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Jon Atack on Scientology — “The Church of Hate”

ScientologyMythbustingJon Atack is the author of A Piece of Blue Sky, one of the very best books on L. Ron Hubbard and Scientology. He now has a new edition of the book out, and on Saturdays he’s helping us sift through the legends, myths, and contested facts about Scientology that tend to get hashed and rehashed in books, articles, and especially on the Internet.

We’re taking a slight departure from our usual Saturday conversation with Jon. He’s headed for Denmark this week for a meeting of FECRIS, the Fédération Européenne des Centres de Recherche et d‘Information sur le Sectarisme, which in English becomes the European Federation of Centers of Research and Information on Sectarianism.

For the convention, Jon has written a brief overview of Scientology that we found powerful. If you’ve been keeping up with our Saturday conversations, you’ve seen us dive into quite a few different subjects in church history. But in this piece, Jon does his best to distill into one relatively short document what sets Scientology apart.

We’ve asked Jon for permission to excerpt a few portions of the paper he’s delivering in Copenhagen, and he generously agreed. We hope you find the latest Atack offering a good summation of what fascinates us about this organization…

I am entirely in agreement with Professor Stephen Kent’s assessment of the religious character of Scientology. Hard evidence shows that it is not a legitimate religion, simply an anti-social organization with a religious façade. But, to avoid argument and out of respect for the IRS, let us pretend that Scientology is a religion. It becomes clear that a positive social agenda is not necessary for religious status in the United States. In 1993, Scientology became a so called ‘non-profit.’ In the UK, this would be called a ‘charity.’

I am a tad old-fashioned: I think that a charity should be charitable. And charity is at the heart of all mainstream religions. St Paul assures us that we are nothing, if we ‘have not charity.’ To the Buddhist, the Christian caritas — caring for another without want of reward — is an essential teaching. Muslims believe that the giver should be grateful to the beggar, not the other way round. Jews, Jains, Zoroastrians and Hindus all teach charity as a principle virtue. Only Satanism and Scientology do not…

 
In L. Ron Hubbard’s teaching, there is no other source of spiritual understanding than himself. He pays occasional lip-service to the mainstream religions, but none any longer has value, now he has revealed his thoughts to the world, because, ‘Scientology is the only workable system Man has’ and ‘In fifty thousand years of history on this planet alone, Man never evolved a workable system.’ Indeed, although claiming to be completely non-denominational — eclectic, even — on the secret upper levels, believers are told that Jesus is a fabrication, implanted into us all some 75 million years ago by the evil Prince Xenu. As Hubbard put it, ‘God is just the trick of this universe.’ All other beliefs have failed and actually lead their followers in the wrong direction. Only Scientology is true, even when in complete contradiction to itself. The tolerance towards other faiths that has been creeping into the mainstream religions these last few decades is entirely absent from Scientology.

Those of us who have tasted, tried and spat out Scientology are even more harshly regarded than ordinary ‘wogs’ — non-Scientologists. We are, quite simply, ‘Suppressive People’ or ‘Anti-Social Personalities.’ In conventional terms, we are entirely destructive, according to the scripture of Scientology. There is a glut of Hubbard teachings about those who criticise his opinions. Hubbard ordered harassment for anyone who commits such a ‘suppressive act.’

Also among the sacred scriptures of Scientology are the directives given to the infamous Guardian’s Office, which transformed into the Office of Special Affairs after the third Mrs Hubbard and ten of her deputies were sent to prison. Curiously, members of the Guardian’s Office’s Branch One ‘covert intelligence’ department moved quietly over into the new Office of Special Affairs. Hubbard’s Guardian’s Office scripture, as it relates to the harassment of opponents, has never been cancelled and remains in force. It is concealed from the broad membership, issued on a ‘need to know’ basis to those who will perform the dirty tricks…

 
Leader David Miscavige, who defeated the Goliath IRS almost single-handedly, paid over $10 million to have his rival for the leadership, Pat Broeker watched around the clock by two private investigators for 24 years. Twenty-four years. This money was tax exempt, because it was used for ‘religious purposes.’ Then, given its own history, perhaps it isn’t so very strange that the IRS would regard harassment as a religious duty.

In 1966, Hubbard created the Guardian’s Office to protect himself. Branch One, which was the department of harassment, thrived for 16 years, under Hubbard’s direction. The 800-page training manual — the ‘B-1 Hat’ — is a scandalous compilation of harassment techniques, many derived from the confessions of former military intelligence agents and constructed around Hubbard’s interpretation of Sun Tzu’s Art of War. Staff were taught how to lie and how to break and enter, among other scriptural requirements. This material was kept strictly sequestered from rank and file members, like myself, who saw only the positive pronouncements of the Great O.T.

Hubbard believed firmly in statistical management, and every week, Branch One reported ten statistics, which included, ‘An enemy or potential enemy removed from the position of power from which he is attacking or could attack.’ This garnered 250 points per enemy (note well, ‘potential enemy’ — B-1 decided who might become dangerous and would then destroy their livelihood, just in case). Further, ‘Documented criminal or scandalous (discreditable) [sic] data about an enemy, publically available, turned over to the proper terminals [people] in a useable form.’…

 
Hubbard was named as an ‘unindicted co-conspirator’ for his part in infiltrating government agencies, for false imprisonment and for theft of tens of thousands of documents. Federal agents were unable to penetrate the security surrounding Hubbard, who remained in hiding for the last decade of his life. The sentences for the eleven Scientologists who were sent to prison should be a warning to those who want to grant Scientology the privileges which should be reserved for groups that benefit society. The judge, sentencing two of Hubbard’s deputies, said, ‘The crimes committed by these defendants is of a breadth and scope previously unheard … No building, office, desk or file was safe from their despicable scheming and warped minds. The tools of the trade were miniature transmitters, lock picks and secret codes, forged credentials, and any other devices they found necessary to carry out their heinous schemes.’ No single scriptural policy regarding harassment of perceived enemies has been changed, to this very day.

In summation, wherever authorities recognise the religious nature of Scientology, they also accept that a religion can be essentially anti-social. If that is so, then we can expect to see more socially destructive systems emerging, and claiming tax exemption, to the further detriment of society. My own stand against Scientology shows that I support freedom of belief, but when an organization which is clearly anti-social is given support by incompetent or corrupt authorities, it is time to call a halt. If we are to have charities, then they must support the social good. If Scientology is a church, then it is a church of fear and hatred, and its policies should be decried.

 
——————–

Carol Nyburg Interviewed by Karen de la Carriere

We’ve written about Carol Nyburg’s recent defection from the Church of Scientology, and now she’s made a series of video interviews with Karen de la Carriere. Here’s the first one…

 

 
——————–

Posted by Tony Ortega on May 25, 2013 at 07:00

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  • Sidney18511

    If there’s anybody jonesing for more of Jon’s research writing and speeches please check out this site….
    http://home.snafu.de/tilman/j/index.html

  • Mighty Korgo of Teegeeack

    Talk about getting the important parts in a nutshell. That was great, John. I hope we get a chance to read the rest of the overview after the convention.

    • Truthiwant

      It is brilliant. Informative, true and at the same time full of irony.

    • FLUNK_101

      I agree with the Mighty Korgo.
      This was such a beautiful piece by John Atack. Thank you, Tony, for sharing it with us. If this is only a segment, I’d love to read the whole thing! Is there any way you could make it available? And what about that 800 page manual, the “B-1 Hat”?

