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Scientology’s Needle Exchange: When David Miscavige Got Technical

EmeterClaire Headley is taking us on our journey to train as Scientologists. She and her husband Marc were Sea Org workers who escaped from Scientology’s International Base in 2005. She spent years working with Scientology’s “tech,” and was trusted to oversee the auditing of Tom Cruise. Go here to see the first part in this series.

Claire, after last week’s interruption for a discussion of “disconnection,” we’re getting back to our progression in Scientology this week.

CLAIRE: Yes, let’s get back on track! After Pro TRs and Upper Indoc TRs, our next step is the Professional Metering Course.

First, I’d like to point out that this course was not on the Bridge when I started my auditor training. But it is now.

THE BUNKER: That seems unusual. Since founder L. Ron Hubbard died in 1986, technical matters in Scientology tend to be set in stone. What happened?

CLAIRE: This is a course that David Miscavige directed after two things had happened in the mid-1990s.

The first was that he found out pretty much all auditors were “falsely calling F/Ns.”

An F/N is a floating needle, a needle movement on the e-meter that is supposed to indicate some sort of release of charge.

My memory is that it is defined as “the rhythmic sweep of the dial at a slow even pace of the needle, back and forth, back and forth.”

In Scientology auditing, you run a process, a series of commands or steps. These are often repetitive processes (where the same question or series of questions are asked over and over again) until the “EP” or end phenomena is achieved.

The end phenomena of a particular process is generally comprised of 4 things:

1. VGIs — very good indicators.
2. F/N — a floating needle
3. Cognition — a realization about life
4. Release — a release of charge and, basically, an improved outlook on life.

But after Miscavige changed things, suddenly the only thing that became really important was #2, the floating needle.

THE BUNKER: So let us get this straight. Around 1995 or so — about nine years after the death of L. Ron Hubbard and Miscavige’s takeover — Miscavige suddenly changed the focus of how auditing was judged. During auditing, a subject is asked a question or a series of questions, often with what to an outsider seems a maddening level of repetition. This is supposed to bring about a “release of charge,” and a result that is a benefit to the subject. But rather than a well-rounded approach on the person and how they were doing, suddenly Miscavige wanted people to pay almost all of their attention on something technical — how a needle on the e-meter reacted.

CLAIRE: Yes, that’s exactly right. All of a sudden, there became an extreme focus on mechanics, not people.

I really didn’t understand why this became the focus. From my perspective, Miscavige had been tied up in legal matters until 1993. I’d never considered him a “tech” guy. He was the head guy.

Up_The_BridgeHe didn’t get involved in the technical side of things. Ray Mithoff did that. After all, the tech training Miscavige did was in the 70s as a teenager at Saint Hill in England. Now, suddenly, he was the expert and made this major change.

He then issued an “amnesty,” where anyone trained as an auditor was to write up all of their “crimes” of falsely calling F/Ns.

It’s hard to explain the impact this had.

But I can tell you without a doubt that it had a huge impact on pretty much anyone who was in Scientology.

All of a sudden, you’d have auditors riveted to the E-meter, staring and “waiting” for the F/N, no longer really interested in the person in front of them — they were paranoid about “mis-calling” an F/N.

THE BUNKER: Wasn’t there also something about Miscavige redefining a floating needle so that it needed a precise three-time back and forth, which also made things more difficult?

CLAIRE: Yes, the focus on at least three swings back and forth was intense. Any auditor who “falsely called F/Ns” was assigned a condition of Treason. Repeated offenses were met with Committees of Evidence, the Scientology justice action that I’ve heard is similar to a tribunal.

THE BUNKER: So what happened after an auditor determined that a proper floating needle had occurred?

CLAIRE: After a session you go to the Examiner, who then has you hold the cans and checks to make sure that you have the four signs of having achieved the end phenomena.

But all of a sudden there were many “red tags” — in other words, the Examiner flunked the subject for no floating needle or bad indicators.

The Religious Technology Center [Scientology’s controlling entity] and David Miscavige would watch videos of all session F/Ns. And this is the back story of how Miscavige ended up involved in and supervising Lisa McPherson’s auditing. You see, she was one of those who flunked at the Examiner.

The story I heard is that Debbie Cook ended up taking Lisa in session to handle the red tag after no one else could, and that was with direct coaching and direction from Miscavige. I wasn’t there, but that’s what I heard.

THE BUNKER: So here was a woman — Lisa McPherson — who obviously had major problems, but because Miscavige was focused on her needle’s reactions (while watching videos of her sessions remotely, from across the country), he passed her as “Clear” when she was actually on the verge of a major breakdown? (She then was held at the Fort Harrison Hotel under church care and died after 17 days, leading to one of Scientology’s all-time worst press nightmares.)

CLAIRE: I really can’t say what might have happened. But I am saying Miscavige was intimately involved. And this is what led to him being so involved with Lisa specifically.

Another change that happened is that David Miscavige redefined an “instant read.”

In Scientology processing, the way you determine what processes to run is by asking a question. If you get an “instant read” — a reaction of the needle at the very end of your question — that means it is “charged” and you run that process.

Once again, the result was that auditors were sunk into the mechanics, instead of the focus being on the person in front of them.

So this was the birth of the Pro Metering Course.

In the course, you do all E-Meter drills 3 times over. There are 26 drills in full. Some of the drills include:

— Reach and Withdraw on the E-Meter
— How to do “Can Squeeze.” This is where you set the E-Meter sensitivity for the individual person
— What did the needle do while reading the line
— Instant reads
— Assessments (where you call off a list and mark which items on the list react)

The assessments are done on lists of insignificant items. For example:

What is your favorite country?
United Kingdom?
Sweden?
Norway?
USA?

The total list is probably 50 items.

The final step of the Pro Metering Course is to get a video pass on a “Drill session.” This then had to be passed by RTC.

In 1996 I was at Flag as an RTC Rep in training. We were charged to get all outer org trainees through Pro Metering. I don’t remember the exact numbers but I believe it was around 350 people.

It was a boat load of videos.

And anyone who had ever been trained as an auditor was required to do this new course and then re-do all their auditor training from the bottom up with the release of the Golden Age of Technology. So that meant even more repetition and re-doing of steps already done and completed. And for the public, that meant more money down the drain.

THE BUNKER: And it meant a real headache for one person in particular. As we recall, this new focus on the mechanics of the needle put you into an interesting situation with Tom Cruise.

CLAIRE: Yes, that’s right. Tom Cruise was at the Int Base in 2003 and I was his examiner. He had no F/N so he was red tagged.

THE BUNKER: So he had finished a process, but then had come to you to sign off on it, and when you didn’t see the proper floating needle, you didn’t pass him.

CLAIRE: Yes, and it became a huge flap with Miscavige. I didn’t know it, but Tom was scheduled to leave the next day. And because he was red tagged, he would have to go back in session to correct that. Well, that went over like a fart in church.

The next thing I know, Miscavige is writing out an “R-factor” [“reality factor”], telling Cruise it was all a big mistake and that he’s awesome and good to go. And that was that. All of a sudden, all those years of focus on mechanics and the man himself could set his own rules and do whatever worked out for him. It was an extremely eye-opening experience.

THE BUNKER: Sounds like it was. According to the 2001 price list, the cost for this course is $5,000. Total so far: $22,697.

Thank you for another great look at how Scientology works, Claire.

 
——————–

Posted by Tony Ortega on July 30, 2013 at 07:00

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  • Observer

    Ah, yes, Big Being #3 Tom Cruise doesn’t have to follow the rules because the esleaziastical leader of his cult doesn’t want Tom to be mad at him. Meanwhile everyone else is out through hell to ensure they confirm to COB’s apparently arbitrary change to an inherently worthless process (hey, he changed the “tech”–that makes HIM a squirrel!) that serves only to put more money in Davey’s pockets.

    Claire, I am so glad you got out. Thank you for working with Tony on this series.

    • MissCandle

      So now we all know that Tom Cruise is a {religious} fraud.
      And that his huge freedom medal is worthless because it was based on fraud.
      And we know that he knows it.
      {Maybe he is a good actor, after all.}

    • OTVIIIisGrrr8!

      We were there at Int Base in 2003 when Admiral Cruise red tagged. It was shocking. It was as if the entire universe stood still and all of its circuits froze. There was no apparent motion and all flows across all dynamics were stuck.

      COB was in vital a planetary-changing meeting wherein he was looking at carpet swatches for the latest remodel of his quarters at the Base. Just as he was fondling a luxuriant swatch of chocolate Berber, he got the shocking news that Admiral Cruise had red tagged.

      COB has spent and tens of thousands of hours delivering auditing to pc’s over decades and so he instantly knew that red tagging Tom Cruise was completely squirrel. The fact is that Mr. Cruise has a permanent and unkillable F/N and that is why the red tag was was completely squirrel. Everyone around COB agreed with him when he called it a squirrel red tag.

      COB immediately R factored Admiral Cruise that he was clear to leave Int Base and go back to making Oscar-winning films. That’s when all of the flows unstuck and the universe resumed its motion. That is how powerful COB is, he is the biggest being in this or any other universe.

      COB’s eval acted as a BDFN item for Admiral Cruise who had never failed to F/N in any session ever. Indeed, Tom Cruise F/N’s as readily as Kirstie Alley tweets vulgarities. Mr. Cruise’s name might as well be “Mr. F/N” because he is on a persistent F/N in life. He is a winner.

      COB RTC David Miscavige continues on unabated in his never-ending technical rampage with the Golden Age of Tech Phase II and the release of Super Power.

      Flag is so crowded these days that the City of Clearwater has sank something like five feet. The City is asking Flag to shift a few million Scientologists to outer Orgs so that Clearwater does not sink underwater.

      • MarionDee

        You are always funny, OT8etc. (though I don’t know how your Scionicity will feel about that remark), and the last paragraph (five feet!) should win an award.

      • DodoTheLaser

        COB should allow Admiral Cruise to do OTVIII already.
        The entire universe will piss itself laughing and we all will go Clear!

  • Mark

    Poor Lisa McPherson died a horrible death because of the whims of a technological analphabet – Miscavige – concerning a device – the E-meter – that is as much practical use as a chocolate teapot. This is not just nonsense on stilts, but tosh perching on Everest.

    All praise to Claire for her precise and devastating exposures.

    • sugarplumfairy

      But dozens of people along the way, at least one of them a physician, could have stepped in and changed her outcome.. All Lisa needed, in that huge building full of the most ethical people on the planet, was just ONE single person with a little common sense and enough balls to do the right thing..

      • Mark

        Well said.

      • shasha40

        I think they all start truly ethical and decent , then Scientology strips them of individuality ,( balls and all !) and turns them into fearful conformists ” for the greater good”. One individual doesn’t count and their ” the right thing ” compass is broken, the needle just goes around and around .

      • Sam

        I remember Lisa. She was on my board at FLAG when she came with the big group from Texas the first time. She was a very sweet lady. Then she returned a second time on her own. I remember her being bounced from board 1 to board 2, and then even put on the L’s board (where the higher trained auditors were stationed). The board I/C (in charge) is the person who keeps track of where the PCs are at any given time and makes sure that they are ready for session when needed. We all had our own system of marking the board and you had to know what all of the different symbols meant to understand what was going on at any given time. I would say that most visitors would not have been able to just walk up and “read” the board, but all of the tech staff understood the “language”.

        Even though Lisa wasn’t on my board at the time, I’m sure she would have been taken off the board so that people couldn’t just come up and see what was going on. There was no secret symbol for “being held captive”. There would only have been a very few people who knew what was going on. It would not have been out there for any one who could read the board to see.

        Because the board is visible to the public, there were several measures that were routinely taken to hide information that was not for public consumption. VIP’s were given fake names, fake PCs were put on the board to make the line look longer, etc.

        I’m just trying to say that almost all of those “most ethical people on earth” had absolutely no idea what was going on with Lisa. We didn’t even know that there was anything wrong. I remember Debbie Cook making an announcement at the after lunch roll call telling us that a parishioner had died of natural causes and that the enemies of the church were using this as a call to protest. I didn’t hear of Lisa again until years later when I was out. I started my routing out process very soon after Lisa died.

        I know none of this changes anything, but I just wanted to give an insider perspective.

        • tetloj

          Anything that adds context to the circumstances of Lisa’s death is appreciated Sam (plus it no doubt drives OSA lurkers mad about what might be revealed).

        • villagedianne

          Debbie Cook: chief enabler.

        • i-Betty

          Thank you for this insight, Sam. 🙂

    • KNMF

      Spot on, Mark. See all the fussing and grief over a quack instrument designed to enhance a confidence man’s distraction.

    • Marie Claire Wolf

      Like you, Mark and Observer, I celebrate the Headley. They were marshalled by their parents into the cult and in spite of every fearsome, harassing, and wounding schemes to keep them put and out of touch with their families, they had the strength and courage to get out. They are heros of mine, and I cannot thank Claire enough for the education she is providing here.

      • Sherbet

        What’s amazing to me is that both Claire and Marc got out with their intelligence and sense of humor intact and functioning.

        • Marie Claire Wolf

          No kidding! That is the most salient point of their story they actually did think out of the Co$ box and stuck it out, as such they are a shinning example that you can get out with all your marbles intact. Great!

        • Observer

          I think that’s why, despite its best efforts, the cult’s conditioning didn’t stick. Marc and Claire both are strong enough that their humanity couldn’t be repressed.

          • ThetaBara

            Leah too.
            One question I sometimes ask them in comments is, “is this what you joined Scientology to do?” Because I doubt it.

        • GlibWog

          Sherbet.. You can’t FAKE that smile on his face yesterday ( in front of the Morgue..oops org)

  • aquaclara

    Thanks, Claire. This stuff is gripping. (Ok, bad pun).

    And so we see once again how something that could possibly be relatively harmless-an e-meter- becomes a tool for great harm. the e-meter is a wacky device that holds tremendous power over people, to control them and bend them to the arbitrary will of the cult.

    I am pained by the way Lisa was used in such a shabby way even up front, in a session. What happened afterward is unspeakably evil. It is horrifying to think of all the others who have been hurt by people interpreting something on an electronic gizmo for ill intent.

    • RMycroft

      The way that they drained her bank account after she was dead says a lot too.

  • Layla

    I have been following Tony for a while. I have never been involved in the cult and I don’t know anyone who has. I am riveted because of the inhumanity, and I am looking forward to the fall of DM and his so-called church. Thank you to all the people who post here. To those of you who escaped and whose families have been torn apart, you have my sympathy. Power to the people!

    • i-Betty

      Welcome, Layla. Great to meet you. 🙂

      • cicely neville

        Yes!^^^

  • Simon

    The acronyms and abbreviations these people use are very lulzy. Sec checks, RFP, F/N, PTS, SP. As the brilliant Jerry O’Connell said in his hilarious parody video: “For me, it’s all about KFC. It’s just good chicken. PYT, Pretty Young Thing”.

  • Simon

    Uh-oh, that Narconon thread has vanished. Have the Sciloons been up to their threatening tricks again? I’m pissed because I posted a particularly funny comment about Knight & Day. Damn.

    • sugarplumfairy

      It was prob just premature.. It’ll be back at some point.. We will await your comment with bated breath.. No pressure..

      • Bury_The_Nuts

        You are killing me!

        • Captain Howdy

          She’s on a toot today. Maybe it’s “Taco Tuesday” at the hospital cafeteria.

          • sugarplumfairy

            I plan on being on a toot later today.. It’s chile Tuesday.. We in the confined spaces of the well-ventilated OR suites do love our chile Tuesday..

            • Captain Howdy

              “Beans beans the musical fruit, the more you eat the more you toot”

            • q-bird

              “The more you toot, the better you feel, so let’s have beans for every meal!”

              geez loueeze – jingle from my childhood here, around the dinner table Capt.!

            • CharlieWaters

              Perhaps a jingle sung at the RPF dinner table as well.

            • Robert Eckert

              And when you got slightly older, did they teach you that the poem is supposed to begin, “Beans, beans, they’re good for your heart”?

            • q-bird

              Sure… the more you eat, the more you…. !!!!

              oh! Dad said FART!

              us kids – uproars & giggles & family laughter!
              Mom, settle down an’ eat your dinner.
              ok

              then the little brother actually farts
              OH!!!

              well, i was raised on those dang red beans & rice…. whatcha gonna do?

            • sugarplumfairy

              Lol.. At work all afternoon, i’ve regretted my uncouth de-rail.. I come back to find comments even worse than mine… Thank you to all my bunker brothers for making me feel right at home..

  • Still_On_Your_Side

    Why not just replace the emeter with an electrocardiogram test? Then Miscavige could monitor his subjects heart beat by heart beat? He could even do it with a mobile monitor, and keep track of them moment to moment. It is certainly apparent that the church is now based on Miscavige-theology, and his understanding of technology is the emeter as a form of punishment and electrified fences with razors facing inward. If the church wasn’t a combination of Jonestown and Gulag, with massive human rights violations, it would be laughable. It, however, is nothing more than a prison camp with inmates bending to Miscavige’s every arbitrary and cruel whim.

