SUPPORT THE UNDERGROUND BUNKER
You can either make a one-time donation to the site via Paypal...

...or you can subscribe and get billed monthly:

FOLLOW ME ON
SUBSCRIBE TO OUR
E-MAIL LIST
To join our e-mail list & get daily updates on new stories, e-mail us at newstory@tonyortega.org.
RSS Feed
Click here to add The Underground Bunker to your RSS Reader

Convicted of fraud by France’s highest court, Scientology still pursues creative appeals

ScientologyFranceOur man in Paris, Jonny Jacobsen, has another dispatch for us about developments with Scientology in France. Take it away, Jonny…

In the interest of tying up loose ends, here are a couple of items, both fall-out from France’s definitive conviction of Scientology for organised fraud last year.

The first deals with Scientology’s latest attempt to persuade people that the French state was the prime mover behind its recent fraud convictions, rather than the courts that actually judged them.

The second item is yet another slap on the wrist from a French court to those convicted in the case.

News weekly Nouvel Observateur has reported that Scientology was going after France’s Ecole nationale de la magistrature (ENM), the school that trains up the country’s judges. (You can find a scan of the Nouvel Obs piece and a handy translation by “mnql1” over at the Ex-Scientologist Message Board.)

Arguing that the country’s judges were biased against Scientology, the movement pointed to the training offered by the ENM as evidence.

Scientology lodged an application with the Commission d’Acces aux Documents Administratifs (CADA), Nouvel Obs writer Marie Lemonnier reported. They wanted to know who had been invited to give talks at the ENM concerning them and which magistrates were present at those talks. They also wanted to see any relevant documents dating as far back as 1998.

Scientology and their lawyers argue that at least some of the outside speakers hired by the ENM are critics of the movement — and that some of the judges involved in their cases attended their talks.

That, for them, is enough to show that these judges can no longer be considered to be neutral and should therefore never be allowed anywhere near cases related to Scientology.

Scientologists even tried to get into the training sessions held at the Paris base of the ENM on the Ile de la Cité in the heart of the capital (just down the road from Notre Dame Cathedral).

Xavier Ronsin, head of the ENM, told Nouvel Obs they had turned them away from the lectures, as they are not open to the public. In protest, the Scientologists had staged demonstrations outside.

Ronsin dismissed as “pure fantasy” any suggestion that the ENM was indoctrinating France’s magistrates against the movement. “No group can impose its choices (on us),” he told Nouvel Obs. “You have to wonder though, why they are so concerned by these courses!”

In December CADA responded to Scientology’s request by handing over some of the teaching materials used at the lectures in question. But it refused to release the names either of the lecturers or those who attended, on the grounds of respecting their privacy.

But Scientology already knows who at least one of the lecturers is.

Arnaud Palisson, a former officer at Renseignements Généraux — the intelligence branch of the French police — has made no secret of the fact that he used to give lectures there.

In 2002 Palisson, a specialist in cults during his time in the RG, wrote his doctoral thesis on how to use the French law to tackle Scientology’s activities.

While it was well-received in some quarters, after lobbying by Scientology he was sidelined from his work in this field: Palisson eventually quit in disgust and moved to Canada.

It was when Palisson stopped getting invitations to lecture there that he realized he was out of favour with the powers-that-be.

When in February 2012 the Paris appeal court confirmed the initial fraud convictions against Scientology, Palisson welcomed the ruling as a vindication of his own work in this field. (Here’s the original piece at Palisson’s blog, Rapports Minoritaires, and here’s mnql1’s excellent translation, again at ESMB.)

That was enough for Scientology’s lawyers to renew their protests.

I asked Palisson about this back in June 2012 when I wrote up the row at Infinite Complacency. He made it clear that the magistrate involved in the case against Scientology had not attended his lectures. From what he understood from his contacts, she had stayed away precisely to avoid this kind of charge since advanced by the Scientologists.

But in any case, as the Cour de Cassation made clear in its ruling last October, Scientology would need something a lot more substantial to establish its case.

They are nevertheless pressing on with their campaign.

François Jacquot, lawyer for the Celebrity Centre — one of the two Scientology organisations convicted of organised fraud — said they would be appealing the CADA ruling to the Conseil d’Etat.

The Conseil is France’s highest jurisdiction in legal matters: one of its duties is ensuring that the government itself stays within the law.

So its ruling on this matter, when it comes, will be the administrative equivalent of the Cour de Cassation‘s ruling last October making Scientology’s fraud convictions definitive.

To be continued then.

Secondly, we reported in January on some fall-out from the French conviction last year of Scientology for organised fraud and promised an update.

Well here it is, and it’s another rap on the knuckles for the movement.

In our previous article we explained how one of the defendants, Sabine Jacquart, had tried to get counter-cult group UNADFI and its lawyer Olivier Morice fined for their role in the trial.

Jacquart, a former president of Scientology’s Celebrity Centre in Paris, was convicted with others of organised fraud in a landmark 2009 trial (confirmed on appeal in 2012 and set in stone by the Cour de Cassation last year).

She argued that UNADFI and Morice should never have been allowed a voice in the trial given that their bids for plaintiff status was eventually rejected by every court that heard the court.

