:

    FLUNK

    In the “people listening” I see three avatars staring at me : JohnP, DeckardCain’s creepy clown and deElizabethan … what is this, a gang-bang sec check?

    JohnPCapitalist

    It is only a gang bang sec check if, instead of the “cans,” we hook up the e-meter using the alligator clips, like LRH did when he was auditing the tomato in that creepy picture that Tony published recently.

    • BuryTheNuts2

      Dude, you are all kinds of “not right”!
      …she says as she laughs her ass off……

      • DeElizabethan

        LOL…AO

  • Observer

    ” … he was memorably photographed looking compassionately at a tomato jabbed by probes attached to an E-meter …”

    I’d describe the look in the second shot not so much as “compassionate” but more like “attempting to destroy the tomato a la Scanners”. I wonder if he ever looked at his sebaceous cyst that way.

  • http://www.facebook.com/VictoriaPandora Victoria Pandora

    http://www.people.com/people/article/0,,20669644,00.html
    wow, jenna is going to be featured in people. that’s a big deal. i can’t wait for her book, i can use tony’s shiny new amazon link to buy it!

    • stillgrace

      I read it while at the hair salon yesterday. It had just arrived, and has the date Flapuary 11, 2013 (only kidding). I learned something I didn’t know about Jenna’s history with her boyfriend/husband. The Co$ had separated them, and Jenna went wild searching through buildings trying to find him. Finally, she perched on a high ledge, threatening suicide to force a meeting with her loved one. It worked.

      There’s a picture of them with their two young children. I got the same warm feeling I get when I look at pictures of the Headley’s! Claire must be getting close to #3. I trust Marc will let us know.

    • Peter

      Also makes me excited for Hana Eltringham’s book!

      • AstroLadyBoy

        When is that coming Peter?

  • http://www.facebook.com/mandi.livingston Mandi Herrmann Livingston

    Long time lurker here at the Bunker… LHR tortures tomatoes. That explains that horrible sci-fi movie Attack of the Killer Tomatoes. They were just out for revenge for being hooked up to an e-meter.

    • 1subgenius

      “Atack of the Killer Tomatoes”
      Fix’d it for you.

      • http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=PBeU2utihwM Deckard Cain

        Snarktastic!

    • Midwest Mom

      Welcome, Mandi! We’re glad that you are joining in on the commentary.:}

  • EnthralledObserver

    When seeing these kinds of pics and reading these kinds of tales about the man I really do struggle to decide whether I believe Hubbard was just purely off his rocker, or an intelligent, manipulative and calculative con man. Depending on the anecdote it could go either way, and I wonder just how much of one might have promoted the other in a continuous switching of the lead.
    Whatever else one might say about him, he is an intriguing individual.

    Miscavige’s behaviour does paint a different picture however… I have no doubt that one is just a completely self-serving little swine taking advantage. I don’t find myself intrigued by him in the least except to wonder just when the twerp will end up behind bars.

    • dagobarbz

      It doesn’t have to be either/or. Hubtoad was crazy and manipulative, they’re not mutually exclusive.

    • Still_On_Your_Side

      I agree. Personally, I am repelled by both Hubbard and Miscavige, but I think it’s a myth that Miscavige gives a damn about Hubbard. Those people locked in the cult of the CoS who claim that it’s the ex-members who are out to get Hubbard are deluded. Despite saluting LRH’s mega-photo at every occasion, Miscavige has done more to destroy the church and the legend of Hubbard’s “infallibility” than anyone else, including Anonymous. Miscavige is the one who every other year announces that more errors have been found in Hubbard’s writings and forces members to buy the “new” versions of the books; who has jailed every single executive or person that was selected by Hubbard or who was close to Hubbard; who has allowed the vast majority of Hubbard’s work to slide into the public domain; who stupidly created the now very famous culture of violence; who has reduced the numbers of members by at least 50%; and who turned the church into a criminal enterprise engaged in insurance fraud and money laundering. I have no doubt that Miscavige will cause the imprisonment of dozens of members as he turns off the lights in the “Ideal Orgs” and flees to some unknown country. Psychology students will be studying the church and Miscavige for generations as a way of demonstrating how sane individuals can be gradually made to accept insanity and criminality as a “normal” way of life if exposed to it without any dissent for a period of years.

    • http://www.facebook.com/phil.mckraken.58726 Phil McKraken

      I find Miscavage to be quite fascinating. He managed to wrest control of the church at a relatively young age, efficiently eliminate his rivals, structure the finances so that he pulls all purse strings, and continue to do it all for over 25 years. Meanwhile he is reported to be a massively incompetent manager and seems to have incredibly poor judgment. For someone with those handicaps, I’d say he’s had a remarkable run. He must be very energetic, if nothing else.

      • stillgrace

        He is as successful as any street-smart criminal can be. At least until the shoe drops. Oh please!

  • Mighty Korgo of Teegeeack

    When I saw the photo of Hubbard with long hair I assumed he was getting ready to form a heavy metal band. I wonder how it got into Michael Ochs archives. Ochs was the manager of his brother Phil Ochs, the protest singer of the 1960’s, who is having a resurgence now. I am not setting up a platform for wild conspiracy theories or undue speculation. I just think that the life weaves itself in strange ways.

    Ochs was playing in my town about that time, wouldn’t you know it, two blocks from the Scientology Cult Offices. A friend, a cult member and a big fan, went down every day to see him play. He talked to Ochs about fixing his ruin through Scientology. Ochs said that he knew about Scientology and wasn’t interested. Who knows? Had Ochs joined Scientology he might have suicided much sooner.

    • 1subgenius

      “I Ain’t Marching Anymore” one of the first albums I ever bought. Still have it.

      • Mighty Korgo of Teegeeack

        The original title of that song was, “I Ain’t a Marchin’ Anymore while Dressed up in a Fake Naval Uniform”. Not too many people know that.

    • http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=PBeU2utihwM Deckard Cain

      “Festering Boil” sounds like a great metal band name.

  • sugarplumfairy

    I personally prefer to torture my tomatoes with a little balsamic vinegar and basil..

    • aboutandout

      oh don’t forget the bocconcini….yummmm

      • sugarplumfairy

        Ooohhhh..great idea.. I’ll force the cheese to watch me torture the tomatoes.. Make ‘em both scream..

        • BuryTheNuts2

          This calls for some extra virgin olive oil………..do you need a table?

          • PreferToBeAnon2

            lol!

      • moxonmoxoff

        the balsamic and basic made me drool. the thoughts of boccaccinis sitting in water made the image of an oozing cyst jump into my head. *vom*

  • dagobarbz

    Because of this little piece of Hubbardian bullpucky, we still read articles that assert that vegetables feel pain.
    More than 20 years later, this old bit of nonsense has found a home amongst some of our less-informed citizens; many of whom also cling to the theory of vaccines causing autism; a theory that was not only debunked, but the doctor who promoted it lost his license to practice. Quack quack!

    See how a bit of stupid self-promotion can turn into something ignorant people will quote as fact until the sun explodes?

    • N. Graham

      I swear I remember reading about this in Weekly Reader in elementary school.

      • grundoon

        I remember the Hubbard/tomato photo in Weekly Reader, maybe around 1965? With a sentence or two about a discovery of emotional response in plants.

    • Gabbyone

      The celebrity who shilled for Wakers also does testimonials for a dentist and his hygienist wife who are founding members of the AAOSH. They are friends of Gary (I’m not a Scientologist) Kadi whose marketing company is a sponsoring member of the AAOSH. If I hadn’t put all of this together I would never have been able to explain what happened to me.

  • Truthiwant

    Admittedly I am not a very good auditor, and if you look at the photos I think I went a bit overrun on the pc (orange) but it does prove what Hubbard said that fruit and vegetables have feelings.

    • Truthiwant

      Shit, the orange is suing me now, saying that he has gone bananas.

      • BuryTheNuts2

        Hopefully you got a letter from Riffer…He is all smoke.
        If the letter is from Moxon…..run for your life and take your family.

        • moxonmoxoff

          ^^And your pets.

    • BuryTheNuts2

      BAAAHAAAHAAA.

      The orange looks like he blew charge in that second pic…
      That or he just had an orgasm and is thinking about a nice nap.

    • Sherbet

      Laughing my head off! The orange is wondering how he’s going to pay for the auditing.

    • stillgrace

      Excellent photos! I had to laugh. As part of a volunteer program to promote “women in science”, I visit 8th grade classes to give a series of classes on electronics. One of the most popular experiments we conduct is inserting a nail made of nickel and another nail made of zinc into a lemon. We attach alligator clips to the nails and with a little “capacitor and switch magic” successfully generate enough electricity to light up LEDs. The kids love it! Lemon Power!

