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What Motivated L. Ron Hubbard? Historian Jon Atack Follows the Clues

HubbardNavyJon Atack is the author of A Piece of Blue Sky, one of the very best books on L. Ron Hubbard and Scientology. He has a new edition of the book for sale, and on Saturdays he’s helping us sift through the legends, myths, and contested facts about Scientology that tend to get hashed and rehashed in books, articles, and especially on the Internet.

Jon, last week you took on the shared reality that props up Scientology’s cosmology. But what about L. Ron Hubbard himself? Did he share in that reality? This time, you said you wanted to tackle Hubbard’s original motivations for creating a worldwide movement. What have you found out?

JON: In the 1952 book Scientology: 8.80, Hubbard described his goal in these words: “My purpose is to bring a barbarism out of the mud it thinks conceived it and to form, here on Earth, a civilization based on human understanding, not violence. That’s a big purpose. A broad field. A star-high goal.”

Long before this, he wrote a fascinating letter to his first wife, which has since been copyrighted on behalf of his estate.

THE BUNKER: It may be copyrighted, but you made sure a healthy portion of it was quoted in Russell Miller’s book, Bare-Faced Messiah.

JON: Before I get to the letter, I wanted to relate an anecdote to help put this subject — Hubbard’s motivation — into some further context.

THE BUNKER: Please do.

JON: In 1986, I spent a month in Palo Alto, interviewing various luminaries, including David Mayo and Sarge Gerbode. David was not the only Class XII at the Advanced Ability Center.

THE BUNKER: The AAC was Mayo’s splinter group that delivered high-level auditing outside the church itself, something Scientology fought vigorously.

JON: Indeed. Mayo was not the only auditor there to have counseled the Source and Founder of Scientology, the Great OT, Ron Hubbard in all his glory. But, while David was open to questions, the other Class XII at the Advanced Ability Center treated me with silent contempt, refusing to utter a single word in my presence. That Class XII was Paulette Mahurin, formerly Ausley and, even more formerly, Cohen. At the time, I thought she took issue with my skeptical attitude about the vaunted Tech, and my expressed concern that OT III has been known to induce psychosis, but I was wrong, as I discovered when I returned to the Bay, in 1988.

The friend I was staying with took me over to see Ron Neuman, fabled collector of Hubbardabilia (and thoroughly decent bloke). Ron had lent his over-sized house to a wedding party, which by the time we arrived was verging on the raucous. I sat in the melee, a little disorientated, and a woman sat across the room, glared at me before inveighing against me. I had not recognized Paulette with her new perm. The silent disdain had given way to rage. She accused me of being “stoned” (as if!), and, rather loudly, so that the whole crowd might hear, told me that I was simply pandering to Hubbard’s will. I was making him famous. And I should be ashamed of myself.

I’d already written A Piece of Blue Sky and helped Russell Miller with his fine biography of Hubbard, so I knew enough to know that she was right about Hubbard’s wishes. But while she was exporting Hubbard’s mind-melting methodology, I was simply putting Hubbard’s devious story into the record. I don’t believe that it benefits him one way or the other. Paulette seemed to think that Hubbard would somehow acquire arcane power, though continued to spread his virus far and wide. She seemed to believe that the Tech should continue, but without reference to its compiler. I had no remaining faith in the Tech, but I felt that Hubbard’s story was both utterly fascinating and highly significant to the understanding of narcissistic sociopaths and those upon whom they prey.

The Dev-OTs believe that Hubbard was a selfless humanitarian, who sacrificed his health in noble pursuit of the liberation of mankind. Contrary to his pronouncements, Hubbard desperately needed praise, admiration, and sympathy, and his goal was not really “star high.” As he put it succinctly in his self-affirmations, just months before introducing Dianetics to an unsuspecting world, “Men are your slaves.” But enslaving humanity wasn’t his goal, either (though he did pretty well, leaving tens of thousands of zealous worshipers, who will harass critics viciously without the slightest twinge of conscience). Hubbard’s motivation was far more simple than that.

Scientology begins in 1938, when Hubbard wrote his first text, “Excalibur,” which remains buried in the archive. He later claimed that he had died while under anaesthetic during a dental procedure. (Whatever else this incident did, it certainly put him off dentists. His teeth would later rot in his head, such was his phobia.) While dead, he was offered a “smorgasbord” of knowledge, which he claimed to have distilled into “Excalibur.” Here he first put forward his famous tautology that the purpose of existence is, well, to exist. This sounds much better if you say “to survive,” but it boils down to the same thing. He would later lead his followers to believe that “Excalibur” was so dangerous that three people went mad from reading it (various Hubbard lectures are almost suicidally tedious, but that isn’t what he meant). As is so often the case with Hubbard’s statements, this is just hyperbole, with no basis in fact. Followers believe that Hubbard here discovered the immortality of the spirit, but there is a letter from the same year (misdated 1939 by the Scientologists, in the copyright filing), which is likely the most important single statement in the whole Hubbard canon.

The letter is addressed to his first wife, Polly, whom he called “Skipper.” First of all, he gives a rather melancholic explanation for his discovery of the principle “Survive!,” saying: “Living is a pretty grim joke, but a joke just the same. The entire function of man is to survive. Not ‘for what’ but just to survive.” He added: “It’s a big joke, this living. God was feeling sardonic the day He created the Universe. So its [sic] rather up to at least one man every few centuries to pop up and come just as close to making Him swallow his [sic] laughter as possible.”

As for immortality, Hubbard is entirely unconvinced of the survival of the soul, spirit, or thetan: “Personal immortality is only to be gained through the printed word, barred note or painted canvas or hard grabite [sic — presumably he meant “granite”]. Note the word “only.”

A 26-year-old Hubbard laid out his aim in life: “Foolishly perhaps, but determined none the less, I have high hopes of smashing my name into history so violently that it will take a legendary form even if all the books are destroyed. That goal is the real goal as far as I am concerned. Things which stand too consistently in its way make me nervous. It’s a pretty big job. In a hundred years Roosevelt will have been forgotten — which gives some idea of the magnitude of my attempt. And all this boils and froths inside my head and I’m miserable when I am blocked.”

Hubbard added that he was going to “make Napoleon look like a punk” in comparison to the fame he would come to enjoy.

So, “Excalibur” was not about spiritual immortality, or spiritual anything. Hubbard felt that he had made contact with some underlying force in the universe, and that he was the only person ever so to do, but he wanted to exploit that force not for the good of the world (which finds no mention anywhere in this five-page letter), but to “smash” his name into history.

Believers will say that Hubbard changed his mind, but at the very end of his life, there is a telling confirmation of his “only goal.” When Hubbard dropped his body, almost fifty years later, he had failed to spend $648 million of the monies he’d extracted from the Dev-OTs. A paltry million went to the wife who had endured prison to protect him, far less to his surviving children. But half a billion dollars went to the Church of Spiritual Technology, which lists as its corporate purpose, “To perpetuate the name L. Ron Hubbard.” Not the “technology,” just the name, please note.

I still disagree with Paulette Mahurin. I really don’t care if I make Hubbard more famous by pointing out his malignant and hypocritical life. Surely, biographers of Hitler, Stalin, and Genghis Khan are serving humanity by exploring these deviant personalities. In years to come, I imagine that parents will warn their children, “If you’re naughty, L. Ron Hubbard will come and audit you until you become his slave.” I believe that it is best to understand evil, rather than to pull up the blankets and ignore it. Hubbard gives us fascinating insights into the self-obsessed narcissist, which could even lead to a society that no longer promotes such behavior. A society, where, as Hubbard put it, honest people have rights, too.

 
——————–

Christian Stolte on Leah Remini

Looks like a fan of Chicago Fire happened upon our friend Christian Stolte and the rest of the crew shaking hands on a city street. But around 1:20 into the video, things really get interesting…

 

 
——————–

Harlan Ellison on Selma

No Scientology angle here, but we’re big fans of Harlan Ellison, who did appear in the Bunker not too long ago with his memories of L. Ron Hubbard, and we thought some of you might appreciate this video he made a couple of days ago. He was filmed by one of our great friends, screenwriter Josh Olson (nominated for an Oscar for his script for A History of Violence), whom we helped achieve immortality by publishing his 2009 essay, “I Will Not Read Your Fucking Script” in the Village Voice. Take it away, Harlan…

 

 
——————–

Posted by Tony Ortega on August 26, 2013 at 07:00

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If you’d like to help support The Underground Bunker, please e-mail our webmaster Scott Pilutik at BunkerFund@tonyortega.org

 

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  • Observer

    None of this surprises me in the least. Hubbard was a malignant old buffoon, simultaneously ridiculous and evil.

    Thank you so much, Jon.

    • DodoTheLaser

      Are you trying to say Hubbard was a really good story teller?

      • Espiando

        Given his fiction, I’d say he wasn’t even that. “Fear” is the exception that proves the rule.

        • DodoTheLaser

          Roger that. But look who we are talking about.

          Perhaps his life story is his best novel of all.
          Good, bad and ugly. Mostly ugly. History it is.

          • Espiando

            Except that we already have had a version of his {“life”} promulgated. It’s called “Forrest Gump”. I didn’t like it then, and I sure don’t like this variation on the theme.

            • DodoTheLaser

              Hey! Respect sophisticated con. So kids can learn.

            • Missionary Kid

              Forrest Gump was a Southern tall tale, told well and understood as such. LRH’s life {history} is a tall tale, much less skilfully told, that people chose to take as real so that they could claim that his fictional powers could be attained.

            • Observer

              I have always hated tall tales, even as a kid. Looking at you, Paul Bunyan and Pecos Bill.

            • Eivol Ekdal

              I liked Jack London stories as a kid 🙂

            • Missionary Kid

              What else are fairy tales and stories from the bible, but tall tales? They are told, usually, to make a point or carry a moral.

              What did you think of fairy tales?

        • Poison Ivy

          I wouldn’t say a “good” story teller, but he was certainly an accomplished story teller. I mean, that’s all he did all day, every day. Pull tall tales out of the air and out of his ass.

          • Marie Claire Wolf

            His best tales were about his colourful made-up adventurous life.

      • Observer

        No–I’ve made a few abortive attempts to read his stuff and couldn’t get past the first couple of pages. He was a prolific but lousy storyteller.

        What I’m saying is that he’s as evil and ridiculous as the evil Gozer taking the form of the Stay-Puft Marshmallow Man in Ghostbusters.

        • Poison Ivy

          Great shoop!

        • Marie Claire Wolf

          The sturgiest of torpid prose peppered for flavor with made-up lingo, and at that I couldn’t tolerate more than 30 pp. of Dianetics. And from the few videos of his so-called lectures I have seen, he comes across as a pompous super bore.

          • monkeyknickers

            Sing it, sister. That’s the worst part of this whole thing. He was a limited, cartoon idiot who hit the right-place-right-time lottery. If I ever fall for a cult, I’m gonna as that they provide proof of IQ first.

            • L. Wrong Hubturd

              How ya feelin’ “almost momma”?

            • monkeyknickers

              Ach well . . . pretty low today. Dealing with the twins’ paternal symbol is stressful for me. And he’s delighting in making me uncomfortable. I’m actually thinking about NOT returning to Los Angeles. He has a big fancy job and resources and I just think a long term geographical detox will be best for all involved. And remind me to cease dating narcissists.

              Aren’t you sorry you asked sweetheart? 🙂

              Apologies L 🙂 I just got off the phone and my face is still hot and the twins are doing backflips using my internal organs as a safety mat and I am plainly feeling very sorry for myself.