Instead of awarding damages in her favour, the court agreed with UNADFI’s defence and counter-claim that this was an unwarranted attack on them.

The result? Jacquart ended up with a bill for 27,000 euros in damages and legal costs.

We mentioned that Jacquart was not the only defendant to have launched such actions and that the judgments in those cases were due shortly.

Well, they came in on February and UNADFI reported on them in their newsletter. The results? More humiliation for the convicted Scientologists.

Both Alain Rosenberg and Jean-François Valli had also attacked UNADFI, accusing it of an abuse of the law that was “grossly unfair” because of its intention to harm Scientology.

Rosenberg, you will recall, is the former managing director of the Paris Celebrity Centre.

Both he and the centre were convicted of organised fraud. He was also convicted of complicity in the illegal exercise of pharmacy.

Valli was one of the salesmen at Scientologie Espace Libraire (SEL), the second outfit that was on trial. Both he and SEL were convicted of organised fraud.

Both men had no more luck than Jacquart: in February, the court rejected their complaints and awarding damages against them.

Rejecting their complaints, the court ruled that it was perfectly legitimate that:

“…an association recognised as having public benefit should undertake any action it thinks useful and that the law should allow this… without its mere presence during legal proceedings linked to its mission being judged abusive.”

Don’t choke on your coffee: the association the court was referring to was UNADFI, not Scientology.

— Jonny Jacobsen

 
——————–

Scientology tax return of the day

Scientology has enjoyed tax-exempt status since 1993, and churches are not required to submit annual returns. However, following a change in the law in 2006, even church organizations are required to submit returns for “unrelated business income,” known as 990-T reports. Those returns don’t reflect the church-related income taken in by Scientology (an organization built on the idea of paying large sums for spiritual advancement), but the forms do ask for a corporate entity to report its “book value” — an indication of that entity’s total assets, such as real estate.

Today, another whopper: The Church of Spiritual Technology’s 2012 return, which shows a book value of $447,192,921. CST is the odd organization that digs vaults in various parts of the country in order to store L. Ron Hubbard’s writings and lectures for future generations. We had one of the lengthiest, most complete stories about CST back in 2012.

Let’s take another look at the book value of just three of Scientology’s major entities — the Church of Scientology International (CSI), the Flag Service Organization (FSO, which runs the ‘mecca’ in Clearwater, Florida), and CST in 2012, the most recent year for returns…

CSI 2012 Book Value: $846,314,618
CST 2012 Book Value: $447,192,921
FSO 2012 Book Value: $209,655,686

Total: $1,503,163,225

Not bad for an organization with maybe only about 30,000 paying members left.

 

2012 Church of Spiritual Technology 990-T return

 
——————–

Surviving Scientology podcast: Chris Shelton

Jeffrey Augustine spends time with former Sea Org officer Chris Shelton in the second installment of the Surviving Scientology podcast series…

 

 
——————–

Posted by Tony Ortega on April 21, 2014 at 07:00

E-mail your tips and story ideas to tonyo94@gmail.com or follow us on Twitter. We post behind-the-scenes updates at our Facebook author page. Here at the Bunker we try to have a post up every morning at 7 AM Eastern (Noon GMT), and on some days we post an afternoon story at around 2 PM. After every new story we send out an alert to our e-mail list and our FB page.

Learn about Scientology with our numerous series with experts…

BLOGGING DIANETICS (We read Scientology’s founding text) 1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 7, 8, 9, 10, 11, 12, 13, 14, 15, 16, 17, 18, 19, 20, 21, 22, 23, 24, 25

UP THE BRIDGE (Claire Headley and Bruce Hines train us as Scientologists) 1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 7, 8, 9, 10, 11, 12, 13, 14, 15, 16, 17, 18, 19, 20, 21, 22, 23, 24, 25, 26, 27, 28, 29, 30, 31, 32, 33, 34, 35, 36, 37, 38, 39, 40, 41, 42, 43

GETTING OUR ETHICS IN (Jefferson Hawkins explains Scientology’s system of justice) 1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 7, 8, 9, 10, 11, 12, 13, 14

SCIENTOLOGY MYTHBUSTING (Historian Jon Atack discusses key Scientology concepts) 1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 7, 8, 9, 10, 11, 12, 13, 14, 15, 16, 17, 18, 19, 20, 21, 22, 23, 24, 25, 26, 27, 28, 29, 30, 31, 32, 33, 34, 35, 36, 37, 38, 39, 40, 41, 42, 43

PZ Myers reads L. Ron Hubbard’s “A History of Man” | Scientology’s Master Spies | Scientology’s Private Dancer

 

Share Button
Print Friendly, PDF & Email
  • Espiando

    And it’s time to revive this one…

    http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=HM-E2H1ChJM

    • ze moo

      I don’t care what critics and film auteurs say, Casablanca is the best movie of all time.

  • Observer

    That, for them, is enough to show that these judges can no longer be considered to be neutral and should therefore never be allowed anywhere near cases related to Scientology.

    Because to Scientology, neutrality = ignorance.