      • Midwest Mom

        My son did that electricity experiment comparing different fruit for a science fair, Grace. :} Isn’t it funny how this great experiment was done in science classrooms for many years before he made it into an e-meter “feelings” hoax?

        • stillgrace

          Yes! Any fruit or vegetable has positive and negative ions in a cellular liquid environment and can generate different levels of a very low-voltage current. Including humans!

          How did your son do in the science fair? I hope he had fun!

          • Midwest Mom

            He did very well and had fun, but so many of his classmate’s parents are professors at our local university, and they took over their kids projects. (They even complained about how much time they spent on them, expecting me to feel sorry for them!) Everything looked so professional, it was hard to compete when my son used magic markers and poster board. My son felt like he was competing against PhD’s and he was in the 5th grade! I had to laugh at one kid’s project. His dad used multi-dimensional imagery obtained from his department. The dad was also one of the Science Fair judges, too.

            • stillgrace

              What you describe is an unfortunate every-day experience in Silicon Valley schools. I remember once one kid had an actual laser exhibition that he couldn’t demonstrate without his dad’s coaching!

              I was guilty of a low-level bit of that madness, myself, until my son (bless his heart) stood up to me, and said “It’s MY project, Mom!” I am so proud of him. I imagine you are very proud of your son, too. His project sounds interesting, and I was actually wondering what types of fruit he tested. I’ll bet a fruit from the citrus family won!

            • Midwest Mom

              Yes. He decided to test only different types of citrus fruits, but as you know, the different varieties of each type of citrus changes the variables a bit because of size, but he was pretty limited to varieties from our grocery stores here, so nothing was as fresh and juicy as “just picked” fruit, but he had to make do with what he had available. :]

            • babby660

              maybe the school should have 2 science fairs: one for the “pros” & one for regular kids. Honestly, fifth graders should not have to go up against Phds.

    • Midwest Mom

      Orange you afraid that Social Services will be called about this, TruthIwant? They might have Produce Inspectors come to your house and could press charges. Get legal counsel; this could get juicy, and I don’t want to see you beaten to a pulp in court and then get squeezed for all you have!!

      • Truthiwant

        You’re right Mom. I can’t afford an expensive trial so I think I will just cut up the bugger, squeeze him and have him for breakfast tomorrow morning.

      • tetloj

        Wow. Did you need a lie down after that effort :)

        • Midwest Mom

          I slammed down a huge glass of orange juice! (I’m not going to lie, it was a huuuuge glass!) Truthiwant’s post induced an orange juice craving like you would not believe! ;]

    • http://www.facebook.com/ToryMagoo44 Tory Christman

      Funny, I remember this photo of the tomato only too well, good auditor or not. A bunch of us were on “Internships” for our auditor training and this photo was brought “in”. We ALL went home…and TRIED (and of course FAILED) to “Audit” House plants. First you clip on the connection. (That alone would be like for us, we later realized, like having a gigantic CLIP the size of a HUGE CRANE hooked up to us, with some moron asking questions). However, we each started in on yes, no questions, expecting the plant to “read” (react) on the meter. “Are you getting enough water?” (no reaction). “Are you getting enough sunlight?” (no reaction) DUH!!!!! We ALL had tried it, none got ANY reaction. That was about chip 50 already in holes in my Scio-Truman show, which I just re-watched last night: OH MY GAWD It is SUCH a great analogy! So happy to hear you’re doing this series both Tony and Jon :) :)

  • Dean Blair

    That huge cyst in the center of his head looks like it might be a cluster of body thetans trying to exteriorize but they couldn’t get past the thick skin on his forehead.

  • BuryTheNuts2

    I used to like Unicorns. That has been ruined for me now.

  • BuryTheNuts2

    This series is going to be great. Atack’s sense of humor is a perfect fit for this kind of material.
    The bunker has been on a comedic roll lately. It is awesome.

    • TheHoleDoesNotExist

      Tony’s got himself one humdinger of a factchecker: one part experience and one part photographic memory with just a dash of dry humor and a twist of tortured tomato. Shake, stir and pour. Sounds like a delicious Ortini to me.

      • BuryTheNuts2

        Yeah, 2013 is just freaking spectacular so far!

        • TheHoleDoesNotExist

          And delicious too. I need to borrow some martini glasses now.

          • BuryTheNuts2

            I am on my way with the glasses.
            Be there in an hour. LOL.

            • PreferToBeAnon2

              I’ll have mine shaken, not stirred. I don’t care if the ice cubes scream.

            • Midwest Mom

              I scream, you scream, we all scream when ice screams!

    • stillgrace

      I showed up late at the Andrea Doven story and then read through the comments. I was cracking up so much my son came into the room, asking me what show I was watching.

      • BuryTheNuts2

        Oh that is one Keerazy beyotch.
        You did watch that video right?

        • Sherbet

          I can’t get the drilling, drilling, drilling out of my head this morning. A lot of talking with nothing said. Well, she learned THAT from her courses.

          • coonellie

            Or watching State Department briefings…

        • stillgrace

          OMG. I actually felt sorry for her. I have yet to see an OTVIII on video that impresses me with communication skills, or even appears sane. Case in point below.

          • Sherbet

            Is that our boy George Baillie? Yes, he really makes a lot of sense in a religious sort of way, doesn’t he….

            • stillgrace

              Yes, that’s the INSANE George Baillie. Crazy guy! I was going to make that picture my avator, but I just couldn’t do it.

          • BuryTheNuts2

            No kidding, all those courses and all that word clearing and she has a vocabulary that can be beaten by an African Grey Parrot.

          • Truthiwant

            Round about 1987, a couple of OTVIIs had just come back fron Flag and were giving a talk about there successes to the local Org. I remember there was a fly in the room and it kept landing on the end of the nose of one of the OTVIIs. He tried to shoo it away but it kept landing back on his nose. I remember talking to the guy sitting next to me and saying that I thought flies didn’t land on OTVIIs noses.

            • stillgrace

              That’s funny! I hope the guy sitting next to you didn’t write up a KR on you.

            • Truthiwant

              No, but sadly the guy joined the Sea Org. He’s still in, wasting his life. I hope one day I can talk to him and show him , for instance, Tony’s blog.

            • stillgrace

              I hope so, too.

      • Midwest Mom

        Okay, I know that after every ridiculous story about L. Ron I say it was my favorite, right? I really really meant it every single time too, I mean, who wouldn’t, right? This time, I really really really mean it. I’m like, oh my gosh, I don’t know how I functioned before L. Ron tortured tomatoes, you know? It’s the meaning of “ness”., It’s like tomatoness and suaceiness and amazingness, it is the best article ever! I mean, really!. I really really really love this article!

        I could go on (really!) but I have shoppingness to do! Bye!

    • Peter

      The thought struck me yesterday – between snorts of laughter – that there are more than a few on this list who might well entertain the thought of becoming comedic writers. I haven’t laughed so much…and consistently…as when reading the bon mots and one liners, one after another, on this list. Who would have thought that Ronnie would be a source of so much humour???

      • BuryTheNuts2

        Are you kiddin Man?
        LRH is the gift that keeps on giving.
        Like 1subgenius said….”This shit just writes itself”.

    • DeElizabethan

      Bury, love your new LOOK! I do, I do, I do.

      • BuryTheNuts2

        This is my green eyed “fuck you” to LouAnne.

  • PreferToBeAnon2

    I now have a cantaloupe-splattered monitor. Thanks guys.

  • http://twitter.com/BradGreenwood2 Bradley Greenwood

    You have to give credit to Scientologists for not being superficial. They’ve virtually deified this very ugly man.

    • BosonStark

      I agree, and that cyst deserves its own salute: Hip cyst hurray!

  • WhatWall

    I believe Hubbard’s tomato experiments were mentioned in the book titled The Secret Life of Plants, by Peter Tompkins and Christopher Bird, originally published in 1974. As I recall, other researchers covered in the book used polygraph machines to detect plant reaction to music, pain, conversation, etc. Hubbard may have gotten ideas from them. I believe several Russians conducted research in this area.

  • http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=PBeU2utihwM Deckard Cain

    Again, how does anyone justify such blind faith in a man whose claims of homo novis status were spouted by a man with a huge boil on his forehead? His 10 pack a day cigarette habit was (along with never getting a deep scaling & root planing) a large factor in Hubtard’s periodontal disease, leading to tooth loss. Oral infections can get into the blood stream and cause nasty things like heart disease and stroke.