      • Truthiwant

        “And what about that 800 page manual, the “B-1 Hat”?

        Now there’s a question to post on Rathbun’s site.

        • FLUNK_101

          Good ol’ Marty’s been holding out on us!
          His site may not get as many hits as Tony’s but he has no right to complain. All he has to do is tell the truth!

          • Xenu, Lord of Kobol

            He has the right to remain silent as anything said or done might be held against in him in a court of law.

            Not sure that he gets that the court of Bunker continues to try him in absenting and we’re finding the silence to be as equally damning.

          • Spackle Motion

            Marty’s stats on his site are rather sad and getting worse. I just looked at his Alexa results compared to Tony’s and it is not even a fair contest.

            • FLUNK_101

              Thanks for hipping me to Alexa, I never heard of that before!
              I’m sure Marty has some stories in him that would keep people coming back for more, but apparently he’s not into “sharing.”

            • Spackle Motion

              Marty apparently signed a lot of NDAs while he was in the SO although it doesn’t sound like he signed them when he escaped. I suspect that he’s been crying wolf for all of these years with absolutely no intention of revealing shit. He’s only looking out for himself.

            • Poison Ivy

              Look what happened to Scientology the last time they tried to enforce an NDA. If someone signs an NDA and it turns out they are agreeing not to reveal evidence of a crime, that NDA isn’t valid anymore.

            • Jgg2012

              At one time they were the same as the Flat Earth Society, but FES has fallen out of the top 100,000 sites. Too bad–it had as much science behind it as Scientology.

        • Xenu, Lord of Kobol

          Or Rinder ……

      • ze moo

        The B-1 hat is at

        :http://www.scribd.com/doc/4839

        • FLUNK_101

          You are one brilliant bovine!

          • ze moo

            Chuck Beatty posted that address below. We should be thanking Frank Oliver for saving that material. All of clamatologys sacred writings are all over the net, you just have to find it and sometimes trust a zip file on pirates bay.

          • FLUNK_101

            Here are the Scientology crop circles, to help guide L Ron Hubbard back to Earth, and the logo for Kools, his favorite cigarettes.

            • richelieu jr

              That penguin knows something… He looks like that clear Beghe was looking for!

        • Spackle Motion

          The link doesn’t work. it says that the material was removed due to copyright issues.

          • Poison Ivy

            Yes, personally, I always copyright all my own writings that encourage people to lie and break the law as well.

      • Poison Ivy

        Yes, that would be something for Tony O to investigate! (In his copious spare time…;-)

  • Truthiwant

    Looking at Carol Nyburg’s interview, she says that she had to write 20 pages of crimes just for saying ‘No’ to David Miscavige.
    If we put all the comments on The Bunker together regarding Miscavige then I think we would need to open a new paper mill to be able to write up our crimes!

    • Mighty Korgo of Teegeeack

      I think each of has a book in us.

      Chapter One: How I got taken in
      Chapter Two: Early Success
      Chapter Three: Something Smells Funny
      Chapter Four: Ethics Enters the Room
      Chapter Five: Out the Door at Great Sacrifice
      Chapter Six: Figuring It all Out
      Chapter Seven: Twenty Pages of Crimes Against Miscavige
      Postscript: Four thousand Five Hundred and Sixty Two Pages of Crimes Against Hubbard

      • Xenu, Lord of Kobol

        My book would largely be fiction because I was never in.

        Fortunately I could rightfully claim to be as divinely inspired as LRH.

        • aquaclara

          And you could have a little fun supplying the pictures!

    • Xenu, Lord of Kobol

      Except being snarky is covered by the 1st amendment and is therefore not a crime.

      Oops … you’re talking about Scientology, where WOG crimes are scriptural directive and CoS crimes are expressions of basic rights.

      One of these decades I’ll eat that straight.

      In the meantime, just remember that logic pretzel the next time you read OT III or I’m called an evil prince.

      Most days I look like this (its only when I’m pissy that things really turn ugly).

      • BuryTheNuts2

        First smile of the day. Thank you.

  • deanblair

    Jon Atack is an impressive person with considerable writing skills. I think I shall have to buy his book to get some more of his wonderful and descriptive information about the cult that I had been part of for so long. Thank you Jon.

    Karen’s interview with Carol was equally impressive. The producer and director of these video interviews is quite professional and entertaining. I look forward to part 2.

    • Ian

      I bought the book last week on the basis of his contributions here. I’m not finished it yet, but it is excellent. I definitely recommend it.

  • CharleneHux

    Jon Atack is a powerful writer. His intelligence shines, his arguments are concise and impeccable. Thank you, Jon, for all you do and for taking such an essential part in such an important meeting in Copenhaghen.
    (and thanks for the article, Tony)

  • 0tessa

    I would love to read the complete paper.
    Thanks to Jon Atack.

  • BosonStark

    The first time I read about Carol Nyburg and what she did at the Ft. Harrison, even with the differences (cult hotel vs. regular hotel), I thought she would be one person who would be readily employable in the hotel industry upon leaving.

  • chuckbeattyexseaorg75to03

    karen’s videos are excellent, and Angry Gay Pope’s editing is the best. Thankyou Pope!

    “Orgs are in the very new, for this universe, business of setting people free.”

    – L. Ron Hubbard, 13 Jan 1983, policy “The Business of Orgs”, page 83, green volume 0, 1999 edition.

    So of course, Flag Crew Org, is non profit, and the chief accomodations salesperson’s role of ushering parishioners to Flag for their spiritual freedom stay at Scientology’s Mecca hotel, of course is all legitimately non profit and a religious activity!

    LRH from his far off OT running program that he’s still running on himself, circling that distant star he told Steven Pfauth that he planned to go circle, LRH says, good work Flag people!

    • Missionary Kid

      Sad, isn’t it?
      Angry Gay Pope’s videos have certainly improved the quality of presentation of anti-Co$ videos, and combining with Karen, it appears that it’s a perfect match.

      • FLUNK_101

        I liked the video too, and I enjoyed Karen de la Carriere’s performance!

    • Xenu, Lord of Kobol

      The video opening reminded me very much of promotional videos for Walt Disney World – another Mecca in Florida that people flock to (including my wife and Xenu Jr.).

      Having stayed on property and off property at the Mouse House, I can attest to the fact that one gets a more holistic, curated experience staying on property. I’m sure the folks at Flag would make the same argument … which I could find hard to argue with.

      “I’m going to the most theta place on earth to be Cleared!”

      The problem being that in such a curated environment it becomes very easy to separate your mind from your wallet.

      At Disney the worst is that I’ll spend $3 for a $1.25 soda.

      At Flag the worst is the only thing leaving in a state of “Clear” is my bank accounts.

      • Spackle Motion

        I pray to the Mouse on a regular basis. I live very close to the California holy land and I second your statement about what one gets in return for handing over cash to the Mouse House. But one can be strategic about it and save some cash rather than hand over Minnie’s retirement fund.

        I secretly agree that the Florida holy land is much better than my local holy land. But I hold the Mouse as sacred.

        • Xenu, Lord of Kobol

          I remember telling a co-worker I was going to the holy land and this look of awe crossed his face.

          “You’re go to Israel?”

          His reaction to “No, Disney World” was quite memorable.