    • Protest Ant

      If you rule against scientology you’re clearly not neutral buhcozzz scientology is always right, geddit? Elron said so.

    • TheHoleDoesNotExist

      and ignorance = strength, war = peace, freedom = slavery, Google is Hearsay, It’s confidential and a Lie.

  • RMycroft

    CST: “The books in care of Arthur Bolstad.” Any relation to ex-member Maureen Bolstad?

    • RMycroft

      Second thing noticed: The 419 Larchmont address looks like a mail box drop address from Streetview. Seems legit…

      • RMycroft

        Third thing noticed: What’s not there. CST receives royalties and license payments for Hubbard’s works, including his non-fiction, non-religious stuff. For example, seven cents on every The Way to Happiness booklet. They keep banging away that TWTH isn’t religious.

        Reprinting or distribution by any individual, company, association or government department does not infer connection with or sponsorship of any religious organization or faith. Reprinting or distribution is therefore admissible for government departments, police departments, banking institutions, their employees or any other public or private individual or entity — and thus anyone can assist THE WAY TO HAPPINESS message to travel broadly through the society.

        If that’s non-religious, I don’t see how those incomes wouldn’t be on this form. Odds are, they’re hiding it by routing that through Author Services Inc (aka Galaxy Press aka Writers of the Future) which is a for-profit wholly owned by CST (per the leaked IRS agreement).

      • Eivol Ekdal

        This same address is also found for many the church’s fcc registrations including the Trementina caretaker’s ham license, airport contact addresses and also many website registrations.

      • TheHoleDoesNotExist

        I see the “Cleaners” sign. Truth in advertising .. at last.

      • TDA1541A
        • TDA1541A
          • DamOTclese2

            They don’t a fuck about the lives of people below that.

        • RMycroft

          Nice, but YHRI’s real address is on L. Ron Hubbard Way, next door to the Shuttleworth Academy. I think they got the dummy mailbox so that they could edit the Wikipedia article and change that give-away. (It’d also be a better stealth operation if CoS didn’t keep taking credit in their PR releases. D’oh!)

      • DamOTclese2

        I visited this place, at the time the criminals were claiming there was a “Criminon” office there. It wasn’t, it was a basically empty office with two tables and four chairs, just a place to launder paper mail. At the time. That was hella long ago, 20 years and more.

    • pronoia

      I believe that Maureen has two siblings, including a twin sister, still in the Sea Org. The other is a younger brother.

  • TDA1541A
  • Sydjazz

    A phrase comes to mind for the french scientologists picketing. Why picket an anti cult lesson? Me thinks thou doth pro5est too much.

  • Silence of the Clams

    I have to imagine it is more salt in the wounds of the ex’s knowing how aggressively they were regged for so many years only to now confirm the church never needed a penny of it.

    It’s mind numbing to live in a country where this criminal organization hurts so many people and does it so openly. If there is an upside, it’s that they have all this money. I’m sure once a couple more large settlements happen and these lawyers figure out how to win against these crooks, the lawsuit floodgates will open and the sharks will be in a feeding frenzy.

    Looking forward to that reality.

    • Richard Grant

      There’s an ongoing, periodic series on National Public Radio in the U.S. about religion and its place in public life — the series is called “Faith Matters” or something like that — and a recent episode concerned some Christian evangelical mega-church that has been shown to be basically a huge money-making scheme, generating great wealth for one or two people at the top and doing next to nothing in terms of conventional ministry (like charity or other services).

      Anyway the question came up about why the government isn’t doing anything about this. And the answer basically was that in the U.S., government agencies like the FBI are extremely reluctant, often downright unwilling, to get involved in cases involving religion. No explanation was offered, and I’m sure there are probably some historical reasons why this attitude came about. But it’s almost like something in the national DNA. And probably most Americans are okay with this — we just instinctively don’t want to live under a government that has the power to muck about with our personal beliefs.

      Naturally there’s a flip side, which is that (as Hubbard was quick to discover) you can get away with anything, even murder, if you can cloak yourself in religious garments. The victims are pretty much on their own to fight back as they can — and fortunately there’s also a strand of the national DNA that involves feisty groups and individuals rising up to throw off oppression. (This strand is not without problems of its own.)

      So it’s an untidy business, and it makes me look at Jonny’s reports from France with a definite twinge of envy. Things just seem so REASONABLE over there. I guess we just have to keep pushing at the arc of history and

      • OrangySky

        Excellent comment, Richard.

      • Sunny Sands

        The Pilgrims’ story of seeking religious freedom is a central theme in the history and culture of the U.S.

        • Robert Eckert

          They weren’t seeking “freedom”. They were wanting to be the ones dictating their religion to everyone.

          • pronoia

            Hence the Witch hunts. And the formation of the state of Rhode Island where people could get away from them and their laws.

            • Robert Eckert

              Roger Williams, founder of Rhode Island, is possibly one of my ancestors (I say only “possibly” because there were an awful of Williamses floating around, and verifying that a particular “William Williams” on your family tree is the same person as the “William Williams” in an old document gets tricky).

          • Betsy

            Good point!