    • villagedianne

      If Miscavige could do it all by machines with no human element, he would. Of course, that might backfire beause then he would have no one to blame and punish when things went wrong. Well, he could always slap a pre-clear, which is what he is reported to have done at St. Hill to someone he was auditing. He wasn’t leader yet then, was still very young, but already showing extreme aggressiveness.

    • Marie Claire Wolf

      I am surprised that Miscarage has not ordered the cans set up to deliver shocks to any ‘unwanted’ response. That would be just right up his alley, sadist that he is.

      • Interested

        Hey. Don’t give em ideas :-)))

    • Studious Judious

      We have software today that can recognize lyrics in a song, or a face from a digital photo. If they had spent some of those millions they could have easily created software that replaces the e-meter. It could record the entire session, it could continually self calibrate, (no more twiddling of the knobs), etc. Package it with a ‘specially calibrated’ laptop and charge $15,000 for it. DM is a complete fool when it comes to forward thinking. I personally believe that DM knew it was a scam when he took over. I think he has been running in ‘full-burn’ mode trying to milk as much as he can from it before it finally crumbles and he disappears to some nice palace out of the reach of the law. (If that’s even possible.)

      • RMycroft

        Sure, a smart e-meter could be made (I’d use a tablet with a USB dongle) .. but it would still be based on GIGO. (Garbage In, Garbage Out.)

        • Studious Judious

          tablet, definitely!

        • Zana

          GIGOLO$ – Garbage In, Garbage Out, Lots ‘O $$

      • ze moo

        I think you just defined the ‘golden age of tech 3’.

      • Douglas D. Douglas

        Such a device would cost actual money, no? The e-meter is so cheap to make that simply changing the way it is to be applied will garner far more cash. That seems, to me, to be the whole raison for these sudden “revelations.” Everyone needs to be re-trained, at $5,000 a pop? Ka-ching!

        • Studious Judious

          It is much cheaper to distribute software than hardware. And besides they can make a few minor software changes every year and force people to cough up more money for the latest version.

          Oooh, and add a bio-metric scanner so they know exactly who is being audited.

          I’m scaring myself now, must shut up.

          • RMycroft

            Tablets have cameras on the front and back. Just saying.

          • Douglas D. Douglas

            I am thinking the initial actual cost of all that new hardware might be keeping them from moving into the twenty-first century. (You know, where the rest of us have been living for the last 12 years!)

        • stanrogers

          You’d be surprised. Throw a Raspberry Pi (or Arduino or similar SoC-based machine) into the box or base it on a sub-$50 Android tablet (they exist) with a bit of “for Dummies”-level software (you can literally do it on a web page) and you can:

          (a) increase the unit manufacturing cost by a negligible amount, something equivalent to a rounding error on a “new” case design’s tooling;

          (b) charge double or more for the unit itself;

          (c) run (and charge for) all-new courses;

          (d) have a call-home feature for financials;

          (e) permit remote recording/storage of the session;

          (f) provide a live remote “supervisor mode” that’s “silent” and always-available;

          (g) add a new set of “indicators” that you could claim don’t “change the Tech” in any way (you can just see what LRH was talking about more easily now, you see); and

          (h) add “gaming levels” so that it’s easier for PCs to get “wins” early (you don’t want to make it too easy, but their hourly rate is too low so you need them further up the bridge) and harder for sec checks and Solo NOTs and so forth. (Bonus: the user tells you what level they’re playing when they set up the session.)

          I’d like to state that I’m not evil, just creative and kinda up on technology.

          • Robert Eckert

            Fortunately, being creative and up on technology are traits that Miscavige lacks, and that are beaten out of most Scientologists.

          • Douglas D. Douglas

            And, of course, apps to keep track of geo-locations. That would be very appealing, I would think.

          • Once_Born

            A {religion} based on your progress through a video game… Hmm… if someone wanted to make a lot of money, they could start a new religion…

            • stanrogers

              Well, there have been a number of games developed around the theme already (for the lulz), and in-app purchases sound so very innocent, don’t they? Not quite sure how the power-regging would go at this point, but I’m sure I could figure it out. Ideal Data Centres maybe?

      • John P.

        SJ, you are exactly right. A more modern e-meter would be a great revenue source for the cult. Consider that when you do OT VII, endless hours of self-auditing to exorcise all those dead space cooties, you are supposed to pay the cult on the honor system by the number of hours you audit. What are the odds that everyone records the hours scrupulously honestly? Not even the most brainwashed clam is going to put down every single minute so they can pay $600 per hour for the privilege.

        And what about field auditors, the guys who come to your house to audit you on the lower levels? I am sure the temptation to under-report hours and take cash under the table for giving a “discount” on auditing must be irresistible.

        By making Golden Age of Dreck II all about undoing the magical punctuation revisions of the last time around, Miscavige is missing an opportunity. Miscavige is too technically illiterate and strategically incompetent to think of this:

        Suppose he instead introduced a new e-meter that required a live broadband internet connection and a valid user ID before it could be used. It would record the conversation on auditing, potentially with a small Logitech video camera, as well as the meter readings, and send that back to HQ in real time. That way, the cult would get paid for every minute of auditing that takes place; e-meters from people who blew would become inoperative (dealing a blow to “indies” who want to audit outside the official cult), and they would be able to enforce whether the meter showed the right “floating needle” or not.

        Hell, if Miscavige was really shameless, he could even put a credit card reader on the side of the thing, just like they now have little credit card readers for iPhones so people at craft fairs can run your credit card instead of requiring cash. So if you run out of hours on your “Intensive,” the e-meter will beep and refuse to read any longer until you’ve contributed more cash. Kind of like this documentary of a form of “auditing” undertaken before the invention of e-meters, which also includes a tutorial on how to handle requesting more funds from the “pc” before continuing: http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=kQFKtI6gn9Y

        • junojones

          Ya know, suddenly I get that joke from the Austin Powers movie where Dr. Evil is cackling about asking for “One-Million-Dollars!”.

          Wee Davy is operating under a similar lack of technological comprehension.

          Thank Goodness.

          Also thanks for the python!

        • RMycroft

          Pffft! His latest e-meter, rotting in boxes for a decade, has an RS-232 serial port. Nobody makes anything that connects to that these days.

    • grundoon

      The e-meter is nothing but a prop in a ritual whose purpose is to re-enact and dramatize the hierarchy of authority: PC beneath / auditor far above, and the LRH-branded tech and e-meter above all. The e-meter represents the Source of Truth, which the auditor wields and manipulates behind a screen while the PC submits and complies.

      It would be completely pointless for the e-meter to measure anything accurately. If the e-meter were more automatic, it would diminish the role of the auditor and of Hubbard, and weaken the mindfuck. With automatic metering, the auditor would be reduced to a button pusher with the LRH Tech reduced to a pocket sized gadget… the hierarchy of pseudoscientific authority would be flattened or, worst of all for the Chruch, reversed. Hubbard would roll in his gravefishbelly. (David Miscavige loves gadgets and hates auditors, so he’ll do this anyway, footbullet be damned.)

      The only really essential parts of the e-meter are the session timer; the barrier that keeps the PC from seeing what the auditor is doing; and the calibration sticker that keeps the auditor dependent on the Chruch.

  • sugarplumfairy

    Oh. My. Goodness. It’s all soooooo borrrrrrrrring.. The endless questions.. The drills.. The videos.. The courses.. They frking BORE you into submission..

    • SciWatcher

      And ultimately they bore you to death!

  • Gerard Plourde

    If I understand Claire correctly an F/N that doesn’t pass muster with the Examiner results in more auditing sessions for the subject (which cost by the hour?). What a great way to vacuum more money from the vulnerable.

    Re TC’s red tag: I guess it was more important to keep Tom happy at the time.

    • sugarplumfairy

      Bingo! If you were a scientologist, you’d win a sec check.. Not free, of course..

    • Once_Born

      TC must have come to Scientology with a towering sense of entitlement. Most people (including prominent individuals) would have smelled a rat when they found the rules were so easily suspended just for them – maybe even wondered if they were being used and whether they had earned their {progress}.

      That kind of attitude, combined with the power he seems to have in the organisation supports the view that he is an abuser, not a victim

      • Gerard Plourde

        The more we learn the more that it appears to border on the sociopathic.

      • Marie Claire Wolf

        Well, I personally think that down deep ‘big being’ TC has abandonment issues and more than a little bit of insecurities. The brassy one who come on full of vim and aggression are usually nothing but peep-squeeks.
        This is why he bought lock, stock and barrel, the very convenient ‘big being’ thingy.

      • villagedianne

        I’d say that Cruise is accustomed to special treatment. He probably doen’t think about it anymore, just expects it.

        • Once_Born

          Yes, but if you go to a degree mill (like Hubbard did) you have surely got to know that you are not *really* a Phd – and if your auditing failure disappears so easily, you have got to wonder if you *really* passed.

          His personal wealth shows that he hasn’t fallen for many everyday scams. What makes the CofS an exception?

      • Interested

        According to something I read (true one cannot believe everything one reads) re Tommy Davies he said that TC hit him once, but then added “but I deserved it” yikes!

      • q-bird

        bc TC is a BIG BEAN don’tcha know?! The rest of us are just DB’s see?

        From Marty’s book: TC tells Nazanin Boniadi:

        He raised his hand above his head, palm downward. “First, there is LRH.”

        Moving his hand down a couple of inches, he continued: “Then there is COB
        (David Miscavige).”

        He brought his hand down to his own hairline, highlighting the intensity and
        seriousness of his words: “Then there is me.”

        […]

        “Dave and me, we’re big beings. We are surrounded by DB’s (degraded beings).
        DBs can’t help but try to destroy big beings. That’s just the way it is in this
        universe. You have to understand this. This is LRH, man. It’s the plight of the
        big being getting jumped on by all the degraded beings. You gotta be
        unreasonable to survive around a big being like me. You can’t be weak. You
        gotta be strong to protect the big being from all the degraded beings.”

        DM uses a similar gesture while attempting to explain to Ted Kopple who benefits from CO$.
        Note his levels for humanity – at 3 minutes on (2 of 9)

        Ted: “What about those folks down there?

        DM: “Well, yes, no, we we we don’t ignore them… these people… makin’ the able more able ”

        & so on & so forth & … ad nauseum.

    • WhatWall

      Sometimes I wonder if Miscavige’s taking people’s money is just another way of harming them or making them less powerful, rather than to make himself richer. The common thread with him seems to be the destruction of people in as many ways as possible. I’m inclined to label him as a SOCIOPATH. He has many of the characteristics.

      • Gerard Plourde

        As did Big Being #1. The evil practices are not aberrations, they’re hard wired into the essence of the organization.

      • ze moo

        Der kleine fürher exhibits signs of psychopathy. Take the test…

        http://www.helloquizzy.com/tests/the-are-you-a-psychopath-test2

        • Robert Eckert

          The Healthy Lunatic
          You scored 80% empathic, 55% delusional, 80% sociable, and 64% law-abiding!
          You’re delusional, but otherwise a normal member of society. Maybe you think weird thoughts or believe in things other people don’t, but you’re able to function just fine. You’re definitely not a psychopath.

      • CharlieWaters

        When I took psychology in college, our professor told us that diagnosing people without years of study was not appropriate. However, for me at least, half the fun of taking psychology was to learn about aberrant behavior, take that knowledge, and play “armchair clinical psychologist.” Am I wrong in doing this? Perhaps. Do I do this with everyone I come across? No. Have I done this with David Miscavige? Countless times.

        Definition of sociopath from dictionarydotcom: A person with a psychopathic personality whose behavior is antisocial, often criminal, and who lacks a sense of moral responsibility or social conscience.

        Part of the Wikipedia entry on antisocial personality disorder (ASPD) taken from the DSM IV is as follows: “They have an ‘impoverished sense of conscience’ and may have a ‘history of crime, legal problems, impulsive and aggresive behavior’.”

        Again, I am not a psychologist, nor do I play one on TV. However, knowing what we know about David Miscavige, the above descriptions seem to fit him quite well. If I were in his (itty bitty) shoes, I would probably hate the psychiatric profession as well.

        • Missionary Kid

          Hey, I agree with you, and I stayed in a Holiday Inn.

      • Interested

        Guys everyone is saying sociopath, but would not psychopath be more appropriate. There is a subtle difference according to my dictionary.

        • Psychopath would be more appropriate, and there’s actually a big difference. Psychopaths are far more likely to be dangerous. And one of the best people I know was diagnosed as a sociopath. It means lacking empathy, not wanting to hurt people.

          Sociopath is the trendy thing to internet diagnose people as, though. That and narcissism. No one’s a con man, a jackass, an asshole — now everyone’s getting into diagnosing everyone else with personality disorders. The basic idea that there are personality disorders is not even totally accepted among psychologists. Most of it is bunk.

          I don’t care much why Davey is an abusive, power-mongering asshole and con man. I know that most people with mental or so-called personality disorders are not these things, so even if he has something like that, it’s no kind of explanation.

  • tetloj

    Nice r-factor for the lurkers again Tony. It almost feels like thing are happening to a predetermined schedule .

  • Erique SG Dougherty

    Leah Remini on Good Morning America. GMA reports the fallout began during the TomKat wedding when Leah asked about Shelly. The ‘churchs’ response? “It never happened”.

    Personally, I like how Leah is handling this so far. She lets the ‘church’ go through their normal machinations and over reactions and then releases a supportive statement to fans. As the ‘church’ ramps up disconnection and idiots like Kirsty spew their hate, Leah comes back with a calm statement saying no one is going to tell her who to talk to. She’s smart. And it’s obvious to me that this is FAR from over.

    An interview is coming and the bombs are about to fall.

    • BosonStark

      One thing I liked in that report was instead of saying “the sometimes controversial Church of…” they said “the controversial…”

      Next, it will be “the always controversial…” then finally, “the well-known scam that is known as the…”

    • ze moo

      The Washington Post and many mainstream papers/news sites are covering Leah’s story. Leah’s ‘coming out’ story is dripping out in very odd ways. She is letting out little bits at a time. I wonder what nuke-u-lar bits she is saving?? Or maybe she is just blackmailing Davey for all her IAS ‘donations’.

    • joan nieman

      I am so eager for the “Fall of Rome”!

  • juliusstahl

    Claire, I hope you will comment at some point on how Scientologists manage to fool the e-meter. I have read many accounts of Sea Org members being able to do this.

    In one case the parent of someone who has blown the Sea Org still writes to the SP offspring and manages to fool the e-meter in sec checks. Thanks.

    • shasha40

      I’ve read somewhere about squeezing the cans tighter . And probably lying, as the e-meter Is not a good lie detector . Go figure. Ha !

      • Captain Howdy

        All the e-meter is capable of is measuring galvanic skin response. It has as much scientific, technical value as X-Ray glasses and Sea Monkeys.

        • Sherbet

          “Zipees Lie Detecto Machine” — I guess lrh read Superman comics.

        • Lark Smith

          Hey ! I liked Sea Monkeys as a kids…they were magical 😉

          • Sherbet

            And fun to play with, with those silly antics of theirs… 😉 back atcha.

          • Sherbet

            And delicious, to the tropical fish in the tank.

            • Lark Smith

              Hey, a better fate then the flushing they received in our home..I made my brother do it.

        • Once_Born

          For those who know (simple) electronics, here is the design in all it’s glory.
          http://www.cs.cmu.edu/~dst/E-Meter/hubbard-patent.html

          It’s rumoured that, before he ‘dropped the body’ hubbard was working on an ashtray for his motorcycle.

          • RMycroft

            He should have just bought a Gold Wing. He could have got the expresso maker option too.

          • Marie Claire Wolf

            What? No icicle sword…

        • Gregg Somers

          I sent away for the brine shrimp (aka Sea Monkeys), but was so disappointed, I never ponied up for the X-Ray glasses. Pray tell how they worked.

          • Couch_Incident

            “They consist of two ‘lenses’ and a diffracting source, such as a feather, to create an off-set image. The darker image inside a lighter image is then said to be the ‘X-ray.'”

            • GlibWog

              OMG hahaha and the stupid Ad about the Goofy guy with eyes poppin while watching a naked woman underneath her clothes.. Good God

            • Sherbet

              I was thinking about this ad. I seem to remember the guy’s hand used to show bones, not that black shadow. It must have been some half-a** truth-in-advertising thing, where Rembrandt Co. had to put “X-Ray” in quotes and quit pretending the user would see a skeleton through the flesh. Howdy, what’s your recollection (and where’s FistOfXenu when you need him)?

              I know — way off topic, but I’m old, and I ramble.

            • stanrogers

              Who had time or money for X-Ray Specs? There was a whole working submarine you could get for six bucks on the facing page!!!

            • Sherbet

              You just reminded me of the frogmen, powered by baking soda (just like the sub).