  • sugarplumfairy

    I’m ashamed that Europeans are so much more proactive than we are in attempting to understand and manage this evil entity that was spawned by an American sociopath..

    • BuryTheNuts2

      Well SPF,…In many ways the USA has “politically corrected” itself right into a corner.
      We are so afraid of stepping on anyone’s toes that when we need to slay a dragon, we instead buy it lunch!

      • Gerard Plourde

        I think that there is a danger in censoring beliefs, but like Sen. Xenophon believe that criminal actions should be prosecuted fully. Unfortunately, as has been pointed out often on this site, many exploited and abused Scientologists have been brainwashed into submission and wouldn’t cooperate with an investigation.

        • BuryTheNuts2

          Absolutely true. But the propensity for everything to be written, and with the testimony of exes you would think would be enough to start bringing down the house.

          • Gerard Plourde

            True. But criminal investigations and investigations into potential labor law violations require the injured parties to stand up and in most cases to report within a time frame, usually between 2 to 5 years of the incident. As sad as it is truth and justice sometimes take a long time. Our job is to keep plugging along and to try to not be discouraged by setbacks.

            • BuryTheNuts2

              Well I am game for the plugging along if you are?
              I may get pissy about the setbacks, but I refuse to be discouraged.
              We really are winning…slowly but surely.

            • Gerard Plourde

              Getting pissy about the setbacks is ok. It shows we care.

            • sugarplumfairy

              yep.. The web has changed the game..

            • Xenu, Lord of Kobol

              There are laws being updated and revised for victims of child sexual abuse with regard to statute of limitations in filing complaints.

              Not to equate the two (or appear to minimize one in relation to the other), would it be fair to say that the level of manipulation and trauma are such that similar changes would help provide longer windows for Scientology victims to one out, acclimate to reality, grieve their harms and then seek justice?

              It is easy for the uneducated to say “should have happened immediately” but they have been blessed by not being traumatized.

            • Gerard Plourde

              “There are laws being updated and revised for victims of child sexual abuse with regard to statute of limitations in filing complaints.”

              Absolutely. I think that recognition of the lasting effects of being subjected to cult abuse should be a basis for tolling (i.e. stopping the clock) on the statute of limitations.

            • ze moo

              Laura DeCrescenzo’s law suit has the ability to change the statue of limitations for CO$ crimes in California. There are grounds to appeal all over the place for Laura’s case, but it could be a game changer. I hope other jurisdictions follow California.

    • Roger Larsson

      Americans helped
      Europe to a victory against a European
      sociopath fighting for Arians supremacy in the world 70 years ago. To help
      Americans to a victory against an American sociopath fighting for Thetans
      supremacy is to repay the debt. I don’t criticize any more; I celebrate one of the
      greatest victories in the history won by critics since WW II. Wogs are equal with the elites ELITE!

      • BuryTheNuts2

        Wow Roger, thank you. It is always nice to hear something positive about the US from a European.

      • sugarplumfairy

        One of the many reasons we love you, Roger! Danke..

  • chuckbeattyexseaorg75to03

    thank goodness for Wikileaks, and Frank Oliver sharing his OSA Hat pack with the world, to prove Jon’s point:

    “Hubbard’s Guardian’s Office scripture, as it relates to the harassment of opponents, has never been cancelled and remains in force. It is concealed from the broad membership, issued on a ‘need to know’ basis to those who will perform the dirty tricks…”

    Here’s a priceless link for experts, proving conclusively, Jon’s spoken points:

    :http://www.scribd.com/doc/48399838/Frank-Oliver-Full-Hat

    Frank’s hat pack is a perfect example of a checksheet and the drills and exercises Scientology trains its OSA and DSA staff to perform. Contained in this above link are Innumerable Office of Special Affairs Network Orders, the real deal current “adopted as church policy” policy today. Incredibly important to print off the OSA Network Orders most relevant to hand out to public officials having to deal with OSA PR people, so officials know what the OSA PR peoples’ agrendas and scripts are!

    • AnonymousSP

      ….and thank goodness for you Chuck. You’re always putting things into perspective and sharing the info from all the exes who know the truth.

      • aquaclara

        Double thanks. Much appreciate all that you share. In English.

    • BuryTheNuts2

      Chuck, please tell me you really are going to start that blog!
      You have got way too much data in that brain of yours and it needs to all be in writing.
      You are the “bookend” encyclopedia to Jon Atack!

  • Stuart Young

    This sounds similar to the Kabala scam.

    • BuryTheNuts2

      It is similar.
      But this has left a much more damaging trail of tears.

      • villagedianne

        Agreed. Kabbalah is not as bad. But it also has not been around as long as COS, and I think more stories are going to come out.
        They are currently under IRS investigation, so maybe they will do some self-reforming.

        • BuryTheNuts2

          Or the IRS will give them carte blanche to act like….well…..Scientology???

        • They don’t seem to be getting the media attention they used to. Once upon a time there was lots of media mentions, tied to celebrities like Madonna and Demi Moore going there, wearing red string bracelets, etc.

          I suspect, or at least hope, that the ridiculous, expensive “Kabbalah water” nonsense exposed them to ridicule and stunted their growth.

    • villagedianne

      Kaballah Center is another group that bears scrutiny. Their staff are called Chevre. Stories are starting to come out about Chevre who have worked for them for many years into middle age. They have no health insurance and are depending on Medicaid or begging doctors in the group to treat them for free. This from a group that has A Lot of money. Link here:

      http://www.rickross.com/reference/kabbalah/kabbalah276.html

      I expect more stories like this will come out as the Chevre begin to age and have serious medical problems.

      Here is the Rick Ross page of media stories about Kaballah center. Don’t miss the one about the widow with dementia who gave $600,000. Link:

      http://www.rickross.com/groups/kabbalah.html

      • richelieu jr

        “Chevre’? Really? Goats?

        • Davka

          Chevrai – the root in Hebrew is Chaver, meaning friend. Chevrai can mean in the vernacular “friends”, or “brotherhood” – along those lines…… The plural is Chaverim and Chevrai is another grammatical form, essentially.

          • richelieu jr

            OK. Chevre in French is Goat.

      • ParticleMom

        Thank you for the new rabbit hole!

  • Stuart Young

    Why the hell are people DOING this? What’s wrong with them that they think this is right?

    • villagedianne

      That’s what Scientology watchers have been asking for many years.

      It seems to be a process of gradual long-term indoctrination. People can be led to do evil things if they think they are saving the world.

  • villagedianne

    There are other new-age religions that don’t believe in charity because they believe it keeps people dependent. The goal is to raise people spiritually so that they will be able to take care of themselves. Also the concept of God among some new age groups is evolving from a man upstairs who gives or withholds favors, to a great creative force, or perhaps a higher aspect of ourselves.
    The fact that a religion or group has some fundamentally different beliefs from the established religions does not mean it is bad. What makes a religion or group bad is when it exploits people.

    • Gerard Plourde

      I would submit that the denial of the virtue of charity leads to the concept that one can exploit people. Beliefs have consequences. Religions can be based on bad beliefs.

      • villagedianne

        Not necessarily. Groups that don’t believe in charity per se may give their services or make their spiritual practices available on a free-will donation basis, or charge very little. Perhaps that in itself is a form of charity. These groups are usually small and under the radar. They have not attracted attention by amassing large sums of money or touting celebrity members. Often it is not the belief that is bad, it is the way the belief is used, or the intention behind it.
        Even a group with good beliefs can become corrupt. History is full of examples of this.