          • mirele

            Yep, as Anne Hutchinson and Roger Williams found out (among many others).

            The only colony that I know of which had real religious freedom was Pennsylvania, founded by the much put-upon Quakers due to the King owing a huge sum of money to William Penn’s father.

          • Once_Born

            And it was, of course, considered too obvious to mention when the first amendment was drafted, that the word ‘religion’ meant ‘the particular brand of protestant Christianity that is currently accepted by us to be the one-and-only true religion’.

            If they had suspected that modern America would apply it to Buddhists and Hindus and all the other faiths (which they would have discounted as ‘heathen superstitions’) they would likely have been a lot more specific.

            • Robert Eckert

              You are mistaken. George Washington explicitly mentions in one of his writings (I will try and run it down if you need me to) that it applies not only to Christians and Jews but also to “Mussulmans” (Muslims) and “Gentoos” (Hindus, also used as a generic term for “pagan”)

            • Once_Born

              Really? Good on him. I withdraw, unreservedly.

        • Once_Born

          But we forget that those Puritans were a sort of English Taliban, who disapproved of the Theatre, and the celebration of Christmas and subjugated women.

          Their supposed saintliness in fleeing religious persecution is part of the US national myth. In fact, you would not have wanted to live under the rule of these Zealots, any more than you would want to live under the rule of Scientology. The only freedom they wanted was the freedom to impose their religion upon others.

          • Betsy

            One of the primary points behind many of the new American Protestant faiths born in the First and Second Great Awakenings was the idea (anti-Catholic) that the Christian Church should be restored to the ways of “primitive Christianity” — i.e., the relationship that existed between Jesus and apostles and other followers before the Church began to organize itself culminating in the Council of Nicea in 325 AD. In other words, they wanted “a relationship with God or Christ” that was NOT mediated by a clergyman and did NOT involve paying out money.

            I really think that many Protestants, especially fundamentalists, who still adhere to the “primitive religion” ideal, would be horrified to learn that Scientologists have to reach the top of the Bridge, and pay out something like half a million dollars, before they believe they will have the tools even to determine whether there is a God. (I’m loosely quoted Jeffrey A. in todays’ broadcast.) Now THAT might be a movement worth cultivating against the Chorch, even though I’m also afraid of the fundamentalist Christian movement.

            • Once_Born

              That’s the problem with, “The enemy of my enemy is my friend”. When your mutual enemy falls you may find that your former friend becomes an even more dangerous foe.

            • Betsy

              Exactly. It’s a dangerous card to play, as we learned from arming the Taliban during the attacks by the Russians. Sigh. If only we could use the fundamentalists…then get rid of THEM, too.

      • Once_Born

        Also, the US government seem unwilling to legally define religion, or make any rulings on the subject. Consequently, swindlers can claim the protection of the first amendment just by making a claim to faith.

        We forget that Dianetics was presented by Hubbard as a rigorously researched Science of the mind, which supposedly brought the precision of mechanical engineering to self-improvement. Scientology started out the same way.

        It was only when Hubbard resolved to avoid paying tax, that he contradicted himself by claiming that his creations had been religious in nature all along – while freely admitting to insiders that this was, in fact, a tax dodge – and since he wrote this down, it’s Scientology scripture.

        Someone here previously described a prisoner who claimed his marijuana smoking was a sacrament of the religion of which he was the only member. One reason that he lost his case when he took it to court was that his ‘religion’ was so obviously made up for an ulterior purpose that the judges refused his claim to faith. They implicitly defined at least what a religion was not.

        Considering its well-documented history, Hubbard’s claim to faith is no more convincing then that creative prisoner. The other reason (and the real reason) is that both the mega-church, and Scientology have the money for an endless legal defence and damaging extra-legal action, and he didn’t.

        It all comes down to money.

        • i-Betty

          Brilliant observation.

        • Observer

          ..

          • Once_Born

            Thank you – that provides all of the required evidence in neatly satirical package.

            The fact that the CofS is supposed to have paid to have those same incriminating quotes engraved on steel plates, packed into titanium containers and stored in a nuclear bunker is just surreal.

          • Betsy

            Oh yay, I was wondering if I had missed the next issue of my favorite mag, “RON.” Love the photo, obviously taken by Annie Leibowitz or some other celeb photographer, because it makes him look so much sexier than he actually looked.

        • TheHoleDoesNotExist

          Yeah, it’s almost like it’s about the United States of Greed. Hey, it’s Monday, I’m sore, and I’m grouchy.

          • TDA1541A

            I think The Curch of Scientology is a sublimation of what is wrong in socïety in general

        • mirele

          I’m of the opinion that even if we don’t have churches paying tax, at the very least, they should file tax returns so we can see where the money is going. I’ve looked at more than a few 1099 forms for charities and they are really eye-opening. I suspect the same thing would be true for a lot of these “churches” and “ministries.”

      • chukicita

        America does have this puzzling notion of itself as a bastion of religious tolerance. I do think some folks mix that up with separation of church and state.

        I agree with Sunny below that religious freedom is an idea Americans like to associate themselves with, but history confirms that’s really a myth at best, and a delusion at worst.