    I love the Indie and Scientology response to Wright’s book saying that it is the ‘same old stories’ told by a collection of defrocked apostates like Atack as if their “stories” are any less valid now than they were years ago. Deluded fools.

    • Sherbet

      I think the line is that, yes, he was a flawed man, but that didn’t invalidate his genius. BS, say I. Years ago I took an investment course taught by another “genius,” and I absorbed everything the man said…until I realized he wore the same threadbare jacket to each class. Financial advice from a pauper? Religious and philosophical scripture from a grotesque?

      • PreferToBeAnon2

        Oh yeah… one look at the picture of him hiding out in the Queens apartment and you know he was a man with cause over MESS…er MEST.

        • Sherbet

          All I can think of is: Howard Hughes in his last days, surrounded by sycophants and paranoia.

          • BuryTheNuts2

            Mormon sycophants no less.

            • Sherbet

              Yes-men come in a variety of shapes, sizes, religions, sexes. It’s all about kissing-up to ensure they get a piece of the pie.

            • http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=PBeU2utihwM Deckard Cain

              Allegedly, the Mormon sycophants that were around Hughes in his last years kept Hughes on very high levels of barbiturates and other pain killers. They had him change his will while under their “care” which sounds familiar, no?

          • http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=PBeU2utihwM Deckard Cain

            Howard Hughes (most likely) had actual physiological reasons for his paranoia and madness. He had many severe head traumas due to airplane accidents and was suspected of having tertiary syphilis.

        • Midwest Mom

          “Mesty” (sung to the tune of “Misty” by Johnny Mathis)

          Look at me, I’m the definition of vulgarity,
          and I still keep on propagating fraud, that is all a huge scam,
          I get Mesty, just fooling those clams.

          My tooth decay, I haven’t had my teeth cleaned in decades,
          people say that the stench from my big mouth, is a lot like rotten meat
          I get Mesty, but I’m still sexy.

          • Sherbet

            There ought to be a special Grammy award for that song, Mom. Between the cysts and the teeth, it’s been difficult to read this blog today…but it’s all funny as heck!

            • Midwest Mom

              Thanks, Sherb! You are super duper sweet! My husband thought I was nuts for replaying “Misty” on youtube over and over for just writing a comment on “that Bunker Blog”. :}

            • Sherbet

              Anything for your art, Mom.

            • BuryTheNuts2

              UM yeah…this is just how Fckd up we get….!
              Smart people who have lost thier SHIZ.
              Thank You LRH!

              My Husband thinks I am bonkers too.
              Although…he did have some choice comments for the Grant Cordone vid…

      • http://www.AlanzosBlog.com/ Alanzo

        L Ron Hubbard was not perfect, even though no one ever said he was. This “L Ron Hubbard was not perfect” line usually comes after a specific fact has been presented about Hubbard’s actual criminality.

        “Yes, he might not be perfect, but was he a criminal?”

        Yes. Yes he was.

        Alanzo

        • TheHoleDoesNotExist

          But what about the tomatoes, George? The tomato tech works! You’re just bitter. Less fertilizer, more salad, should fix you right up.

      • http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=PBeU2utihwM Deckard Cain

        AMEN to that, Sherbet. It’s like taking personal fitness training from an obese person.

    • villagedianne

      To me the answer to that question is what L.Ron Hubbard Jr. said, that most of Hubbards processes and discoveries were stolen from others.

  • Are_sics

    I’m so glad you’re talking with Jon Atack, Tony. At some point in the early 90s, when the internet was brand new and I was amazed by this “dial-up” thing a guy at work told me about, I found “A Piece of Blue Sky” in full on a webpage. While I knew only very little about Scientology, I had an aesthetic revulsion to it already (and this was in my early “seeker” days when I was checking out and half believing every spiritual trip being sold, it seemed). Atack’s book was made a deep impression. Sure it was nice to have confirmation, but even more, went a long way toward teaching me to be careful. A major step on the path toward my current cynical skepticism toward any spiritual salesmanship.

    Jon, I love you man.

  • MO Mom

    Off topic, but – http://www.people.com/people/article/0,,20669644,00.html
    ‘Jenna Miscavige Hill Pens Revealing Scientology Book’ in People magazine. Maybe they have stopped worshipped TC and have seen the light…

    • Sherbet

      It’s never off topic when someone high profile gets herself and her story out!

      • MO Mom

        Still being rather new, I try to be polite, as I value y’alls comments and insight.

        • Sherbet

          You’re doing just fine, and today is a real giggle-fest, and Jenna needs a big Hooray!

          • Are_sics

            Thanks MO Mom for the pointer. And yes, agree with Sherbet — kudos to Jenna! From first noticing her on Ex-Scientology Kids, I’ve been very impressed with that lady. She’s got courage and principles and is all kinds of authentic.

            • Sherbet

              Plus she’s a Miscavige. Think of the significance of having DM’s own niece blow! I wish DM’s father weren’t so quiet about his experiences in and out of cos.

    • AstroLadyBoy

      “She’s anti Scientology but uses the Miscavige name and David Miscavige image to make money. Just someone out to make a buck off their family because they are too lazy to get an education and pursue a career.”. (Other comments seem to be in the vein of Jenna should just move on – afterall ‘I had a bad childhood too. Boohoo’)

      The clams are going hard at ‘handling’ the internet. So great how Vanity Fair and now People are shoving it to the cult. At this rate Tom’s only safe media haven will be Freedom Mag.

    • BuryTheNuts2

      If you are busting Scientology’s chops in any way, shape or form, keeping in mind of course that “space is a viewpoint of dimension”…
      …then you can never be off topic.

      • MO Mom

        “space is a viewpoint of dimension” – no matter where you go, there you are…

        I was talking into taking the ‘personality test’ way back when, during a time when I was really struggling to figure my life out after my dad passed away. But the questions were so poorly worded, I had to keep asking the cute guy who gave me the test about way too many of the questions. His ears kept getting red. I skipped several of the questions, as I felt that they did not deal with my personality, but rather my political viewpoints. That did not go over well. Not my fault that I had very wonderful grammar teachers and an excellent high school teacher who really emphasized how to read test questions, to prep us for the ACT/SAT. Plus I’ve always been a questioner. So, apparently I was in an urgent need of COS help, as my test ‘revealed’ that I was extremely depressed. Well no shit, Sherlock! So the push for me to do another test and to read some of their materials came rather hard, all the while being so plastic feeling. But fortunately, I was more pissed at this point than depressed (and admittedly, I WAS depressed at that time), I said oops, have to be somewhere in 15 minutes and left. Called an old friend who talked me into a weeklong camping / canoe trip up in the Boundary Waters, which got me out of my funk and back on the road of life. I had kind of forgotten about that whole time frame for years, basically writing it off as a scary experience and a lesson learned. Thinking harder now, I’m really glad about two things – that I had twisted around my phone number (always did that, helped get rid of the creeps at a bar) and that my ‘weirdo meter’ actually kicked in and told my feet to get me the hell out. But for the grace of God…

        • BuryTheNuts2

          But for the grace of god is right.
          “Shivers”

        • stillgrace

          I had a very similar experience to yours, MO Mom. I got very uncomfortable when they started pressuring me for my credit card, alluding that they could get my card limit increased (?). I walked out and they followed me out to the parking lot. I really relate to your closing sentence. I am so glad I acted on my gut reaction. I had a completely different view of Co$ after that experience, and started looking on the internet.

        • MO Mom

          Fortunately, I did not have a credit card back in the day. I was a poor, miserable college freshman – mind you this was over 30 years ago. I really had put it all out of my mind until this past summer, when I discovered Tony’s wonderful columns. Gave me cause for some reflection.

    • http://twitter.com/Scientology_411 Scientology_411

      I am so looking forward to her book, I’ve had mine preordered for weeks.

  • Chocolate Velvet

    This tomato business has always reminded me of a book I stumbled on in a coffee house in the 80’s called The Secret Life of Plants.  A delightful and entertaining bunch of pseudoscience, it focused on the work of Cleve Baxter.  He was an interrogation specialist for the CIA, and still runs a polygraph school to this day.  But in the 60’s he decided to focus on what he called “primary perception”, essentially sentience without a nervous system.  He used plants in his research.

    He hooked polygraphs up to plants and studied their galvanic response in different situations.  Plants were damaged, deprived of water and whatnot.  Plants were also forced to witness the murder of other plants, to test their response later when the “murderer” came into the room.  What a nightmare that must have been for them.  The cruelty of science is epic!