            • grundoon
            • N. Graham

              Here is the false advertising, showing bones ad.

          • Captain Howdy

            The x-ray specs worked great. Eventually I didn’t even have to wear them to get the full effect.

            http://youtu.be/t5s1fRxFhlg

            • Couch_Incident

              Classic bad UHF channel movie! “X: The Man with the X-Ray Eyes”. Don’t know how Ray Milland ended up in so many bad movies in the 60’s.

            • Captain Howdy

              Actually, “The Man with the X-Ray Eyes” is considered a science fiction film classic. It has an 86% rating on Rotten Tomatoes.

            • Couch_Incident

              I’ll have to revisit it with adult (non-xray) eyes – I was a kid when I saw it and was supremely bored. I have to admit I secretly love “Panic in Year Zero!”

              Rosey Grier did bring out his best work since his Oscar for “The Lost Weekend.”

            • Sherbet

              And Ray Milland begins spinning in his grave.

            • Sherbet

              Oh, like “The Thing With Two Heads” is bad, Couch…

            • stanrogers

              Is “bwahahahahahahahahahahahaha….hahahahahahaha” the correct spelling?

            • Sherbet

              Perfect, Stan.

        • shasha40

          Roflmao, I haven’t thought about ” sea monkeys ” in ages ! Great analogy .

    • Once_Born

      You can probably easily fake the various needle movements, but you can’t control the mind of the people tasked with interpreting them.

      There is a *great* psychological experiment where a group of 7 people are all given cards with numbered lines printed on them, and asked to take turns saying out loud which two lines are the same length.. I say apparently, because 6 of the group were stooges, who consistently chose the same wrong answer.

      The experimental subject was the last to speak – and 75% of them denied the evidence of their eyes, and agreed with the stooges on an obviously wrong answer.

      If someone is out to get you (and if you are in a ‘sec check’ they probably are) I suspect that they will see the meter movements they want to see / are told to see.

    • Victoria Pandora

      even hubbard himself said you should be your own councel. maybe one or two of the oat tees took that to heart, and knew communicating to their own child wasn’t an overt by any sande standard. but at that point, you really wonder why they are still in.

    • I remember seeing that Christopher Reeve figured out how to fool it very quickly, but I’ve never seen the original article that was in.

    • DodoTheLaser

      Thinking of “Pleasure moments”, from what I’ve heard.

  • Sidney18511

    Claire or a bunkerette…..could someone please post a link to Claire’s new website, I want to snoop around.

  • Graham

    “The assessments are done on lists of insignificant items. For example:

    What is your favorite country?
    United Kingdom?
    Sweden?
    Norway?
    USA?

    The total list is probably 50 items.”

    Could someone clarify for the uninitiated. Did the auditor read out 50 items, the person being audited did nothing but continue to hold the cans and the auditor had to deduce from meter readings which country produced a reaction when named? If that was the process was it usually clear which one was the favourite?

    • robstead

      My understanding is the person says which is their favourite (UK spelling so no need for a meter to know my answer!) and the auditor confirms this with the meter. But Mark Headley says in his book one auditor told him he didn’t need to say the answer in one auditing session as they could simply ‘read’ the answer on the meter. If someone does know the real answer I too would love to know.

      • shasha40

        That seems like another part of their control tactics, ” we know what you’re thinking , the e-meter along with my OT powerz allows me to read your mind .” * cue Twilight Zone music *

        • Captain Howdy

          The e-meter can’t and doesn’t work as a lie detector. All of the needle movements are random fluctuations and have no connection to the questions being asked.

          • tetloj

            Thanks Cap’n. There’s a lot of ‘splainin going on for what is, in a nut shell, bunkum. Whew!

          • Michael Leonard Tilse

            Respectfully, I disagree Captain. In my experience in getting auditing and in doing e-meter drills, on both sides of the table, my observation has been it is not random.

            Something is happening. I don’t know if it is micro-muscular tremors, or electrical changes in the bio-systems, but something is making the changes the needle is indicating. I also don’t know if it’s thought or emotional reaction or memory. But my observation is that there is a not-random association with my internal experience and the response of the meter.

            I do think that the interpretation of what is happening is way, way, wide of the mark. It is unscientific and quackery in the extreme.

            But, that does not mean there is no phenomenon that could be explored scientifically.

            Jung is reported to have explored similar phenomena with regard to GSR and words.

            • Once_Born

              Please correct me if I’m wrong, but when you were being audited, you could not see the meter dial. You only had the word of the person who could that something significant was happening.

              in auditing, I understand that you have to sit together a long period, concentrating hard with very little sensory input. During this time you are expecting amazing things to happen. This can bring about a very suggestible state of mind – you both see meaning in things like needle movements that simply isn’t there.

              If there is something more to an e-meter reading than skin resistance it seems to be a very small effect that no-one seems to be able to define, let alone demonstrate.

              Do you think it might be it possible that you experienced a trick of the mind – one that the CofS exploits in order (without understanding) to make people feel that something significant has happened during auditioning?

            • Captain Howdy

              Thanks for your response Michael. I kind of wrote that comment hoping to elicit a response from those who believe that the e-meter actually does something. I think a machine can only do whatever it’s physical limitations are. If I had been sec checked perhaps I would feel differently about it, but that would still be a emotional response, not necessarily a logical one.

          • ze moo

            “Lie detectors” record galvanic skin responses by attaching a metal plate with a Velcro strip to you with a constant pressure. Holding the ‘cans’ allows much more fluctuations in contact area and holding pressure. Real lie detectors also record heart rate, breathing rates and volume, blood pressure and capillary dilation.

            “In the peer-reviewed academic article “Charlatanry in forensic speech
            science”, the authors reviewed 50 years of lie detector research and
            came to the conclusion that there is no scientific evidence supporting
            that lie detectors actually work. Lie detector manufacturer Nemesysco
            threatened to sue the academic publisher for libel resulting in removal
            of the article from online databases. In a letter to the publisher,
            Nemesysco’s lawyers wrote that the authors of the article could be sued
            for defamation if they wrote on the subject again.”

            A ‘good’ auditor also listens and watches the ‘auditee’ and brings their observations into play. A ‘skilled’ auditor could guess about truth and lies, but it would still be a guess, though anyone can make a good guess.

            http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Lie_detection

          • shasha40

            Exactly, yet I still see people refer to it as ” a crude lie-detector “, and we know Scientologists believe it is one which is why they often confess “sins ” so readily while utilizing them.

      • Pretty Nice Lady

        Auditor asks person the question. He knows he is supposed to be still and not say anything during an assessment. The auditor reads off the list each “item” marking the reaction of the needle to each one (called “falls” of the needle anywhere from 1/4 inch to 3-4 inches usually, and moving to the right). The “item”, as in Graham’s description above is the one which has the longest “read” or reaction. Then the auditor let’s the person know what the longest read was and checks to see if this is really true for them. They both assume it is in my experience. Recalling it gives me a headache.

        • Marie Claire Wolf

          I get a huge headache just reading all of the above, cheech….

    • Ruby

      This is a drill for learning how to spot instant reads on the meter. The auditor would let the person holding the cans know what the assessment question was, then go down the list and mark any instant reads and size of read. It’s purpose was to practice the calling of a list and noting reads…what the results were was not of any particular significance since it was a drill for auditor training purposes only.
      And yes, the person holding the cans did not say anything.

      • Graham

        Thanks for the reply Ruby. I’m still a little confused. Was the ‘read’ and the size of the read supposed to be related to the person’s preferences? eg if I like Sweden but adore France then presumably there would be a certain movement of the needle for Sweden and a bigger one for France? If that’s the way it worked I’m wondering if the person being audited was asked to confirm (“I’m getting a reading for France. Can you confirm that is your favourite country?”) or whether it was ‘top down’ from the auditor (eg “I don’t know what country you think is you favourite but the needle went berserk on Bulgaria so- whether consciously or subconsciously- that MUST be your preferred country”). Or was the auditor just noting each time the needle moved and didn’t even bother to check whether there was any significance to the movement? Apologies if I’ve totally misunderstood the process.

        • Ruby

          If the auditor was in a real session with a person, then yes, the size of the read would be of significance as it would mean that there was more mental “charge” on that area and would also have more interest for the person being audited. But the drill Claire is referring to is just that, a drill for training the auditor, so those particular lists are meant to be meaningless questions so as not to stir up any “real” charge in the person who is holding the cans. Theoretically, yes, if it was a real auditing session, it should read and correspond to what the person’s favorite country is…but since the question really doesn’t mean anything, it is only about training the auditor. We would tell the person the reads we got at the end of the assessment, but many of them were NOT the person favorite country…and some were places I’d never even heard of!
          Does that clarify? Ask as much as you want…it can be confusing.

          • Graham

            Thanks Ruby. So the subject might have a reaction to eg France for a variety of reasons (eg the word might remind them of Frances, with whom they were passionately in love) but the auditor was not concerned in following that up, just in getting tuned in to how the meter works.

            • Ruby

              you got it!

    • Gregg Somers

      Don’t forget…you pay $5k for the privilege. At what point does common sense kick in and say, “Enough of this shit…”?

      • Douglas D. Douglas

        Common sense?

        COMMON SENSE???

        To the RPF with you. The nerve…

  • RandomSP

    Since David Miscavige’s apparent intention is to turn Scientologists into robots, it is entirely appropriate that auditors take their orders from machines.

    This ties into my previous comments as to Miscavige talking any human factor out of events (canned events only), “enlightenment” (Ideal Org video panels), training (GAT-style drilling), etc., etc.

  • GlibWog

    To Lisa McPherson and many who have died at the hands of this evil, evil cult. We honor your memory and mourn the lives that ” Could have been.” That is why I am here. That is why we are here.

    • Marie Claire Wolf

      What better way to honor all those who lost their lives to Co$ than to dig and unearth as much information towards vaporizing this evil cult to nothing. I have been both enraged and so profoundly affected by the stories of torture and death that it keeps me coming back here daily in the hope of hearing the death-knell sounds of Co$’s demise. It will not be soon enough unfortunately…

      • GlibWog

        Absolutely Enraged Marie and completely sickened that it continues.

    • i-Betty

      Such a lump in my throat.

      • GlibWog

        Just so sad Betty.. So much destruction and abuse under the guise of { Religion }

        This IS Jonestown. One death at a time.

  • SciWatcher

    Well this proves it…David Miscavige is actually a robot. Although that is an insult to robots. My Roomba has more humanity than he does.

    • Bob

      Not a robot. The head Scieborg of the Scieborg colony.

      • Sherbet

        Bob, how are you doing, personally, with scientology? I know it’s a sticky situation, but are you any closer to breaking free?

        • Bob

          Sherbet,
          If you follow my comment history you might have deduced that I have been able to decompress more and more. I appreciate the astute commenters and Tonys excellent reporting. So I feel really free. As to my position right now I am also free to roam in and out and see and hear many interesting things. I find that very useful.

          • Sherbet

            I’ve noticed a different “tone” to your posts that suggested you were feeling freer about expressing yourself. I’m so glad you’re able to find a way that feels right for you.

            • Bob

              Yes, I feel less paranoid and more certain about the lies I bought. As a result my quality of life continues to improve. And I see more clearly how the clams all have disabilities created by their continued adherence this cult. The Golden Age of Dave II is absolutely rediculous. And should create lame robots.

            • Sherbet

              Hugs, Bob.

            • Missionary Kid

              Bob, not only are you more open, but much more assertive in your comments.
              It’s like you’ve thrown off the shackles.
              Hugs here, too.

          • Marie Claire Wolf

            May you be blessed with happiness and true freedom always, it is great news you are decompressing, stay strong!

      • SciWatcher

        “Resistance is futile.”

      • Robert Eckert

        An “Ideal Borg”

    • Once_Born

      Roombas are certainly more endearing than Miscavige – I’ve watched one trying to disentangle itself from a power lead, and you actually feel sorry for it…

      • RMycroft

        Roombas clean up the carpet. Miscavige cleans up on money siphoned to his private accounts.

      • SciWatcher

        Hahaha! That’s true!

    • GlibWog

      Not A robot SciWatcher..
      He is a complete AssHole! An Asshole without feelings.. But can still Shit over everything that he touches!

      • SciWatcher

        That too!

      • Missionary Kid

        That’s what I call his Midas Touch: Everything he touches turns to shit.

        • Sherbet

          It’s the Merde-is Touch.

          • Mark

            Yup: he’s a real chie-tête (sh*t-head).

            • Casabeca

              New vocabulary words…yeah!

          • Missionary Kid

            Appropriate

        • Robert Eckert

          The “Minus Touch”

          • Missionary Kid

            Thanks, it sounds better that way.
            Davy has the Minus Touch. .Everything he touches turns to shit.

  • Simon

    If Miscavgie, as head of the COS, is by default the most powerful Sciloon, why can’t he use his superpowers to make himself 6 foot. What’s the use in being an all powerful higher being who can do anything he wants in the universe but has to remain a midget?

  • Sherbet

    This is a joke, right? All those drills? C’mon! The foolishness meter is registering “Beyond Laughable.”

    • Sherbet

      AARRRGGHH!! I’ve been attacked by an indie (or a still-in). See the downvote?

      • Missionary Kid

        Or it could be someone who doesn’t like to be confronted with the fact that they were induced to behave in such a way, or that they believe the e-meter has powers to detect thought energy.

      • The couple of downvotes here today seem really random. I think it could be just someone slipping, or Disquis being its usually buggy self.

        • Sherbet

          Don’t know, Lliira, but there are still people around who believe they got good results from auditing. I may have inadvertently insulted one.

          • Missionary Kid

            I hate $cientology with a passion, but good results are possible with an empathetic auditor. Empathy is, of course, something that $cientology tries to eliminate from all of the followers.

            The Placebo effect also is at work, as well as just the need to talk to someone abut themselves.

            IMO, it is possible to get good results from auditing, but the same or better results would come about with a therapy session with a trained therapist. The cost would be far less, too.

            • Sherbet

              I agree, with everything you said, Kid.

            • splog

              It’s been said before on Arnie’s site but it bears repeating over and over:

              Scientology does not work.
              Scientology does something.

              When people tell you auditing works and they know this from personal experience, what they really mean is “something happened”. Not being well trained in scientific method or even basic judgement they conclude that the subject obviously works. The bat-shit crazy wording of the EPs just reinforces that.

              You’re right about empathy, this really is the magic bit. As I like to express it “if you give people a chance to sit down, talk and figure shit out, the usually do”

        • Once_Born

          I just found that if you occidentally downvote, you can cancel it simply by upvoting the same comment.

  • ze moo

    I don’t want to derail anybodys train of thought but John Sweeny’s Secrets of Scientology is popping up on PBS stations. I am told the Buffalo/Toronto PBS station is showing it tonight. Perhaps more PBS stations in the US and Canada will show it soon.

    Doesn’t the CO$ know that all ‘floating needle’ type of displays have been replaced by digital readouts? $cientology, analog in a digital world.

    • Marie Claire Wolf

      Thanks for the heads up ze moo 😉

      • ze moo

        It is odd that Buffalo and Toronto share the same PBS station. Maybe they trade buffalo wings for back bacon and such. I do hope the show comes to my area. I have seen it on youtube or the bbc site, but the widest audience possible should see this one.

        • Marie Claire Wolf

          We get it in Montreal as well. Since they rerun docs all the time you may be in luck, plus Co$ is good for ratings of late, so like you I wish for the widest possible audience.

        • RMycroft

          There’s a big flat lake between the Buffalo PBS station and Toronto. And since the Metro Toronto area is the fifth largest population in North America (including Mexico City), it’s a market that they can’t ignore.

          • ze moo

            Radio and TV stations get across Lake Erie very easily. Once you get east of Toronto, Lake Ontario distances keep most radio and tv signals too low to bother with. There are a lot of canucks between Toronto and Buffalo and west to Detroit. I think that’s the highest population density in Canada. I do hope lots of people get to see Sweeny, the Toronto and Cambridge mOrgs could use some sunlight.

            • Marie Claire Wolf

              Yes it is re: Pop. density, and I tell everyone I know to be on the look-out.

    • Gregg Somers

      Is this the same show available on youtube?

      • Interested

        Yes. As well as others.

    • Still_On_Your_Side

      How would that work? Would the numbers scroll up and down, or would there be a graph? It’s an intriguing idea that I haven’t heard before, and the irony is that with Miscavige’s focus on a more “accurate” reading of the floating needle, you would think he would want a digital e-meter.

      • ze moo

        Either type of display would work, the graph option would look like a digital volume display ( stereos and car radios often display volume that way). Add in some software and you could automatically declare any clam question to be ‘charge blown’, or whatever the fearless leader wants. I suspect this will be the ‘golden shower of tech 4 or 5’.

        It they take the auditor out of the loop, $cientology will die out very quickly. They are the only thing keeping the scam working and giving it a ‘human’ touch. Without the constant love bombing and ego stroking the whole thing will die out.