        Here’s a good article about the roots of religious tolerance in America, (but even it doesn’t mention the Ghost Dance and how it was made illegal and all. They said Ghost Dance was made illegal because its goal was for the white folk to go away, but somehow it’s okay for Scientology to hate on mental health professionals and anyone else who disagrees with it):

        http://www.smithsonianmag.com/history/americas-true-history-of-religious-tolerance-61312684/?page=1

        • Mooser

          “America does have this puzzling notion of itself as a bastion of religious tolerance.”

          Huh? That’s cause it is! Can you name one religion which was ever legislated against, in the way that “races” was a legislative distinction until we got our Civil Rights straightened out? Can you name one religion which achieved official recognition or privilege?

          Yes, there is plenty of social prejudice around religion, but that can’t be helped, not that it’s good.

          But yes, the US is, by any objective measurement, a bastion or religious tolerance. Racial tolerance, no. But religious tolerance has fortunately, not been a problem, thanks to “Congress shall make no law…”

          • chukicita

            I already named one religious movement that was legislated against – Ghost Dance. It ended with a massacre at Wounded Knee.

            It was also illegal for the people to speak their own language or pray in their way when they were sent to boarding school to be “assimilated.” It was part of the BIA’s mission to convert those who were forced to attend the schools to Christianity. This is not a secret. After the Indian ESElf-Determination and Education Assistance Act of 1975, many of these schools closed.

            • Captain Howdy

              Thanks for this comment. I was raised on stories about the Ghost Dance.

            • chukicita

              Me., too. But to get back on topic, I think that a system like the UK’s, wherein nonprofit groups have to demonstrate that they actually provide benefits to people and communities in order to maintain tax exemption, might be useful here (although we know Scn will likely pull stats out of thin air).

              I think it’s interesting that none of Scn, Inc’s “social betterment” programs is divested from the proselytizing. In fact, there was a document that demonstrated how the fronts like Narconon, Way to Happiness, ABLE, etc. were all “inroads to Scientology” and were created and designed to funnel bodies into the shop.

            • Captain Howdy
            • mirele

              Ironically, it appears that one part of the Ghost Dance (the use of the Ghost Shirts) may have been assimilated from Mormon teachings.

            • ze moo

              A Mohawk friend of mine (died about 10 years ago) and his sister were taken from his mother during the depression and sent to an Oklahoma ‘Indian’ School because the family was so poor. All the tales about beating the native language out them and leading them to ‘Christianity’ are true.

              There isn’t one cultural, religious or racial group that hasn’t committed such crimes in their past. That is the one thing that unites all mankind, we are all sinners and we have committed every crime that ever existed. That doesn’t mean we can’t get better, that is what ‘spiritual growth’ is, isn’t it?

            • Betsy

              Those forced pack-offs to schools are one of the disgraces in our history. I have a few Hopi friends. Their culture suffered terribly around the turn of the 20th century because kids were packed off and couldn’t be taught the normal Hopi way. Some Hopi parents (men) who refused to send their kids were imprisoned.

          • Captain Howdy

            The Mormons were legislated against, they had bounties placed on their heads by the governor of Missouri.

            • Douglas D. Douglas

              Individual states have legislated in various ways concerning religious groups at different times in American history.

              The State of Missouri did not, however, place a “bounty” on the heads of Mormons. Following a series of skirmishes between Mormons and non-Mormons in the state, the Governor issued Executive Order #44 in 1838, ordering the removal of Mormons. The salient sentence in the order is: The Mormons must be treated as enemies, and must be exterminated or driven from the state if necessary for the public peace–their outrages are beyond all description. This has been cited at times as a “bounty” or “extermination order.” However, the Order did NOT provide any legal pretext for anyone outside of authorized troops to take action. It should be noted that no Mormons were actually killed by State troops, although others used the Executive Order as an excuse for violence against Mormons.

              Federal troops were sent against the Mormons in 1857-58 in Utah, which was then a Territory. But I do not believe there was actual legislation involved.

          • mirele

            Mormons were legislated against during the time Utah was a territory. In fact, because the Mormon church refused to give up polygamy by the early 1880s, the Edmunds-Tucker Act authorized the Federal government to confiscate Mormon church property. This was upheld in Late Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints (meaning the Mormon church had been *dissolved*) versus US (spring 1890). Also upheld in spring 1890 was Davis v. Beason, which allowed for the use of a “test oath” in Idaho Territory. The test oath disqualified anyone who even believed in polygamy, even if they didn’t practice it.

            As a result of having their property taken and their voting rights endangered, the Mormon church issued what is known today as the Manifesto in September 1890. So yeah, there is a history of the feds going after a church and trying to put it out of business to get it to conform it to its will. Remember, the first Republican party platform was to get rid of the twin relics of barbarism: slavery and polygamy.

        • villagedianne

          Yes, the brutal suppression of the non-violent Ghost Dance is an unfortunate chapter in our history.

        • Betsy

          Totally agree, and thanks for the smithsonian link. I believe (although I’m not completely sure) that although the Vatican disassociated itself with the Penitentes (Brothers of Light) in New Mexico in the 20s or 30s, because they practiced flagellation and (possibly/probably) occasional voluntary crucifixion, the government was very wary about getting involved. (The flagellation part still goes on, as people involved with residents of tiny northern NM towns know.)