    So again we see Hubbard is not an original in his work.  The question I have is, did Baxter influence Hubbard, or the other way around?  I doubt they both just happened on this idea simultaneously, and Hub was a notorious appropriator of ideas.  Baxter was tengentially connected to the CIA “remote viewing” guys, a program that had some connection to scientology.  What was his link to scientology, if any?  Anyone know?

    • PreferToBeAnon2

      It was Peter Tompkins who did the experiments. My sister actually was a lab assistant for the documentary about it. It doesn’t show up on her resume. :-)

      The connection is with the Stanford Research Institute with Ingo Swann (a clam) who developed the remote viewing protocols there under contract with the CIA. He was a going-exterior kinda guy.

      • Chocolate Velvet

        As far as I can tell, Thompkins was a journalist and intelligence guy, and co-wrote the book. Backster conducted the research, such as it was, and he authored the paper that was published and ridiculed.

        I knew Swann was a scilon and participated in Backster’s research before he started his own. What I wonder is whether Backster was a clam as well? Did he ever meet Hubbard? Seems like a match made in Heaven.

    • http://www.AlanzosBlog.com/ Alanzo

      I read that book while in college moonlighting as a janitor in a bank in the 80’s. I had to take care of the plants in the building, so part of my research was to read it. If I remember correctly, L Ron Hubbard’s work with plants was actually cited in that book! I think it was the first time I came across Hubbard’s name.

      This was about 6 months before I got involved in Scientology, too.

      Alanzo

      • Sherbet

        Wasn’t the “plants feel pain” hypothesis “proven” by Kirlian photography back then? I seem to remember these experiments being a Big Deal in the 70s or 80s.

        • Ze Moo

          Kirlian photography was co-opted by various ‘psychics’ and ‘paranormals’ during the 60’s.

          “Results of scientific experiments published in 1976 involving Kirlian
          photography of living tissue (human finger tips) showed that most of
          the variations in corona discharge streamer length, density, curvature
          and color can be accounted for by the moisture content on the surface of
          and within the living tissue.”

          • Sherbet

            A simple explanation for a mysterious phenomenon. Thanks.

          • PreferToBeAnon2

            It’s a shame that LRH never met that Japanese guy who does the water experiments–the one who talks to water or plays different kinds of music and photographs the patterns of reaction. Given LRH’s vast knowledge of science, I think we all would have watched with great interest as he audited water with the e-meter.

            • stillgrace

              YIKES! Auditing water! What an interesting experiment that would have been!!!

            • PreferToBeAnon2

              nothing like electrocuting a few BTs!

            • http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=PBeU2utihwM Deckard Cain

              Or himself.

      • Chocolate Velvet

        I had completely forgotten Hub’s work was cited. Or maybe I never knew. (The book wasn’t mine, and I only read about 2/3 of it.) I am not surprised, though.

        I hope you were nice to those plants, Alanzo. Apparently they can hold a grudge, and tell their friends about it! ;)

        • tetloj

          See “The Happening”

        • http://www.AlanzosBlog.com/ Alanzo

          To this day, I name every plant I have, say good morning to each, admire each blossom they put out, and tell them how good they are doing and how much I love them whenever I water them.

      • BosonStark

        One of the sad facts about Scientology is that so many people got into it, because they did make some kind of connection they saw as a “sign.” Whether it was hearing mention of it from a friend, reading about it somewhere, seeing an Org, being asked to buy Dianutty.

        On this very thin exposure, and it being a sign, they then proceed to relate to it somehow — e.g. I’m a musician. Hubbard is a musician too — explore further based on curiosity and a lot of hope.

        The secrecy and unusual aspects of it appeal to people. Worse, that part of it they’ve got down to a science now. They know exactly what kind of thing appeals to the most likely people to buy into it. Problem is, the Internet threw a huge wrench into the works.

        Another aspect is the ENTHUSIASM or earnestness of people selling it, like when Paul Haggis bought a book from Jim Logan. That also faces challenges, as more people will confront the people selling it in a more informed manner. Instead of selling to polite or curious raw meat, these Scientology salespeople are going to start facing a backlash for the first time. Their sales techniques are going to fail, and even new buildings with electronic displays can’t help.

        I’ve mentioned before that the people who work at Orgs, when people do come in, probably feel very uncomfortable not knowing if the people are there to goof, see the freaks, or if they are real, potential customers. That makes the behavior of Org staff even less appealing, as they might read the signal wrong of a real customer.

        At the time, this photo about tomatoes probably intrigued or impressed some of the more eccentric people in England. Now, it just looks nutty and suspect. Why couldn’t the con artist show one of these giant vegetables he was growing? Instead he’s hooking up his looney meter to them.

        Although it would have been great to have him with a lump on his head in this photo, the tomato photo stands as the single most representative photo of Hubbard and the cult he created. It really shows it all to outsiders anyway. Insiders are more shocked by the photo of him looking old, sick, and unkempt.

        • TheHoleDoesNotExist

          I often grumble with each new fact revealed by any of the small inner circle who were with Hubbard and knew, Knew, what he was really like and really up to. Why didn’t someone tell us? Okay, there were a few that tried, but the message didn’t get through.

          If only there was a Twitter feed in the 50’s.

          • AstroLadyBoy

            Scientology would have had its Arab Spring then instead of 50-60 years later.

          • liz_alice

            I know. I knew of him originally through my own sci-fi fandom and had read the numerous stories of all the sci-fi types who had heard his famous pronouncement of making money through religion: a quote he must have said often enough for one in present time to be confused to as to it’s original utterance by the number of witnesses and the number of times he must have said it. They treated it as a joke. There might not have been much they could do at the time to stop him, being mere writers of marginally verboten literature, but I have been a little saddened by authors such as Ellison recounting these tales as funny in and being generally indulging to a fellow sci-fi writer rather than saying seriously, “WTF”?

            • BuryTheNuts2

              I certainly understand your disappointment liz_alice…but if you frame it as it probably was…It does sound ludicrous.
              I am sure if he had said it to me I would have rolled my eyes far back into my head and said, right Ron…
              Hindsight is always 20/20.
              He was among some great writers…(much better than he was)…I can certainly understand them not taking him seriously.
              My God….I can barely take him seriously now and I know Just how hideously serious it all was and still is.

    • Are_sics

      At least we got a really interesting Stevie Wonder record out of it.

      • Chocolate Velvet

        Right! I read that that album originated as a soundtrack for the documentary. I guess Stevie was into it! :)

        • Are_sics

          Was the documentary completed? I seem to remember it wasn’t. Maybe it wasn’t and then it was. The record was somewhat trashed by critics at the time. I started listening because one of my professors in college, and Ethnomusicologist, did a radio interview where he held forth on the recording and all of its references to, and incorporation of, “world music”. It was really pioneering for a pop artist. Still, I find it more “interesting” than moving, for the most part. But some it is indeed really moving, and it just grows stronger upon further listening. Very few people made those synethesizers sound so “organic” (if you’ll forgive the term). Anyway, not my favorite Stevie Wonder, but still really good. And I have no idea, or particular concern with, what Stevie really thought of the ideas contained in the book. Or documentary. The musical inspiration is the thing!

          • PreferToBeAnon2

            Yes, it the documentary was completed: http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=7_X2Z9v8-6Q
            But as I recall, there was some lawsuit about it at the time–some infighting that stopped the release for awhile.

            • Are_sics

              Wow… once again youtube comes through, eh? Amazing. Thanks for the link. I’m only in for the music, still.

          • Chocolate Velvet

            The docu was completed, and it was full of fun time-lapse imagery set to music. You can watch it here:

            http://topdocumentaryfilms.com/the-secret-life-of-plants/

            As for Stevie, I think he was a genius. He was obviously inspired by the concept, and it led to one of his more cerebral and interesting albums. Can’t see anything wrong with that!

    • mirele

      The Secret Life of Plants was really popular back in the 1970s. Even my mother had a copy of the book.

      • Chocolate Velvet

        I loved the book, myself. Although it’s wacky, I find the idea of plants having sentience and responding emotionally is just compelling.

        Especially on a walk in the woods.

        Especially on acid. LOL

        • Are_sics

          And I would have expected mushrooms… !

          • Chocolate Velvet

            Nah, they scream when you eat em or boil em up for tea. It’s a real buzz kill…

        • BuryTheNuts2

          I once found the pattern on the upholstery of a vinyl high-chair mesmerizing on acid for several hours.
          I was pretty sure I had found the meaning of life in there somewhere.
          There were trees in that pattern…does this count?

        • mirele

          This made me laugh so hard I scared my cat.

          • q-bird

            oh my my … same here mirele … and I have 2 cats!
            laughing here hard … now they, settling down, giving me dirty looks … oh yes CV…
            walking with y’all.