    • richelieu jr

      Scientology: Witchdoctors in a Stem-cell world.

    • Eivol Ekdal

      Just watched the copy on YouTube and I am not mistaken Leah Remini appears briefly with Kirstie Alley, Juliete Lewis, and Ann Archer while they are denying Xenu. Wouldn’t it be great if John Sweeny did a follow up with her?

      • ze moo

        I don’t think Remini has decompressed enough yet to question Xenu yet. She will be getting press coverage from now until the day she dies asking her about the Clamdom and what she and her family went through. Win for her, win for us, fail for the scam….I have not heard Juliete Lewis speak up for the cult in some time. Could she be next???

  • AnonymousSP

    “The next thing I know, Miscavige is writing out an “R-factor” [“reality
    factor”], telling Cruise it was all a big mistake and that he’s awesome
    and good to go.”

    Imagine working away at your bridge and finding out that the whales and celebrities are getting away with this kind of crap! More members should know about this kind of thing and then demand their own R-factors like little Davey does for little Tom.

    • Lark Smith

      Or just be bridge free.

  • Simon

    Amidst all the horrific catalogue of crimes and atrocities committed by the Sciloons, there’s some things to revel in. After Earth’s colossal failure has shown yet again that, like Battlefield Earth, Sciloon propaganda is not box office gold. That should put the final nail in the coffin of Sciloon projects. Thank fck no Sciloon is a studio head (I hope not anyway). I’m reminded of the genius 1 page advert Trey Parker and Matt Stone took out a few years ago during the Trapped in the Closet controversy which showed the South Park kids below the caption: “Come on Jews! Show them who runs Hollywood!”

    • villagedianne

      There were rumors that Tom Cruise alienated the Jewish establishment in Hollywood when when he angered Speilberg during the promotion of War of the Worlds. Instead of promoting the film like whe was supposed to be doing, Cruise was making it all about Scientology and his new romance with Katie Holmes.

      • Spackle Motion

        I guess the Jewish community has a short memory because the Simon Wiesenthal Center gave him a humanitarian award a few years later.

        http://blogs.villagevoice.com/runninscared/2011/04/is_tom_cruise_w.php

        I knew the Wiesenthal organization was like a Monet (all messed up when you look closely) but when they gave Cruise this award, I lost the small amount of respect I had for them.

        • Sherbet

          You just touched a nerve I had forgotten about, Spackle. Presumably, TC’s sole contribution to humanity was in dollars.

        • villagedianne

          Agreed. I also lost respect for Weisenthal organization. But I also think Cruise lobbied very very hard in a very focused way, to get back into the good graces of Hollywood’s powerful after things went south for him following his public promotion of Scientology.

        • Douglas D. Douglas

          Hey, hey there! He did, after all, try to kill Hitler…

          http://www.imdb.com/title/tt0985699/combined

      • Simon

        Talking of which, I read a very lengthy and detailed account of what allegedly happened between TC and SS that apparently led to the end of their friendship. This account is up on various forums. Have any sources been able to corroborate it as being authentic? I was genuinely shocked when I read it. If it’s all true, it means he actively tried to recruit one of the world’s most famous Jews, someone who’s proudly Jewish, into the Sciloons and even told him his wife should stay home more often! Like I said, this is what the account claims but I’d like to know if it’s been verified as correct. The bit about the confrontation at a party was a doozy.

        • RMycroft

          Showdown at Fort Sumner: Politics & Power December 1, 2007, Bryan Burrough, Vanity Fair
          http://www.vanityfair.com/politics/features/2007/12/paramount200712?printable=true%C2%A4tPage=all

          “Spielberg felt the actor’s antics had hurt his own movie, 2005’s War of the Worlds. Far worse, though, had been an episode when Spielberg told Cruise the name of a doctor who had prescribed medication to a relative and the doctor’s office was subsequently picketed by Scientologists.”

        • BrianClear

          I don’t think it was the proselytizing that pissed off Steven Spielberg. I think that Tom Cruise made disparaging comments about Spielberg’s wife being in therapy and how psychs are responsible for all the evils in the world. Tom Cruise pretty much interfered in a private medical matter and went into a Scientology rant about psychiatry. I bet he said “Steven, Steven, you’re glib”.

  • media_lush

    on a side note that vile woman who set-up the ‘Scientology Kills Brain Cells” as a main attack site on Leah Remini has had her twiiter account suspended…. pretty sure it’s the tweets she sent to me and Leah similataneously that did it when she found out we knew her real name…. chalk that one as a win

    • Lark Smith

      What was her beef any way- just sick and lonely? From that site she did not sound like the sharpest tool in the shed. Box of rocks comes to mind.

      • Zana

        A box of rocks! LOL. Or one sandwich short of a picnic. ROFL.

  • California

    Please keep this look inside SCN going…. every week Claire delivers new and pertinent information.

    BTW, Tom Cruise and son were in the SF Bay Area for this past weekend for a ride on the America’s Cup New Zealand team’s 72-foot catamaran “Sunday.” It received limited press…. certainly nothing like the coverage he would have received pre-THE divorce and the revelations about SCN that are now part of main-stream media and public awareness.

  • q-bird

    lulz from 2011 – Tosh.O – web redemption – e-meters & scientology –

    http://tosh.comedycentral.com/video-clips/p0f47o/brad-the-actor

    • Captain Howdy

      good one.

  • 0tessa

    Training to become an auditor under the reign of Miscavige must be a real nightmare.

    • Sherbet

      I know. I had trouble remembering only Ten Commandments in Sunday School. I can’t imagine remembering all the auditing training process criteria.

      • Graham

        Apparently there were originally more than ten commandments. Moses went up into the mountain a second time, came back down and told his followers “Guys, there’s some good news and some bad news. The good news is I’ve got it down to ten, the bad news is- adultery’s still on the list.

      • Captain Howdy

        I had trouble remembering the Cub Scout Oath, which was one of the reasons they kicked me out.

        • Sherbet

          What were the other reasons? 😛

          • Captain Howdy

            I got framed for stealing the dues money. And my mom was one of the den mothers! The kid who framed me, Charlie Murphy, I kicked his ass hard at the local playground for payback. it was epic!

            • L. Wrong Hubturd

              Charlie Murphy? Now you got me thinkin’ of the Chappelle Show.

        • ThetaBara

          Did you make it past Weebelos?

  • Observer

    I doubt that auditor “amnesty” for false F/N crimes wasn’t anything like the real definition of the word. My guess is that it resulted in sec checks and ethics actions for those who confessed and for those (if any) who didn’t.

    • splog

      The amnesty really was an amnesty – I was around at the time. You wrote down all your shit, got checked out at the examiner and went off to the reg to buy moocho mulla courses.

      It wouldn’t have worked if the amnesty wasn’t real, the whole intent was to get more suckers in the door. It’s the bait in bait-n-switch.

      • Observer

        Thanks for the info!

  • Sherbet

    I could research this, but the Bunkerites always have the answers: When did the e-meter first become part of dianetics? And how? Did lrh commission it?

    • Bury_The_Nuts

      https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/E-meter

      Your answers await you.

      • Sherbet

        Thank you. Ugly blue thing, isn’t it.

        • Bury_The_Nuts

          Would that be the Mark VI? Or the Mark Super VII Quantum?

          • CharlieWaters

            It’s the Super VII Quantum.

            There’s actually a sleek black model on ebay for the obscene price of $1495.00 (HAW!). At least it’s free shipping…

            http://www.ebay.com/itm/EXCELLENT-Complete-Hubbard-Scientology-E-Meter-Mark-Super-VII-Quantum-BLACK-/261248022941?pt=LH_DefaultDomain_0&hash=item3cd398799d

            • Bury_The_Nuts

              And there are two suckers actually “watching” that item.

            • aquaclara

              I am tempted to go over and “watch” , too. Just for the hell of it. But then, someone’s probably watching the watchers….

            • Sherbet

              I’m wondering why somebody sold it to the ebay vendor in the first place.

            • q-bird

              I am hoping it was someone who is absolutely & completely DONE WITH IT ALL.
              To hell with LRH & his case! I don’t want or need his thought system in my life!

              “What on Earth do I need this emeter for anymore… really? I DON’T!!! fuck it! I’ll sell it on Ebay, see if I can get some of my investment back… hahaha… using my highly toned postulatingness and willful intention, I will turn this junky non-musical thing into ducats…
              then maybe get something really useful… maybe one of those new-fangled high tech ‘puters everyone is talking about!”

              I imagine. I hope.

            • Lark Smith

              Might have bee worth keeping if it made music! rofl

            • Sherbet

              Or….he/she was forced into buying another one.

            • q-bird

              NO! Sherbert! no…………….

              dammit. I hadn’t thought of that scenario. wishful thinking on my part m’dear.

              So the {church} doesn’t buy back older versions? (like college course books)

              What happens to all the ones that haven’t made it into a museum of quackery?

            • Sherbet

              I imagine they’re moldering in garages. Good question, though, for an ex. Anyone? Where are your old e-meters?

            • Ruby

              Molding in the garage…you nailed it, Sherbet. The church would NEVER buy back an old e-meter. And, altho not “illegal”, it is frowned upon to sell it to someone else as then you would be depriving the church of the income from the sale. Some people do…but, it is not a happy subject and would probably come back to haunt them on a sec check somewhere down the road.

            • Sherbet

              Thanks, Ruby!

            • Captain Howdy

              What’s up with those cans? Did Man Ray come back to design them?

            • Sherbet

              Multiple sizes to accommodate everyone from Mighty Joe Young to Prince George.

            • RMycroft

              CoS used to use their merchant account to go in and block e-meter sales. Finally, after years, eBay woke up to the abuse of the account and cancelled it.

          • Sherbet

            I think it was the Smurf VI model.

    • Michael Leonard Tilse

      Invented by Volney Mathison in the early 50s, who was initially independent of scientology and Hubbard and had developed other electronic devices for use in chiropractic. He evidently offered it to Hubbard somehow, and it started being used by Hubbard to research the “whole track”. History of Man style.

      Mathison had a falling out with Hubbard and was quite critical. Mathison owned the design so Hubbard went on this big thing for a while of NOT using a meter in auditing.

      But he was developing it in the background. And a lot of electronics guys in scientology were coming up with their own designs. Eventually it became a standard design blessed by Hubbard around the early 60’s.

      • RMycroft

        If Hubbard had any real smarts, he could have bypassed Mathison. The same basic circuit had previous appeared in electronics magazines as a “party lie detector”.

        I wonder if Mathison built his first e-meters using scrapped radio chassis. Back then, tube radios had controls for tuning, power/volume and sometimes tone. Maybe that’s how the tone arm got its name?

        • F_Randy_Hullabaloo

          Mathison was an interesting person. There are some of his old books still floating around. Someone in the critics’ community should snap them up and make PDF files of them.

          • Andrew Robertson

            Here’s a classic work in Ron’s own words on the E-meter – the greatest invention in human history since deep fried Mars Bars.

            Understanding the E-Meter
            A Book on the Basics of How the E-Meter Works: by L Ron Hubbard

            http://e-meter-star.com/books.files/Understanding_the_E_Meter.pdf

            “If the truth be known, the E-Meter utterly dwarfs such inventions as that of the microscope. Leeuwenhoek found the way only to find bacteria; the E-Meter provides the way for Man to find his freedom and to rise to social and constructive levels of which Man has never dreamed, and to avoid perils in that route which Man, in going,would have found more deadly than any bacteria ever evolved or invented.”

            Andrew

            • Sherbet

              Andrew, that bit of text is classic lrh. Full of pomposity, bombast, fake science, and pure BS. It’s laughable, until it just isn’t.

            • Robert Eckert

              A greater invention than the nose-hair clipper, but not nearly to the level of the Pez dispenser.

            • Phil McKraken

              “If the truth be known…”

              The linguistic hallmark of an inveterate liar.

            • sugarplumfairy

              perils like scientology?

        • 1subgenius

          I gotta get me a crystal radio.

          • ze moo

            Radio Shack often has the kits for crystal radios.

            • stanrogers

              Not a real one — they use a germanium diode instead of a natural galena crystal and a fiddly cat’s whisker. (I had one of each as a kid. The Radio Shack one worked all of the time, but it was just about as much fun as a toaster; the real one wasn’t much concerned with my feelings or sense of fairness and justice in the universe, and getting it to work was a triumph.)

            • 1subgenius

              My dad strung an antenna about a mile long on the ceiling in the attic, and seven boys tapped into it and listened to thrilling radio dramas under the covers.

            • 1subgenius

              A crystal radio. How magical is that?

              I am now on a mission to find one like the kid has in this wiki article.

              http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Crystal_radio

      • Sherbet

        I knew the Bunker denizens would come through for me.

    • Couch_Incident

      Naturally, SCN made money by periodically “improving” the e-meter, making the old ones outmoded. Here’s a photo of some SCN sap’s collection (donated to a California university, but ultimately destined for the Museum of Quackery: http://www.museumofquackery.com/welcome.htm ).

      • CharlieWaters

        What a waste of a nice display case.

        • Captain Howdy

          You don’t understand the “strange” value that stuff has. As a collector of the weird and horrible I would drool to have that stuff.

          • Mark

            I want some of these for my collection:

            • Missionary Kid

              Do you have a theramin?

            • Mark

              I wish… and an Onde Martenot, and a glass organ, and especially a Mellotron! (If only I could play music).

            • 1subgenius
            • Mark

              Beautiful!

            • ze moo

              Another Moody Blues fan heard from.

            • Mark

              How did you guess? Also the Zombies, King Crimson, Yes, &c.

            • ze moo

              No one else but the ‘art rock’ and psychedelics used mellotrons. I love old Genesis and Uriah Heep.

            • Mark

              I note the “old Genesis” – pre- the wholesale Collins-takeover – you have musical discernment, Zee!

            • ze moo

              I like ‘both’ Genesis, I’ve seen them in concert 8 times. Great shows and Collins does alright. He isn’t Peter Gabriel, but then who else is? One of the best rock songs of all time is :

              http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=jwTMmBoah3o

            • Mark

              True. Collins is a great showman, and the first couple of albums with him as vocalist are more than acceptable.

            • stanrogers

              Trick of the Tail, especially. Written (more or less) for Gabriel (there was some hope, apparently, that he would put that silly “family” thing aside and get with the program) and sung by Collins because the search for a new lead singer wasn’t going well and Phil hadn’t screwed up Selling England by the Pound with More Fool Me. Best of both worlds, I think — all of the musicianship and “art” of the Gabriel era without the self-indulgent “star drive” of either the Gabriel-era Genesis or the later Phil Collins Travelling Road Show.

            • Mark

              Exactly.

            • ze moo

              Listen to the last Genesis album ‘calling all stations’. The music was all Banks and Rutherford and Ray Wilson sang quite well. Three good to great songs on that album.

            • Mark

              Will do.

            • stanrogers

              You do not want a Mellotron. The tape loops wear out if you use it and gunk up if you don’t. It’s sort of like an inexpensive inkjet printer (use up all of the expensive ink quickly, young man, or the heads will clog) only worse (and not particularly inexpensive, at least back in the day).

            • Mark

              Yes; I’ve read of Mike Pinder’s (Moody Blues) and Rick Wakeman’s (Yes) struggles with them – and the roadies hated them ‘cos they were so fragile, yet weighed a ton.

            • Robert Eckert

              I am glad to see there are still new virtuousos (virtuosi?) taking up theremin:

              http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=D0RRCuvplY4

            • Mark

              My favourite theremin piece is by Bernard Herrmann:

              http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=rYbHpXca7U0

            • Captain Howdy

              Bernard Herrmann was GOD

            • Mark

              Psycho suite!

            • Captain Howdy

              Brilliant to the end..Taxi Driver.

            • Mark

              Yeah!

            • Twilight Zone theme(not the da-da-di-di-da-da-di-di one,)

            • Phil McKraken

              That is so hot.

            • Captain Howdy

              Hot Theremin chick is hubba-hubba

              http://youtu.be/Xer3_RHJ2Hw

            • Captain Howdy

              Thanks for the link.

            • Dmitri

              Her other video is hot too:)

            • Robert Eckert

              Howdy linked to it a couple posts down.

            • 1subgenius

              Yes. There’s an app for that. Really.

            • Couch_Incident

              An original RCA Theremin would cover my retirement! I’m sure most of you know this, but after Leon Theremin returned to the USSR, he spent time in the Gulag, but went on to produce some of the Soviet Union’s most sophisticated eavesdropping bugs, including the one in the Great Seal of the United States in the US Ambassador’s residential office in Moscow from 1945 to 1952.

            • Mark

              Didn’t know he went back to Russia, let alone aided the spooks. Well, I never!

            • RMycroft
            • Mark

              “Leon, dollink! Vot say ve hook up und invent ein bullshit detector? Ve could test it out on dat nogoodnick Hubbard, ja? Ein bisschen like shootink fish in ein barrel, but ve gotta start somevheres. Immer dein, Hedy.”