              Time to buck up ! 😉 I’ll put on Ash’s fave nature documentary . . . . her little face lighting up at the sight of CGI prehistoric sharks and the noise she makes (“OOoooooooooo, Auntie LOOK) never ceases to make me feel better.

              🙂

              How are you?? ready to fix my amp? 🙂

            • L. Wrong Hubturd

              From now on, if you so much as twitch a mere thought of LRH about any guy you date, RUUUUUUUN!

              Consider amp fixed. Sometimes I just do a touch assist and it’s all better. I’m thinking of getting yellow shop shirts.

    • WildaBeast

      This makes me think of those T-shirts that were going around maybe 15 years ago; they had a picture of the Pillsbury Doughboy and the caption read: “Poke me and die”. Sounds like a distillation of Fair Game in my “I-drove-seven-hours-yesterday-and-slept-for-five” state.
      Also: BWAAHAHAHAHAHAHA!
      Also: How do you always have a shoop for the occasion? Do you just have a portfolio of hundreds of them in your computer? It’s wonderful.

      • Observer

        There are so many recurring themes in Scientology that shoops have a very long shelf life. I did this one a couple of weeks ago because a poster (I forget who) mentioned the Stay-Puft Marshmallow Man and it inspired me … and it just happened to fit today’s article.

    • TheHoleDoesNotExist

      Another one of my favorites. I guess this means Jon Atack is off the Indie’s Christmas Card list too.

      Christian Stolte… Midwest folks say it plain and say it loud. Miscavige is a Bully and those who support him or Bully Enablers.

      Morning coffee with Harlan Ellison? Too much, Tony, Too much! Now I have to check and see if he does audio books. Actually, he might have a whole other marketing venue if he just put out video stories. Gets all that “nuance” as he describes it, in.

      Oh, and I remember the days of the March, but was not in the one in Alabama. I was still a teen, and I could not understand why anyone would pour so much hate and behave so cruel just because what someone looked like. I kept listening to explanations and it still never made sense to me. There were many supportive small marches in towns across America, and some were ugly, others not. But as the sunset, we came home and the watched Selma in the comfort of our all white suburban livingrooms while feasting on our frozen Swanson TV dinners on our TV dinner trays. It was, indeed, the lineup of notable figures like Mr. Ellison himself and the broad spectrum of stellar and honorable names that left an indelible mark on many a conscience that had never stepped out of the comfort zone before. The tension would thick and nauseating and lasted not for a day, but for the rest of my high school years.

      And now for my Super Power PSA. For any lurkers out there, if you haven’t already heard, The Cause Resurgence Rundown is about running around a glowing orange pole in a darkened room.

      No, I am not joking. The Rundown is a joke. I did it so that’s how I know.

      http://i44.tinypic.com/a9tges.jpg

      • Poison Ivy

        Speaking of delusion and hate…this absolutely blew my mind. http://www.nytimes.com/2013/08/24/opinion/i-have-a-character-issue.html
        Are people this nuts out there?

        • TheHoleDoesNotExist

          “she hasn’t been judged by the same set of standards as Walter.”

          I look at it this way, PI. There are several billion people on this planet. Until medical science has a procedure or pill for them, there will always be a few neanderthals in the punch bowl. They have no place in civilized society, but anyone can have a website.

          • Poison Ivy

            Yes, the internet is a wonderful gathering place for madmen and women in their pajamas.

            (I’m not wearing pajamas right now, by the way – but I am wearing workout clothes.)

            • Missionary Kid

              Wait a minute. I’m one of those madmen.

        • Marie Claire Wolf

          Poor Anna who should be praised for her great performance has unfortunately attracted human plancton who, in their turn have an extremely narrow filed of view.

          • TheHoleDoesNotExist

            Plankton have no eyes, so that might explain it.

            • Marie Claire Wolf

              Thank you for paying attention 😉

        • BosonStark

          I like Skyler. I hope that Breaking Bad reaches a resolution that will mollify some of those Skyler-hating freaks out there.

          Confusing an actor’s real life character with the virtues of the roles they play can be unhealthy too, like the people who think Tom Cruise is some kind of ideal as a person, simply because he’s not a crackhead or driving drunk. He could have some other deep-seated problems like wanting to believe he has all the answers and is of historic importance in saving the planet.

          • q-bird

            exactly.

          • Jgg2012

            What? He isn’t a fearless Air Force pilot?

            • Missionary Kid

              I’m glad you mistakenly put him in the Air Farce.
              He portrays a Nasal Radiator in Lost Gun.
              As much as the movie did a lot for Navy recruiting, any pilot that deserted his wingman would be severely disciplined, if not lose the faith with their squadron mates.

            • Jgg2012

              I never saw it, though Katie Holmes said she wanted to marry his character. Tell me this–do all Navy aviators have beautiful, unattached female supervisors?

            • Missionary Kid

              They may now, but 35 years ago, there were none. The movie was unrealistic for someone who has been close to Naval Aviation, but so was an Ocifer and a Gentleman.

              For military subjects, the Navy uses Navy instructors. The only time that I can envision them using a civilian would be for something like the operator of altitude chamber.

              The sad part of the film was that Art Scholl, a fantastic pilot, lost his life filming a aerial sequence for the film. His body and plane were never found.

        • FLUNK_101

          FLUNK’s RE-Butt-AL:

          “it has illuminated some of the dark and murky corners that we often ignore or pretend aren’t still there in our everyday lives.”

          She’s describing herself, isn ‘t she?

          What an ignorant hypocrite.

          Or maybe she’s just being provocative … or maybe she’s a self-absorbed narcissist for, for whom no amount fame is ever enough.

          So what if people hate her character? Does that mean they hate women?
          What if people loved her character ? Would that mean that women, as a group, are universally loved and respected?

          C’mon ! This is so stupid it could only be printed in a feminist rag like the NYT. Don ‘t get me wrong, The New York Times has a lot of information in it, and in that way, it ‘s a great paper. But there is an anti- intellectual, anti-science, po-mo bias which always seems to manifest itself in the name of feminism.

          Context is everything!

          And who hasn’t heard about a wife who’s tried to shape her husband into something else? This behavior has it’s roots in biology, by the way. There’s nothing misogynistic about representing that in a drama and letting the audience make their own associations and inferences, depending on the context. To presuppose sexism before the fact is pure bigotry, based on ignorance, as well as totalitarian, because people have a right to make up their own minds about a work of art.

          The first rule of celebrity is that you don’t get to define yourself, because the audience had already done that for you!

          This woman should be PLEASED that her character is so hated. There are actors in this this world who would give anything for that kind of success. It’s like she won the lottery!

          Sheesh, y’all!

          • sugarplumfairy

            Maybe you should read it again.. Flunk..

            • FLUNK_101

              What about make actors? I read that DeNiro had to get a carry permit because, in public, creeps would challenge him to fight. Irrational harassment happens to men, too. It’s a part of being famous. To say that a female character is hated only because she’s a woman is a stretch, isn’t it?

            • sugarplumfairy

              So far, you’re the only one I’ve heard say it.. Anna said something quite different..

            • FLUNK_101

              This is what she said:

              “Because Walter is the show’s protagonist, there is a natural tendency to empathize with and root for him, despite his moral failings. (That viewers can identify with this antihero is also a testament to how deftly his character is written and acted.)”

              ” So from the beginning, I was aware that she might not be the show’s most popular character.”

              “Could it be that they can’t stand a woman who won’t suffer silently or ‘stand by her man’?”

              That’s what she said … it’s so stupid … she’s contradicting herself!

          • Jgg2012

            This brings me to Kirstie’s latest tweet:

            “The sick thing is that hateful people help NO ONE and they HATE those who help so many. I have no use for them. Well maybe one..fertilizer”
            Yes, she thinks anyone who defends Leah is fertilizer.

            • FLUNK_101

              I think what Kirstie is actually saying is that people who criticize scientology would make good fertilizer …

        • Eclipse-girl

          I like Anna Gunn’s character. I may not always agree with her actions. I am also capable of distinguishing between a character in a movie or TV show and the actor/actress who portrays that character.

          • Poison Ivy

            Well, most people don’t realize 90% of reality TV is 90% scripted (or re-scripted in post.) So it’s easy these days to get confused between what’s real and what’s fiction. Personally I prefer my fiction to be well-scripted and well-acted, but that’s just me.

            • Jgg2012

              It’s not an alien implant?

        • Jgg2012

          PI, the people liking that FB page represent less than 1 American in 10,000. Come to think of it, so do Scientologists.

      • Eivol Ekdal

        I am from the Midwest and although we use colorful language I would never describe it as plaid.
        😉

        • TheHoleDoesNotExist

          hahaha. I already edited, but I almost left it in …. I grew up in the Midwest and this was part of the uniform…

          http://i41.tinypic.com/2mc8yzm.jpg

          • Eivol Ekdal

            sorry Disqus refresh behavior is less than reliable and a little of the pedant in me slipped out. But yes that is the uniform …I got mine from Eddie Bauer at Woodfield Mall in Schaumburg.

            • q-bird

              I know this place of which you speak. I have family in Schaumburg!

              A song ~ http://youtu.be/eWNJM4Pl21c

            • Eivol Ekdal

              …made me yearn for beer and brats.

          • ze moo

            Is that your everday flannel or your Sunday Go to Meeting flannel??

            • TheHoleDoesNotExist

              I live in Florida now, but i Do have one plaid shirt leftover. We bundle up 2 weeks in January. I bought a mid length lined coat about 10 years ago and wore it once, when in Las Vegas. You never know.

          • John P.

            That looks like the uniform that people wear in the “Canada” region of far upstate New York. Since it doesn’t have a fur-lined hood, I believe that is summer dress. I believe, however, that Canadians are very free about mixing several different colors and patterns of plaid in their local costumes.

            • TheHoleDoesNotExist

              True. Garnet Red and Forest Green are the only approved colors in Midwest though. Those New Yorkers and their liberal ways!

            • monkeyknickers

              Hweet! Many centuries ago, the plaid thermal shirts in all their rainbow glory marched tirelessly from the north with one purpose – one mission. After many long years, they arrived upon the PACNW and finally – finally – could rest their weary threads.

              and lo!

              grunge was born.

              Oh shit and also (ahem) AND LO! So was Nirvana.

            • L. Wrong Hubturd

              Yes, but Nirvana at least gave birth to Dave Grohl and Foo Fighters.

            • Jgg2012

              Costumes? I thought that they were hockey uniforms.

    • SciWatcher

      Haha, this reminds me of a line from the early fifteenth century poem Morte Arthure, where King Arthur challenges an evil giant: “His body bulged, as big as a porpoise’s / and the flesh of his foul lips fiercely quivered / each collop curling like a cruel wolf’s head.”

      • Missionary Kid

        That sounds much more like LRH in the flesh, without the shoop.

        • Poison Ivy

          Especially the fleshy foul lips fiercely quivering!

      • filosofa

        Absolutely wonderful poetry, but I simply can’t accept the sacreligious notion of collops having any association with Hell Ron Hublard! My dear Scots grandmother used to cook a mean pan of venison “Collops” with brandy sauce for family celebrations, and serve it up on a huge blue and white ashet.

        I still have that ashet and I don’t want to be thinking of his ugly mug whenever I use it! ;D

    • Bradley Greenwood

      We owe you for this one! 🙂

      Actually, DM might say the same thing in a different spirit, of course.

      • Observer

        I have no doubt!