        • Gerard Plourde

          “Groups that don’t believe in charity per se may give their services or make their spiritual practices available on a free-will donation basis, or charge very little.”

          I agree, but would categorize those acts as acts of charity. After all, what you propose indicates that the group you posit seeks to benefit society. What I define as charity is based on the original meaning from the Latin “Caritas”, meaning love and concern for the other. The word has been distorted from its original meaning by the rise of organized charities.

      • chuckbeattyexseaorg75to03

        “Religions can be based on bad beliefs….”

        so true, and Scientology isn’t bad because of necessarily their pseudo-therapy or exorcism procedures they must follow to the letter, but because of all their administrative staff in all the bureaucratic sub units, of which the OSA (Office of Special Affairs) have countless exact “adopted as church policy” writings they are required to follow just as faithfully, to the letter, which are not at all what is commonly thought of as religious activity.

        The OSA “bad beliefs” to me, are so easily fixed. Just disband OSA, retire those Hubbard “scriptures” that aren’t religious traditional activities.

        I’d just draw the line on those most offensive parts of Scientology.

        Hubbard obviously cared not for what the definition of religion was commonly perceived to mean, because OSA Network Orders are NOT religious scriptures by the common moral beliefs of people who think of what scriptures are all about.

        • Gerard Plourde

          I agree that the pseudo-therapy is ineffective at worst, but some of the concepts within the material itself is problematic and will require extensive sifting. Treating children as miniature adults because they are immortal thetans comes to mind (As a parent I’m scarred by that image of the child confined in the chain locker on Hubbard’s order).

      • And there are some beliefs that are, in themselves, inherently bad, and only lead to bad things. The idea that one kind of human is less than another. The idea that if bad things happen to you, it is inevitably your own fault.

        Scientology has woven through its belief system the idea that disabled people “pulled it in” and are extremely “low-toned”. LRH famously said the earth would be a better place if everyone under a certain tone died. This is usually quoted in reference to him saying homosexuals were low-toned, but he put disabled people even lower than that. When your belief system is based on victim-blaming, you’ve got an evil belief system.

    • chuckbeattyexseaorg75to03

      Agreed.

      But here’s the key “intelligence” Hubbard comprehensive summary from Hubbard, also proving Jon’s points in his paper.

      http://www.scribd.com/doc/48399838/Frank-Oliver-Full-Hat

      then, go to Page 44 of this link, the checksheet Frank studied, and look at the Hubbard writing Frank as the trainee first had to study on his Hubbard training course:

      *1. OSA NW Order 9, DEFINITION OF INTELLIGENCE

      2. CLAY DEMO: The definition of INTELLIGENCE.

      …..then here’s the quote that the Scientology intelligence staff make their clay demonstrations to depict, this LRH quote from this OSA NW Order 9:

      “Highly Confidential”

      “DEFINITION OF INTELLIGENCE”

      (Taken from an LRH despatch…25 February 1966. …)

      “…Intelligence is the process of informing one’s command
      area of the plans, characteristics and crimes of all opponents to one’s own
      activity and purpose.”

      “-L. RON HUBBARD”

      “Founder”

      “Adopted as official

      Church policy by

      CHURCH OF SCIENTOLOGY

      INTERNATIONAL”

      What got me the most, was the “adopted as official church policy” part, so blatantly freely admitted, and this is what needs be generally known, that these actions are to be expected, as the church of Scientology’s policy.

      When official Scientology failed to throw out entirely their Guardian’s Office era Hubbard scriptures, they have stuck themselves rightfully with the bad image problem that adopting such Hubbard orders, as continuing church policy.

      So Jon is entirely correct in what Jon stated to FECRIS.

      • villagedianne

        Nowhere in my post did I say that Scientology does not have evil written into it’s scriptures. As a Scientology watcher for over 20 years, I am aware of OSA, and Fair Game, etc. What I was addressing was the generalization that if a group differs from established religions, for instance in the belief in giving charity, then it cannot be considered a religion, or must be a bad group.

  • Ze Moo

    Jon Atack writes beautiful prose. I continue to worship him from afar.

  • FLUNK_101

    Last I night, I had a dream that Peter King was a Scientologist!

    (More often than not, I dream about music.
    Example: Recently, I had a dream I was getting ready to go onstage. I was wearing black shoes and pants. The only socks I could find we’re some sweaty, old white gym socks, so I put them on. Suddenly, Michael Jackson burst into the room, pointed at my socks and said, “You are NOT wearing those socks!”

    I really don’t recall having dreams about Scientology for such a long time now.
    30 years ago, around the time I left Scientology, I had a dream my parents wanted to talk to me — they told me they were both “Clear.” Yikes!
    And, when I first got “in,” I had a dream I went to the Scientology mission in the middle of the night, and L Ron Hubbard was there. He had a top hat and cane, and he started doing doing a soft-shoe dance. He sang:

    If you want a cognition,
    Let me do my rendition!

    In a way, the Scientology/Peter King dream might have been about music, too … He supported SOPA, The Stop Online Piracy Act, but he opposed the PRA, The Performance Rights Act. What a pig.)

    • BuryTheNuts2

      Flunk,

      You are unique to the point of downright odd. I mean this exclusively as a compliment.

      You are such an interesting combination of intellect, humor and unpredictability.

      And thank you for the image of the day (you in the socks getting nagged at by Michael Jackson…not Hubbard in a top hat)

      Oh, by the way…Peter King is my Uncle!!!

      • FLUNK_101

        Thx … You are pretty unique too, BTN!
        Is Peter King really your uncle? I apologize for calling him a pig. It wasn’t necessary, and I am very sorry!

        • BuryTheNuts2

          No, I was just fucking with you.
          But I got ya!

          • Missionary Kid

            Oooooooooh, sneaky!

            • BuryTheNuts2

              It is how I roll……….

              But I always immediately fess up when I do something like that, because I am the worlds worst liar.

            • Missionary Kid

              😀

          • FLUNK_101

            : )

      • Xenu, Lord of Kobol

        Uniquely maladjusted but fun to be with?

    • sugarplumfairy

      Last night I dreamed that Chef Gordon Ramsey was a scientologist.. He has the personality for it.. But i was greatly alarmed because I am excessively fond of food and cooking and good recipes.. And let’s face it, there’s only so much even Chef Ramsey could do with beans and rice..

      “there is no love more sincere than the love of food..”
      – either George Bernard Shaw or the Swedish Chef

      • Roger Larsson

        The truth is that I
        dreamed about DM a couple of nights ago. He looked for advice. Where’s Shelly? She’s
        not Sherry, she’s Shelly, she’s a human being. In the dream he wanted to be more human.

        • BuryTheNuts2

          You were dreaming, lol.

        • sugarplumfairy

          That would be a good thing, Roger.. I like your dream..

        • FistOfXenu

          It would be like Pinocchio. He’d have to stop lying and become a real boy.

      • Xenu, Lord of Kobol

        But it would be “fun” to watch him go after COB.

        Gordon: “You call that rice and beans. I call that septic sewage I wouldn’t fertilize my garden with you poor excuse for a middle manager at a Burger King. I’ve scraped better tasting things than that off my boots after walking in a pasture full of cows with diarrhea.”

        Also … just think of all the cameras that Gordon brings with … 🙂

        • sugarplumfairy

          Yah, it would..