            • Missionary Kid

              That’s Headly, Headly Lamarr” – Blazing Saddles.

            • Mark

              “Where’s my Rubber Ducky!? Quick, find Rubber Ducky!” ROTFL.

            • Missionary Kid

              I’m glad he didn’t, considering that he was a spy.

            • Missionary Kid

              They had one that was apparently pre- or prototype RCA on History Detectives, (PBS).

      • Sherbet

        Couch, you sent me down a fun rabbit hole (www.museumofquackery.com). I had to bookmark it for future reading.

        • GlibWog

          OMG me too Sherbet. I just eat this stuff up. I would have loved to have gone there!
          Thanks Couch!

      • Couch_Incident

        I’ve seen the court cases regarding the FDA vs. the e-meter, but I just came across an interesting period piece from a Deputy FDA Director for Enforcement in late 1963 after the e-meter seizures, but before any court rulings ( http://www.devicewatch.org/reg/milstead.shtml ). This was at the 2nd National Congress on Quackery co-sponsored by the FDA & the AMA. For context, this was a year after President Kennedy awarded FDA’s Frances Oldham Kelsey a medal for blocking the sale of thalidomide in the US, thus preventing widespread birth defects in the US. They seem to have been bolder at the time… Forgive me, but I think it’s worth quoting at length below:

        The Hubbard E-Meter, which is another skin galvanometer-type device similar in principle to the Micro-Dynameter, is now under seizure here in the District of Columbia. In January of this year the United States marshal seized in possession of the Academy of Scientology and related organizations 117 devices referred to as the Hubbard E-Meter. Scientology is an organization founded a number of years ago by a science writer, L. Ron Hubbard. Branches are found throughout the United States.

        Also seized were about three tons of labeling containing therapeutic claims. The government charged that the labeling falsely represented that the devices are effective for the diagnosis, prevention, treatment, detection and elimination of the causes of all mental and nervous disorders such as neuroses, psychoses, schizophrenia, and all psychosomatic ailments. Psychosomatic ailments were represented to include most of the physical ailments of man such as arthritis, cancer, stomach ulcers, radiation burns from atomic bombs, polio, etc., etc. It was further claimed that the device is effective in improving the intelligence quotient, to measure the basal metabolism, and “change of state of man.” The seizure action is awaiting adjudication in the Federal District Court….

        In this scientific age it is possible to determine whether a drug or a machine or a method will do what it is supposed to do. The time is past when the promoter and user of a worthless device can hide behind a cloak of secrecy and mystery, for secrecy and mystery are incompatible with science…. Science has stripped away the mystery of quack devices and left bare the truth, which is that there are no secret cure-all machines that are capable of diagnosing or treating different kinds of disease simply by turning dials, and applying electrical contacts to the body. Such devices are fakes! Their promoters are eccentric individuals and pitchmen who would turn medical science into a side-show…. Device quackery has no legitimate claim to immunity. It is the most despicable of all quackery, for it uses science to advance its cause. It takes advantage of the people’s confidence in the great discoveries in science and their belief in the incredible…. The progress of science is irreversible. We have made clear our determination to deal with device quackery. We invite all of you to join with us in a relentless battle of science and law against superstition and fraud.

  • BosonStark

    I can see how the floating needle rules and new checks would take a lot of fun and flexibility in auditing for the auditor. It’s surprising it didn’t die out in the 90’s for that reason.

  • F_Randy_Hullabaloo

    Excellent headline, Tony. I’m not surprised to see how backwards DM got things. I think Hubbard would have always put the focus on the “indicators” from the PC with the meter readings being of secondary importance.

  • ThetaBara

    This absolutely proves that Miss Cabbage IS a squirrel and an SP!

  • Jgg2012

    It sounds like Miscavige squirreled the tech.

  • dbloch7986

    When I was at FLAG (in 2003 mind you), all of the–what are now known as–GAT 2 pilot courses. There was yet another definition of an F/N and instant read in there.

    The biggest waste of time in that course is the lists that contain unusual names of fruits and countries that most people didn’t know existed. You have to “clear” those words. Sometimes repeatedly.

    What the fuck is a loquat…I still don’t know. As many pictures I have looked at…

    • Bury_The_Nuts

      “What the fuck is a loquat”

      ^^^ Yummy.

      • dbloch7986

        Curse you Floridians and your strange fruits!!

        • Bury_The_Nuts

          hehehe

          • dbloch7986

            I suppose you have kumquats too…?

            • Bury_The_Nuts

              Lol, yep. But I don’t much like those.

            • dbloch7986

              They are actually pretty good. My landlord has a tree of them. Really sour though.

              Right up my alley….

            • Mark

              They make excellent chutneys & pickles.

            • 1subgenius

              Kind of like saying, “She’s got a great personality.”

            • Mark

              Well, must admit I really prefer lime pickle (made with mustard oil, the Indian way), but kumquat chutney is more piquant than the usual over-sweet kinds.

            • Bury_The_Nuts

              They would be perfect for a chutney. Weird tasting stuff usually does. My mom used to make a watermelon rind type of chutney or jelly thing.
              It was to die for…

              But who the heck wants to eat a watermelon rind!

            • Mark

              Like green tomatoes. That watermelon idea sounds intriguing – must Google a recipe.

            • Bury_The_Nuts

              Green Tomatoes…………..OH NOES! You found my ruin!!!

            • Missionary Kid

              My grandmother used to make watermelon pickles. The rind is much the same as cucumber. (As I remember it, cucumbers and watermelon are out of the same family). They weren’t made as dill pickles, but sweet.

            • stillgrace

              My horses loved them.

        • Sherbet

          By their fruits, ye shall know them. The Floridians, I mean.

        • Mark

          I always thought they were Chinese, tho’ my main memory is of their apocalyptic effects if not completely ripe. But I prefer medlars anyway.

        • RMycroft

          In Canada, we have oranges, lemons, limes and grapefruit.

          In Mexico, they have a whole spectrum of fruit in-between and off the edges. (I was impressed by the orange whose juice could eat through a styrofoam cup!)

          • Robert Eckert

            I read a book once with a chapter about Persian limes and a grower’s problem with an invasive fungus. Unfortunately since they are seedless and new trees are grown from grafts, most of the new trees he started got the fungus too. So he wanted to grow one from seed, went through tons of the pulp from the juicer to find a couple dozen seeds– and from those seeds he got limequats, limons, limegerines, limey oranges and limey grapefruits, cross-breeds with every citrus fruit in Florida, and finally, one Persian lime tree.

      • splog

        Loquats are amazing. juicy, sweet, tender…jummy. Around here they grow like weeds and every second house has a tree, same with avocados

    • Jgg2012

      And you know what? I don’t think they have recruited a single important celebrity since 2003. All the big names came in during the 70s or 80s. But a dozen or so have left since then, along with the top ranking officials.

      • Sherbet

        You’re dissing the famous Chill EB, Jgg.

        • Jgg2012

          Who?

          • Sherbet

            Exactly.

      • dbloch7986

        Right? No one is falling for their tired old gimmicks anymore. Thank science for the age of information.

    • aquaclara

      Ever try a pluot? It’s part plum and part apricot.

      • 1subgenius

        Why do they do that?
        Too much time on their hands?
        “Let’s see, plums aren’t quite good enough on their own, and apricots aren’t quite good enough on their own, so let’s cross them, and maybe they’ll exceed the sum of their parts.”
        Leave shit alone.
        Its gotta taste like a mediocre plum and a mediocre apricot mixed.
        Hey, here’s an idea: take a bite of one, and then the other.
        (Sorry, I’m amusing myself.I didn’t mean to say it out loud.)

        • Mark

          Like loganberries (half blackberry half raspberry). My mum planted some in an excess of enthusiasm over loganberry jam, but all they ever did was attract hordes of moth caterpillars – and the jam wasn’t up to much either. They were grubbed up without regret, only for my dear mamma to decide the ideal replacement was a pyrocantha (inch-long thorns; formerly used as hedging round lunatic asylums). It survived her by a decade, never produced any decorative red berries, and took me three years to remove. Now I wait for autumn and collect wild blackberries and sloes – delicious jam and lovely sloe gin!

          • 1subgenius

            “sloe gin!”

            Distill your own?
            You do have the right to remain silent on that.
            Which I will take as a yes.

            • stanrogers

              One normally just infuses an existing gin. But it’s fresh fruit, and you get to pick the spirit.

            • 1subgenius

              Infusion is awesome.

            • Mark

              Well, you could distil it (but I absolutely refuse to confirm or deny any old kettle-and-liebig-condenser lash-ups I may or may not have once tried out successfully on failed home-brews).

              The way it’s usually done is to pour a bottle of gin (or vodka if you don’t like gin) into a Kilner jar or similar, and then fill it to the top with ripe sloes, having first pierced their skins all over with a thorn from the same bush. You aren’t supposed to use a fork, even a silver one, because any metal is said to taint the flavour. You then leave it in a warm dark place to steep. If the sloes have ripened early enough in autumn, the gin is quite drinkable as a liqueur by Christmas, generally with the addition of sugar; but it’s best to leave it until the next Xmas, when it will have gone a deep ruby-red, need no sweetening, and be almost incomparable.

            • 1subgenius

              Recipe saved, thanks.

            • Mark

              Enjoy!

        • Robert Eckert

          Raphidobrassica is a species which arose as a cross between cabbage and turnip (but then underwent a chromosomal realignment so that it can no longer breed with either). Most unfortunately, the plant has the rootstock of a cabbage and the foliage of a turnip.

          • 1subgenius

            Hmmmmmm…..”What could we cross rhubarb with?”

            You know, with something that wouldn’t make it so horrible.

            • Sandy

              strawberries! Mom’s jam & pie were delish!!!!!

            • 1subgenius

              Sorry, that would be incorrect.
              Why do people insist on ruining strawberry pie with rhubarb?
              Now, be honest. It was the strawberry part that you liked, no?
              It’s almost like, you’re so grateful that there’s something other than rhubarb, that you’ll overlook it.
              Strawberry pie, strawberry jam. Yum.

            • Sandy

              sorry, 1sub. If you had grown up in rural Minnesota, you would appreciate the fine pairing of these two summer delicacies. :o)

            • 1subgenius

              I kid because I love.

            • Sandy

              ;o)

            • Mark

              Proper ‘forced’ rhubarb from Yorkshire (grown by candle-light in huge dark sheds) is never sour or stringy. The only shame is the season’s so short. Stem ginger goes well with ordinary rhubarb.

            • Bury_The_Nuts

              My mommy did it right.
              She made plain old Rhubarb pie…No strawberries.
              That was my favorite pie growin’ up.
              It rocked.
              It was tart and sweet and not at all stringy. I loved it.

            • stillgrace

              You are so right! My grandmother grew rhubarb in her garden! So delicious! Homemade rhubarb pie! To look at it right out of the garden, you’d never believe it could cook up so right

            • Missionary Kid

              My grandmother used to make it, too. She had a small patch right outside her back door, right next to the steps.

              It was delicious. I think she had a mountain of sugar in it.

            • John P.

              I agree with BTN. My grandmother grew rhubarb in the back yard and made rhubarb pie. Strawberries and lots of sugar were for wimps. She always said it’s too sweet if it doesn’t make your eyelids sweat.

            • RMycroft

              We have a lot of burdock in parts of the garden. (That velcro burr plant.) In the first year, it looks a bit like rhubarb. It’s a real pain to dig the roots out. Now I find out that you’d pay good money for that root cut up and stir-fried in a Japanese restaurant. One of these days I’ll have to try that.

              http://justonecookbook.com/blog/recipes/kinpira-gobo-braised-carrot-burdock-root/

          • Mark

            When does it pick up its roots and start walking?

        • aquaclara

          It’s a little more plummy than apricotish; I think the apricot people were out of ideas for trying to get people to eat their stuff. They probably thought that linking up with the people that had to create “dried plums” as a new food name would be pure marketing genius.

      • Robert Eckert

        I drove through Pluot country (east of the Bay Area into the central valley) and was extraordinarily puzzled by the signs advertising “Strawberries, Artichokes, Pluot” or “Asparagus, Lettuce, Pluot” as if “pluot” was a perfectly ordinary word which everyone should know. It took me a while to guess what it could mean.

        • aquaclara

          That’s funny.
          Ever try a pomelo? it’s a kind of grapefruit. Fun fact – real grapefruits, not the scilon types, come from Clearwater. They had the first grapefruit grove in the state. There’s a park there now.

          • Robert Eckert

            Why did they call them “grape” fruit? The taste and especially the size are specifically not reminiscent of grapes.

            • stanrogers

              They grow in clusters on the tree, like grapes.

            • Robert Eckert

              Thank you. That’s puzzled me since I was a kid.

            • stanrogers

              Me too. It only took like a half-century for me to finally stop being annoyed and just look it up. There must be something subconsciously attractive about those “eternal secrets”; I’m usually the sort who needs to know — right now — all of the hows and whys.

            • Bury_The_Nuts

              Don’t you hate it when you lapse back to the nineties and forget about the google?

            • stanrogers

              I hate it even more when I lapse back into the fifteenth century BC and forget about the library. I have no idea what I was doing in the “sixties” (the period between 1968 and 1974), but it seems to have had some sort of lingering effect. I blame it on Space Food Sticks, lawn darts and fondue.

            • WhereIsSHE

              I have to add Libbyland TV Dinners to your list: http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=IqqhJql-2Pg

            • Bury_The_Nuts

              OMG…I kinda…sorta remember when they actual did look kinda like that!

              And you had to put them in (GASP)…the actual oven!

            • grundoon

              before we had microwaves

            • Bury_The_Nuts

              YAH!

            • RMycroft
            • Bury_The_Nuts

              Gonna be sicky now!!!!

            • aquaclara

              My Florida upbringing comes in handy every once in a blue moon. Grapefruits were named thus because of the way they grow on the trees – clustered like grapes.
              Count Odet Phillippe brought grapefruit to the country from an island – I think it might have been Bermuda – and grew them in a part of Clearwater that is now called Phillippe Park. Given the truly lousy French accents of my southern childhood, this park is pronounced by locals as “FiliPEE” , not FILeep. It was also an old Indian hunting ground, and so, arrowheads can still be found there if you are good at finding stuff. Hint – look around the tree line, which is where the deer would have been (and thus, the arrows). Most people look in the wrong spots.

            • Bury_The_Nuts

              The Caribbean has some cool ass fruits and peppers!
              In Dominica..I discovered what it tastes like to suck that white film off a cocoa bean. It was great…who knew

    • 1subgenius

      Its akin to a fuhquat.

  • Bury_The_Nuts

    Off topic: Bradley Manning has been aquitted.

    • Mark

      …of aiding the enemy, but guilty of espionage.

      • 1subgenius

        I love the scene in “Love and Death” (I think it is) where you hear Woody Allen’s voice coming from a dungeon.
        “Here I am, to be executed tomorrow at 6 am. It was supposed to be 5 but I had a good lawyer.”

      • WhereIsSHE

        The details per the Washington Post:

        “An Army judge on Tuesday acquitted Pfc. Bradley Manning of aiding the enemy by disclosing a trove of secret U.S. government documents but found him guilty of espionage, a mixed verdict that dealt a rebuke to military prosecutors who sought to prove that the largest leak in U.S. history had assisted al-Qaeda.

        The judge, Col. Denise Lind, found Manning guilty of most of the more than 20 crimes he was charged with, including several violations of the Espionage Act. He could face a maximum of 136 years in prison.”

    • Captain Howdy

      Still looking at some serious time.

      • Robert Eckert

        I doubt that, actually. The judge did not like the prosecutorial overreach, and might even sentence Manning just to time served.

        • 1subgenius

          You a bettin’ man?
          I think, from afar, that the judge has done a decent job so far.
          I’ll still bet a dollar to ten dollars, that he gets at least 10 years (with time served).
          Just a wild guess on my part.
          I don’t think she could get away with time served only, but I would be very happy to lose my bet.

          • Robert Eckert

            I wouldn’t “bet” on time served, but I think it a possibility. I think the judge can “get away” with just about anything.

            • 1subgenius

              Sure its a possibility, but you said you doubted it. I’m just trying to quantify your doubts.
              And I meant “get away with” in the context of what can reasonably be expected.
              I’m saying just time served is not to be reasonably expected.
              10 to 1 for you. C’mon. What do you think the odds are? I’m negotiable.

            • Robert Eckert

              What’s the currency? Up-arrows?

              I thought you meant “get away with” in the sense of “avoid getting punished in some underhanded manner”.

              10-1 is maybe too low, but not unreasonable. During the course of the sentencing the judge is likely to take into account that “time served” here includes things like 9 months of naked solitary and other extreme deviations from normal procedure. The prosecution here has bent and arguably broken the law, and judges don’t like that.