    • AsthmaticDwarf

      Love stay puff marshmello Ron !! Turns out he was full of fear: *couldn’t face medical doctor to remove that putrid sebaceous cyst from his forhead; *couldn’t face dentists, so his teeth rotted in his head for years until his death; * terrified of the ‘authorities’ and their power to take him into ‘custody’. L Ron Hubbard: Coward.

  • chuckbeattyexseaorg75to03

    For sure Paulette is being short sighted, thinking that not discussing Hubbard in full, is somehow better.

    Intellectual history on earth is for discussing, and the non existent “ability ” of Grade 0 parishioners supposedly would overcome any troubles that increased and detailed discussion of Hubbard’s voluminous flaws brings about.

    Hubbard’s contradictions are inevitable to be discovered and pawed over, by intelligent people, and that is what is in store from now on, no matter what!

    My own background in Scientology, my “expertise” was the course training “tech” which includes the “word clearing” tech.

    To me, Hubbard’s blindspots, the words Hubbard did NOT use regularly in his writings, the omitted words he didn’t use, are telling.

    “Scapegoating”
    “Insular”

    are two that leap to my mind.

    And most importantly, “religion” leaps to my mind as a word Hubbard grossly misunderstood, and around which, his whole Scientology “religion” is a serious human mistake.

    • 0tessa

      Maybe that pesky ‘body thetan’ was just Hubbard himself …?

      • Espiando

        More likely some unknown form of microbial life that evolved in his rotten teeth and gained consciousness.

        • Observer

          Pass the brain bleach, please.

          • TheHoleDoesNotExist

            You should always have some handy before diving into Espiando’s pool … just in case.

    • Once_Born

      I sometimes wonder how many modern religions would have survived if their founder’s lives, and the early history of the organisation, had been truthfully recorded. Today, we only have access to revised and mythologised versions written by believers who often suppressed dissenting opinions.

      Scientology is possibly the first example of a cult which has fallen foul of the Internet’s power to communicate and store inconvenient information. The CofS view of Hubbard (great writer, humanitarian, photographer &c.&c. &c.) is held by a small minority because the majority have access to historical source materials and the critical writing based upon those sources.

      I sometime wonder – if Hubbard had been born after the advent of the Internet, would Dianetics &/or Scientology have ever got off the ground at all? In the 1950’s disaffected members had no way of bringing their experience to public attention, making the job of the recruiter so much easier.

      I strongly agree that truthfully documenting Hubbard’s life, and the history of Scientology, is a vital enterprise – especially as the early days will soon pass out of living memory.

      • Douglas D. Douglas

        The true life and background of Joseph Smith was written out, disseminated, and is still readily available for anyone who wants to look at them. Smith’s own mother wrote a lively biography of her famous son. Yet, Mormons continue to easily cling to and proclaim an utterly false version of his life that fits more easily into their cosmology.

        Hubbard is not unique.

        • Once_Born

          Perhaps there is a difference in scale.

          The truth about Mormonism was available through a few books, whose existence would probably have been unknown to those who would have benefited most from reading them.
          The truth about Scientology (both source material and critical writings) is available in the form Terabytes of data that is indexed, searchable and readily available.

          Mormonism could get away with ignoring a few obscure books and still survive long enough to become established. Scientology can’t get away with ignoring the sheer mass of online material – and can’t ignore it either. This is a serious threat to its long-term survival.

          Hubbard was not unique – but perhaps modern communications make it more difficult for organisations created by people like him to establish themselves.

          • Douglas D. Douglas

            Of course, the difference is in scale, and timing. My response was to the first paragraph.

            As far as whether or not the material is readily available– it is. It is also unassailable (although, of course, that doesn’t matter to True Believers).

            • Marie Claire Wolf

              Scale matters, but more importantly for its survival a cult, and yes I think of ‘moronism’ as a cult, they have had the smarts to adapt themselves to the U.S.A rule of law and do not treat their followers like sub-humans, and that is the world of difference that spells out Co$’s future demise. Under Midget’s dominion, they can be totally compared to the pathetic souls of FLDS.

            • Once_Born

              Agreed – the Mormons survived because (among other things):

              > Smith’s successor was also a charismatic leader
              > An effective organisation was quickly established
              > They moderated their early doctrines to fit in with wider society
              > Domination and abuse were not explicitly built into the doctrine

              The CofS has not achieved any of those hurdles, and will not endure in the same way.

              What I am arguing is that the advent of the Internet has added a new hurdle to the obstacle course that must be cleared by new religious movements. Scientology has fallen at that hurdle.
              Mormonism might have done, had it been in place whey they ran their race.

            • Douglas D. Douglas

              As already noted, the LDS Church endured because the next leader, Brigham Young, was a far more capable administrator than David Miscavige. Young also isolated the main branch of the LDS for a period of time (Utah was not part of the Union when they emigrated). That is an option that Miscavige did not have the luxury of choosing.

              Oh! And Brigham Young was a tireless worker who motivated those around him. Miscavige is a snotty, entitled little tyrant. So there’s that, too.

            • Missionary Kid

              You’re insulting snotty, entitled tyrants.

            • Poison Ivy

              Young was all that, but he was pretty dictatorial as well. And he tried the isolationist route, like Miscavige in Hemet…you have to remember, he hadn’t totally given up the idea of a Mormon militia (Smith’s original inspiration.) But it became really clear very late in his regime and to the leaders of the religion after that they had to assimilate or always be symbolically at war with America (that’s how most Americans felt about polygamy by the way – they wanted it wiped from the map, one way or another, violence included.) It was the general Mormon leadership who followed Young who finally cried “Uncle” all the way and decided to become “American” as well as Mormon – they saw the writing on the wall. You’ll get those mini-Mormon cult/polygamy compounds that pop up here and there and some of them manage to stay under the radar for years, but others end up not so happily.

              You’d never have had a US government capitulate to a sect back then the way the IRS folded over the Scientology issue in 1991. Never. Even without the internet, the Mormons felt the weight (and the responsibility) of being American and co-existing.

            • Douglas D. Douglas

              Hubbard effectively isolated his True Believers in the actual Sea Org, when it was at sea. Even if he would have considered tit, he had no option to assimilate, as he was a wanted fugitive in his final years.

            • Once_Born

              If a movement is to endure long-term (for generations) it has to survive long enough to socialise its children (the best way to create a ‘true believer’). Mormonism {achieved} this, and grew, year on year.

              Thanks to modern communications Scientology has been exposed to unprecedented degree of critical scrutiny and public awareness. I agree that this does not matter to the self-deluded ‘true believers’ – but it denies them the ability to pass their delusions on to a sufficient number of children to sustain the organisation.

              How do you think Joseph Smith would do if had been born in 1980?

            • Douglas D. Douglas

              Smith may have found “another path” to spread his ideas. Bear in mind, like Hubbard, he did not initially set out to create a religion. (I know, I know. Others disagree with me.) Smith and Hubbard were both motivated by wealth and fame. They “fell into” religion and in the end, it consumed them. But they were happily consumed.

              The current state of social connection, and the rapid dissemination of information (both real and false) is a formidable obstacle for anyone who would attempt to create something like the LDS faith or Scientology today.

            • Poison Ivy

              Smith’s “ideas” (or tall tales) would probably not have caught on in 1980. They were uniquely suited to the time period in which he developed them, in a very young America undergoing its first religious upheaval as a nation. People were tired of bleak, dreary, hopeless Calvinism and rote Protestantism that had no pizazz to keep them interested or relevance to their current lives. Smith hit on this religious notion that “proved” Jesus had actually visited America (!!!) and that the Native Americans were the lost tribe of Israel. There were angels and trumpets, and golden plates, and an afterlife and it really was like a kick in the pants to a lot of people who were seeking a reason to keep believing, and were just about over the wet blanket Calvinists.

            • ze moo

              Joseph Smith spent some of his early years as a type of dowser for ‘treasure’ and gold on neighbors lands in central NY. He was sued by several people for his con jobs.

              The USA has always been a strange collection of religious conservatism in public and hedonism in private.

            • Douglas D. Douglas

              You pretty much describe the “other path” to which I referred. Smith was a charismatic fellow, and I somehow think he would have found a way at any period in time. And probably ended just as badly!

            • Casabeca

              Imagine being willing to follow Smith across the west on foot! He must’ve had quite an egaging personality to inspire such devotion. And the concept of new, ongoing revelation was brilliant IMHO. God just might ask you to do anything, and only Joseph Smith could tell you what would be that new required behavior.

            • Poison Ivy

              Smith only led them as far as Nauvoo before he got murdered. Young led them to Utah.

          • Poison Ivy

            Mormons now include some of the unpleasant facts in their vast libraries and archives. They don’t “disappear” them entirely, even if they choose not to believe them. There’s a difference in rejecting something based on belief and on rejecting its existence in entirety (which is what Scientology does.)

          • filosofa

            Also the breeding in large numbers of new generations of baby Mormons is built into the structure of the LDS, whereas the Co$ doesn’t value children and prefers to abort it’s own potential members if sea-ogres get pregnant.
            .
            And the polygamous aspect of the original LDS (and current FLDS) favours, in terms of sheer numbers of those born-in, membership figures that must make Dave Miscavenger weep with envy.

            • Once_Born

              Definitely – I sometimes consider nominating the Sea Org’s anti-reproduction policy for a Darwin Award. http://www.darwinawards.com/

            • filosofa

              What a faaaaabulous idea!

              They’d fit right in. My fave is the man who’s dog playfully caught the lit stick of dynamite his braindead master threw into a fishing lake. Dog ran back with it to his owner who was, by then, cowering in his brand new vehicle, dropped it right there then ran away hoping his master would throw it again.

              BOOM – bye-bye stupid! If only the Co$ was so easily disposed of.

            • Casabeca

              Very important distinction there!

      • Observer

        I think it would have attracted followers–just look at the success of The Secret dreck–but not nearly as many.

        • Once_Born

          I had to look that up http://reason.com/archives/2007/03/15/the-secret-of-the-secret and then found a book / DVD on Amazon.

          It’s interesting because it strips a whole subset of fringe beliefs(including Scientology) to the core proposition:

          The real world isn’t real – and you can manipulate your reality by wishful thinking. If you get what you want, be grateful to us. If you don’t, it’s your fault – you didn’t try hard enough’.

          Perhaps this is why appeals to reason rarely work on true believers – because it not their reason that is being exploited, but hope and desperation.

          • TheHoleDoesNotExist

            You got it! It has Nothing to do with intelligence, reason, nothing in That territory of the brain! I wish people would get that. Wrong brain section, folks, move along.

            Show me One “intelligent” person who has never fell in love with the “wrong” person, or got snookered into one bad business deal, or fell for one scam sales pitch and purchased a useless and yes, even dangerous product or service. You will find in Each instance that person was not at their “peak” in their life for one reason or another. Desperate people do Not use their Intellect first, they use their emotions first. If this wasn’t true then Advertising would not be a multibillion dollar industry. Have you been to a grocery store recently? It’s a minefield of dangerous illogic.

            • Once_Born

              There is a wonderful book called “The Making of a Moonie” by Eileen Barker. Barker observed UK groups that recruited for the Unification Church from inside.

              The Moonies initial strategy involved a lengthy series of lectures which were supposed to lead people to the realisation that Moon was Christ come again. This approach absolutely bombed in the UK. If you are going to appeal to reason, you need a reasonable argument.

              They didn’t give up. Instead, believers opened ‘house churches’. Newcomers were welcomed, and made to feel part of an extended family. This approach worked, for reasons that have everything to do with social psychology, nothing to do with theology.

              For example: humans tend to like people who like them. We tend to conform to the expectations of those around us. If you are at a vulnerable period of your life, these things can have a profound influence over your behaviour.