    • Spackle Motion

      Funny how many of us have Scientology-related dreams. I had a dream last night that I was still an undergraduate at my very large university (although it didn’t look at all like it in my dream), and I kept getting lost on my way to my comparative religions seminar. I kept walking into classrooms where the students all had Dianetics on their desks or other LRH books. I just knew I wasn’t in the right classroom but I couldn’t find the one I was supposed to be in. It was most bizarre.

      • FLUNK_101

        Excellent. This blog has become part of our collective subconscious, no doubt about it!

  • BuryTheNuts2

    Atack day is my absolute favorite.

    An 800 page training manual on one discipline!
    No wonder Scientologist’s can’t think critically or independently. Their brains are so bombarded with memorizing Hubbard’s shit there is no time or room left for anything else.

    It is as if Hubbard was actually trying to occupy and possess every single brain cell inside the human skull.

    • Missionary Kid

      And the Hub wanted everyone to pay him for the privilege of him occupying their brain.

    • Xenu, Lord of Kobol

      Is there an electronic database of all LRHs writings or is it all in hard copy format?

      Wondering if any could do a “Bible Code” type analysis on secret hidden messages buried in his rants.

      Would we discover the evil: “Forced abortions are good, destroyed families are good, ….”

      Would we discover the inspirational: “Must have people yell at ashtrays long enough to get angry and break ashtray to keep investments in Acme Ashtray upstat for Ideal Org scam.”

      Would we discover the sublime: “Mummy never loved me.”

      Would we discover the truth: “I’m a giant teapot, large and stout. Ready or not, here I spout!”

      • BuryTheNuts2

        I have often thought about what it would take if one cold get access to everything Hubbard wrote or directed.
        How many people would it take to categorize, read, cross reference…ah hell, you would need WATSON to mine the data.

        • Xenu, Lord of Kobol

          I would not trust a computer of WATSON’s caliber to work on this.

          I think that is what led to (feel free to pick):

          1). SkyNet
          2). I, Robot computer deciding we needed watching over
          3). Matrix AI

          • BuryTheNuts2

            Great freaking point!!!

        • Considering what happened when they fed UrbanDictionary.com to WATSON (the resulting torrent of profanity forced them to painstakingly undo it) I wouldn’t want to see the result of feeding WATSON Hubbard’s collected works.

      • ze moo

        The computer/AI world is built on the principle of GIGO. Garbage in, Garbage out. You don’t need an AI to tell you that Hubbtard was nuts. Just read enough of his writings and you get the picture.

      • grundoon

        Here’s one for your Bible Code analysis. What secret message do you think L. Ron Hubbard concealed in this excerpt from Professional Auditor’s Bulletin No. 119, 1 September 1957?

        In South Africa they had a bit of the whip but everybody just gave up. The South African native is probably the one impossible person to train in the entire world — he is probably impossible by any human standard. I’ll give you an example. A South African native is being shown how to sow crops and he has a basket, and he’s got some seed, and he’s walking along back of the harrow disc—and he is supposed to throw seed out this way: seed out this way, seed out that way, seed out this way. A white man is riding a little tractor that’s pulling the disc and scraping the soil for the seed. And this scene was enacted and was witnessed and was told to me with considerable hilarity as some kind of an idea of learning rate. The white man was sitting on the little tractor pulling the harrow, the native along behind him, sowing the seed straight down in handfuls on the ground. The white man got off the tractor, came back to the native, took the basket away from him, put his hand in the basket, threw it to the right, put his hand in the basket, threw it to the left, and gave it back to the native. And the native waited, the white man got on the tractor, drove along, and the native took a handful out of the basket and threw it straight on the ground. So the white man got off the tractor, came back, took the basket away from the native, showed the native, throw it to the right, throw it to the left, gave it back to the native, took his seat again on the tractor, the native followed along behind, took handfuls and threw it straight on the ground! And this went on for a very long time. The native never did throw any handfuls of seed to the right and left. Never did. That is farming in South Africa.

        Now did anything ever come along and change that? Yes. Man had to cease to be Homo Sapiens and had to become Homo Scientologicus in order to accomplish any action that was anywhere near efficient in South Africa. And we have had some auditors in South Africa who have actually succeeded in training natives easily and well and have successfully managed large organizations there. That’s certainly something. Now with these people it was still possible to get something done. But what had this native done? Was this native what we think of as primitive stock? No, we make a great many mistakes. We say a child is in a “native state.” A native is in a “native state.” People are in a barbaric condition and then they grow up and become civilized. How do we know that this barbaric condition isn’t a retrogression from a highly civilized condition back to an Only One category? How do we know that isn’t true? How do we know that that native didn’t at one time achieve a great civilization of culture which then collapsed on him and he went back into a state of being a barbarian? But the point is, is this true that a native is in a clearer state, and is it true that it requires Livingness to advance somebody in that crude state up to a condition of ability? No, that is not true. The child, the primitive, the native, are in retrograded states. They are worse off than somebody who is at a civilized or thinking or analytical level.

        I will give you an interesting example of this. If you can tell the difference between a lot of little kids you run into, and psychos, I’ll give you a medal. Now the funny part of it is that little kids have something to hope for. They have the future to grow up into. And that’s their only asset. Almost everything else is on the debit side of the column. Here is this poor devil who has been slugged, he’s just lost a body, he’s been put into a state of anxiety, here he’s got another body, is it going to get along right or isn’t it? He’s got the hope that it will grow and that alone can carry him forward and color the world brightly for him, but at the same time he is suffering from death shock. And because he is suffering from death shock, he is coming along very timidly with his learning.

        Now that is the condition a little kid is in, and when you KNOW that a little kid is in that condition, boy! can you handle him! You don’t label him with this omnipresent overused term “insane,” or “psychotic,” you don’t do that. This person is having a terrible time trying to adjust himself to his environment and control a body which is suffering from many responses he does not understand, and he is at his wit’s end. The delusions of children and death delusions are quite similar. When a person dies and starts to pull out of that body, he generally snaps in on himself a torrent of facsimiles of one kind or another. He has all sorts of weird things that go “boomp in the night” present themselves at that moment. And very often you get a preclear who is suffering merely from the death shock. And he is psychotic, he’s crazy, he doesn’t know whether he is coming or going. Why? Because he’s surrounded by things he cannot understand—and that is the common denominator of all lack of orientation, of all aberration. It’s being surrounded by things you cannot understand. And a child, surrounded by these things he cannot understand, therefore can produce what we call childhood delusions. But I can’t find any real difference between these childhood delusions and the delusions being suffered by a person about to die or a person in an asylum.

        http://www.cs.cmu.edu/~dst/Cowen/essays/apartheid.html
        http://www.solitarytrees.net/pubs/kotze/kotze.txt

        • Xenu, Lord of Kobol

          Unfortunately the sample is to small to analyze for hidden messages other than:

          * I am a racist and not just a misogynist
          * I randomize second hand stories to create “facts”
          * Scientology makes a new breed of homo (not to be confused with being tone 1.1)
          * I am an idiot

          My sincere apologies if cognition #3 is phrased in an offensive manner. My inner offensive 3rd grade bully momentarily showed up and retrograded my normally polite societal norms. No offense is intended.

        • richelieu jr

          And that Black Man?- Nelson Mandela!.. What a slow learner, that guy!