          • TheHoleDoesNotExist

            I’m thinking with Jon as a regular on Saturday’s, might as well just keep the cats in another room where they’ll be safe.

        • http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=PBeU2utihwM Deckard Cain

          I can top that one…..how about pondering the secret lives of plants while on acid at Disneyland (all of the plants/flowers have high landscape value). Those were some special moments, I tell you!

      • http://www.facebook.com/people/Robert-Eckert/100002715429426 Robert Eckert

        Saturday Night Live’s Jack Handey had a line, “Would we cut down trees if they screamed? Sure we would, if they screamed all the time, for no reason.”

      • TheHoleDoesNotExist

        The Secret Life Of Plants, a bedtime story by OSA?

        • FistOfXenu

          No, a secret description of a day in the life of DM

    • TheHoleDoesNotExist

      CV: There’s a wild and wooly ride down this particular rabbit hole when it comes to scientologists, remote viewing and yes, Clive Backster mixed in, all with the sooper seekrit CIA and government spy programs. I believe this whole era was leftover remants from the 40’s and 50’s when Heinlein, Asimov, Bradbury, Hubbard and the likes of people like Jack Parsons were involved in govt. affairs as consultants.

      It’s a very wacky wabbit down there. Here’s just the first of many holes that will lead you there…

      http://mindcontrolblackassassins.com/tag/cleve-backster/

      • Chocolate Velvet

        Thanks for this!

        My afternoon is booked now, I’ll be down the rabbit hole if anyone needs me…

        • TheHoleDoesNotExist

          Oh my. I just saw this on ESMB., Evidently Ingo Swann has died. There’s a quote in there from him stating that he had so much (government?) pressure to try everything, that he tried the scientology stuff too, but didn’t consider himself a scientologist. But Putham, or Putoff, in that link I gave that was involved was a scientologist.

          http://www.forum.exscn.net/showthread.php?30384-Ingo-Swann-Died&p=773047#post773047

  • Sherbet

    Isn’t there a similar photo with lrh and a geranium? I seem to remember that he’s wearing leather dress gloves rather than lab gloves.

    • BuryTheNuts2

      http://www.wanttoknow.info/mind_control/scientology_remote_viewing_files/lrhplantsall.gif

      It wont let me upload the pic but it can be found at the link.

      • Sherbet

        Thanks. That must be a part of the whole plant series, but it was a geranium that I saw. Wow, look at lrh’s face! He’s showing Major Seriousness for the Major Experiments he’s conducting. I’m Majorly Impressed.

      • Ze Moo

        Attack Triffids, attack !

      • Truthiwant

        Many years ago when I was at Saint Hill, one day I was standing looking up at this big Yew tree that is just next to the manor. A Sea Org member approaches me and says that Ron brought that tree back to life.

        No shit , I say.

        Yes, and he goes on to tell me that the tree was dying and Ron gave a series of touch assists to the tree and brought it back from the dead.

        Wow!! I’ve got goose bumps all over me.

        • BuryTheNuts2

          If Ron would of given me a touch assist I would be in the corner drooling…AND NOT IN A GOOD WAY!

        • Ze Moo

          Did Lron impart more ‘woodenness’ to the tree? So, Lron knew his wood.

          A birch and a beech tree grow up side by side in the forest. One day, a sapling grows between them, and each swears that it’s not their son. The beech thinks it’s a son-of-a-birch, and the birch thinks it’s ason-of-a-beech. To settle it, they enlist the help of a woodpecker, who
          checks it out.

          “You are both wrong,” he says when he comes back up. “That’s the best piece of ash I’ve ever had my pecker in.”

          • Truthiwant

            Yew got it.

      • Couch_Incident

        “Do you expect me to talk?”
        “No, Mr. Plant, I expect you to die.”

  • Chocolate Velvet

    I’m already loving this series with Jon Atack. Thanks for doing this, Tony! Not only does Jon have a great sense of humor, he is also quite a philosopher. I have been watching a series called “The Nature Of Existence”, Jon pops up a few times in the first episode, and his insight and eloquence are wonderful to hear. Good on ya, Jon!

  • http://twitter.com/Scientology_411 Scientology_411

    Wow, this is great stuff Tony! Really looking forward to future installments.

    I had no idea his fear of doctors went that far. God that’s nuts. Nobody likes going to the dentist, but there are some things you just man up and do, especially if you’ve got the dooky-breath.

    • TheHoleDoesNotExist

      Hubbard was terrified of everything and everyone that discovered his scam and/or his mental illnesses. Name one category that didn’t end up on his enemies list or destructive list? Psychiatrists, M.D.’s, Teachers, Bankers, Lawyers, Reporters, Business CEO’s, etc.

      And Hubbard found ways to get even, or try to, with each group, using his network of fans and slaves. Take those evil dentists, for example. Today we have one of the largest, longest running scientology business ripoffs, Sterling Management. And one of the groups they especially target: Dentists.

      As has often been claimed, auditing is an attempt to cure Hubbard’s mental illness. His other types of “tech” were simply there to “get even” with his perceived enemies. Ethics, Admin, OSA, WISE business groups, it’s there to help him attack all those evil people (voices). Narconon became his way of “curing” his drub addiction. Applied Scholastics became his way of curing his study inabilities. CCHR was his way of eliminating psychiatrists. OSA was his security system to cure his insomnia due to paranoia; he had spy reports to lullaby himself to sleep. He had the OT (upper level) orgs to get thousands of others to “cure” his never ending supply of delusions and invisible voices. He had CL 5 orgs (lower levels) to have thousands be guinea pigs for all his other “cures” above.

      It’s a very difficult truth to dig up when you realize you were nothing more than a guinea tomato in the rotting mindgarden of a mad man. We Ex’s often refer to this process as “peeling the scientology onion”.
      To each his own vegetable.

      • http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=PBeU2utihwM Deckard Cain

        A true narcissist is always afraid that people will see them for what they are…..

        • Midwest Mom

          Narcissists also detest the people who see right through them.

    • Midwest Mom

      It reminds me of that “Yuck Mouth” PSA from the ’70’s that ran during Saturday morning cartoon time.

      http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=2MaCXVSwec4

  • PreferToBeAnon2

    Do you think he ever put the alligator clips on the cyst? Why do I keep thinking of that stomach scene from Alien?

    • Dean Fox

      Should’ve done the purif rundown. Wouldn’t want to be in the sauna when that sucker blew.

      • BuryTheNuts2

        This one made me lose it!
        Kudos!

        • PreferToBeAnon2

          I’m too sexy for my cyst
          Too sexy for my cyst…
          So sexy it hurts…

    • Midwest Mom

      II keep thinking of that John Belushi scene from “Animal House” when he has the mashed potatoes in his mouth, but your suggestion is more accurate. ;p

  • http://www.facebook.com/jerry.spiegelman.7 Jerry Spiegelman

    Scammer to the umpth degree.

  • bculkn

    I wanted to make a quick comment on the Andrea Doven video. I will concede that the Data Series has some good points and definitely can be integrated into other schools of thought in regards to this area. (logic, games, etc.) But like everything else in the Scientology religion, they try to isolate and individuate their systems which of course lessens their potential positive effect.

    What I find amazing is that the CofS is a walking talking “outpoint” and here is the OT8 who just graduated from this course and can’t even come close to using this data to function properly.

    Every single Karen Pouw statement contains at least one of the 5 major outpoints described in the Data Series course and Ms Doven can’t even see whats in front of her face.

    Scientology=epic fail

  • SP ‘Onage

    I bet once that cyst popped it looked like lava coming out of a volcano. *gagging*

    • PreferToBeAnon2

      And there goes my lunch….

      • SP ‘Onage

        XD

      • BuryTheNuts2

        I am glad I finished my runny eggs already.

        • SP ‘Onage

          LOL! His thetan twin!

    • FistOfXenu

      How many thetans do you think were attached to it?

  • JonnyJacobsen

    Good stuff on the tomato pic: nothing like going to Sauce (sorry, couldn’t resist).

  • 1subgenius

    I hope Jon makes some money with the re-release. He deserves it.

  • Artoo45

    More wonderfulness from the Bunker and Mr. Atack. I hereby name Hubbard’s cyst “Li’l Source.” Oh, wait! Maybe it was some GE restimulation of Incident II re-enacting on Hubbards head . . .