              Scientology’s exploitation of these very human characteristics is only notable for its extreme ruthlessness.

            • TheHoleDoesNotExist

              Thanks. Might check that one out.

            • phronsie

              Arthur Conan Doyle come to mind when considering the difference between intelligence and gullibility.

          • Marie Claire Wolf

            Insecurities and longing to belong.

      • Missionary Kid

        There was a science fiction story written where a time machine enabled people to look and hear past events.

        They were able to see and hear events such as Lincoln giving the Gettysburg address, Columbus discovering the new world, etc. People were fascinated, and historians found it to be a gold mine.

        However, when they went back and found Jesus and followed him around, riots ensued, and, as I remember the story, people destroyed the time machine because he was different than what they’d been told.

        I’m not comparing Hubbard to Jesus, but Jon Atack is our time machine. The Ronbots and Indies hate him because he doesn’t follow the script in their heads.

        • Poison Ivy

          Know the name of the story? Sounds interesting.

          • Missionary Kid

            Sorry, I don’t. I seem to recall reading it in Analog

        • iHateDuplicity

          A movie made fairly recently that covers this idea well is called “The Man from Earth” a little indie film about the idea of a guy who has lived for 14,000 years and decides one night to tell his story to some of his university professor friends (who have no idea of his actual background). When it comes time to talk about Jesus and what REALLY happened back then, the lady who represents the “religious faithful” doesn’t even want to hear the truth and viciously denounces any attempt to give it to her. There is no arguing with faith. It is one of the strangest of all human phenomena that an idea will have such force and power that it will actually make people want to kill other people rather than even consider changing their mind.

          • Missionary Kid

            There is no reason in faith. It is belief. You can’t argue belief.

            • Douglas D. Douglas

              There is a single argument I have advanced, and wield whenever necessary.

              Faith is, indeed, beyond human reason. Scripture says, “Faith is the substance of things hoped for, the evidence of things not seen.” Faith, therefore, allows one to believe things whether they are known to be true or not. Faith does not, however, allow one to believe something that is proved to be untrue.

              Too many people have the notion that people of faith are completely credulous– that we will believe anything we are told. But most people of faith have a common-sense gauge that tells them when they are being asked to accept something that is patently false. My faith makes me tend to be more skeptical of those who point and cry, “Lo!” But I have zero tolerance for those who dismiss all faith as something that is “beyond all reason,” and therefore, of no value whatsoever.

            • Missionary Kid

              I equate faith with belief. So what if it is beyond all reason? That doesn’t mean that something has no value. People base all sorts of decisions on faith every day.

              You said, “Faith does not, however, allow one to believe something that is proved to be untrue.” I disagree with that, because faith allows people to ignore evidence contrary to their belief.

              It’s my opinion, the argument that just because someone believes one thing that they accept belief in all things they are told is a reductum at absurdum argument.

            • Eclipse-girl

              My definition of FAITH is the belief in that which cannot be proved.

            • Missionary Kid

              Because I have faith that the reports and research on evolution are true, that is also to me a belief. It’s a very strong belief. Faith is one of those words that has, as the term goes, areas of meaning.

              It’s one of those words that has slightly different meanings for different individuals. When we discuss something when we use those words, it’s often necessary to find out what the other persons mean before we get involved in a discussion.

            • Eclipse-girl

              I understand scientific methodology. I do not need to repeat of all of science to trust in science. I know that fraud in science has happened and will probably continue to occur. However, science does a pretty good at exposing its own frauds. It is repeatable, verifiable, falsifiable, etc. I do not have faith in science, I trust in its methodology.

              To me, there is a difference between trust and faith. There is a difference if an idea is supported by tangible, verifiable evidence or if it is just an assertion or an opinion.

              I am not trying to challenge anyone’s faith. I just want them to know there is no tangible, verifiable evidence for their belief. Everyone has the freedom to believe what they choose to. They do not have the freedom to harm others due to their belief. They do not have the freedom to impose their beliefs onto others.

            • Missionary Kid

              I understand where you’re coming from. I also mostly agree with you. To me, it is a problem that words don’t have fixed meanings.

              We’re really talking about is slight differences in personal definitions. Faith, to most people, means religious belief. When I left Christianity, people said that I lost my faith. Actually, I didn’t. I just had a different faith. My beliefs changed. I cannot prove or disprove the existence of god. I use the terms more or less interchangeably. (O.K., I was sneaky there).

              For example, I like your definition of scientific methodology, but there are many things in science that are postulated and generally accepted, but later proved false, (perhaps from methodology that doesn’t take into account undiscovered factors, or a later theory explains something better) or the results are disputed, yet we accept them for the time being.

              That’s why the term, “area of meaning” becomes so important. Words have overlap, like a Venn diagram, yet we each would draw such a diagram differently.

              That’s why I hate the whole “word clearing” BS from Co$. They are insisting on one fixed meaning for each word.

            • Eclipse-girl

              I agree. I also abhor “word clearing.” I am not a linguist, and I understand that the meanings of words change over time and within a culture. I despise the idea that Hubbard was able to get away with redefining words to mean their opposite. It is very Orwellian. I despise everything I have ever learned about Hubbard and $cientology.

              I also agree there will never be a scientific proof or disproof of the existence of any gods or goddesses. I was raised Presbyterian, and am now an atheist.

              Because I have argued for atheism on other websites, the use of the word FAITH is a pet peeve of mine. I apologize if I caused any hard feelings, it was not my intent.

            • Missionary Kid

              Absolutely no hard feelings involved. We just have slightly different personal meanings for terms.

              I well understand the use of the word faith. Being raise in a more fundamentalist sect (closer to Baptist in many ways), it was a friend of my father’s who asked me when I lost my faith. At the time, I gave him an answer, but later, I thought that I hadn’t lost my faith, but I had a new one: that god didn’t exist.

              I have no problem with someone believing just about anything, as long as it doesn’t hurt someone, or they try to convert me or have a sense of entitlement to push their beliefs on others or use the government to advance their agenda or beliefs.

              Being the son of Missionaries, I’ve seen the sense of entitlement up close.

            • Eclipse-girl

              You have just demonstrated something I really enjoy about this place. The ability to discuss, and perhaps disagree, With CIVILITY and RESPECT and an honest desire to understand.

            • Missionary Kid

              Those are also the reasons I like this place. It is also basically unmoderated, which makes it unusual on the web.

              The disagreement was slight, but it stimulated my thought.

            • Eclipse-girl

              And mine.

            • Poison Ivy

              We are about the same there, DDD. I consider faith to be highly personal and not something to ever be foisted on others. Because it’s just that – belief. Not facts. However, I refuse to have “faith” in anything that facts have proven to me to be untrue.
              I could not possibly believe that we are descended from clams, or that there were Dinosaurs on the “ark.” I’m not one of those who believes there’s a “real” Noah’s ark sitting on a mountaintop in Turkey. Per the ark, however, I am fascinated by the confluence of flood myths that permeates several ancient situations. Could there have been some sort of actual flood event in our collective unconscious? Or is the flood a cross-cultural metaphorical dream image, signifying something uniquely human? Sometime spiritul? It’s in pondering those questions where I find “faith”, “belief”, “theory” and “fact” diverge. And I’m just fine with it. I’m fine with uncertainty, with a personal cosmology that is flexible enough to shift with me as I learn both new provable facts and experience things that facts can’t explain away.

              People were scamming others in the name of “faith” back as far as supernatural beliefs go. Sacrificing virgins in pagan temples. Costly animal sacrifices and moneylending in the temple that Jesus was all hot and bothered about. The black market of holy relics that made so many Priests rich and was part of what set off Martin Luther. Indulgences. I’m sure there are still aboriginal peoples somewhere where the richest dude in the village is bribing the medicine man to guarantee his “eternity.” Playing on and taking advantage of our very human propensity for magical thinking is as ancient as the very first con man. Today you can call up a psychic hotline and charge your credit card to hear some out of work graduate student pretend to know your future.

              That’s why I’m glad I had both the religious and the skeptics background that I had – I treasure what’s still left of my “magical thinking” because it gives me hope and comfort – but I try not to let it get in the way of living a practical, reason-based life. There’s a fine line, sometimes, between faith and self-delusion.

            • Artoo45

              Well put Ivy. Waking up from magical thinking wasn’t comforting or easy. But living in reality is bracing and my brief flash of conciousness amid the wonders of our universe is more than enough.

          • Poison Ivy

            Another one I’ve got to see.

      • Marie Claire Wolf

        You are so right that keeping accurate records on the evolution of this American made con/cult is very important, people who have witnessed the early days and participated in core events are still around and must be encouraged to share their own experiences. I salute John Atack for his courageous work and vigilance, much is also eagerly anticipated of the current effort of Tony O.
        Pandora’s box has cracked open!

      • Rob Kline

        It was the hypothesis of your first sentence that really peaked my interest in the cult. Although I had seen a copy of Dianetics years before (thought it was ridiculous and non-sensical), it was during a class in the scientific methods of religious studies/research (I’m a former seminarian and was working on a inter-disciplinary BS in psych/philo/relig) that I really began my more earnest cult-watching. It was a religious studies wet dream to see a contemporary “religious” movement in action.

        As someone from a xian background I can assure you that most if not all biblical characters have been scrubbed squeaky clean, when it was required, by the apologists of the time to promote the “faith”. Interestingly though it is in these latter days of the xian movement that we find ourselves seeking out the most authentic and human (with all the foibles and untowardness that entails) portrayal of the “historical Jesus.” Although not a completely new thing in the xian faith, the mass popularity for this current search for the authentic Christ did take 2000 years. I somehow doubt that amount of time will be allowed to the $cions to come to terms with the real Hubbard.

        Just wanted to share in your query and take this chance to say a lil bit about myself and why I am here lurking in the wings of the bunker.

        • Once_Born

          My own interest in this question began when I was 14, and read a book called “Cults of Unreason” by Dr Christopher Evans. Published circa 1973, the first section covered the early history of Scientology.

          I was struck by the last paragraph, where Evans asks,

          “Supposing that the world rolls in for a thousand years and that people are still walking about on this peculiar planet and supposing also that Scientology is still around, [..] what then will the mythology of Scientology look like? And what stories will will people be telling of Mr Lafayette Ronald Hubbard, his teachings and his first disciples?”

          This is, basically, ‘the hypothesis of my first sentence’

          As I have argued elsewhere on this page, we may never find this out. Since Evans wrote his book, the advent of the Internet will probably prevent Scientology (and future new religious movements) from consigning inconvenient information to a cult memory hole. However, this is still a live question for established religions (dealt with brilliantly in the writings of Bart D Ehrman).

          Finally – I have never heard the expression “xian” before – may I ask what this movement believes?

          PS… and a new member introducing themselves would normally attract more attention – but everyone has moved to commenting on an unexpected second post of the day – so it falls to me to say it. Welcome!

          • Rob Kline

            “xian” = christian

            • Once_Born

              Thanks for the explanation.

              I should mention that I’m English (and a number of other participants here are from the UK) US usages (e.g. “Xian”) occasionally puzzle me.

              As I understand it ‘501c3’ refers to a tax-exempt non-profit organisation. We have tax-exempt status in the UK, but organisations which receive it have to pass a reasonable ‘public benefit’ test which is strictly enforced. What’s more, thanks to an historical accident (to satisfy the legal definition of a religion, you your observance have to include “acts of worship”) they don’t get a religious exemption, either. Consequently, Scientology in the UK is the runt of the international litter.