          Lesson? Get of your fucking tractor Mr Know-it-all whitey and sow your own fucking corn!

  • AnonymousSP

    Love that latest vid. Carol gives a good interview, Karen’s voice asking intriguing questions and the AGP production with a hint of humor. SurvivingScientology is great for getting the word out. Shut down that cult!

    • Missionary Kid

      And, it should be added, AGP does a superb job of editing so the videos are to the point.

      • mirele

        I think this video was the best in the series so far. It’s a great combination of an intriguing topic (money-grubbing at a “spiritual retreat,”), a knowledgeable informant, a skilled questioner and good production values. I do appreciate when AGP puts in a subtitle: SCIENTOLOGESE.

    • richelieu jr

      Interesting subject and I will charitably say that they seem to be learning as they go on…

      I am very glad they are keeping it up, though.

  • Sherbet

    Wonderful distillation of scientology from Jon. Critics often say the problem with scientology is not the beliefs, but the abuses. Jon makes it clear that we DO have to look at the beliefs to understand the abuses. People who say, “I couldn’t care less what scientologists believe” are not looking at the whole picture. Bravo to Atack.

    • Poison Ivy

      “Those of us who have tasted, tried and spat out Scientology”…I love Jon’s writing. He does not mince words but he selects them perfectly.

      • Jgg2012

        Is he referring to kool-Aid?

    • FLUNK_101

      I love what Jon Atack said about Scientology.
      But does that give us carte blanche to discriminate against others based on what they believe?
      Many ideas in Scientology were stolen from other writers such as Freud, Darwin, Korzybski and others. If someone derives some benefit from that, is there anything wrong with that?

      “If people draw some benefit from their involvement, that’s fine.” – Jon Atack

      • Sherbet

        It’s not the discrimination against dogma that’s the problem. It doesn’t matter whether one believes in angels, goddesses, or xenu, and we don’t have carte blanche to discriminate. But if any church promotes greed, lies, and hatred, it is not to be ignored; there is danger there. Where is the spirituality? The scientology party line has always been that dissension means discrimination. That’s just part of the masquerade. You ask: “If someone derives some benefit from something they were exposed to in Scientology, is there anything wrong with that?” I’d like to amend that to “If someone derives some SPIRITUAL or EMOTIONAL benefit…is there anything wrong with that?” and the answer is, probably not, if people don’t mind spending money for self-actualization they could have received elsewhere, possibly for free. But aren’t we all here because we know scientology is a self-help program that became a bloated and powerful cash cow with a legacy of misery? It’s a religion only when it needs to be.

        • BuryTheNuts2

          I am going to add that it is cause (belief) and effect (practices). While some of the beliefs are harmless, and even of some benefit…many (most) of them directly influence the practices that make Scientology extremely dangerous.

          Unfortunately, because of the way LRH structured his Hydra….he made it very difficult for a person to get any of the good without a free bag of evil attached.

          For the ones that did get some benefit from Scientology without any major suffering…great!

          Flunk, you were one of the lucky ones and there is no reason you should say it was anything more or less than it was in your experience.

          But unfortunately, it seems that it is not the experience of the majority of people who have been touched by scientology.

          • Sherbet

            You said it better than I did, Bury.

          • FLUNK_101

            Thank you Sherbet, I appreciate your response, and I don’t mean to trivialize the evil of Scientology just because my experiences might not have been as horrible as someone else’s.
            I loved Jon Atack ‘s overview because he sees the big picture. He exposes Scientology for the evil, anti-social thing it is.
            But It seems to me that all human beings have beliefs of one kind or another.
            That’s all.
            Thank you Sherbet!

            • Lady Squash

              Excuse me, but what religious organization “believes” its followers should set out to utterly destroy its critics. There are lines and Scientology crosses them.
              And where is the charity toward the poor. There is none. Scientology is for the able. The disingenuousness sickens me. It is a psycho-therapy that may or may not help someone.

            • FLUNK_101

              Good point, Lady Squash. And Scientology does more than “cross the line.” It was designed to manipulate, control and exploit, from the very beginning … but still, not every person who got into it is evil to the core. But that’s the whole point, isn’t it? It tricks otherwise intelligent people into doing stupid things.

            • DeElizabethan

              That’s for sure Flunk!

        • DeElizabethan

          Insidious cult!

      • grundoon

        “But does that give us carte blanche to discriminate against others based on what they believe?”

        No. We can’t really know what people believe. We can only judge them on their words and actions.

        The disapprobation directed at L. Ron Hubbard, David Miscavige, the Scientology enterprise, its apparatchiks and water carriers, and those who have fallen under their influence, proceed directly from their words and, above all, their continued and repeated actions.

        • BuryTheNuts2

          apparatchiks
          word of the day!

          • Missionary Kid

            Straight out of the Cold War.

        • FLUNK_101

          ” We can’t really know what people believe”

          In a Daniel Dennett lecture on YouTube, he talked about a survey that was done which revealed that a significant percentage of Christians think of their belief as a concept, and in that sense, they are no different than an Atheist, because Atheists believe in concepts as well.
          You can’t always judge a book by it’s cover.
          We all have beliefs, and I think it’s important to approach the subject of belief with compassion and respect.

          • BuryTheNuts2

            Thanks for this link, Flunk.

            There is a good “panel discussion” at the below link as well (although this is from a more political stance related to belief):

            http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=qtBsZZ7veaI

            Richard Dawkins, Daniel Dennett, Sam Harris and Ayaan Hirsi Ali are on the panel.
            The only thing missing…sadly…is Christopher Hitchens.
            It is a good discussion. I was not familiar with Ayaan Hirsi Ali and found her very erudite and impressive.

            • FLUNK_101

              “The only thing missing…sadly…is Christopher Hitchens.”
              And the concomitant “journalistic rocket fuel!” (John P ‘s euphemism for alcohol)

            • BuryTheNuts2

              Touche’

          • BuryTheNuts2

            Damn Flunk! I might be an atheist!

            • FLUNK_101

              If we all agree that we are sentient beings, but can’t explain how or why, who are we to argue about God?

            • BuryTheNuts2

              Ironically….the fact that we are sentient beings is what gives us the capability and propensity to argue at all.

              After all…what would we all have to talk about if each and every one of us didn’t see things from a slightly different view.

              Respect should always have a bi-directional flow.
              And as long as there is respect, it is always OK (necessary even) to argue.

            • DeElizabethan

              I agree with you BTN. a different view fine, but we can ague and it is necessary when you looking at an evil slimey cult who takes advantage of people who are sincere or honest and overthrow, control them with their shit. Respect goes out the door for the Scientology organization where the individuals are duped and lied too. Besides, they don’t recognize any God, so what’s to argue on that. They think they are God!

        • richelieu jr

          I once spent an evening with Mr Hitchens and I hope there is an afterlife for my liver.

      • jensting

        It’s not the beliefs inspired by Freud (or by Marvel comics) – it’s the belief that it is necessary to eliminate the “SP” who stands in the way of “man’s only hope for eternity” – or whatever. Without the PTS/SP “tech” there would not be such a big problem.

        Gerry Armstrong spoke eloquently about this in Dublin.

        https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=F2X0-XvJclo

        • FLUNK_101

          Excellent point, Jentsing.
          I speaking about belief in more general terms. We all have our beliefs. So, even if I disagreed with someone or their belief system, I would be hesitant to tell to tell that person, “Everything you believe is wrong” … unless I was going for shock-value, but still, the person would have to be ready for that, or they’re just going to get offended and not want to talk to me.