          • stanrogers

            There’s got to be something. This wasn’t “whistle blowing” (or at least wasn’t just whistle blowing), it was also a random dump of just about every classified document he could get his hands on. Giving him max credit, that means about 699,000 documents that he had no good reason to “leak”. And while that may sound okay in passing to people who don’t know what that means, think about what it might mean to you if your personal details (family, kids schools, health, financial, work schedule, vacation plans, etc.) were dumped willy-nilly across the web without your permission. (In the military, most of the health and social services are also covered by the military.) Yes, folks, those documents are classified too, and part of what was leaked. If this guy was a civilian working in your company’s HR or IT departments, you’d probably want a few minutes alone with him and a cheese grater for company. And there was a whole bunch of operational stuff that had not even a tinge of relevance to any wrongdoing or cover-up. This wasn’t blowing the lid off of My Lai or the incident on Hill 192, it wasn’t the Pentagon papers, it was an unpricipled “rage quit” by somebody who thought he could hide behind whistleblower laws.

            • 1subgenius

              So how long is he gonna get? I’m saying over 10 years for sure (or at least 10 to 1 odds.)
              Hell I’ll go 10 to 1 that he gets at least 20.

            • stanrogers

              As much as I hate “example” sentencing, I think this is a point where a clear signal needs to be sent — that is, the sentencing remarks are as important as the sentence itself. And I know that nominal sentences (sentences before parole considerations) in the US in general have gone up over the years, but I can’t see him getting more than Michael Walker (25 years nominal) under any circumstances, mostly because there seemingly no direct intent to inform anyone who could use the information operationally (and the acquittal on that charge sort of puts an upper limit on the severity the court can perceive). I wouldn’t be surprised by 20.

    • Marie Claire Wolf

      Poor kid will be sent to the big house forever. The US govt. is not a forgiving entity when espionage is the chief count; he will be taking all the heat for Assange et al.

  • Jefferson Hawkins

    One could get into a whole discussion about whether Scientology auditing “works” in any sense of the word. In my experience (35 years in Scientology), auditing “worked” best when the auditor had genuine empathy with the person in front of them and had an honest intention to help them. And many auditors are compassionate, caring people. With those things in place, limited results could be obtained (as with Breuer’s “talking cure”). The rest of it, the formulaic questions, the e-meter, the “prepared lists” and so on, was all window dressing to make the subject seem solid, authoritative and “scientific.”

    David Miscavige, being a textbook sociopath, does not understand human empathy, so entirely misses, in my opinion, the only reason why auditing ever worked, when it did. He only understands mechanics, because
    mechanics equate to control. He only understands the “window dressing.” An actual human being trying to help another human being is a wild card to him – something he cannot understand or control. And, as he has a pathological mistrust of people, it is something he has to negate and stamp out.

    This, in essence, is what his “Golden Age of Tech” is all about – removing the human element. Empathy, compassion, the desire to help others – all these things are random, erratic, capricious to him – or to use the Scientology term, they are “arbitraries.” And so he proudly announces that his “Golden Age of Tech” removes all “arbitraries.”

    The result – and I experienced this firsthand – is auditors who are rote, robotic, and focused on the mechanics of what they are doing, not on the person they are trying to help. And they are in a constant state of fear
    that their mechanics will be found wanting and they will be disciplined. And that is no state of mind to approach helping a fellow human being.

    And so Scientology died.

    • Lark Smith

      Very well said. Without human compassion and empathy you end up with Scieborgs as someone here previously stated. Thanks for the insight.

      • Conditioner

        That’s why just listening to someone’s problem, with genuine interest and compassion, works so well. Believe it or not, many auditors never got that even before the Muddy Age of Dreck.

        Anyone of Tony’s crew here at the Bunker probably produce more ‘case gain’ by listening to someone, than most of the weird ass auditing that’s occurring in the CofS. Think about it. You’re helping people get better. You’re making conditions better.

        Well…truth be told, you’re all freakin’ auditors. There’s no denying it. Pity is, you’re not getting $550.00 an hour for your help.

        Maybe if you wrote up who you helped for how many hours and what cognitions your friend had and submitted an invoice to the church you might get something back.

        • music8r

          Do you think ANY Sciloon auditor is getting $550 an hour? LOL! More like 50-cents an hour on a good week!

          • RMycroft

            But but… The defunct ASHO site, on the Auditing as a Career page ,said that an FSM could make pots of money!

            • DeElizabethan

              All I know is that an FSM can make a percent of whatever service he gets the PC to sign up for. Either auditing and/or courses. The staff or SO members don’t make but their usual pay. Probably true with IAS. He get a percent of monies given for statis. I have no idea what these people are talking about for income. Not to my knowledge. the greater amount always goes to the church as far as I know.

            • stanrogers

              “First, let me assure you that this is not one of those shady pyramid schemes you’ve been hearing about. No sir. Our model is the trapezoid!”

    • Graham

      “auditing “worked” best when the auditor had genuine empathy with the person in front of them and had an honest intention to help them.”

      Research into ‘what works’ in counselling shows that the personal relationship between counsellor and client is the major factor. What type of theoretical approach is used, whatever clever tricks or techniques are used, are all of secondary importance. It’s the quality of the relationship that counts, and too many tick lists, formulae etc tend to get in the way of that.

      • Missionary Kid

        That’s how I remember the research.

      • Vistaril

        . . . Research into ‘what works’ in counselling shows that the personal
        relationship between counsellor and client is the major factor. What
        type of theoretical approach is used, whatever clever tricks or
        techniques are used, are all of secondary importance. It’s the quality
        of the relationship that counts, and too many tick lists, formulae etc
        tend to get in the way of that . . .

        Auditing isn’t “counselling” so, in that regard, it doesn’t matter what the research shows. Even if Auditing could be considered “counselling”, I do wonder what the research might show about the power-dynamic within a therapeutic one-on-one relationship in the Standard Tech Scientology situation. It must, surely, must be skewed, when, for example, the “client” is required to be attached to a lie detector and the “counsellor” is required to make careful note of any “sins” so they may subsequently be used to destroy the “client” should the need arise.

        • Dmitri

          And the power dynamic is designed to shut down any critical thinking, or resistance of control in the subject.

    • And so Scientology died.

      One can only hope.

      • Xenuvius

        In which case, we’d owe a debt of gratitude to that little dweeb Miscaviage for goofing the floof.

    • ze moo

      Ultimately, the product $cientology is producing is the interaction between auditor and pc. Remove the salesmanship of the auditor and it all fails. GAT1 and 2 have proved that. If only Lroon had listened better in his Dale Carnegie classes.

      • Robert Eckert

        L Ron had a good knack for what to steal that would produce enough “wins” to get people hooked. It is Davey who has no clue about this.

        • ze moo

          The more I look at $cientology history in the 50’s and 60’s, the more I come to appreciate Lroons scaming powers. Yeah, he bankrupted and lost control of ‘dianetics’, but he came back with new and improved ‘$cientology’ and built that into huge empire. He also had the sight to make it a multi-level marketing scam and get others to work for him. The ‘tech’ was in getting others to get the pc (pubescent clams?) to cough up cash for the ‘cure’. He did have 30 years to shape the scam, so he wasn’t a genus by any means.

          • Marie Claire Wolf

            Oh he was a genus alright: genus Ponzi – not a genius, just you average grifter with a plan.

          • stateofcircle

            Hahaha pubescent clams. Love it

        • FLUNK_101

          Good point, Robert. When L Ron accidentally stumbled upon something that sometimes made some people “feel better,” he milked it for all it was worth – he used this to gain their trust.

    • sizzle8

      As an aside, repetitive questions, using a meter, prepared lists, TR’s and even engram running came from others.

      • L. Wrong Hubturd

        Please explain…

      • RMycroft
        • Captain Howdy

          Heh heh, Hubbard completely loses his shit. Never heard that one before. Priceless.

          • Xenuvius

            Every great leader loses his shit now and again. Just ask Nixon…or that kid who stole my empire…and talk about a screwed up pre-clear….whoa!!

            -Elron

        • WhereIsSHE

          HOLY F-ING MOTHER OF PRICELESS-NESS!!!!!!!!!

          LOL!!!!! His “tech” was so great that it, when misunderstood, ended up screwing up thousands of cases of pre-clears?!
          Can I get a Homer Simpson, “D’OH!”??!

          • RMycroft

            “It’s practically killed thousands of PCs!!” Auditing doesn’t sound very safe.

        • Unex Skcus

          Unbelievable SHITE.

        • aquaclara

          Now you’ve destroyed all my illusions. Here I thought he was a great leader, inspired and admired by all…..
          It’s been replaced with the sounds of choked back hysterical laughter.

        • Candygram

          Whoah. Is that a Burroughs gysin cut up?

    • Phil McKraken

      I always wondered what he meant by arbitraries being cancelled. There’s another case where clams robotically applaud their own doom.

    • InTheNameOfXenu

      Wow, this is very thought-provoking. I experienced genuine empathy and kindness from my book one auditor. I felt most gains from that. Just the mere fact that someone was listening to my every word and focusing their entire attention on me was mind-blowing and therapeutic. Book One is just an extension of Fruad’s abreaction therapy. It worked on some, but not on most.

      So now Miscavige is really de-humanizing any element in the ‘tech’ that had a grain of humanity. The result now of the alteration is creating robots. This is indeed truly scary. But, like you stated, ‘And so Scientology died’. Miscavige is his own way is destroying everything Hubbard created. Unfortunately, he’s taking a lot of victims down with with his sinking ship.

      • FLUNK_101

        I had a similar experience on the the first auditing I received on my Self Analysis co-audit. My auditor was on my wavelength, and he had a lot of empathy for me. I was remembering pleasant memories, from as early as I could remember … but real memories, not prenatal stuff or past lives.

        I was under the assumption that if I liked this auditing, the rest of Scientology would be even better!
        It wasn’t.
        When I got my first sec- check, I got so mad at the guy who was giving it to me. I thought he was foing it wrong! Later, I realized that that’s the way a sec-check is done – with a complete lack of compassion.

      • Dmitri

        The way I see it, Miscavige is hastening the demise of a devious system that may have otherwise flown under the radar a bit longer. Hubbard is still the satanic kernel of the mind control scheme. Any “love bombing” or compassionate listening was a short-term trick with the long con being mind control.

        • Dave Roberts

          Absolutely right on dmitri. From reading the comments of these ex-members, one can’t have anything but sympathy for the way that they’ve been exploited.

          But, I get the feeling that there is still some admiration and belief in the LRH only produced work, drills and methods. That it’s Miscavige that has ruined an organization that would otherwise perhaps be doing good work were he no longer at the top.

          From my viewpoint, LRH was the one who set up the whole mid control cult, and it was only through his death that he escaped turning into a taller David M. Absolute power corrupts absolutely, does it not? Miscavige is just a smaller version of the master fiend and controller, LRH – Satan himself.

          Dave

    • Truthiwant

      What you say, Jefferson , is so true.

      Any one of us, when we really want to help somebody, can do so by simply using empathy. It is the understanding of the individual and his personal problems that allows us to help him by putting him in the right direction and choosing the right words to get him on to that road. If Scientology had been based on these principles, then it would work and it would be accepted.

      Scientology, however, is not based on empathy nor on a desire to help somebody that has problems.

      Scientology is based on brain washing pre-prepared lists that make a person forget his own problems and instead make him enter the mind-fuck world of Scientology.

      Hubbard, Miscavige, Independents, and anybody else using Scientology ‘Tech’ are simply wrecking any individual and their hopes of resolving their problems.

      • Dmitri

        Scientology “tech” is not going anywhere. It will be preserved on the internet and in libraries (well, maybe the libraries will keep a copy of Dianetics- they probably throw out most of Hubbard’s crap). But the criminal corporation must be shut down.

      • Candygram

        “The right words” reminds me of Valis by Philip K Dick. There was a scene where a sympathetic doctor says to a patient, “you’re the expert,” and they’re profoundly healing words. On another note, the repetition and indoctrination to make one forget ones problems … Reminds me of my dad (gently) stomping on my toes to make me forget another minor pain and asking me if I felt better. And he’ll do that for free… 🙂 Unrelated note: you all are wonderful, but I love ALL your posts Missionary Kid; especially enjoyed last week’s observations on child rearing. We’re a judgmental, cussing type family — that requires a bit of extra education re: what’s ok to say where, among whom.

    • 0tessa

      Hubbard created Scientology. Miscavige created Scientology Inc. What Miscavige is destroying is his own creation, Scientology Inc. Scientology itself cannot be destroyed. Just as the Roman Catholic church did not succeed to destroy Christianity.
      There will always be people discovering Scientology again, be it with the Independents or in the Free Zone, or where ever. It will survive in small groups. In that way it will be rather harmless.
      Unless the current Caligula is removed from power, Scientology Inc is doomed. And there’s no way back. Fortunately.

      • Dmitri

        The unique thing about scientology compared with say, catholics or hindus, etc, is that scientology is so terribly written. There are beautiful passages in most of the great holy books, with centuries worth of poetic commentary, from some of the best minds in history (whether you are religious or not). Scientology is based on the most wretched accumulation of sloppy and repulsive thinking, that anyone with a good sense of ethics or education instantly recoils from the cesspool of Hubbard. It has zero chance of persisting after the corporation is disbanded. The house of cards was built on Hubbard’s charisma, and without it, the stench is far too offensive.

        • Robert Eckert

          Have you ever fought your way through the Book of Mormon?

          • Bury_The_Nuts

            i did, but in spanish…Just to complicate the stupidity of it all.
            Seemed like a good idea at seventeen…..

            • stanrogers

              Like most translations, you just don’t get the full effect. As I’ve said elsewhere:

              A quick pro tip for people wanting to use the “prophet” scam: It may be plausible that God chooses to talk to you in sixteenth-century English. After all, it may be beyond the power even of an otherwise omnipotent being to keep up with the way kids talk these days. Goodness knows that no mere mortal can. But how likely is it that He would get the grammar so horribly and comically wrong? Inflectional endings and case-marked pronouns are not freely interchangeable, people.

              It’s not just made-up and convoluted nonsense, it is obviously made-up and convoluted nonsense.

            • Bury_The_Nuts

              I bow to yer eggcellnence…….

            • Robert Eckert

              It’s also important to understand that the Book of Mormon, like Dianetics, was just the initial blast of bloviation from a man whose lifelong logorrhea never improved:

              https://www.lds.org/scriptures/dc-testament/dc/132?lang=eng

            • Robert Eckert

              I was looking for my favorite part and couldn’t find it: yes, it’s all the way at the bottom:

              ” 64 And again, verily, verily, I say unto you, if any man have a wife, who holds the keys of this power, and he teaches unto her the law of my priesthood, as pertaining to these things, then shall she believe and administer unto him, or she shall be destroyed, saith the Lord your God; for I will destroy her; for I will magnify my name upon all those who receive and abide in my law.

              65 Therefore, it shall be lawful in me, if she receive not this law, for him to receive all things whatsoever I, the Lord his God, will give unto him, because she did not believe and administer unto him according to my word; and she then becomes the transgressor; and he is exempt from the law of Sarah, who administered unto Abraham according to the law when I commanded Abraham to take aHagar to wife.

              66 And now, as pertaining to this law, verily, verily, I say unto you, I will reveal more unto you, hereafter; therefore, let this suffice for the present. Behold, I am Alpha and Omega. Amen.”

            • Dave Roland

              King James English doesn’t make it the Word of God, but unfortunately many are tricked into thinking otherwise.

            • Couch_Incident

              But it was translated from “reformed Egyptian!”

            • stanrogers

              It’s doubtful that Smith would have known about Champollion’s work, or even about Young’s insights into the cartouches, so I’ll give him a pass on “translating from” a language that never existed. He simply believed he could never be caught out, and that hieroglyphs were going to remain nothing more than inscrutible pictures forever. “Reformed” gave him a bit of a fudge factor. But he “translated” to a language that should have been familiar to most people at the time (the early-sixteenth-century English of the KJV, which was left deliberately archaic) — with divine aid, of course — and did it so badly that anyone even verging on literacy should have noticed (as, it seems, Lucy Harris did).

          • Dmitri

            Why would I do that?

    • mouseyhair

      Having never been in or no personal relationship with someone who has, things process slower when it comes to “understanding things.” But your comment, “textbook sociopath” just rang true to me. I have read almost everything posted and almost all the recommended reading including, “The Sociopath Next Door,” but today, reading your post it ALL came true! I had an ‘aha’ moment. David Miscaviage is a TEXTBOOK SOCIOPATH! Yes, I know it’s been said before and written before, but today, DUH!! It explains everything! He has ABSOLUTELY NO EMPATHY! Classic, textbook sociopath!

      • Dmitri

        No empathy at all!!! I wonder if he liked to torture animals as a child.

        • Johan

          He sure enjoys torturing people as an adult….

      • Proud to be an SP

        He has been a scilon since birth, right? so… i think that LRHs approach facilitated any pre-existign tendency towards sociopathy. LRH created DM.