    Slightly OT: It’s ironic that in responding to Wright’s book, the cult tries continues to tar critics with the brushes of “religious bigotry” and “hate,” implying that we hate Scientologists. When I visit the Bunker I am surrounded by smart, funny, passionate, caring, rightfully angry former Scientologists, most of whom have jettisoned Hubbard’s tech, but some who still find value in it. And for all the fun we have here, deep below the bustling streets of Manhattan, I know that each ex has lived through some awful shit thanks to Hubbard’s megalomania. And yes, it’s easy to like the ex’s who agree with me about Hubbard and Cº., but I think we all fight (in our own ways) for those who still zealously believe. It’s easy to laugh at the OTs as they gush robotically about this TR or that Level, but ultimately we care about them. We want them to be free of this manipulative scam. I want to see Miscavige pay for his abuses, but like a pit bull, tortured and provoked from puppyhood to be a killer, he too is a victim of Hubbard’s mental illness. His personality disorder seems evident at an early age in Going Clear, and as someone who lived with a Borderline for 10 years, I found reading those descriptions of his behavior to be chilling. He stands as the greatest example in the world that the tech doesn’t work. He is Hubbard on nuclear steroids.

  • Captain Howdy

    GO NINERS !!!… I’m off to the Man Cave to swill and smoke with a gaggle of downstat Pat’s Fans. These Neanderthals don’t even have a computer, but they do have the giant flat screen idiot box. Have a lovely weekend growing entheta in the Garden of the Clams.

    • BuryTheNuts2

      On it Capt.
      Have a great time.

    • SP ‘Onage

      I’m a 49’er fan too, but I’m not happy about Chris Culliver’s anti-gay remark. Kinda stupid of him, a lot of teh gays live there.

      I’ll take a gay Ad any day over a scientology Ad.

      I see nothing wrong with this Ad.

      49ers Gay Rights Ad gets pulled [VIDEO]: Super Bowl Hopeful 49ers Want No Part in “It Gets Better” Campaign

      Read more at:

      http://www.mstarz.com/articles/8097/20130202/49ers-gay-rights-ad-gets-pulled-video.htm

  • TheHoleDoesNotExist

    While Hubbard was obviously the consonant gardener and an excellent driver, let’s not forget that he was also a great shepherd.

    “I wanted it to be the ultimate religion. And the basis is going to be in my liking. So I did that.
    Look, all I wanted was to make Money. I could not be responsible for people believing what they wanted to believe. I was simply there to sell them something that they needed and I feel I have the right to sell it.
    That is reality. And the reality is going to be there forever because, because scientology is going to be here forever.

    “They are the sheep. I am their shephard and there are times when I will have to sheeeeeear them.”

    http://jamiedewolf.bandcamp.com/track/the-false-idol-wiretap

    • stillgrace

      Wow, Hole, that was a sobering little clip! Thanks for the link. I never heard those words in his own voice. I think, and I could be wrong (he is a bit of a slush mouth), that he said “And the basis is going to be in my WRITINGS.” (?)

      • BuryTheNuts2

        It was “writings”.
        Holy creepyola HOLE!

        • TheHoleDoesNotExist

          Thanks Still and BTN. Edited. But really, let’s thank Jamie DeWolf for bringing this to our attention.
          Baaaaaa Baaaaaa Bunker Black Sheep.

    • http://www.facebook.com/michael.tilse Michael Leonard Tilse

      Actually, doesn’t sound like hubbard’s voice to me. Some of the mannerisms are imitated pretty well, but I instantly knew it wasn’t him. I’ve listened to probably a 100 hours of Hubbard reel to reel and cassette tapes (shudder), this isn’t him.

      • sugarplumfairy

        It sure sounds like him to me, Michael..

        • TheHoleDoesNotExist

          Speaking of sounds and garden things, here’s a little something from the old man’s poetry called “The Garden”. Morphed into song version. Evidently he also grew ecstasy and buried lots of secrets in his. Hey, the original Hole, maybe? (sorry, having a coffee withrdrawal day)

          http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=-hL_lMFeUOA

          • BuryTheNuts2

            Sherb….here is the geranium!

          • http://www.facebook.com/people/Robert-Eckert/100002715429426 Robert Eckert

            So now we know where “Target Two” was: the planet Vogon.

        • http://www.facebook.com/michael.tilse Michael Leonard Tilse

          Nah. It is very good, might even be sampled words from lectures cut together. The drawn out endings of some of the words are too long though. I hear someone trying to sound like him, pacing, diction, and emphasis, doing a good job. Close, very very close, but no cigar.

      • TheHoleDoesNotExist

        Ask Jamie?

      • http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=PBeU2utihwM Deckard Cain

        It sure sounds like him although it sounds spliced together. It’s neat, though.

    • sizzle8

      What’s the background and history of that clip?
      Is it in one of the lecture tapes?

  • richelieu jr

    I think the lump was the brains of the operation.

    Too bad they popped it (it went clear….. asil)

  • subsilentio

    There’s another picture I really wonder about. Hubbard looks like a derelict on drugs. I can’t directly post it to this thread, but here’s a copy. http://www.xenu.net/archive/hubbardcoroner/oldhubb.jpg

    • BuryTheNuts2

      Is that a zit in the middle of his forehead?
      Or is that his “third eye”?

      • PreferToBeAnon2

        Is that a sebaceous cyst on your forehead–
        or are you just happy to see me?

    • Midwest Mom

      This is the man that scios salute and applaud? That is absolutely cray cray.

  • http://twitter.com/BumpItMcCarthy BumpIt McCarthy

    OK, don’t know if this will work, but here goes:

    • http://twitter.com/BumpItMcCarthy BumpIt McCarthy

      Well, you get the idea. It looks better bigger.

  • http://www.facebook.com/people/Robert-Eckert/100002715429426 Robert Eckert

    So, in these pictures of a disheveled LRH with the Purple People-eating Pimple surrounded by typewriters and stacks of papers, could it be his final spewings of Battlefield Earth and Mission Earth (in which he “kind of takes his subconscious and vomits it all over a plate”, per Chelsea Gaither) that he is working on?

    • http://www.facebook.com/people/Robert-Eckert/100002715429426 Robert Eckert

      I’m really getting into BE/ME as an unedited look into his head: it is absolutely 100% clear that LRH never went back and revised a single word after he typed it, or spent any time outlining where he thought the story was going to go, but just typed whatever came to mind. I am curious now about how much of his late life is represented: it could have taken up to 15 years, if he only averaged a page a day, or down to 3 years, if he averaged a “chapter” a day; the “chapter” breaks are completely arbitrary, as all reviewers notice, and I really do think it reasonable to hypothesize that they simply represent whatever he managed to type into a day, which he would then stick in a manila folder and number. However it is unlikely that he typed every single day, so 3 years is surely less than the actual composition time.

      The sixth book of ME contains a reference to Betty Horseheinie of the Saint Petersburg Grimes: “The alligators tried to eat her but got so sick the conservationists raised hell. We sent her to an insane asylum near Miami but she drove the patients so crazy that we got a permit from the government and disposed of her as contaminated waste. She’s miles deep in the continental trench now, but they do say all the fish are dying there.” This is LRH doing “satire” in his usual subtle manner: Bette Orsini of the SP Times won a Pulitzer in 1980 for investigating the underhanded way CoS bought up downtown Clearwater. This is the only passage where I can see a direct hint as to what year it might have been written in.

  • California

    Somewhat off-topic but: http://philadelphia.cbslocal.com/2013/02/02/former-philadelphia-public-school-superintendent-arlene-ackerman-dies/

    Arlene Ackerman was a strong supporter of Narconon Drug Education in not only San Francisco Unified School District, when she was superintendent there, but other school districts as well. She used her considerable influence, at the time (2001-2008), that was secondary to her relationship with the Bush/Sec’y of Education Rod Paige/Chief of Staff SCN’er John Danielson to push for Bush-supported NCLB curriculum and policies, including having Applied Scholastics in the now defunct Title 1 Supplemental Educational Services after-schools program, paid for with public education monies to the tune of $30-$80 per student per hour to the organizations….. the tutors, of course, never saw that amount of money.

    Her influence waned considerably after Obama/Arne Duncan came in.

    • BuryTheNuts2

      Awwhh man. RIP.

  • mattekudasai

    Wow! I’ve been away for a month, I come back to check in and all hell’s broken loose on the Co$. Had almost forgotten how much fun, informative, useful and sometimes sad Tony’s bunker is. Read all the comments and now here’s my two cents worth: You say toe may toe and I say toe maw toe. Let’s call the whole thing off! Scientology is being called out. Onward and upward to ending the abuses and fraud. Missed you guys. And Midwest Mom, thanks for the kind words and hugs on New Years Eve. Right back at you. Had to do some reconnecting with my family but all is well and looking forward to staying abreast of things. Love to all.