          • jensting

            Well, obviously, I think you should be allowed to speak in generalities. Others might disagree…
            Seriously, the belief in PTS/SP becomes a problem because of the actions taken. Those who who simply “disconnect” are practising shunning which is unpleasant. Other actions are unacceptable and prove all the atheists right when they blame religions for making good people do evil things. (They’re being narrow-minded, the atheists, IMHO; all extreme beliefs can lead to extreme actions, not only religious extreme views…)

    • OTVIIIisGrrr8!

      This fellow Jon A. Tack does not understand Scientology and never will.

      It is a fact that all religions enshrine Felonies as Sacraments and we in the Church of Scientology are no different in this respect.

      Indeed, Pope Benedict had to quit his post lest his numerous crimes were exposed.

      Quite honestly, this would all be so much easier for everyone involved if the Church of Scientology ruled the planet as will happen within months.

      When the Church of Scientology rules the planet, there will be sanity and large banquets will be held each night for IAS Patrons in our millions of Ideal Orgs.

      It will be an ideal scene:

      http://i1284.photobucket.com/albums/a563/OTVIIIisGrrr8/DSC00462a_zps9883e59c.jpg

  • N. Graham

    Scientology is probably the only religion that practices “negative charity,” that is, charity that takes away as opposed to giving to mankind. For instance, the CCHR’s goal is to eliminate psychiatry, although CCHR is still living in the 1950s and battling electroshock and lobotomies. Eliminating psychiatry now would set back many people who are able to live normal lives due to pharmaceutical intervention. Scientology’s stance on medicine is especially medieval, especially when need blood pressure and diabetes medications are taken away from Narconon patients. More negative charity: Convincing firemen to undergo Purification Rundowns, thus preventing them from seeking more valid medical solutions. the hubris of thinking their phony rundowns and processes will help accident victims, the teaching of brain-stopping, context ignoring “study” technology, stunting many students’ academic progress. And this is just the tip of the iceberg of what havoc a criminal organization can inflict on society.

    • Michael Leonard Tilse

      “negative charity” great description! But that would still make it a charitable organization wouldn’t it? “We take charitable contributions from people until they are poor and bankrupt.” What a mission statement!

  • Alice Flynn

    Many religious cults do not teach or promote charity. Church Universal and Triumphant (Summit Lighthouse) teaches not to give charity, as blocking the suffering of others means you are keeping that person from learning a lesson from their suffering. It is a backwards thinking that promotes giving only to the cult, not giving or volunteering to help others. A member of C.U.T. told me this belief of theirs when I asked if he would help on a Habitat for Humanity project. A cult leader can channel all the money and work to the cult by making up some reason why the followers should not have charity for others. It is a common ploy.

    • RMycroft

      Besides, CUT doesn’t believe in Habitat for Humanity stuff, they want Survivalist bunkers. (Gah, the Wikipedia article is full of cites of the usual suspect scholars saying that they’re not so bad.)

  • L. Wrong Hubturd

    I just saw this headline on CNN and immediately thought of the Bunker:

    • grundoon

      L. Ron Hubbard built only half a bridge. You only ever see one end of it. No, it’s not safe.

      • richelieu jr

        And Sarah Palin was against that bridge from the moment she stopped being for it!

  • Xenu, Lord of Kobol

    Why does COB refuse to use a computer? He’s seen 2001: A Space Oddity.

    He gets enough counter intention from the future SPs reporting to him.

    • richelieu jr

      Eight words DM has never heard.

  • Spackle Motion

    Atack’s statement should be published widely. I often get frustrated trying to explain my Scientology fascination and I know that many of my relatives probably think I’ve got a strange obsessive hobby. I am looking forward to the day when they are taken down in grand fashion and the truth becomes widely known. I’m sure my strange, obsessive hobby will be looked upon differently by others at that point.

    Anyone that respects and desires a just world should know of the evil that permeates in our own back yard.

  • chuckbeattyexseaorg75to03

    “You will have to defend to a certain degree. But if you use 75% of your energies to attack, you will always win.”

    . . .

    “L. RON HUBBARD
    Founder
    Adopted by
    CHURCH OF SCIENTOLOGY INTERNATIONAL”

    from OSA Network Order 40, excerpt of tape lecture by Hubbard of 21 Oct 1963.
    It’s from the Class 6 auditor training course lectures, this above datum.

  • California

    A bit off-topic but…..

    A week ago today, SCN’s CCHR staged a demonstration against the American Psychiatric Association’s meeting in SF. JohnP and others questioned whether all the marchers were somehow affiliated with CCHR or part of other groups.

    And it was hard to determine.

    This past week the SF Weekly published an article by Joe Eskenazi about “Occupy the APA” and its decision to protest on SUNDAY and stay as far away from SCN/CCHR as possible, physically and ideologically.

    Here is the link: http://www.sfweekly.com/2013-05-22/news/dsm-5-scientology-american-psychiatric-association/

    I did not go to the Sunday demonstration and have no idea how many showed up for “Occupy the APA.”

    • Xenu, Lord of Kobol

      Thank you for the link. Favorite quotes:

      “That’s because while the CCHR describes itself as a “psychiatric watchdog,” it’s also an offshoot of the Church of Scientology — which wants to do to psychiatry what your dog wants to do to a squirrel.”

      Having a straw man is handy for the psychiatrists and drug companies who stand to financially benefit from the DSM-5’s proscriptions. Says Gottstein with a sigh, “If the CCHR didn’t exist, the psychopharmoceutical complex would have to invent them.”

  • This is the best denunciation of Co$ that I have ever read, so clear and too the point, perfection. Thank you Jon.

  • ze moo
    • Gerard Plourde

      I was surprised by the apparent lack of sock puppet comment following a funny and vicious slapdown. The blog post has been up since Thursday.

    • Xenu, Lord of Kobol

      Favorite quote:

      The Scenic Toiletists have lots of different programs to help you, your business, and your community. In case you’re easily confused, they kindly gave each program a super obvious acronym. It’s like each of their programs got its name by writing a letter to Dear Abby.

      Best response screenshot below:

      • aquaclara

        This is great!

    • Michael Leonard Tilse

      That was funny! The snark is strong in this one.

  • Michael Leonard Tilse

    Jon’s piece is brilliant! Thank you.

    I know that for the uninitiated, to speak in such strong terms seems intolerant. But with not too much research, it becomes evident that even stronger opinions are justified, even necessary. Scientology is saturated with hubbard’s paranoia. It leads them down very dark paths. Many who are in scientology are not aware of what goes on behind the frozen affect of OSA or the crimes they commit. They have been told “acceptable truths”. It is almost unbelievable that scientologists would accept from their highest leaders an explanation of “They were convicted of stealing copier paper” for the imprisonment of 11 of their top people, including the wife of the founder of scientology. But, the paranoia that threads through all scientology studies that “they” are against scientology and want to destroy it results in an acceptance of this lie. I was a scientologist at the time of the FBI raid, indeed, I was there. I accepted this “acceptable truth” because I too had ingrained the paranoia.

    It goes like this: KSW says scientologists, (me), are the only hope for the universe. Many other references detail who is working against scientology to prevent the salvage of the universe so they can keep us as unknowing slaves; the psychs, the bankers, the intelligence agencies, even our own reactive mind.