              Part of the fascination of Scientology-watching, for me, is trying to understand the cultural differences that have enabled it to prosper in the US.

              It seems to me that Scientology ruthlessly exploits your first amendment to obtain a tax-exempt status that they do not deserve – along with abusing the legal system and intimidating public officials. It’s not just the IRS they do this to, either… They tend to behave as if they are above the law.

      • chuckbeattyexseaorg75to03

        yes, and Scientology seems like an opportunity for researching your points.

        The internet is really just a sped up and much wider quicker word of mouth interaction of human beings.

    • TheHoleDoesNotExist

      I think this at least sums up Hubbard’s “case” quite neatly:

      “even if she knows she cannot publish it while she’s still alive.”

    • filosofa

      You are absolutely right. The full history of Scientology will, and should, remain a fascinating study for scholars and the generations that follow us. Not to accurately record it would be an unforgivable tragedy.

      To quote George Santayana’s famous words from The Life of Reason – “Those who cannot remember the past are doomed to repeat it”.

  • Andrew Robertson

    “…smashing my name into history so violently that it will take a legendary form”

    Well, some have achieved this accolade, but ‘Hubbard, Lafayette Ronald’ as my public library calls him?

    No, he’s on the same forgotten bottom shelf as those other self aggrandizing and pompous buffoons like Helena Blavatsky, George Gurdjieff and Mary Baker Eddy.

    Think, in this batter’d Caravanserai
    Whose Doorways are alternate Night and Day,
    How Sultan after Sultan with his Pomp
    Abode his Hour or two, and went his way.

    Andrew

    • Douglas D. Douglas

      “Round the decay of that colossal wreck, boundless and bare,
      The lone and level sands stretch far away.”

      • tetloj

        Look on my works, ye mighty, and despair.
        Nothing beside remains.

        • Gurdijeff was more than a charlatan, read “In Search of the Miraculous” and get back to us.

  • DodoTheLaser

    The plot is thickens. In a good way.

    My fave quotes, so far:

    “I really don’t care if I make Hubbard more famous by pointing out his
    malignant and hypocritical life. Surely, biographers of Hitler, Stalin,
    and Genghis Khan are serving humanity by exploring these deviant
    personalities.”

    “I believe that it is best to understand evil, rather than to pull up the blankets and ignore it.
    Hubbard gives us fascinating insights into the self-obsessed narcissist,
    which could even lead to a society that no longer promotes such
    behavior. A society, where, as Hubbard put it, honest people have
    rights, too.”

    ~ Jon Atack

    “I believe that one lives for more than one life with more than one
    body. But the fact is, after this long, he has not “returned” as “Ron in
    a new body.” And I place great credence in what Sarge said about the
    later years of his life. There are simply too many other facts that
    align to the notion that he was NOT in fact in good shape and certainly
    was not “causatively discarding his body to continue research that would
    be hindered by a body.” If this was the case, there would have been a
    LOT more detailed hat write ups and turnovers and farewell messages —
    even a film or video. A lot of things I took as “gospel” from the time I
    was young concerning the infallibility of LRH I no longer see that way.
    Including this idea that he could knowingly postulate a future body and
    identity and return with full recall of his last lifetime.”

    ~ Mike Rinder
    http://www.mikerindersblog.org/mike-rinder-interview-talk-radio-europe/#comment-13262

    • Observer

      It sounds like Rinder’s Clam-Aid is wearing off. That makes me happy.

      • DodoTheLaser

        I know. I’ve met Mike briefly. I liked him. I try not to judge people.
        Scientology was his life for a very long time.
        He is a work in progress, just like any ex.
        Except, he is Mike Rinder.

        • Poison Ivy

          Makes me happy too. He’s an extremely intelligent man with a lot of talents.

      • 1subgenius

        Here’s a real good one courtesy of Mike (note where the August 23 event was held):

        • Eivol Ekdal

          Yum! Poo Pie in a Blue Sky.

      • Marie Claire Wolf

        Mike is okay, he had been keeping tabs diligently on the {chirch}, so it seems inevitable that critical thinking is kicking in. Let’s rejoice that the real world proves to be the best remedy to Co$ fallout.

    • Eivol Ekdal

      “I am hoping that by appearing in person, my facial and my body motions will indicate I that have a good heart and fuck the lot of ya.” – Harlan Ellison

      • Missionary Kid

        Harlan was an enfant terrible when he was young, and, now that he is old, he still fills that role.

      • TheHoleDoesNotExist

        I know. He fits right in here, doesn’t he?

    • Eivol Ekdal

      Mike Rinder should probably watch this…
      http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=FJE7ZcWD6vA

      • Missionary Kid

        The bridge in the background really does go nowhere.

        • Eivol Ekdal

          “The Bridge to Total Freedom is paved with abandoned good intentions.” – Eivol Ekdal

          • Missionary Kid

            Eivol, I not only put that in my list of things said about $cientology, but I attributed it to you.

            • Eivol Ekdal

              I came up with that one after watching this …
              http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=m-97WtpmEz0
              Quite telling as to how they slowly brainwash you. Thanks for posting Karen!

            • Missionary Kid

              How old was she when she made the video, and how long was it after escaping?

            • Eivol Ekdal

              I do not know, maybe Karen can tell us. Notice the comments on how not to listen to “Reactive Mind”…so Hubbard seems to redefine what we would call “common sense” as the “reactive mind” and caution people on the dangers of paying attention to it. Problem Solved!

            • Missionary Kid

              Is your name Scandinavian?

            • Eivol Ekdal

              My screen name is from this Batman TV character…
              http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/A_Death_Worse_Than_Fate
              My real surname is of Swedish origin.

            • Missionary Kid

              Ah, another Svenska poika. My parents were missionaries for what was at the time, Swedish Evangelical Mission Covenant Church.

      • Mark

        Funny how he seems to be permanently dry-mouthed, and bears an uncanny resemblance to another waffle-merchant: David Cameron (though not quite so fat-headed).

        • q-bird

          This is excruciating to watch, so just listen then I say — and it’s just as bad! OH my Xemu! Can some body just get this lying SOB a glass of pure sweet water?!!!

          • Eivol Ekdal

            and they are laughing at the “Drop Body Tech” jokes…anyone know what OT Level that ended up being?

            • q-bird

              the guy’s still working on those amazing & expensive levels Eivol Ekdal. You know, that bridge to nowhere is endless… excruciatingly ENDLESS.

              It is also quite difficult for him to complete the {{research}} as he is officially retired now. Most recently, he has moved into a retirement development on Florida’s southeast coast…. living }.

              I believe he is in the “Delray/Boca/Boynton Golf, Spa, Bath and Tennis Club on Lake Fake-a-Hachee”.

          • Poison Ivy

            You can see pretty easily how Miscavige ousted him so quickly. He’s not a cutthroat savage like tiny boots.

          • filosofa

            “OH my Xemu!” – ehehehe!

            I plan to steal this phrase from you right away and use it freqently.

        • filosofa

          One would need to be a very special snowflake indeed to match David Cameron’s level of fat-headedness.

      • Phil McKraken

        Unwatchable due to constant lip licking. Someone needs glass-of-water tech.

        • Eivol Ekdal

          It’s the Cal-Mag

      • Captain Howdy

        Pat Broker..the Andy Kaufman of scientology.

    • tetloj

      Great contrast between Mike’s blog and Ton y’s article and comments today

  • Xique

    A half a billion to smash your name into history, who knew? You know, what’s his name?

  • Truthiwant

    The more I read about Scientology (mostly on The Bunker!), the more I realize how futile, worthless and often dangerous it is.

    Jon Atack always spells it out so beautifully. He always manages to answer those niggling questions I have about Hubbard and his organization that disturb me.

    Thanks to both of you, Tony and Jon, for sharing these stories.

  • Espiando

    I’m just wondering what the trope pull will drag in today from the Sargasso of the LRH Defenders. Theo, possibly. It’s too much to hope for Margaret, although I’m sure that a number of people here would like to have a good, solid debate with her regarding her “findings” about LRH’s life (and her implied assaults on Gerry Armstrong’s credibility). Do I dare wish for Oracle to show up? I do dare. It’s Monday morning here in Change Planes At O’Hare Country, and a little bit of the cray-cray will help move along what’s going to be a hot, steamy day here.

  • BosonStark

    Long before Hubbard thought of it, civilization was based on cooperation. Violence is certainly a manifestation both in man’s nature and society but to say civilization is “based” on it, it’s just, well, the kind of idea that would spring out of a nut who would write this:

    “My purpose is to bring a barbarism out of the mud it thinks conceived it…”

    WTF? It’s hard for me to get past that kind of crappy nonsense which permeates Hubbard’s writing and “research.”

    • Poison Ivy

      Yes, Boson…I’m really fascinated by the recent studies from animal behavior and biology which show cooperation as the basic instinct of life and “survival”, not aggression or competition.
      When you look at the animal kingdom, true violent conflict is always the very last resort. There’s lots of posturing and dominating and symbolic defending and standing of one’s ground – with the result usually being some sort of concession by one side, in an agreement of the social order and then a return to balance. Any actual aggression (unrelated to hunting, food, etc.) is rare – and happens a lot more in captive and domestic animals than in the wild…when resources are lacking or animals are crammed into habitats/spaces much too small for more than one group to exist at once.

      That line about “Barbarism out of the mud”….reminds me of the Scientology orientation film. “Man has long thought he was a spirit and not a piece of mud.”

      What was it with Hubbard and mud?

      • TheHoleDoesNotExist

        There were no asphalt roads and concrete sidewalks when he was growing up. A rainy day was a muddy day. That’s probably how he got to be mankind’s bestest ever Mud Slinger.

      • WhereIsSHE

        Morning, P.I.
        So true.
        May I recommend the movie “Blackfish” to you, related to your point about the animal kingdom.

        Scientology: the SeaWorld of “religion”.

        http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=8OEjYquyjcg

        • Missionary Kid

          Scientology: the SeaWorld sewer of “religion.”

          • TheHoleDoesNotExist

            Scientology: The Sewer of your MInd

            • Missionary Kid

              Amen.

        • Poison Ivy

          We just saw a preview for it last night at our fave local arthouse.
          CANNOT WAIT TO SEE IT!
          Actually did some directing work on a documentary about cetacean intelligence several years ago; shot belugas in captivity and orcas in the wild. Orcas actually have languages. Fascinating.

          • TheHoleDoesNotExist

            Wow. You toss that out so casually, like all of us Bunkerettes have shot doco’s of belugs in captivity and orcas in the wild. That sounds like an adventurous story in itself! Did you do any shots over head, in a seaplane or coptor?

            • Bury_The_Nuts

              I saw a beluga at the Chicago aquarium once…………….
              That is all I got!

            • TheHoleDoesNotExist

              I swam with a reg once. Does that count?

            • Bury_The_Nuts

              Are you kidding? You are the winner!

            • q-bird

              BTN! Hi!! Howzit goin’?! Staying cool in schweaty Florida?
              Where’s Delizzy?

            • TheHoleDoesNotExist

              Still pounding on her Computer Tech guy last we heard. And Tent Lot perusing.

            • TheHoleDoesNotExist

              Uh oh. You realize that we are now dooming Sherb? Already I’m dizzy with power.

            • q-bird

              Swimming with sharks is far more dangerous Hole!
              And you lived to tell of it. You sure are one tough cookie Kiddo!

            • Poison Ivy

              I shot a lot from boats, but it was a short job.

          • WhereIsSHE

            What can I say. You are living the interesting life, lady.