  • http://lliira.dreamwidth.org/ Lliira

    During the first part of this article, I got hungry for tomatoes.

    During the second part, I lost my appetite. Forever.

  • OTVIIIisGrrr8!

    The real story here is that COB RTC David Miscavige singlehandedly pulled Scientology out of the miasma of half-dones, undones, and backlogs left behind by the Founder.

    It is a testimony to the greatness of COB that the entire subject of Scientology survived and went on to flourish and prosper despite the many attacks upon it by SMERSH, Interpol, the CIA, Psychiatry, the Marcabs, and more recently the internet, bitter defrocked apostates, and the insane non-Scientologists who post at this blog and are paid by Big Pharma.

    Moreover, if by way of underscoring the centrality of Mr. Miscavige to Scientology, the release of the Basics in 2007 has boomed the Church, this while the 2,289,518,724 new Ideal Orgs have become the global pipeline of dissemination whereby over one million new people each day are reached by Scientology in the form of a book, a beginning course, or through one the dozens of social betterment programs that are saving the planet on an hourly basis from the four horsemen of the Apocalypse: drugs, illiteracy, pestilence, and Scientology-hating.

    All of which is to say is that we in the Church of Scientology respectfully wish that the Founder had never had his photo taken with a tomato plant or when he was laying low in Queens. Mr. Miscavige shows far more discretion and manages his image far more carefully.

    • TheHoleDoesNotExist
      • http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=PBeU2utihwM Deckard Cain

        Is that a picture of the midget with our newest friend, Luke?

        • Midwest Mom

          Nice pose, Davey, with your thumbs in your pockets. Did John Travolta teach you his line dance moves from “Urban Cowboy”, too?

        • TheHoleDoesNotExist

          I believe Luke posted that picture. Funny, this ecclesiastical leader of scientology who is to busy to Ever be anywhere but at events, is shown posing at so-not-scientology Narconon.

    • http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=PBeU2utihwM Deckard Cain

      That picture of the scribbled out Katie Holmes still makes me laugh.

    • Observer

      That reminds me, I’m going to have to call Big Pharma. My check is late again!

      • BuryTheNuts2

        Mine too! It is pissing me off. I am going to have to start withholding wise cracks!

        Ruh roh….shouldn’t have said “withhold’….looks over shoulder for renegade auditors….

      • http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=PBeU2utihwM Deckard Cain

        The fact that Scientologists actually believe that we are paid by some unnamed “Big Pharma” is a testament to their actual distance from realty.

        • BuryTheNuts2

          Huh Deck?
          you mean we are doing this for free? Out of the goodness of our hearts? Because we want the Scientologist’s to go free from the hideous invisible chains of L. Ron Hubbard?

          All this time I thought big pharma was just in arrears and my coin was going to be here any minute!
          Damn it is a good thing I despise Tom Cruise as much as I do.

          (sign on neck)
          Will work for YUKS!

          • Observer

            Plenty of yucks in sebaceous cysts … oh, wait …

        • John P.

          There was a recent story on CNN about the non-renewal of Sarah Palin’s contract with Fox News. There are thousands of comments authored by “Palinbots,” the moon-eyed followers of the former VP candidate. One of the most interesting threads was where one Palin supporter claimed that the anti-Palin commenters were actually being paid to write anti-Palin comments. That someone would believe there is a well-organized, shadowy opposition force writing checks to ensure that Sarah Palin doesn’t coast to the 2016 GOP nomination and effortlessly become president in a landslide is really remarkable. Even scarier than a few thousand members of a bizarre UFO-believing dead space cootie-exorcising cult believing that we’re all being paid by pharma to make jokes at their expense. It’s amazing what the paranoid will believe.

          • OTVIIIisGrrr8!

            We in RTC beg to differ with our friends in Global Capitalism HQ.

            It is not at all paranoid to consider that shadowy nameless psychiatric front groups with offices in New York, London, Bonn, and Berlin are organized in a conspiracy to destroy the Church of Scientology.

            We say this because we in the Church of Scientology actually do have shadowy nameless Scientology front groups with offices in New York, London, Bonn, and Berlin organized in a conspiracy to destroy Psychiatry and our various other enemies.

            Because we do it to others, we know it can be done to us.

          • Midwest Mom

            I have ulterior motives to diss Sarah Palin on the interwebz. I want her job and her title of GOP cover girl. They are sweet gigs and I could get the exposure I need for my line of “Midwest Mom’s Baked Goods” and also my new line of cake and cookie mixes.

            First I’ll get on Fox, then Oprah will beg to produce my new daytime cooking/home decorating show, where I will bake and help you decorate your world using re-purposed items. I will be assisted by my very attractive and manly male carpenters {wink-wink}.

            Step aside, Sarah Palin, Betty Crocker and Martha Stewart. Midwest Mom is ready to sell America some snickerdoodles and is going to make the Grand Old Party the partay of the super groovy Americans, my boos!

            Remember, if it’s good for me, it’s good for you too, boos.

            • Kitz

              *perks up* Snickerdoodles?? You have my vote! :-D

          • Sidney18511

            that is who the cos should target! The palinbots would be easy peasy to suck into their cult, they are the same empty minded glazed eyed conspirisiy theorists. If you want to really have a good time, go to the site conservatives4palin and take a gander. Actually after reading some of those posts. The ronbots almost seen sane!

          • N. Graham

            I’ll comment as soon as I check the mail to see if my Big Pharma check came.

        • Observer

          Whoa, that didn’t occur to me. With the economy the way it is it would be helpful if Big Pharma acutally *did* pay people to be snarky about Scientology online. Since they don’t, I’ll just have to keep doing it out of conviction and compassion for the people who are being physically, mentally, spiritually and financially abused by Scn.

          • PreferToBeAnon2

            It’s a shame YOU can’t take a tax deduction for that!

    • grundoon

      OTVIIIisGrrr8! You’re the only one here who carries the flag for RTC. You’ve picked up Karin Pouw’s dropped hat, and you’re wearing it with flair! Highly commended. VVWD!

  • dwayners13

    Having read what I deem, “The Big Three” (Bareface Messiah, Messiah or Madman & Piece of Blue Sky) biographies of L. Ron Hubbard, I really like the latter for the way it covered Hubbard near the end of his life. Obviously there is some overlap between the three, yet Atack seemed to provide details that allowed for a better understanding of not only Hubbard, but the gradual creation of Dianetics & Scientology. .
    As I wrote in an earlier comment, it’s Atack’s account of the latter years which really foreshadowed the church of Scientology today. That aggressive style of shoring up power & control seemed even more ruthless than ever before. No longer would the individuals be able to profit from the lower level ‘products’ as they had previously. In the early days, the church operated much like a franchise operation which allowed both Hubbard & the Org. owners to make a profit. This changed however when LRH when into hiding. When these quasi-independent Org. owners were assemble for a meeting, they were told, in no uncertain terms that things were going to change. Atack provides a description of a meeting of Org. owners that would would be hard to believe had you not been aware of the nature of this organization. Athough Atack provided a detailed description of how this change was implemented, it isn’t clear how involved Hubbard was in terms of how the job was done. You get the sense that he may have said, “this is the end goal, make it so”. Atack even suggested that Hubbard offered the ‘young guns’ a financial incentive. Judging from Hubbard’s previous behaviour, there was probably an overt or implied consequence for not achieving the objectives he desired. The debate as to how involved he was in the details of how to go about realizing these goals, only Miscavige & Broeker know for sure. Considering Hubbard’s treatment of his followers in the Sea Org., I doubt Miscavige & others worried about being too militant or forceful. The issues of ethics or even legality were probably not a big consideration.
    So as you can tell, I’m enjoying these “Bunker Book Club Discussions”, be it Dianetics or Atacks “Piece of Blue Sky”.

  • TickTockDM

    Regarding Hubbard’s return from Queens to the Apollo in 1973, Pierre Ethier claims that Hubbard took the train from Queens to Montreal with Jim Dincalci to fly from Canada to Lisbon and that, in Montreal, Hubbard stayed overnight at the Queen Elizabeth Hotel as “Mr. Harris” and visited the Montreal org, which was located downtown in 1973. Here is an excerpt of Ethier’s “My Meeting with LRH:”:

    “… I was introduced by a young man calling himself ‘Jim’ who looked just like a ‘Sea Org Missionaire’ to ‘Mr Harris’ who was decribed as an ‘Old personal friend of LRH’. Mr Harris appearance was anything but ordinary. A stout Man in his late 50s or maybe early 60s, he had bright red hair, penetrating blue eyes, muscular arms, and he literally exuded the Beingness of a ‘Seaman’. Upon gazing at him, the instant thought that raced to my mind was: ‘By Gosh, this is LRH’, but being an introverted type person at the time, I felt uneasy at the fact that nobody else’s seemed to have recognized that obvious fact. I kept glancing back and forth between the Man standing in the Lobby and the large picture of LRH on the wall and the more I looked, the more I saw similarities and the less I saw differences.”

    http://pierreethier.wordpress.com/pierre-ethier-class-xii/my-meeting-with-lrh/

  • BuryTheNuts2

    Karen De La Carriere got married today.
    Congrats to her!