        • Robert Eckert

          No, not since birth, though his dad dragged the family into the cult when Davey was young. A “cure” for Davey’s asthma was, according to some versions, a major impetus for joining.

    • Papa Xenu

      I can understand why Miscavige would be so anti-psychiatry/psychology, he is, as you stated a “textbook sociopath” with no ability to empathize with anyone. From what I have read from your accounts & others, he simply cannot connect on any meaningful way emotional. While I strongly disapprove of many of the church’s doctrines, I can see how people would benefit from auditing, especially with a empathetic auditor. Miscavige having no concept or experience with empathy would naturally not recognize it’s value. Furthermore, I think there was an economic advantage to this alteration as everything boils down to money for Miscavige. It’s the one thing he connects with. So sad. I would love to get him on the cans, that would be one hell of a session.

      • WhereIsSHE

        Sociopaths have the ability to pass lie detector tests with flying colors. I doubt a session with DM on the cans would be worth the price of a senior citizen discounted ticket to the show. Plus, he could rearrange the tech, the rules, etc to his own personal benefit, as he has done so many times already; as he did for his megalomaniac pal, TC.

        I’d prefer to read a well-sourced piece about a mutiny in the Hole ending with DM and remaining miscreant minions playing insane games of musical chairs, fighting each other over slop, accusing each other of crimes, as visible and accounted for as Shelly has been all these years and counting.

        • RMycroft

          I’m sure that the New Hole has security video cameras. Footage from that would be .. Gold.

          • WhereIsSHE

            The movie opens with Queen’s Bohemian Rhapsody BLARING… a group of 6 dirty, sweaty, malnourished people who have severely dark circles under their eyes circling a very old set of 5 flimsy, dirty chairs–as if their very lives depended on getting a seat when the music randomly gets cut off…..and slowly the camera focuses in on the shortest of them all….

            He has a Lord-of-the-Rings, Gollum-esque appearance….

            Despite the desperation in his eyes.. he is muttering to himself: “We wants it, we needs it. Must have the precious. They stole it from us. Sneaky little [SPs]”…..

            ANd… cut.
            Bohemian Rhapsody fades out…
            Some cheesy tune from the 80s fades in….something like… Kenny Loggins’ DANGER ZONE (since it was the theme from TOPGUN, I am going with it for now–even though the mere thought of it gives me a massive headache)….

          • enoughofthissh…

            Yes the Golden Age of Holes!

        • stateofcircle

          A movie about The Hole is ripe for the making…

        • Candygram

          That sounds like Albert Speers memoir: Spandau. Among other things, Hess hoarded socks.

        • Papa Xenu

          It wouldn’t be about whether he lies, it’s clear he ascribes to Hubbard’s “what is true, is what is true for you” justification, it would be more about getting a peak inside that little man’s head. I don’t even think he would lie that much as in his warped view of reality he probably thinks everything he’s done is justified. Lying would indicate a sense of right/wrong, a concept most likely foreign to him.

      • ThetaBara

        Didn’t he stop at OT3? Or am I misremembering?
        If your Ecclesiastical Leader can’t go all the way, what does that say?

    • FLUNK_101

      Well said, Chuck. And what a long strange trip it’s been!

      • Vistaril

        Psst . . . its Mr Hawkins not Mr Beatty

        • FLUNK_101

          Yikes!

    • Conditioner

      As a highly trained auditor of many years I can verify Jeff’s comments above. Many auditors blew off the “3 swing” FN and continued auditing as they’d always did. This was out in the field or in sessions not being video’d. And auditing continued to work as it always had – when it did. But you were left knowing that you had lied in your auditing reports. For myself, my attitude was ‘fuck ’em. I’m here for my pc’. And that removed any “guilt”. But, to quote Jeff “And so Scientology died”. Truly.

    • sister wendy

      thank you for the details. Really helps me understand what was going on when I got involved.

    • stateofcircle

      This is a really great point, Jeff. It completely explains the current state of Scientology and also why it will fail. Virtually every ex-member (who wasn’t born into it) whose story I’ve read has said that they joined because of the comraderie they felt, and the feeling of being a part of a tight knit group that wanted to help others and make the world a better place, and maybe have a little fun while doing it. What is the allure for a new member now, really? You’re presented with a rigid and mechanical set of steps and rules, mostly by people who, if you go into an org, are probably in some sort of ethics trouble, who are being punished, and/or who probably won’t be on the same post in a week or two. They have so many people breathing down their neck for “stats” that they don’t view you as a person, but a number. No one feels any comraderie or any sort of real, human connection with a number. There have been many stories in the past year or so of people going into orgs, even ideal ones, and the staff was either miserable, apathetic, confused, detached, clueless and/or weren’t even physically there. And who can really blame them? As I said, these staff members, in all likelihood, are in some sort of ethics trouble, are currently being punished, are being threatened with punishment and regularly yelled at, and/or won’t be on the same post in a week or a month, which creates this fend-for-yourself environment of fear that is only concerned with upping their statistics and their present situation as a staff member. There is no group to even be a part of, and I’m not referring to the fact that there are so few Scientologists, but rather the individual, self-serving mentality that completely decimates a group. There is nothing to be a part of. And besides this, at best, a new person might gain some personal benefits through a communications course or something, but again, this perpetuates the individualist environment and mentality. A group with strong ties and a common goal is what gets people and holds them together. Achieving a few “wins” from a course MIGHT hold on to someone for a little while, but in this day in age a person can just take the information and processes that worked for them and find similar things online or use what they’ve learned to proceed themselves, without having to pay hundreds or thousands of dollars for played-out “therapy” procedures. Everyone (almost) wants to be a part of something, and if doing all of these courses for all of that money meant that you would be working together with a bunch of like-minded people who really care about each other and are passionate about what they’re doing, people would stay. There is no positive unique benefit of Scientology anymore.

      • Bury_The_Nuts

        Beautiful summary!

    • music8r

      Very well said, Jeff.

      I remember being so excited to become an auditor. Before I joined the Cult I had always been told I was a good listener, and I always found it fascinating and awe-inspiring that people would open up to me and tell me their stories, sharing deeply personal parts of themselves. When I joined the Cult I thought being an auditor would be a fine calling for me. As it turned out, I was a horrible auditor. I just couldn’t be natural with the formulaic questions, lists and the damned e-meter, and, of course, writing everything down. I did find that when I would let myself just be ME, the communication became much more natural and preclears did much better. But then I would get hauled in for being “sympathetic” (not empathetic, of course) or “evaluating for the pc” when I would give what seemed like an appropriate acknowledgement, instead of just “okay” or “thank you.” I think I spent more time in cramming than doing actual auditing.

      Once I got set with my own auditor for my grades, someone whom I dearly loved, I found her to be robotic as well. Our best conversations were outside of session where we were just buddies. Then, back in session, the formality took over both of us. I remember her saying, “Don’t try to be a good pc, just talk to me.” It was pretty hard.

      Fortunately, I got out before the whole 3-swing F/N crap was introduced. Although, maybe I would have gotten out sooner than I did. Thanks for pointing out the obvious break down of humanity.

    • Proud to be an SP

      That is very well said. People join to help others, to save the world. They are beaten down by the cult’s mind-control and the constant sec checks. Empathy is squeezed out of them and the toothpaste tube is empty.

    • Xenuvius

      Jefferson – although I joke around here a bit, in all seriousness your book was amazing. Thank you for writing it and peace be with you.

      • music8r

        Yes, still the best-written book on leaving Scientology.

    • Once_Born

      Says it all. Thank you.

  • ze moo

    Many people wonder how NarCONon could stay in business. CNN does one states poor record with Rehab regulation and reimbursement.

    http://www.cnn.com/2013/07/29/health/rehab-racket-siu-cir-part-one/index.html?hpt=hp_C2

    • aquaclara

      lying, cheating and stealing have been known to put assets on the books.
      (thanks for the link, too. It’s worse than I could have imagined….).

  • aquaclara

    So let’s see. We’re going to use 1960’s wiz-bang technology to clear the planet….
    TC, you really fell for this?

    • 1subgenius

      He don’t need no fancy iPod. He’s got a crystal radio, and that’ll do just fine.

      • RMycroft

        So that’s why David Miscavige wanted all those copper grounding rods! (A good crystal radio can pick up strong stations with just a ground and no antenna.)

        • Sure, because the cats’ whisker used a semiconducting piece of lead to receive the signal. The wikipedia says it’s the first semiconducting electronic device. A family friend described to us one time being a kind in Barstow, CA in 1928 and using one of them to listen to music and whatnot. Of course, they also worked with signals that skipped through the atmosphere or became easier to receive at night.

          Thought you’d find this interesting, involving technology and another con man out to “improve” people’s lives:

          So it’s no surprise that, in 1922, Doc saw the potential of these
          new-fangled radio stations, and started one of his own. Nobody knew at
          the time that KFKB, “Kansas First, Kansas Best,” would help invent AM
          radio.

          Doctor Invents Media Politics

          Now, Doctor could put on a medicine show with the best of them. He had a
          nice big truck, called “Ammunition Train No. 1,” that opened out to a
          stage, complete with PA system and movie screen. Doc, however, was
          among the first to realize that radio waves traveled way faster than
          anything Chevy could ever make.

          KFKB was a medicine show of the air, with the perfect AM format, then,
          now, forever. It played plenty of friendly, folksy, country-western
          tunes, often live, from well-known Kansas musicians. It rented time to
          friendly, folksy preachers on a pay-before-you-pray basis. Mostly,
          though, it sold snake oil, Brinkley’s snake oil, all over the Midwest.
          Doc reserved a couple of the best hours for his own talk shows and
          infomercials, where he answered letters with friendly, folksy, medical
          advice, all delivered in a radio voice that remains disquietingly
          soothing in old air checks played today.

          As a con man, Brinkley intuitively understood clear-channel AM radio,
          with its long-distance reception late at night. In the prime, family
          hours, radio was a living-room medium, as TV is now. Brinkley aired
          plain old entertainment for plain old folks, heavy on the ahh-haah
          bands.

          The Best Darn Story of the 20th Century

          • Couch_Incident

            You left out the best part – Brinkley made most of his money by transplanting goat testicles into people with various ailments, but mainly to cure male impotence.

            • Robert Eckert

              He very nearly became governor of Kansas.

      • aquaclara

        Yep; it’s toaster tech, following the only other electronic gizmo that hasn’t really changed since the 1960s.

    • WhereIsSHE

      And Xenu’s fleet of DC-8-like “spaceships”! HAAAAAAAAAA!

      • BananaSplits8

        It was metaphorical. /sarcasm

        On a scale of 1 to 10, I rate a 1.5 in my knowledge of aeronautics and THAT part of the Xenu story chaps my ass. Just for starters, a plane has wings to provide lift; lift can only happen in atmosphere; there is no atmosphere in space; intergalactic spaceships don’t need wings therefore intergalactic spaceships don’t look like DC-8s!

        It’s symptomatic of Hubbard’s bizarre imagination: he could endlessly tell a convoluted tale with things he already sort of knew, saw and heard in the 50s and 60s but was stunted in all manner of social, technological, economic and political foresight.

        For a man who claimed to time travel through billions of years, it’s amazing he couldn’t see a thing 10 years forward in Teegeeack’s future. George Orwell wrote “1984” in 1949 and nailed it a hell of a whole lot better than Hubbard.

        • Bury_The_Nuts

          JOHN TRAVOLTA! you finally came to the bunker and your senses!!!!!

          j/k

        • Robert Eckert

          The Marcabians “wear fedora hats” for example.

          • Bury_The_Nuts

            Yes! and we keep our eyes out for those darn Marcabians at all times!!!!!

            • Dmitri

              Hail Marcabia!

        • Xenuvius

          Perhaps, but did Orwell become the most published author in history with thousands of Ideal Org Bookstores across the planet to hawk his wares? Just sayin…

          -Elron

          • WhereIsSHE

            And people buy a TON of useless garbage every day.
            That doesn’t make geniuses of those who manufacture and sell it. It simply helps to see–from an outside perspective, mind you– just how unscrupulous some people are.

            Orwell was ringing the bell of truth and firing a warning shot.
            Orwell wrote great literature.

            Hubbard was busy ringing up his own personal cash register.
            Hubbard wrote stuff I wouldn’t use to line a birdcage.

            Apples to oranges.

          • Once_Born

            Bet Orwell will outsell Hubbard long-term, though.

        • WhereIsSHE

          That part chapped my ass, too! (And so many friends I have who don’t follow here, but who I bombard with reports from here!)
          DC-f-ing-8s!!!!!!!!!!!

          If LRH really KNEW about the alleged ability of mankind to use his “tech” to somehow evolve into a more “able” species… surely, surely, surely he would have known that it was just plain STUPID to use DC-8s as a descriptor of an alleged SPACE FLEET!

          WHAT a DUMBASS!

        • Once_Born

          Listening to that nonsense, I always wonder if he wasn’t playing with the audience – mocking their credulity, and trying to gauge *just* how far he could go.

      • Xenuvius

        Yes, Xenu used DC-8 spaceships. And 75,000,000 years ago people had trains, clothes and cars that look remarkably similar to those in use today. What’s so hard to accept?

        Wait a minute!! You need to remove your bullshit filter first…try it now. Better, right?

        You’re welcome.

        -Elron

    • Bury_The_Nuts

      Is that like a Jim-Dandy Whizzer type technology?

      • aquaclara

        Yup. I am beginning to think even those of us with limited techie skills could have come up with a better cult. But then, we would also make it a nice place to be, never ask for a penny in donations other than for Observer’s picture book of shoops, and have far too good a time at the bar!

        • Bury_The_Nuts

          Oooh! I like it……when do we start?

          • aquaclara

            It needs a name. And we have to find a bar. Probably easier to come up with a name after a few rounds at the bar. I’m imagining a bar overlooking the gulf, with a sunset view.

            • Bury_The_Nuts

              Did you actually just say to me: We have to find a bar?

              For gods sake aquaclara…it is me BTN.

              I have them all in my GPS as favorites and most of them keep a cot in the back room for me…(just in case I wanna stay over).

            • Sherbet

              Jeez, send my earrings pronto before your next blackout begins, ‘k?

            • Bury_The_Nuts

              Too late…I already shipped them….lol!!!
              (its OK…I was sober when I packed em up)!

            • Sherbet

              Um, sure. Close enough.

            • aquaclara

              !!! (and best use of a GPS EVER).
              I will be back in FL in October….we shall have to test a few cocktails. maybe the Southern SP Society will be holding a meeting?

            • Bury_The_Nuts

              I think it could be arranged!

            • aquaclara

              🙂

            • Proud to be an SP

              oh, i want to hang out with youse guys!

            • Mark

              What about the “Royal Orgasmo-Therapeutic School of Bards, and Allied Liberal Lycanthropic Seers”? The initials would attract attention, at least.

            • Bury_The_Nuts

              BAAHAA

            • aquaclara

              that was awfully fast thinking, Mark. Have you found your way to the bar before the rest of us????!!!

  • Papa Xenu

    It amazes me that members of a church that is so obsessed with rules & ensuring EVERYTHING is on “source” would idly stand by & allow someone (who had no documented proof to justify his authority) to make such substantial changes to the ‘tech’. Considering the importance of auditing in Scientology, you’d think there would be a mass revolt to the number & nature of the changes Davy-boy has made. What will it take for the rest of them to finally stand up & say enough & demand their ‘church’ back?

  • Observer

    Gah! Sorry, Disqus screwup.

  • Observer

    Not that I think any of it does anything, but Mr Squirrelscavige is committing heresy.

    • Sherbet

      The appearance by Leah is a nice touch, Observer.

      • Observer

        I think she’s going to be haunting him for quite some time to come, much more than Katie did.

        • ze moo

          Katie never drank the kool-aid deeply and has good financial reasons to be quiet. Leah has no such problems and as a loyal follower of Lrooon, could wield the ‘standard tech’ banner very well. Davey is probably very afraid of Leah.

          • Observer

            I’m not so sure she’s a dedicated Hubbardite since she has publicly identified herself as a Catholic since leaving. I hope not, anyway. She’s OT so she knows about the prohibition on mixing practices.

            • Sherbet

              I love this famous TC quote: Cruise tells Sawyer. “I mean, you can be Catholic and be a
              Scientologist. You can be Jewish and be a Scientologist. But we’re just
              Scientologists.”

            • Bury_The_Nuts

              Lying liars that lie.
              TR-L works people!

            • Observer

              *eyeroll* Tom Cruise is a blithering idiot.

              Edit: In fact, Tom Cruise should try out for this:

              http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=imWlSMgMFGE

            • Sherbet

              I kinda miss his public blithering. It was more fodder for ridicule. He’s too darn quiet.

            • Observer

              I suppose it’s too much to hope for that he’s having a crisis of “faith”.

            • Bury_The_Nuts

              Um yeah…He is too stupid to dig that deep.