    So hearing that they were convicted of stealing copier paper, I internally provided the context in which I could believe this statement. I knew the evil ‘they’ were out to get scientology, so they must have fabricated evidence and planted it in our church so they could justify the raid by the FBI and destroy scientology. BUT, our management, the guardian’s office are so ethical that the only crime they could manage to make stick was stealing a few sheets of copy paper from a public library! And then threw an obviously unjust and excessive penalty on eleven top scientologists.

    Of course! That’s it!!! Just another battle against the evil psychs/bankers/military/reactive mind///. Onward! We are winning because “they” are being so frantic!

    It disturbs me a bit that I can still channel this paranoid, loony scientologist viewpoint, but it is useful for showing what society is up against.

    I re-read the FBI “stipulation of evidence” that the eleven scientologists agreed to. It is still mind-boggling in it’s detail of scientologists doing their day-to-day job of burglary, theft and lies, all justified as ‘saving the planet’. A true banality of evil.

    • richelieu jr

      Now, to be fair, that was some very nice paper. Nothing but the best for the FBI!

      Mrs Hubbard should have counted her blessing they dropped the paper clips charges!

    • DeElizabethan

      Is’t that the truth? We just believed it, sad. Thank good ness we woke the F up! Cheers for the Holiday and waking the F up!!

  • Still_On_Your_Side

    I have never been a Scientologist, but the more I learn of Miscavige’s insane treatment of church members, the more I realize that his agenda isn’t religious based. His play book is straight out of Disney from the 60s and Las Vega from the 40s-80s. His agenda is to purge Scientology of everything remotely human that existed under Hubbard, including Hubbard’s direct followers. They ask too many questions, they remember a more compassionate (relatively) organization, and, most importantly, they haven’t been 100% molded by Miscavige. Therefore they don’t worship him, or money. If you are reading this, and you are still in the church, and you are over 40, watch out. Miscavige doesn’t trust you, no matter how many times you salute him, you remember when the church was not an armed camp that worshipped money. You “harbor” negative thoughts about Miscavige, and you will be purged soon. If you fail, like Allender did with Bunker and Rathbun, and you are over 40, Miscavige believes it is because you are planning to stage a coup.

    Anyone that doesn’t fit a profile that Miscavige has created is being squeezed out, literally. He allows them to stay as long as they are a source of many dollars. He is not interested in a workforce over 40. He is not interested in anyone who wants to study or “go up the bridge.” He is interested in a Benny Hinn type of operation, lots of flash, with a limited focus on “theology,” and the use of auditing/courses solely for money making purposes. Miscavige wants to turn Clearwater into a combination of Orlando and Las Vegas, the only thing missing will be the rides and the show girls (for now). Each Idle Org is designed to be the local franchise of the Clearwater “world of tomorrow.” The biggest reason he opposes the Indies is fear that the Indies will dilute the brand of the Clearwater spectacle, especially among young people. He could care less about the theology. He wants a “cool” flashy religion that will sell CDs and tshirts, make movies and TV shows, hold beauty and talent contests and make a billion dollars of tax-free income a year. (With rap added in, ala Will Smith, http://www.thedailybeast.com/videos/2013/05/25/will-jaden-dj-jazzy-jeff-alfonso-ribeiro-rap.htm).

    I now realize that Miscavige’s other model is not Jim Jones, it is Bugsy Siegal, and the crowd that built Las Vegas, and the lawyers that bought Florida for Disney ( very quietly). The Indies and Scientology-watchers could destroy this, and he is desperately trying to destroy them or buy them off. I have no idea who his real backers are, but I imagine they do not want Miscavige being deposed or the church indicted. Miscavige hasn’t done a very good job of making the church look good. What a mess it must be for him, and his true backers, to have Narconon raided, and investigated, and to have so many exposes.

    • Still_On_Your_Side

      I have to add this, imagine a Brandon/Disneyland/Las Vegas version of the church. A simulated trip to Venus, complete with train, and a room full of ” auditors” in mini skirts (women) or muscle tshirts, (men), with lights hitting jackpot when someone goes clear (only $1000 a try). Do you the IRS will notice or will they think it’s just a new religion’s “growing pains”?

    • ze moo

      While I like your comparison between Miscavige and Bugsy Siegal, I think davey’s personal ideal is Joseph Stalin. Davey’s nipples get hard for power, not money.

  • dwayners13

    I would really be interested to hearing/reading the reactions of scientologists to this description/analysis of their ‘religion’ including current members & those who describe themselves as ‘independents’. In my humble opinion this is perhaps one of the best critiques of Scientology I’ve read in a long time.

    • Missionary Kid

      They won’t actually read it because it is entheta, and declared so by the church. If they make any comments, they will consist of the usual attacks on Atack. I like the alliteration of Atack attacks.

  • Observer

    I think Sheriff Joel Kerns needs to read this, but somehow I get the feeling that reading may not be among his top 10 favorite activities.

    • BuryTheNuts2

      Sweet burn!

      • Missionary Kid

        V is for Vendetta is on, and the TV network in it is BTN, for the British Television Network. When I saw that, I thought of you.

        • BuryTheNuts2

          You poor thing….now I am haunting your real life!

          • Missionary Kid

            Ah! Sweet dreams!

  • Mary_McConnell

    Thanks for all you are doing, Jon Atack!

  • Mary_McConnell

    I love that interview of Carol Nyburg! Can’t wait to see more!! Thank you Karen and Angry Gay pope )

  • TheLurkingHorror

    “Then, given its own history, perhaps it isn’t so very strange that the IRS would regard harassment as a religious duty.”

    lol… ZING.

    Great piece. I wish everyone who thinks scientology is just another wacky cult would read it.

  • aquaclara

    Love you, Carol! This is a great video by Angry Gay Pope and Karen and you!

  • California

    More from David E. Love on Sheriff Joel Kerns and Gary Richardson’s responses to his statements:

    http://www.examiner.com/article/i-would-rather-have-a-live-scientologist-than-a-dead-kid

  • Bella Legosi

    Hey ZeMoo, just a heads up, I just got back home and on here……Disqus says I have 8 replies from you! But they were all from months ago! So sorry if I ignored ya! Disqus disconnected us!

  • jensting

    Excellent article from Jon. I just finished the new print of “A Piece of Blue Sky” and recommend it.

    Speaking of Copenhagen, there appears to be a recruitment drive for a “European Ideal Narconon” located 45 km from Copenhagen. http://forum.reachingforthetippingpoint.net/index.php/topic,12477.0.html

  • OTVIIIisGrrr8!

    COB RTC David Miscavige was inspecting the mailer for the young peoples convention on The Freewinds.

    In the middle he spotted a picture of young Taiwanese floating in the water in life preservers. COB correctly determined that these teenagers were stowaways (as are all Taiwanese on ships anywhere).

    http://i1284.photobucket.com/albums/a563/OTVIIIisGrrr8/stowaways_zpsede42db6.png

    COB ordered them to be held in the engine room of The Freewinds where they are being forced to work long hours. Their Scientologist parents have wisely decided that keeping their OT Eligibility is more important than squawking about their children who are now in the Sea Org.

    So yes, please send your children to the ship — particularly if you want your OT Eligibility!

  • Shawn Kearney

    For the life of me I don’t understand why people care how rich people waste their money.