    • Tony Ortega

      She’s been married more than three years. She just got around to changing her FB status.

      • BuryTheNuts2

        Well she sure fooled the shit out of a bunch of us today!

      • http://www.facebook.com/people/Robert-Eckert/100002715429426 Robert Eckert

        Happy Facebook, Karen!

      • DeElizabethan

        OK, will change the Congrats Karen #1 to your letting us know on your FB status.
        Will talk to you later Bury.
        What happens when one follows comment notifications. Thanks Tony.

    • DeElizabethan

      Really?
      Congratulations Karen #1. So good to hear and know you are happy.

      • BuryTheNuts2

        no, see below…goofed the floof!
        KD is just slow on the FB updates.

  • http://www.facebook.com/people/Chuck-Beatty/1631176570 Chuck Beatty

    http://tv.broadwayworld.com/article/Scoop-THE-VIEW-on-ABC-Week-of-February-4-2013-20130131

    I’m pretty sure there will be some “rock hauling” stories.

    I can confirm the kids did rock hauling.

    Which I think taking those river rocks, from the Happy Valley creek riverbed I believe is some kind of state law violation, and the evidence is all over the Happy Valley property, today, all those walls that the kids and the RPF members built, using the creek rocks!

  • mook

    Marc Headley drops another bombshell about Grant Cardone over on WWP: “Pretty sure Grant made all of his early Real Estate riches by starting of with Drug Money in Miami.
    When Scilons found that out he had to Re-up at Super Power, IAS & ASI. AFter they get their cut, you are forgiven.”
    https://whyweprotest.net/community/threads/grant-cardone-makes-an-ass-out-of-himself.108612/

    • BuryTheNuts2

      I just can’t stop watching this video. This brings douchebaggery to staggering new heights!
      Grant Cardone and his “Stepford wife” are the epitome of good Scientologist’s.
      This is so hideous I am sure that even L. Ron Hubbard his-self is completely enturbulated out there on “target two”.
      I wish they would show THIS on Anderson Cooper!

    • aboutandout

      Scientologist’s believe children are adults in little bodies but when they grow up they are adults acting like children. How can someone that claims to be a professional 1) act like this 2) post it on the internet…good god do they have no shame.

      • BuryTheNuts2

        obviously “Less than Zero”.

  • http://www.facebook.com/larry.moore.9693001 Larry Moore

    You can laugh all you want, but I happen to know the truth. When I was auditing back in 1974 I recalled being a tomato myself. I was a fairly large, quite red, and juicy tomatoe. And quite frankly in my recalling the event, I relived it. With full vegatational semantics. Here is my story.

    I was hanging around on one sunday afternoon enjoying the the sunshine and the warm summer breeze when I noticed a child, perhaps 10 or eleven years old walk by. And then, for reasons I didn’t understand at the time, the child stopped, turned around, and came back towards me. He stopped in front of me, looked at me, and whoosh, the next thing I knew he started to yank me off (my vine). And I can tell you with absolute certainty, that hurt.

    If you’ve never been a tomato that’s being yanked off, you probably can not duplicate what I am saying. But it was true. And I know. I was there. I was that tomato.

    A few lifetimes later I was a banana. But, well, that’s a different story.

    I love Scientology. And I love L. Ron Hubbard. For his breakthrough technology set me free. Even to this day my friends call me a peach. Not knowing the technology of scientology and the time track reality of Thetanism.

    • BuryTheNuts2

      I am a clay demo in your hands Larry!

    • grundoon

      I get that you can recall a time when you were a BT. (Big Tomato) Going earlier on the track, could you recall a time when you were implanted? That’s OT data, Mister! You’re ripe to route onto OT Preps immediately. Bring a sharp knife and a cruet of oiliness and vinegarness.

      • FistOfXenu

        So THAT’S what the oily table is for!

  • http://www.facebook.com/bob.gravlin Bob Gravlin

    Why does LRH remind me of Howard Hughes who died a sad paranoid and isolated death? Methinks the “Big being” had a bit of a drug and certainly a tobacco problem too.

  • PreferToBeAnon2

    When Scions mess around with tomatoes they sometimes get and exploding one: John Sweeney. Poor guy.
    I love that he calls himself this.

    • DeElizabethan

      Speaking of Sweeney, I recently had delivered, in less than two weeks, his book from the UK. Love the way he writes and his sense of humor.

      • PreferToBeAnon2

        Generally, I’ve never seen a group of anti- *anything* (religious, political, or whatever) that has a better sense of humor than those against the Co$.

        Btw, good job over at the People comments!

        • DeElizabethan

          Saw you there too and was happy. Was nice to see so many new names and such good comments with few bots. Was encouraging and fun. There was no way I saw to ‘like’ a comment, thought strange. Two days running and didn’t get spoiled by some Prophet, as it did on the CNN blog.

    • DeElizabethan

      My comment seems to be hung up. I wanted to add that I’m reading Jon Attack’s great book also, wonderful info.
      Edit: My first comment is still hung up. Took about two weeks before I got Sweeney’s book from the UK. Love his sense of humor.

  • i-Betty

    I really thought that said “he had created the ‘OVERbearing’ tomato”!

  • http://twitter.com/cultexpert Steve Hassan

    Tony,

    Thanks for this new feature. I find it fascinating and I do think it is important to separate fact from fiction. It also demonstrates that, going to top researchers who have the network to track down the original sources is incredibly valuable. Tony, when is YOUR book coming out? Can you say. I trust it will be incredibly thorough. Thanks for your hard work.

  • http://profile.yahoo.com/RK7GMFXCPLT6XP3CYWKP4TCPHA Trish

    I’m always astonished that there are people who believe that they’ve met someone who has access to experiences & communications that are only available to other people second-hand (even when the followers are told they can attain such knowledge or experiences, it’s only after getting tutored by the one with the special access) And even believing that, why would such scarce “knowledge” be offered to these particular persons?

    Maybe this is because I have never had an experience that can’t be understood as the product of human interaction with the material world.

  • http://twitter.com/jonhendry Jonathan W. Hendry

    Typewriter In The Sty.

    (rimshot)

  • FistOfXenu

    For the record I’m glad Atack’s back and before I forget, thanks for writing Blue Sky. It maybe saved my life.

  • http://www.facebook.com/people/Robert-Badger/100000986698235 Robert Badger

    I’m so glad to see Jon Atack offering his insights here. Back in the late ’80s and early ’90s, when the very effective Dianetics TV commercials were still playing, I was kind of interested. I was a high school student then. I made the mistake of writing for more information, which meant that my mailbox was soon full of all sorts of magazines, fliers, and so forth from the Church of Scientology. Anyhow, two good things happened around that same time. First, there was the wonderful 1991 Time magazine article. I was also disturbed about the so-called “fixed donations” and alarmed at how much it all cost. About a year or two later, I came across Jon Atack’s book. So, I never did progress (or regress) up the bridge to total freedom. So, thanks Mr Atack, Time Magazine, and other jouralists who saved me from ever getting involved in $cientology!

    • DeElizabethan

      Love your story, thanks for sharing. I’m just reading the Jon Atack book, but have read many others and his is fascinating and meaningful to me.

  • Freedom Forever

    I’m wondering whether anyone at IRS reads this blog. This would give them better understanding of “Tomato God” who created what they define as religion. Highly recommend Jon Atack’s book to those who still believe that scientology is religion.

  • Diane Arden

    Thanks for this series, fantastic work as always. Something i am disturbed about is that Scientology has a Facebook page, called “The RouteOut” everyday there is a really cute photo of various animals, and they talk a lot about freedom. I have made a few comments warning people that it’s Scientology , and to beware of them. So far , they haven’t reacted, i am a bit worried that i will be reported for discrimation, i have stopped now, but do you know, or have you seen, their FB page.?

  • Innoculated

    About the 2 photos: it is clearly the same room but the LRon in Jim’s 1973 photo looks years younger than the photo supposedly 1982. When I compare the two, the guy sitting on chair (1973) has better skin and thinner gut. The guy sitting on the bed looks 10 years older, fatter and more wrinkly.