            • Sherbet

              I don’t want him to smarten up. I love the utter stupitude from TC’s mouth when he’s on a soapbox. (Stupitude = Stupidity + Attitude. I made it up.)

            • Bury_The_Nuts

              What are you?… L Ronita?

            • Sherbet

              Yes. Grab the cans, and so on, and send me $3,000, and so forth.

            • Mark

              El Ronita the transgender terpsichorean has just risen before my mind’s eye!

            • Bury_The_Nuts

              Why am I envisioning Chubby Checker in an organza prom dress with flaming red hair?

            • Mark

              Aaaaaagh!

            • stanrogers

              I shall require therapy for this, BTN. Not happy.

            • Bury_The_Nuts

              Pick up the cans. Scientology can help rid you of that engram.

              And THAT IS an engram!!!!

            • Observer

              I like it!

            • Sherbet

              Calling the copyright office toute suite…

            • Mark

              Please please PLEASE do a shoop of “El Ronita” showing some real “stupitude” as a ropy old tranny nightclub singer!

            • Sherbet

              Mark, that’s EXACTLY what I look like! How did you know? Are you OhTee or something?

            • Mark

              Oh Tee Tee, probably. And I bet you don’t. But we really need to see more of LRH in drag looking like J Edgar’s bridesmaid!

            • Sherbet

              Ru Paul, he ain’t, Mark.

            • stanrogers

              You’d be “Oh, tea? Four.” wouldn’t you?

            • Mark

              That’s it! I’m off for my bath before I start making off-colour puns about cucumber sandwiches.

            • Sherbet

              I’m with you, Mark. Not in your bath, but signing off. My silliness has reached critical mass. Gnite all.

            • Observer

              I did this one of him channeling Cecil Rhodes awhile back …

            • Mark

              Where! Where?!

            • Bury_The_Nuts

              refresh refresh

            • Mark

              Sorry – forgot with giggling.

            • Sherbet

              And only the words are shooped in! lrh did this one all by himself.

            • Observer

              I wish he had! It took forever to find a pic of a caftan where the sleeves were in the same position as his arms. And you don’t even want to know what comes up when you Google “red chest hair” (that’s not his chest, obviously).

            • Sherbet

              It probably took forever to find a pic with his mouth closed, too. That didn’t happen too often.

            • Mark

              Worth it – the result is truly flabbergasting. Never has my gast been so flabbered!

            • Bury_The_Nuts

              That sounds like you may need surgery!!!

            • WildaBeast

              ROFL
              My wife is sleeping next to me and I don’t want to wake her, but I can’t look at that caption without little bursts of air escaping from my nose…

            • Observer

              I aim to please!

            • aquaclara

              stupitude. LOL.

            • Lark Smith

              Let’s face that boy ain’t right but he is fun to mock. Great word!

            • Sherbet

              And, just think, he paid good money to become “ain’t right.”

            • Lark Smith

              Which makes it even funnier.

            • MO Mom

              And an upvote on the ‘stupitude’ from my daughter as well.

            • Sherbet

              I’m flattered. We’ll know if OSA is snooping around the Bunker if the word starts appearing in Karin Pouw’s official church statements.

            • MO Mom

              THAT would just be too funny.

              It’s such a useful word, like dumbass. Good for all sorts of situations. Especially at work.

            • Sherbet

              I’ll expect a crisp $5 in the mail for each use.

            • Bury_The_Nuts

              I am personally co-opting this word and plan on using it on a particular person in a meeting at 10AM sharp tomorrow morning.

              I will let ya all know later if I still have a job!

            • Sherbet

              Good luck! Just don’t accompany the word with any rude gestures.

            • Bury_The_Nuts

              But I have a signature sign language sign off I tend to use frequently.
              Hint: Kirstie Alley uses the same “sign” a lot…..

            • Sherbet

              I don’t think I saw that sign in “The Miracle Worker.”

            • Bury_The_Nuts

              Alas, I can’t get anyone to get me a glass of Water…….

              But I have had a few ballpoint pens thrown in my general direction….

            • MO Mom

              He probably will not agree to any interview where his people can not preapprove the questions. No interviewer who values their career will agree to those terms anymore for old TC.

            • Sherbet

              Yeah, wasn’t he fun back in the day?

            • MO Mom

              At least my parents taught me not to jump on the furniture.

            • MarionDee

              He meant “just” in the sense of “only,” I’m sure, but to me “just Scientologist” comes off as though TomKat were like flies that anyone could brush of off their sleeve.

            • DodoTheLaser

              Hubbard once said in his Dissem series somewhere:
              Paraphrasing – “Everyone is a scientologist, they just don’t know it yet.”

              Turns out, it’s more like – “Every scientologist is an ex, they just don’t know it yet.”

          • ThetaBara

            Katie has to think about her kid. But I bet she’s got some info we’d all love to have!
            Leah probably does, too. She’s been amazing all through this! So well played!
            I’d really love to hear either of them say what she really thinks and experienced.

    • Captain Howdy

      One of your best so far. O. I think Missquirrelage will be a future nightmare.

      • Bury_The_Nuts

        Yeah, Leah just puts it right over the top.

    • Mark

      Those soopah powah gizmos look unnervingly like giant bidets to me…

      • Bury_The_Nuts

        They are sinister contraptions for sure.

      • Sherbet

        Gay men aren’t supposed to know what bidets look like, Mark. 😉

        • Mark

          Every domestic bathroom I saw in France had one. Very useful they are too (if you need to wash your socks) 🙂

          • Sherbet

            I’m laughing so hard I can’t think of a comeback, Mark.

          • MO Mom

            When I was in Europe back in 1979, the most embarrassing part of the whole trip was asking one of our group leaders what the thing next to the toilet was. Or actually, what was it for, once they told me it was a bidet.

            I did use it to wash socks and underwear…

        • WhereIsSHE

          I don’t get why you say gay men “aren’t supposed to know”. So far as I know, everyone can enjoy the use of a bidet!

          Per Wiki:
          “Bidets are primarily used to wash and clean the genitalia, perineum, inner buttocks, and anus. They may also be used to clean any other part of the body such as feet. Despite appearing similar to a toilet, it would be more accurate to compare it to the washbasin or bathtub. Bidets once served as a practical way for couples to prepare themselves before sex, as well as to rinse themselves afterwards.”

          • RMycroft

            It’s a crotch shower.

          • John P.

            We in Global Capitalism HQ would be very lonely without bidets in each guest room in our luxurious waterfront estates. Since so many of the supermodels are European, and would thus expect bidets in the bathrooms, we long ago found that having shiny high-tech bidets with all sorts of digital controls was far more important to attracting a critical mass of supermodels on summer weekends than food (all supermodels are on 130-calorie-per-day diets of watercress and celery as far as we can tell). No bidets = no supermodels. It’s just that simple.

          • sugarplumfairy

            My catholic mama who had lots of babies insists bidets are evil contraception devices..

          • Sherbet

            Live and learn, m’dear! I always thought they were “a lady’s thing.” Anyway, read John P’s post. Apparently, they do attract supermodels, so I’m not the only one who associates the bidet with women. (Plus I was joking with Mark.)

        • Sunny Sands

          My relatives had one when they lived in Europe. They used it as a place to keep their daughter’s rabbit.

          • WildaBeast

            Coffee snorted through nose. Thanks much…

    • media_lush

      just a general idea for a future shoop …. The Borg must have a lot of potential …. ‘resistance is futile’ , hive mind type thing …. Borg Cube = Super Power Building? …. that bit where they lower the Borg queen torso onto the legs … what Miscavige does when he wants to feel tall….

      • stanrogers

        There’s room for a Lord Farquaad treatment there, lush.

        • media_lush

          it’s a shame the Pythons are no more [although they’re rumoured to be doing an animation] as they ripped on all religions brilliantly…. with whats been happening to the cult over the years would have been manna for them

          • stanrogers

            I dunno — even something like the “Find the Fish” segment from The Meaning of Life combined with the Pirhana Brothers and the Secret Service Dentists would be, I think, insufficiently bizarre.

          • BananaSplits8

            The Holy Grail’s “I’m getting better” scene would take a whole new meaning.

            (btw, Graham Chapman’s “what an eccentric performance” in answer to Tim-the-enchanter’s warning is one of my favorite movie quotes of all time)

      • Observer

        Noted. I’m sure infinite possibilities will present themselves. With Scientology, it’s Christmas every day!

    • ThetaBara

      OMG HIS WIDDLE SQUIRRELY PAWSES!
      Very well done!

  • N. Graham

    Contest of Evil:

    Scientology vs. North Korea

    Nutrition

    North Korea-The World Food Program estimates that 6 million
    of North Korea’s 25 million people are in need of food aid and one-third of
    children are chronically malnourished or stunted, as many as a third of the
    population or more.

    Scientology-Probably about a third of the remaining
    Scientologists still in the cult are in the Sea Org or the Hole, where they are
    fed rice, beans, table scraps, or nothing.

    Score: Tie

    Crime

    North Korea-Is one of the world’s main providers of illegal
    drugs, pornography, and other black market items. They hold public executions.

    Scientology engages in confidence schemes, kidnappings,
    slave labor, credit card theft, fraud, murder.

    Score: Tie

    Labor Camps

    North Korea-Has at least five labor camps with about 20% of
    their people imprisoned.

    Scientology-Has the Hole with about 20% of their former
    executives imprisoned.

    Score: Tie

    “Leadership”

    North Korea-controlled by a short, dictatorial ruler

    Scientology-controlled by a short, dictatorial ruler

    Score: Tie

    (Wouldn’t it be a great Celebrity Death Match between Kim
    Jong-un and Wee Davey Miscavige?)

    Weapons:

    North Korea has rockets that blow up on the launching pad.

    Scientology practices disconnection which causes many
    footbullets.

    Score: Tie

    This could go on for awhile…

    • Unex Skcus

      They could swap notes at the next “Convention of Dear Leaders”.

    • Xenuvius

      Beautiful.

    • media_lush

      North Korean porn? Is that like with midgets or something?

  • Espiando

    I’m watching Mary Beard’s documentary on Caligula right now (FSM bless torrents). Too bad that Mary Beard is an expert on ancient Rome. I’d trust her to take on another subject that certain people here call Little Boots. She can make anything entertaining, and make sense.

    • Mark

      Ho! The young Bootikins (Shortarse) as one of the spinthriae to an aged and depraved Tiberius (Slubbard)!

      • Espiando

        But was he trained to swim between Hubtard’s thighs and nibble at his genitals?

        • Mark

          Well, if there were any swimming-pools at that isolated ranch near Creston… maybe that’s why little Davy won’t reveal the TRs for OTIX. And it might explain the mystery of the ‘oiliness table’…

        • ThetaBara

          Let us hope not, for his sake at least! Or of our sakes of having to imagine that…

  • RMycroft

    CoS Net News:

    It turns out that Karin Pouw has one of those dormant domains too: whoiskarinpouw.com Registered directly to CoS and created in March 2011, just like whoistommydavis.com and whoisjessicafeshbach.com. Blocking or insurance?

    Alacer Corp, apparently a WISE vitamin company, makers of Emergen-C, was bought out last year .. by Pfizer!

  • Xenuvius

    Now how is it I have to read Ortega’s Blog to find out that little runt has been squirreling my tech since ’95? WTF!?? I’ll make your needle float you little bastard. I might have to return to fix this mess.

    -Elron

  • DeElizabethan

    Thanks Claire for giving us more info from your personal account of this wretched organization.

  • MarionDee

    There’s been some kind of image lurking in my brain about the madness of Scientology’s habit of regrouping and re-emerging with “Oh, we’ve changed almost everything! All you parishioners had better start all over again! And expect a bill.” I just realized that, of course, my subconscious was seeing that the journey up the Bridge is like Sisyphus trying to push the rock up that hill. (Yeah, I took a mythology course in college, though a lot of people know this myth anyway.) Every time, when victory is just in sight, that boulder rolls down to the bottom and the whole dreary exercise starts again.

    I don’t know, Claire, how how you and Mark endured it, analyzed the “church” alone and together, and finally left it–let alone

    • MarionDee

      continuing… with your humanity intact. (Don’t know what happened there.)

  • DodoTheLaser

    The subject of a floating needle (F/N), has been indeed quite a nightmare for auditors and pcs since the 1st “Golden Age of Tech”. And yet I approve of it, despite of all the grief I had to go through when I was in.

    Why? Because, ultimately the whole thing is a con carrying a carrot of false promises, regardless of some “wins” here and there, that can be attained elsewhere, cheaper and without false advertizing and sc-fi mumbo jumbo.

    Thanks to COB for speeding up the end of the fraud of scientology.

    • Tory Christman

      It’s true, DodoTheLaser…>Dave DID speed up the end of the fraud known as scientology. Good point!
      Claire—I was at Flag, on OT 7 when the F/N definition was changed. For anyone not familiar, Hubbard had written a Policy used for years: “Are you Waiting for the Meter to Play Dixie?” This was all about the PC’s INDICATORS vs the Meter. IF the pc says they had a great session and the look bright and happy, glance at the meter, see the float and indicate: “Thank you, your needle is floating”.

      However, as soon as this new F/N arrived, one would go to the examiner….they would (literally) STARE at the Meter. You would say, smiling: “I had a great session”. Examiner staring at Meter, no Acknowledgement. This continued–into the Red Tag (Meaning another auditor had to take u in session and “fix” whatever was out). What was OUT was the GD “F/N”…new definition.

      At Flag, the 1st time it happened, I went to the Director of Processing (person over the ‘tech”) and asked: “What the HELL Is this?” She: “I know…I know…..you have to re-do the Metering course. Go watch Ray Mittoff’s new video on F/N. ARGH!!! So my question to you, Claire—is HOW in the world did David Miscavige ignore that policy? It was a KEY policy for years for auditors, examiners, etc. Please let me know. Thanks, Claire and Tony O 🙂 Tory/Magoo

      • DodoTheLaser

        Yeah, Tory! They also developed some double standards over the time, because the whole thing created such an insane scene with the overrun/upset pcs and crushed auditors. Fucking mess.

  • Exterrier

    Wow, this is one of the most telling posts ever, on a few levels. It is a real good one to send to the half outs, the half decideds, and even some indies, due to the technical aspects. And even though I am way, way out of the church, it does explain the pressures to zombify that are going on, and that I saw signs of, as far as the delivery of the actual supposed product of the church. DM’s by the numbers humanlessness has really sped up the decline of this sorry empire….and now he prefers pretty looking empty buildings to actually having to work with people.
    It is all numbers now, and no humans. I noticed that with the Birthday Game, stat pushes, cheating on stats, etc. When I was around I began to notice that far from being the most competent people on the planet, which I had up to then fantasized that they were, they were the greatest foot marksmen on the planet. They were turning people off in droves, falling all over themselves in desperation to look good by the numbers, and not make mistakes and get yelled at. There was a definite “headless” quality about the whole thing, to go along with the obvious “soulless” quality, that became more and more evident.
    This post also goes a long way to show who was behind the most costly snafu, if you can call manslaughter a snafu, in Sciborg history, the Lisa McPherson affair. It was little Psychoboy all down the line.
    There were a lot of “aha” moments in this post, as well as in Jeff Hawkin’s post just below it.

  • Richie

    Another eye-opening post, Claire. Thanks!

  • Nevermore

    I’m still wondering why it is that Miscavige apparently refuses to be audited? I mean, that’s like the Pope refusing to go to confession. How can you lead the {church} and refuse to abide by one of its most basic rules?

    • Simon

      That’s how they turn otherwise nice normal people into robots with dead eyes, through brainwashing via incessant dry nonsensical garbage drilled into them repeatedly. Kind of like watching Battlefield Earth from what I’ve heard.

      • ze moo

        Battlefield Earth is very funny. Travolta pranching around in a cod piece and Doc Martin Boots is hilarious. The sad part is the movie is very true to the book.

  • DodoTheLaser

    I hope Leah and many others are reading all of this. The timing is good. The truth is clear.

  • Simon

    During auditing, do they ever ask things like “How many times have you watched Knight & Day? Do you own it on DVD? If so, why don’t you own the Blu-Ray? Do you make sure you watch at least 45 films a week starring Scientology actors? Do you think Kirstie Alley is a better actress in Cheers than Shelley Long? Yes? So why does the e-meter show you as lying? You now have to clean a toilet using a toothbrush.”

    • Nevermore

      I watched a rerun of the first series of North and South over the weekend. Ms Alley’s behaviour as Virgilia was very similar to her recent Twitter outbursts. Which led me to wonder how much acting she was doing back then. Or is what she’s doing now all an act? Which is not a good thing to consider before my first cup of tea of the day!

  • Roger Larsson

    Full attantion on an e-meter clear the meter and not the pre-clear. $cientology’s handling of Lisa McPherson made Clearwater to Muddywater. Have I left out something? Yes, operation “Snow White” was “Coal Black”.