            Documentaries being my favorite genre,–and animal rights/welfare being one of my passions, just saw Blackfish a week ago.
            A must see.
            And yes… they have languageS–as in MANY. Each pod/family has it’s very own dialect. Their brains are MORE EVOLVED than ours. (Medical evidence in the film.)

            And I really think there is a proper analogy to be made between the Sea Org and Sea World.

            The innocent, young are plucked from the wild…their mothers/pod members roped off nearby literally crying out,screaming at the INJUSTICE of DISCONNECTION. They are SUBDUED and then LOCKED UP in HORRID CONDITIONS… UNABLE TO COMMUNICATE MEANINGFULLY with the other captive whales, as they had with their own families, because no one speaks the same language… are TRAINED on ROUTINES, NON-STOP, until they are ready to be paraded out to perform as though they were ecstatic to be stuck in small tanks, surrounded by loud crowds and god-awful “music”…. all for a few buckets of crappy fish…just to be locked up again overnight in small, overcrowded, dirty tanks (where they are subject to becoming victims of others in the tank, but with no surrounding, grand ocean in which to escape as they naturally would in the wild)…

            So yeah. SeaWorld is the Sea Org of Amusement-Parks for these poor, unfortunate Orcas. (Except that the Orcas would be wise enough to swim the fuck away, first chance they got,… if only they could.)

            There is even an RPF (of sorts)=(
            There is Black PR.
            They LIE to their STAFF.

            They TRAIN STAFF TO LIE to the public.
            They LIE to the public.
            And why???
            Because they love the almighty dollar.

            Sound familiar?

            • TheHoleDoesNotExist

              And Dolphin research continues as well. And I abhor zoos, or aquatic “parks”. Yeah, they’re humane parks just like the Hole is a “volunteer vacation resort”.

              http://news.discovery.com/animals/whales-dolphins/dolphin-update-what-do-we-know-130812.htm

            • Poison Ivy

              I just did something on the horrible things our government is RIGHT NOW doing to our wild horses in the west. It’s a crime – the wild horses are competing for land with cattle (that make money) and strip mining (that makes TONS of money) and fracking (which makes even MORE money.) They just live their lives, so even though by law they’re protected, they’re pretty much disposable to us. Basically, we humans are the worst predators on the planet. If something can’t make money for us, it has no value. What value do killer whales have in the wild, just doing their thing, living their lives and raising their families and migrating and having yearly family reunions and stuff? Now, in Seaworld, they can make money for us. That’s what I’m talking about.

            • Casabeca

              Used to live in San Diego, this whole concept hit me hard. Deserves to be widely known!

        • Captain Howdy

          I have mixed feelings about zoos and especially places like Sea World. To me it’s basically imprisonment and enslavement of other life forms. Unfortunately, by the middle of this century they are probably the only place many of these life forms will exist, so there’s the rub.

      • Espiando

        I hate to do the pop psychology thing…no, wait, I love to do the pop psychology thing, especially when it comes to Hubtard or The Dark Lord Chuckles The Silly Piggy. It’s fun to try to figure out their motivations.

        So, Hubtard and mud…I can think of a few reasons:

        1) The direct use of biblical imagery. Very powerful, and very resonant in a society and time where it would be universally recognized. It also gave a rather early patina of religiosity to his incoherent ether babblings, something he’d later expound upon when he created his money machine.

        2) He essentially grew up on farms and ranches. Mud all over the place. When he went into town, the roads weren’t paved. Again, mud all over the place. You couldn’t escape the stuff. I wouldn’t be surprised if he had it on the brain.

        2a) He also could have been influenced as a young’un by the talk of older men regarding the one place where mud was more omnipresent than farms and ranches: the Western Front. Montana cowboys who’d been Over There might have had some stories about the trenches.

        3) Good old Victorian Values, specifically “Cleanliness is next to godliness”. We know the female influence on Kiddie Hubbard was huge (we can only speculate on how much this influenced the misogyny of Diarrhetics). I wonder if Grandma and the Aunt Brigade instilled a mindset of “dirty = bad” in him, going directly against the ethos of every eight-year-old boy to get as filthy as humanly possible in the pursuit of fun.

        Again, this is just speculation and pop psych. But a century removed from the fact, along with the whole rigmarole surrounding Hubtard to begin with, only leaves us with speculation.

      • Captain Howdy

        Hubbard’s name is MUD in the history books.

    • WhereIsSHE

      WTF is RIGHT.
      This is a large part of why I am in a constant flux of awe vs. fury when I think of someone as bright as, for example, Rinder, who still either cannot (or refuses to) see the entire “crappy nonsense” picture.

      I understand that some people may enjoy the auditing process, and good for them if that helps them feel better, but enjoying a therapeutic process is no excuse for continuing to prostrate oneself to the maniac who regurgitated it and spat it out.

      • Captain Howdy

        Scientologists, like vaLLarrr for example, have told me that it doesn’t matter if LRH was nuts or a criminal, and they love to use Issac Newton as an example of someone who was supposedly psychotic and believed in alchemy, but his law of universal gravitation “tech’ is observed to be true.

        As long as people like Rinder believe in the ultimate scientology maxim ‘What is true for you is what you have observed yourself. And when you lose that, you have lost everything.”, the subjective reality delusion will continue.

        • John P.

          Scientologists say that it doesn’t matter whether Hubbard was a genius or a madman when they’re being criticized from the outside. That’s a modern viewpoint — the validity of the idea is independent of the author. But internally, Scientologists are utterly medieval — they believe that everything Hubbard said was true. This is the medieval notion of “authority” in action.

          Of course, the one detail that vaLLarrr and others trying to defend Hubbard in this way will always miss is the fact that there is absolutely no evidence supporting his ideas. “Research” was a synonym for “I completely made shit up.” There are no notes, no source documents, no basis for much of what he said, and the stuff he said where there was some basis was for the most part lifted from others.

          Nice try in defending Hubbard, but we’re still laughing at him out here in the reality-based community.

  • BosonStark

    “I have high hopes of smashing my name into history so violently that it will take a legendary form even if all books are destroyed.”

    So, he’s going to replace violence with understanding, but he wants to do it violently, by ruining anyone who gets in the way.

    And don’t worry about your books L. Ron, all your inane writing is on stainless steel in a vault somewhere.

    • WhereIsSHE

      A vault which will survive a nuclear holocaust (but somehow be able to be opened by mere thetan-filled-meat-bodies, who can’t figure out on their own that it is advisable to communicate with someone if you are having some sort of unresolved issue with them).

      • TheHoleDoesNotExist

        Because a touch assist is all you need to fix that radiation burn right up.

        • Observer

          That and cigarettes. Smoking runs out the radiation, don’t you know.

          • TheHoleDoesNotExist

            Don’t you just Know there are cartons stached in there vaults!

        • phronsie

          So, I looked up this “touch assist” thing; I was thinking, ‘well, touching can’t replace sound medical procedure, but touching someone when they are out of sorts or in pain can be comforting so it sounds somewhat kind.” But then I read you had to do it with just one finger! Leave it to scientology to take something that could, in essence, be a form of comforting and turn it into something to annoy the hell out of someone! “Oh, you broke you collarbone?” “How does that feel?” “How about now?” “LEAVE ME THE HELL ALONE!!!!”

    • Poison Ivy

      “Smashing” my name into history.
      I’ve always thought this line was so telling about Hubbard’s narcissism – and the anger, “I’ll show them what a genius I am” behind it.
      The word “smashing” is such an interesting choice – so incredibly violent. So active. Nothing like most people would say, “I’d like to make a mark on history,” or “I’d like to be remembered.”
      Nope. Hubbard was determined to SMASH. And smash he did. He smashed up a lot of lives.

      • TheHoleDoesNotExist

        Smashing Shmersh too. He was wild about Shmersh.

        • Mark

          Watsh out for your denturesh, THDNE!

    • ze moo

      How many steel plates will be left once steel (recycled) hits a dollar a pound??

      • Once_Born

        That’s if they even exist in the first place – has anyone (reliable) ever been inside this facility and had a chance to look?

        • ze moo

          I know of no independent confirmation of the steel plates or titanium boxes. I suspect the whole archive project is a way to launder money for the dwarfenführer. But no evidence either way….

          • TheHoleDoesNotExist

            I think I recall someone did go down and see Some steel plates or boxes or vaults. But All of the underground spaces in all of the vault places, never heard of anyone.

  • sugarplumfairy

    “…She seemed to believe that the Tech should continue, but without reference to its compiler..”

    Love this.. lrh isn’t the source of anything except his fairy tale science fiction.. He’s just a compiler..

  • LongNeckGoose

    1) Hubbard had a brief brush with fame as a young Eagle Scout in Washington, D.C. and craved more of that parental approval and public notice.
    2) Hubbard’s dropping out of both high school and then college brought him major parental disapproval instead. So he had to justify himself by becoming a famous writer, more famous than his very famous uncle Elbert.
    3) Hubbard’s aquatic-related failures (Doris Hamblen, WWII service) also had to be justified, so Hubbard had to be captain of his own ship, then commodore of his own fleet.
    I think the key justification of Hubbard’s life is when he had his dad take a cruise with him on the Apollo, as if to say, “See, Dad, I was successful after all.” Much like the bronze plaque John Lennon had made up for his Aunt Mimi, “John, the guitar’s all right but you’ll never make a living from it.”

    • 1subgenius

      Very good analysis.
      I won’t tell you what my high school counselor told me, but how many lives have they ruined?

    • Mark

      Elbert Hubbard was much admired by another cult leader – Herbert W. Armstrong, of Worldwide Church of God and Plain Truth infamy – oddly enough, as “Fra” Elbert was a self-proclaimed socialist, anarchist and feminist. But it didn’t stop Herbert from mentioning him repeatedly in his voluminous writings.

      There are many curious resemblances between LRH and HWA as exponents of the narcissist-sociopath school of cult-dictatorship: http://www.secularnewsdaily.com/2011/01/in-memoriam-two-con-men-herbert-w-armstrong-and-l-ron-hubbard/

      • Captain Howdy

        Interesting article. Thanks.

        • Mark

          Herbert W & the WWCoG is another rabbit-hole for the unwary browser. Beware! http://hwarmstrong.com/

          • Captain Howdy

            It’s OK, my life has pretty much revolved around one kind of hole or another.

  • sugarplumfairy

    The debunker is in the bunker.. Wow.. This is a pretty damning stuff.. If I were an open-minded, critically-thinking believer, I’d be devastated.. too bad open minds and critical thinking are banned in scientology..

  • Kim O’Brien

    More people know who Yoda is than this Hubbard goofball . That just makes me warm and fuzzy . ” Roosevelt will be forgotten” ….LOL !!!!

    • sugarplumfairy

      Be good, Kim, or elron hubbard will come and audit you until you become his slave..

      • TheHoleDoesNotExist

        Oh, nooooooooo, SugarPlum. Not the boogeyman! Picture: Guess… Miscavige or Hubbard?

        http://i44.tinypic.com/t7hq54.jpg

        • sugarplumfairy

          Wow! Are you sure that’s not Starbuck in the 1956 Rainmaker?

          • TheHoleDoesNotExist

            Hubbards “E-Meters” were the Rainmaker’s “Tornado Rods” hah good belly laugh!

            http://youtu.be/0sb-7RJ3658

  • Douglas D. Douglas

    I guess this makes Hubbard the anti-Woody Allen. Allen once said, “I don’t want to achieve immortality through my work. I want to achieve it through not dying.”

    • 1subgenius

      Woody is the man:

      “I am not afraid of death, I just don’t want to be there when it happens.”