        • Douglas D. Douglas

          Religious freedom and state-sanctioned religious tolerance are two different things. One of the founding principles of the United States was religious freedom, as the article makes quite clear.

          Religious tolerance, on the other hand, has been less than stellar, especially among the States and individual communities. On the Federal level, tolerance has not really been extended to the point of legislation, other than judicial rulings dealing with conflicts between States and the Constitution.

      • TheHoleDoesNotExist

        So individual victims who are fresh out, like Jillian Schlesinger, should apply for asylum in France for protection from religious persecution, right?

        Justice served with chocolate croissants and delicious irony.

        Perhaps it is time. Should be no problem whatsoever in proving an American cannot get this protection in the United States of America.

        • Once_Born

          This is not too far-fetched.

          In all of the nations of the European Union, you qualify for Asylum if you can show you are justified in a well-founded fear of persecution for reasons of race, religion, ethnicity or political opinion.

          Recently the European Court of Justice ruled that refugees who are fleeing persecution because they are gay should also be granted asylum, so this treaty is not narrowly interpreted.
          http://www.dailymail.co.uk/news/article-2490311/Gay-refugees-fleeing-persecution-granted-asylum-EU.html

          Such a case (if it was every heard) would be an exquisite embarrassment to the US government, and the treatment meted out to so many critics certainly qualifies as persecution.

          • TheHoleDoesNotExist

            I am convinced it will take something profound to move the will of the American people to act with their voting power. I am more and more thinking that the time is getting very ripe because the few religious fanatics in our current political arena (and the billionaire psycopaths who fund them….sound familiar) are hurting U.S. families to such an obvious degree now, that citizens are waking up to the problem.

            I’m serious about the asylum. Scientology persecutes people for Not being and acted and behaving like good and silent scientologists, even those who were never scientologists in the first place. They want to persecute those who taught the French judges anything that doesn’t fit in Their justice policies. They are saying it is not fair that those lecturers did not teach Scientology justice and ethics.

            It’s all written out quite clearly in the ethics and justice policies and ethics book. Scientology believes it has the right to persecute anyone who is not a scientologist. Hell, they are now on record in claiming harassing and stalking is their Legal right.

            Scientology can’t have it both ways. If it wants all the benefits of cloaking and tax exemptions as a faux religion, then it should be treated just like any religion that persecutes anyone not to their liking.

        • Betsy

          Yes, look at original mega-victim Paulette Cooper. She really needed religious and political asylum; she wasn’t going to get it here until it happened that the Federal Raid on Project Snow White happened to exonerate her.

      • Captain Howdy

        After the horrorshow called Jonestown and the government led debacle at Waco, no one has to wonder at the governments reluctance to revisit Cultland. The only reason they got involved with FLDS was because of the rampant pedophilia. And even with that righteous justification, the Feds got all kinds of shit from the religious right wing in this country.

        • Betsy

          I can never understand why, with respect to the FLDS, they don’t focus on welfare fraud. The spectacle of screaming children being wrenched away from their crying mothers, even though the FLDS DOES demonstrably practice child abuse, was one that doomed that approach from the first attempt in the mid-1950s Enforcing bigamy laws doesn’t work either. However, it is quite true that most multiple-wife families freely use welfare, since the wives are legally unwed, and this money may well go to enrich the male heads of the community and not those to whom it is issued. In a welfare-fraud case (I think) it would be the MALES of the community who would be subject to prosecution, since in legal fact the women that they accumulate and impregnate are indeed unwed.

          • mirele

            You’ll note that the major FLDS convictions came in Texas, where there isn’t a long history of polygamy, and not here in Arizona or Utah. I can explain that. Too many of the legislators in both states are descendants of polygamists and it’s tough to go against a religious doctrine of one’s church which teaches polygamy may be practiced again in the eternities. That said, our otherwise extremely corrupt Attorney General Tom Horne has arranged for non-FLDS law enforcement to patrol in Colorado City, which has brought some real law enforcement to the twin towns, despite our sit-on-their-hands legislators.

            I have a friend who is the guardian ad litem for seven kids involved in a custody battle between a father kicked out of the FLDS and two of his wives (one of the wives went with him). The judge awarded full custody to the kids to the father because the mothers simply could not guarantee that the girls wouldn’t be married off** or the boys kicked out of the community.

            **No Warren Jeffs’-sanctioned marriages have been performed since 2006 in the community as punishment for the FLDS apparently not praying hard enough to spring Warren from prison. Also, marriages entered into before 2006 are “invalid.” As can be imagined, it makes for a weird situation in the twin towns.

            • Betsy

              Thanks for this comment. I think (can’t remember why) that I read recently that Utah has more or less given up trying to prosecute simple polygamy. I imagine Arizona, which seems to have many polygamous communities, may have had to look at a similar position, although as you point out the number of polygamy-related people in power skews everything. Of course the main thing we all hope is that the phenomenon of 14-year-girls being forced to marry their uncles and young boys being abandoned in cities because they threaten the older male population will be curtailed and made extremely illegal. I read that Jon Krakauer, author of Under the Banner of Heaven, has adopted a “lost boy” and is sponsoring halfway houses and other services for them.