  • pronoia

    Dev OTs. I love me some Jon Attack wit.

  • EnthralledObserver

    As I have intermittently suspected… Dianetics and Scientology were predominantly the tools for giving LRonny the public recognition he so dearly coveted. And it worked for a time, despite the inconsistencies and obvious failures of the systems… but only because the information couldn’t easily be share. Welcome INTERNET… the world’s true saviour!
    Is it too late to extract LRonny’s name from history? Probably, but at least it won’t be the adoration LRonny desired, no… eventually the last fanatic will die off and only loathing and disdain will prevail along with humanity KNOWing what a pathetic laughingstock the sick fool, LRonny was.

    • Eivol Ekdal

      ditto…His attitudes at 26 are pretty much the same as his later Affirmations. He is always seeking to be recognised by readers and public and looking for his successes to come from outside by conning people to follow, listen and adore him. How sad! He could have done a whole lot better by investing his time in developing true friendships and learning real skills. He seems to lack the confidence to deal with people on a one to one basis and instead focuses on his ‘stage act’ like a teen age magician trying to pick up chicks.

    • TheHoleDoesNotExist

      This is why his history of vicious attacks included Any one or Any thing that would “tarnish” his reputation. Reporterss and newspapers and media we All suppressive. Anyone who loaned him money became All banks are suppressive. Anyone who recognized his illness became All psychiastrist and medical doctors are suppressive. Anyone who found out his “tech” was a scam became All Ex’s who speak out are suppressive. Any government agency or authority investigating scientology became All government is suppressive.

    • ThetaBara

      There are still people who think Jim Jones actually worked miracles, so that is probably what it will take for LRH to lose his last defenders. (I read that book over the weekend, based on earlier comments here. Creepy as hell but very interesting. I was still pretty young when all that went down.) Oh and FWIW, whoever said he thought he was the messiah was correct.

  • sugarplumfairy

    I think I’m spending too much time here.. Last night I dreamed I got kidnapped by elron, Joaquin Phoenix and Kelly Preston.. They took me on a cattle boat, dressed me in hot pants and halter, held me prisoner in an anchor locker, made me chain smoke, and then forced me to brush elron’s teeth.. And then, after all that, they made me read one of his stories..

    • EnthralledObserver

      heh heh… a sure sign, yes, but unless you are subjected to reading his ‘Affirmations’ with LRonny in front of you, leering sickeningly at you, then you are not excused from the Bunker!

    • Sherbet

      That was no dream, ‘fairy. You went back in time, and It Really Happened. Tonight: the screening of “Battlefield Earth.”

      • sugarplumfairy

        Aaagghh..

      • ze moo

        I’ve seen ‘Battlefield Earth’ on the cable tv guide on Cinemax or one of the other pay services in the last 2 weeks. You can always search the bargain bin at Big Lots or flea markets for your own copy.

        • Sherbet

          Um. No.

          I tried to watch it when it first came out, and even Forest Whitaker, whom I love, couldn’t get me through it.

          • ze moo

            Battlefield Earth is not for people who don’t take drugs. Forest and Barry Pepper may not highlight BE on their resumes, but they did take the checks. While I enjoy making jokes about Doc Martin boots, fake dredlocks and codpieces, the really sad thing is the movie is very true to the book. The movie only covers the first 60% of the book, the rest was much worse.

            • Sherbet

              I’ve seen some pretty bad movies, but BE was so impenetrable, that I got tired of asking my son (a major sci fi fan) what was going on. He was lost, too, and gave up on it, himself. (I’ll pass on the book, thanks.)

    • Bury_The_Nuts

      That is not a dream. That is a nightmare!

      • Mark

        You make it sound like the (ahem) arrival of Rosemary’s Baby.

    • TheHoleDoesNotExist

      I Love that dream!

  • skippress

    Let me tell you about Paulette Mahurin, who was Paulette Ausley when all the knucklheads were on the bad ship Apollo. She was Commodore Staff 5, over the Qualifications Division, which was supposed to make sure the “spiritual technology” was applied standardly worldwide. This sooper-dooper tech person (Class Hell is more like it, not Class 12) didn’t know the difference between a “dirty needle” and a “rock slam” E-meter read. Everyone around her apparently knew she didn’t know the difference including my late friend John Ausley (Paulette’s husband) and Nikki Merwin, then married to Rick Merwin who was C/S Estates (he bought the Cedars of Lebanon buildings that became the “Complex” now on L. Ron Hubbard Way in L.A.). Nikki was Mary Sue Hubbard’s “communicator” (secretary).

    So what did Paulette’s “misunderstood” do? It gave Hubbard a way to claim a whole bunch of very competent executives in the L.A. area were “List One Rock Slammers” who needed to be on the Rehabilitation Project Force to conveniently fix up the Complex – a cheap but efficient labor force who also learned to continually put themselves down via continous co-audited security checks, thus making them more compliant to the evil redhead’s empire desires. A List One R/Ser is someone who supposedly had evil intentions toward Elwrong or Mary Sue or some other major $cientology stuff – you’d see a jagged reaction of the E-meter needle. A dirty needle was a much less dramatic “read” sort of like showing there was some irritation or consideration about an item mentioned in an auditing session. Like being pissed off that you were working 16 hours a day “clearing the planet” while eating little but rice and beans, perhaps.

    So Elwrong just let that little confusion of Paulette’s continue long enough to get the major BUILDING REHABILITATION done, then he sent Wayne Marple in to go “Oh no, the Commodore found out this was going on, bad, bad, you’re not all bad, you can be good now.” And many from the RPF were sprung.

    So that’s what that idiot Paulette enabled. And when she was married to John, they both had weight issues and made agreements to be on a diet as “twins.” Paulette always cheated. Why? Because she’s a jerk, and as Jon illustrated, she still is. So much for the great “tech.” It’s most convinced practitioners are as evil as Hubbard, and that’s pretty damned evil.

    • TheHoleDoesNotExist

      Yep. and then what did Hubbard do? Like the abusive husband who brings home flowers and a new set of pots and pans after beating up the wife, Hubbard came home with a bouquet of Super Power promises to “help fix” his broken slaves. Obviously, it wasn’t the physical and mental abuse that prevented them from being able to study, learn new skills and Produce MOAR money for the fat bastard… it was because they were SO outethics and SO stupid, that Hubbard had to come up with more ethics and study “tech”, but dumb it down so it would work on even his slaves. That Is What Super Power is all about… the abusive leader bringing home flowers to his beaten up slaves. That is ALL it is, Lurkers and so it is not just lower level bridge processes, it is sub level. It is the bargain basement floor of “tech”, Not Superman’s Secret How To Manual.

      I was looking at the list of those RPF’rs, Skip. You know, just for a skip down memory lane of those “good old days”. This is only about 1/3 of them, but still, Warrior has some and it is Quite a stellar list. I can look back and say at least I was in some good company. David Mayo for one. There are several people though that sadly never recovered. The Epsteins, for instance….how many years have they been stuck in the Hole in Hemet. Derek Bloch mentioned yesterday that Barbario Rubio was still in, at least as of 2004, and at AOLA instead of ASHO. Other names are those who died horribly or needlessly, like Obilensky, Weissberg. Others are “volunteers” for OSA like Shapiro, and others who were once declared are now OT Committee “volunteers” at Class V orgs, like Grondin and his wife, Jane. Former Sea Org SP’s are now being used to prop up the Ideal Corpses!

      http://www.holysmoke.org/cos/rpf2.htm

      • skippress

        This is why I don’t want $cientology reformed, revised, or anything but reviled and DESTROYED. It’s been evil from its very beginnings and ruined countless lives.

        • John P.

          Fortunately, the force of karmic gravity will do that. Near as I can figure, without the massive bureacracy of the cult that deals with punishing deviant thoughts and reinforcing thought-stopping, the “tech” is sufficiently worthless that only a handful of the most devoted nut cases will be able to practice it for years outside the confines of the cult. The “tech” and the coercive organization are inseparable. So when the cult collapses into a heap of toxic rubble, an event that seems to be drawing nearer at an accelerating rate, there will not be much grass growing in the ruins, ever.

          The collapse is inevitable. That is not to say that helping it along is a waste of time.

          • Eivol Ekdal

            I agree John. It will collapse without the built in protection mechanisms such as disconnection and fair game. As soon as they allow critical thinking it is over.

            • ze moo

              CO$ will never allow critical thinking, Lroon is ‘source’ and must be obeyed. Anything that takes Lroon off the pedestal and puts him among the masses is heresy and anyone who advocates heresy must be punished!

              Clams can’t be as isolated as they used to be. The huge majority of clams (even staff and Sea Argggghhhh) have to work in the wog world and they have to hear about Travolta, Cruise, Remini and Beghe from time to time. Depending on your flocks wearing blinders all the time is just as smart as building a huge tent in Florida during hurricane season.

            • Eivol Ekdal

              agreed – they won’t allow that in the Church – but the ‘indies’ are already starting to allow, accept and practice critical thinking. So if DM goes they will need some Super Bastard to fill his shoes. I don’t even think Marty qualifies any more.

            • Missionary Kid

              As they start to allow critical thinking, then they will splinter, because there will be faithful that will not allow changes to source, and once critical thinking starts, outside ideas will seep in and Co$ cannot stand in the face of outside ideas, further splintering the Indie movement.

              There will always be the true believers, who, by sheer effort will KSW or KISW (Keep Independent Scientology Working), but most people will just drift away.

            • Eivol Ekdal

              I am the guest – I deleted my reply to ze moo because it was showing as a primary comment rather than reply. I think a need a faster PC to cope with the tons of javascript shenanigans that Disqus employ.

            • ze moo

              Disqus is essentially a huge database with lots of indexes (how the list is ordered). Given the large number of comments and articles and websites Disqus is responsible for, I think they do a good job. Worldpress has been the target of DDOS attacks in the 2 or 3 months. I don’t know if the attacks are still going on. Your latest update to Internet Exploder or Firefox and Microsoft may be to blame too.

              Don’t you just love tech??? Makes me yearn for the days of stone tablets….

            • Once_Born

              Every time I log in, I hope to hear that the tent is on its way back to England – vis the jet stream

          • Mooser

            The “tech”? You can pick up a digital VOM at Sears for 14.95. It’ll read your “E” and tell you if your batteries are good.

          • Missionary Kid

            John, if you haven’t seen it yet, I thought you’d enjoy this one.
            http://www.gocomics.com/nonsequitur/2013/08/26

        • TheHoleDoesNotExist

          I’d like to at Least be able to take down a few sections of the RPF wing myself. I’m with you 1000%

    • Mooser

      “you’d see a jagged reaction of the E-meter needle”

      My Gawd, can you imagine what they might of done if any of them knew how to work an oscilloscope? Whoo boy!

  • Sherbet

    I’m wicked busy today, so let’s please keep the stories and posts on the dull end of the spectrum, or else I’m doomed.

    • WhereIsSHE

      Hate to state the obvious, but….
      You’re doomed.

      • Sherbet

        Just like every other day in the Bunker, WIS…

  • SciWatcher

    Ah, the poet’s (and using the term very loosely here for Hubbard) quest for immortality. A theme that stretches from Homer to Dante to Chaucer to Spenser and so on and so forth. Luckily, Hubbard won’t be remembered amongst the truly great ones.

    • ze moo

      He won’t be remembered among the 4th rate ones….

    • The poet’s quest is to write. Making a name for onesself is merely a byproduct. LRH was no more a poet than he was a scientist.