              I’m glad that the Jeffs group has been stifled. (They were really so over the edge by the time Warren reached his peak that they were almost impossible to ignore.) But as I understand it there are lots of other groups that remain extremely active…the Allred family, for example.

              Thanks for your information. If you have more to add, I’d be extremely interested, as there are NO polygamous groups near me (as far as I know.) Mormonism, both mainstream and fundamentalist, is something by which I am totally fascinated.

          • Captain Howdy

            Exactly. And why doesn’t the FDA/FBI send in undercover agents that are wired to get the reggs telling them that scientology will cure whatever ails them? How obvious an easy case of fraud and RICO would that be?

            • Betsy

              This is a question you and I both are asking! I can’t for the life of me see why all the reports of child abuse, slave labor, possible trafficking, simple unsanitary living conditions, sub-standard building, and so on haven’t result in SOMETHING.

      • Betsy

        This IS something in the American DNA. I think this is why in some ways a secular state (like France) or states with state churches (England and Germany) have a legal advantage over us in this case. The legal systems there are not open-ended with respect to what calls itself a religion, nor are they open-ended about what a “religion” can do in its manifestations.

      • ze moo

        While RG is right about law enforcement keeping away from some ‘religious’ activities, the IRS has real duties to keep such operations under control. ‘Inurement’ is what lost Lroon his tax deduction in the 60’s. All it takes is an IRS administrator who wants to make a name for themselves and the wheels will start turning.

      • And I don’t rent cars!

        This is the NPR story about TV Mega-Churches http://www.npr.org/2014/04/01/282496855/can-a-television-network-be-a-church-the-irs-says-yes

        It explains why the IRS won’t investigate a church. Based on this story, I have finally given up hope the IRS will every investigate the church of scientology, especially since the CoS already has a sweetheart deal in place which is closed to public scrutiny.

  • Yeah! a few tweets this AM—with allergy brain any coherent thought is a triumph! 🙂 Another beautiful day in akron too, suppose to be 76 today, so i’ll go back out and try to get a handle on the jungle side yard, before it gets over grown and do so, while trying to avoid creeper peeper—who scared the hell out of me yesterday…..grrrr…..i think he likes scaring me….next time, i tell him off, yes i’ll video that! 😀 tomorrow RAIN, so i’ll update my do something page then—best time to do web work, when the sun and warm weather isn’t calling to ya! 🙂

    $cientology
    The goose that lays golden eggs
    For niblet daily
    @scientology #haiku #moneymoneymoney

    Does niblet test tech?
    Did he do Super Power?
    He should lead the way!
    @scientology #haiku #niblet #WhyNoTestTech #NotALeader

    Smoking cures asthma
    That’s what niblet would tell you
    Don’t believe doctors!
    @scientology #haiku #AssbackwardsThinking #RunAroundAPole

    Rewrites history
    No one ever questions this
    Kirstie, Cruise, hello?
    @scientology @TomCruise @kirstiealley #haiku #PsychsDIDNOTcauseHolocaust

    Made up on the go
    Keep stringing people along
    Get all their money
    @scientology #haiku #BullShitSciFi #GetMoneyBitch

    Hey you, I.R.S.!!
    Why don’t you look into $cis?
    They violate laws!
    @scientology @IRSnews #haiku #IRS #Violate93Agreement #NotAChurch

    Human trafficking
    How can you keep IGNORING???
    Shame on you! WAKE UP!!
    @FBILosAngeles @FBIWFO @scientology #haiku #DoSomething #GrowAPair

    the following 3 are all by Anonymous Confused Person:

    Church forbids the web
    Afraid flock might see the truth
    This is “true freedom”?
    @scientology #haiku #truefreedom #donotlookatweb

    Church says no to web
    What is it that it’s scared of?
    Staff might start to think?
    @scientology #haiku #thestafflife #thinkforyourself

    Teach your flock to fear
    Because it’s really you who
    Fear they’ll start thinking
    @scientology #haiku #fear #thinkforyourself

    • joan nieman

      Always creative Tia. Thanks for all you do. Maybe that creep next door is a scientologist. Ugh!

      • oh no!!! i believe he’s an evangelical….he thinks obama is a secret muslim and is gonna give the USA to the middle east—he fervently believes this, and claims it’s in the bible….apparently we’re going to have martial law by july too….he’s not there today, but eddie didn’t help by saying he might have a camera facing my yard….he might!! i wish he WAS a $cieno, least i would know how to handle ’em! 🙂

        • joan nieman

          Oh! He’s one of those! Another brain washed victim of a belief system.

          • yeah, that’s one way to put it!!!