  • Paulette was Ausley before she was Cohen.

  • allioops

    Thank you once again for a magnificent essay on the ruthless cruelty of socio paths in our midst’s….I had a good, strong, well needed, laugh at this brilliant writing.
    I love you Jon Atack! I also love this site, Mr. Ortega.
    Bless you all.

    • Mooser

      I’m with you. As far as I’m concerned, this site is just like Mother makes, and serves it up hot and crisp every day. Top-drawer, fust-cless and so nat’url, to boot. I like it.

      • Casabeca

        You are just the perfect wildlife for this site! Welcome.

  • Veritas

    “But enslaving humanity wasn’t his goal”

    It may not have been his primary goal. But he believed that mystical power was in some way derived by controlling and subjugating people. So it was a secondary goal.

    • TheHoleDoesNotExist

      He believed in controlling his cash flow an his herding his golden geese. That was his secondary goal.

      • Veritas

        That, too

    • Mooser

      “But enslaving humanity wasn’t his goal”

      Nah, that’s way, way too ambitious. But if you scale it back to just enslaving anybody who will put up with it, it’s doable. But hardly original.

  • In a hundred years Roosevelt will have been forgotten

    My god LRH was a stupid person.

    Very interesting essay. I’d never seen this stuff before.

    • ze moo

      Lron was a buffoon and a horrible historian. Roosevelt would be forgotten?? Roosevelt will be remembered for his ‘new deal’ economics and his leadership during WW2. Thinking anything else is laughable.

      Look at the Lron navy picture at the top of the story. Note the lieutenant (senior grade) stripes and how poorly the uniform is pressed. Lroon would be confined to the base and be fined, just for poor ironing.

      And this guy thinks he can pick histories winners and losers???

      • aquaclara

        Love your comments, Ze.
        Real Navy vs fake navy. We CAN tell the difference. Oh, yes we can.
        The cult today is still operating under fake navy syndrome. No psych drugs can cure this.

  • Spackle Motion

    I love the Poe collage behind Ellison. Neat.

  • Krew13

    Seeing that fat fraudulent fuck in a military uniform reminded me of the lulzy moment in the infamous Cruise award video where he and his BFF Miscmidget salute each other. Those two have never fought in their lives and yet they salute like the’re soldiers. They wouldn’t last one second in combat. Maybe that’s why Top Gun keeps playing action heroes. He has a real desperate need to be seen as tough.

    • BosonStark

      They are planet-clearing Scientology warriors, like Marty Rathbun used to be.

    • TheHoleDoesNotExist

      Heroes in their own mind. This is what it looks like inside:

      http://i42.tinypic.com/d5rx1.jpg

      • q-bird

        Hole is on a roll – love it. 😀

  • Krew13

    It’s ironic that Sciloons want to control MEST, because they’re all really messed up. Geddit?!?

    Thank you. I’m here all week, try the lobster.

    • TheHoleDoesNotExist

      Hubbard had a simple fix for everything, including messes. If you didn’t like something about your character, he had an eraser. Hubbard was an EraserHead.

      http://i41.tinypic.com/5vzxww.jpg

      • L. Wrong Hubturd

        And the midsection is the precise area he seemed to have the most issues.

    • filosofa

      LOL! Truly, the $cilons are the Masters of Unintended Irony.

      • Missionary Kid

        $cilons are the Masters of Unintended Irony.

        That’s collected.

  • Spackle Motion

    Did anyone else catch Anette’s story in Radar about the clandestine attempt to audition her for Tom Cruise’s bride?

    http://radaronline.com/exclusives/2013/08/tom-cruise-scientology-audition-wife-secret-before-katie-holmes-anette-johansen/

  • Mighty Korgo of Teegeeack

    Great essay. I believe it.

    I don’t think his name will live on in infamy. First, he never had that many followers. Even at 15 million, the absurd claim when I was a member, it would only be 1% the size of Catholicism. Many intelligent people have never even heard of L.Ron Hubbard and mistake Scientology for Christian Science. Then there is a large number who think his name is Ron L. Hubbard. There is already one Hubbard in common myth and that is the Old Mother. L.Ron will never supplant her.

    As for Miscavige, it is hard to spell and harder to pronounce. Who would remember the name of Brigham Young if it was Brigham Miscavige? Even Paul had to get the Jewishness out of his name. Saul didn’t cut it. “Saully, what’s up with that friend of yours, Yeshua?” We’d all still be heathens.

    • Mooser

      Mighty Korgo, you sayeth sooth! And I am going to unlimber my vouchsafer, and reply. At this point, given all the boats, Captain’s hats, Scotch, cigarettes, drunken meanderings, bullying and suchlike, I’m having a hard time keeping ol’ L Ron separate from Earnest Hemingway. But I promise to try.

      But I agree with you, the name “Hubbard” will live on forever. They grow quickly, store well and are delicious baked. I put butter and brown sugar on mine. Also cans well. And his poor mother was so impoverished she couldn’t feed her domestic animals (the “cupboard” incident), and her son, or grandson, a noted squash-breeder! Who’da thunk it?

  • Eivol Ekdal

    New Post up and it is a Doozie!

  • Roger Larsson

    Gerry
    Armstrong released LRH from his missed withholds and is worth a lot. John attack
    is just a messenger working with the good guys. Gerry Armstrong cleared LRH
    from missed withholds.

    • Mooser

      “Armstrong released LRH from his missed withholds”

      The IRS can get pretty sticky about missed withholding. Probably that’s what will bring down Scientology.

  • Bob

    Tony, thank you for posting the video from Harlen, he is a true American classic.

  • Exterrier

    This is a brilliant interview and commentary by Jon. Goes deep. Hitler used to say that his greatest cloaking was his “utter unbelievability”. In other words, because the relatively healthy minds out there cannot conceive of a mind that would go as far as he did to pursue such a megalomanic and also misanthropic goal, it does not seem possible that what they are caught up is a scam and lie. This was also described as the Big Lie technique. Well, Jon dissects Hubbard quite well, and goes deep deep deep so that we can “fathom” the bottom feeding motivations of the man.

    • Mooser

      “the bottom feeding motivations’

      When the things you do to get through life cost you more in self-respect than they can possibly gain you, you is one gone goose.

      • Exterrier

        “When the things you do to get through life cost you more is self respect than they can possibly gain you, you is one done goose.”

        I hope Missionary Kid finds your quote, Mooser. For his Archive of Eloquence. You just succinctly summed up in in 25 words or less what the whole Scientology ordeal is about. And the magic words that unlock the door in people’s minds that leads OUT. We can now cancel classes for the day at the Blog and head for the playground, til Tony reconvenes!

      • Johan

        Yep, unfortunately I think narcissists have no self respect….

  • Mooser

    “Scientology begins in 1938, when Hubbard wrote his first text,
    “Excalibur,” which remains buried in the archive. He later claimed that
    he had died while under anaesthetic during a dental procedure. (Whatever
    else this incident did, it certainly put him off dentists. His teeth
    would later rot in his head, such was his phobia.) While dead, he was
    offered a “smorgasbord” of knowledge, which he claimed to have distilled
    into “Excalibur.”

    Ah, the old ‘revelation-by-illness’ which did such great things for the Taipings in China! BTW, it was also used twice, once by the original leader Hung Hsiu-ch’uan and again, by Yang Hsiu-ch’ing. An old scam, but a good one.

    • L. Wrong Hubturd

      Rimshot!

  • Alice Smith

    Jon Atack has done a great service to mankind by making sure the true nature and motives of LRH are fully known. If you’ve been the in cult and supported it, it is very embarrassing and de-stabilizing to read about, but everyone should.

    I found there are some beneficial mental therapies in the “tech.” Seems this came from Saint Hill, when he had a lot of help and had to be accountable to the students there, who could leave, unlike the Scientology Navy crew on his flotilla later. When he was auditing himself alone all day and everyone did everything he said. Very dangerous time.

    The concept of “wrong Item” should be implemented in the field of psychotherapy, for one, because people do get evaluated for endless in psychoanalysis and psychotherapy and it makes them permanently upset and kinda dumb. (Of course, much of Scientology was designed to give people wrong-items without their consent. All the labeling (PTS, SP, etc.), Some of the repetitive processes are lasting questions, etc.)

    I’ve known many people in psychotherapy. Connecting all of your adult problems to the way your parents treated you when you were 5, or endlessly wondering why your marriage of 25 year of ago failed is very suppressive, nuts, and traps people, too.

    I can always tell when I’m talking to a cult-of-therapy addict. (Yes, I consider that to be a mild cult because the therapist takes over the patient’s life, tells them what to think, what to make of their past, and this tends to be isolating.) The therapy-addict CANNOT STOP talking about her past, her issues, her divorce, her unkind mother, and cannot withhold extremely personal information from strangers – they sort of vomit it out at inappropriate times. TMI!

    Psychotherap-addicts get shut off from a certain level of common decency and generosity of spirit, and, aside from being unable to stop rambling about themselves, all they want to do is point out YOUR issues, too. Forget trying to accomplishing anything in life, it’s all about being upset about the past. That is not a safe practice.

    A little over write up. clean up of wrong items, comm course could actually get somebody going in life.

    • ze moo

      Most talk psychotherapy is given by people licensed as psychologists and social workers these days. Psychiatrists are the ones prescribing medication and supervising treatment plan. There are more then enough depressives and schizos and other mental illnesses to keep any therapist busy. Are there enough people with the money or insurance coverage to support these therapists??? I have no idea, each area has its own problem, access to mental health services being the most common, not inappropriate level of treatment.

      Yeah, there are clowns ‘encouraged’ to take up a therapists time to bitch how mother never liked them or the 6th grade baseball team hated them. And there are therapists who take anyone’s money or insurance to listen to the rants. These folks are very much in the minority. There are too many people not getting treatment because they can’t afford it or the services are just not available in their area. That’s the real problem.

    • Johan

      A good psychotherapist will give you ‘homework’, meaning stuff you have to work on your own. The idea is to give you the means to cope with your issues yourself after some time. Unfortunately some people like hanging on to their issues and some psychotherapists like money….

    • Casabeca

      I probably did some of these things for 6 months or so. A very painful and complicated family issue made me go beyond my fears into a counseling office. I think the overly conversant aspect is just human nature when we are trying out any new skill, new diet plan, great parenting advice book,,, new trainer, home remodel, etc.. My friends were good listeners to me,and I try to return the favor to keep balance in relationships. The months I spent in counseling really helped me gain that elusive inner peace most of us look for. My experience did not lead to dependency and gave me very practical skills. I hope every day not to be permanently upset or dumb ;). My goal to keep learning and share encouragement and offer peace and love. This is only my own experience, your mileage may vary. I would be interested in hearing more about your experience if you care to share. We can all cheer for common decency and generosity of spirit. Friends with those traits are real treasures!

  • Jvm3

    “Scientology begins in 1938, when Hubbard wrote his first text, “Excalibur,” which remains buried in the archive.”

    From Bare Faced Messiah:

    “He said the guy at the door wanted to give him a cheque for $5000 for a copy of Excalibur. Then he laughed out loud and said, “One of these days I’ll have to get round to writing it.” We cracked up. It was the only time Ron ever admitted there was no such book.”

    So which is the real story? Did he “mock up” Excalibur later on? Do they even have a text titled “Excalibur” in CST archives?

  • USA MRIID

    Drugs motivated that insane crook, as much dope and alcohol and the filthy conman could shove in to his fat face.

  • Norwood Partz

    The e-book Brainwashing Manual Parallels in Scientology, and the article

  • Truthiwant

    ..