  • Yeah! a few tweets this AM—with allergy brain any coherent thought is a triumph! 🙂 Another beautiful day in akron too, suppose to be 76 today, so i’ll go back out and try to get a handle on the jungle side yard, before it gets over grown and do so, while trying to avoid creeper peeper—who scared the hell out of me yesterday…..grrrr…..i think he likes scaring me….next time, i tell him off, yes i’ll video that! 😀 tomorrow RAIN, so i’ll update my do something page then—best time to do web work, when the sun and warm weather isn’t calling to ya! 🙂

    $cientology
    The goose that lays golden eggs
    For niblet daily
    @scientology #haiku #moneymoneymoney

    Does niblet test tech?
    Did he do Super Power?
    He should lead the way!
    @scientology #haiku #niblet #WhyNoTestTech #NotALeader

    Smoking cures asthma
    That’s what niblet would tell you
    Don’t believe doctors!
    @scientology #haiku #AssbackwardsThinking #RunAroundAPole

    Rewrites history
    No one ever questions this
    Kirstie, Cruise, hello?
    @scientology @TomCruise @kirstiealley #haiku #PsychsDIDNOTcauseHolocaust

    Made up on the go
    Keep stringing people along
    Get all their money
    @scientology #haiku #BullShitSciFi #GetMoneyBitch

    Hey you, I.R.S.!!
    Why don’t you look into $cis?
    They violate laws!
    @scientology @IRSnews #haiku #IRS #Violate93Agreement #NotAChurch

    Human trafficking
    How can you keep IGNORING???
    Shame on you! WAKE UP!!
    @FBILosAngeles @FBIWFO @scientology #haiku #DoSomething #GrowAPair

    the following 3 are all by Anonymous Confused Person:

    Church forbids the web
    Afraid flock might see the truth
    This is “true freedom”?
    @scientology #haiku #truefreedom #donotlookatweb

    Church says no to web
    What is it that it’s scared of?
    Staff might start to think?
    @scientology #haiku #thestafflife #thinkforyourself

    Teach your flock to fear
    Because it’s really you who
    Fear they’ll start thinking
    @scientology #haiku #fear #thinkforyourself

  • Protest Ant

    Off Topic…
    Tony, WBM was offering a Mary deMoss/Panton crazy scientologist ring tone yesterday. I know there was some debate back in 2006/2008 about whether or not she’d blown. Do you (does anyone) have any further confirmation either way about this?

    • mirele

      As far as I know (last I heard from Patty Moher), Mary has not blown.

      • TDA1541A

        “And that rare day there was meat with the rice and beans wich tasted a bit like chicken”

      • Protest Ant

        Thanks.

        • DamOTclese2

          Yeah, Mary DeMoss was expected to have walked away several years back however nobody could confirm it, it seems DeMoss dropped out of sight and getting solid confirmation is impossible unless she or a family member steps forward and notes it in public.

  • i-Betty

    Vive la France, once again. Thanks so much, Jonny.

    I’ve made a cup of tea and gathered together the remnants of yesterday’s egg massacre and I’m about ready to listen to the pod cast. Can’t wait.

  • richelieu jr

    As a Frenchman, I hate to say it, but I have to give reason to the Cherch in their accusations against the judges who attended Scientology-themed presentations in school. It is not possible to know anything about Scientology and remain neutral. What they want is a totally uniformed legislature, just as they want totally uninformed applicants and members, because the least amount of information, given a reasonably capable brain, free of interference, will come to the conclusion that it’s a load of Bollocks.

    It is well known that reality has a clear anti-Scilon bias.

    • OrangySky

      “It is well known that reality has a clear anti-Scilon bias.”
      Honestly, here in the US, you would have to prohibit all court officers from watching shows like Dateline or CNN, or reading certain papers or mainstream magazines, or certain blogs (ahem!)…or even watching the damn history channel…to ensure that NO jurist had any preconceived notions about Scientology. It’s just not possible.
      Scientology has only itself to blame for this situation. Right now on Netflix and iTunes there are at least 2 major feature documentaries on child abusing priests…and yet even the Catholic church has never had such uniform bad press against it, across all media.

      • TheHoleDoesNotExist

        Scientology expects and now is demanding all to be deaf, dumb and blind like any good scientologist. If you refuse, you are an SP and are fair game to be destroyed. Simple, actually.

      • Betsy

        Yes, it is very difficult, if not impossible to find “fair” representation for a broadcast on an entity that is so completely self-serving and harmful. It would be like trying to put together an hour on “The Humanitarian Side of the Manson Family.”

    • Barb Snow

      True. The more you know about Scientology, the more “prejudiced” you are against it!

    • Mighty Korgo of Teegeeack

      Here, default mode seems to be versions of, “People can worship in whatever way they want. You can’t legislate on what people should think. It doesn’t matter what church you go to as long as you go”. At this point, in a friendly discussion, it would make sense to mention The People’s Temple, Branch Davidians and Heaven’s Gate and say that we don’t accept EVERYTHING done in the name of religion. A professor of religion was on the CBC saying, “In this great and open land of ours there are probably less than a dozen religions that WE DON’T ACCEPT AT THE TABLE”. Most, I am sure, heard in this a reinforcement of our religious freedoms. I heard, “Watch out– there are almost a dozen out there who will hurt you”.

      A dear friend is a “family lawyer” which is the euphemism we use here for divorce lawyers. He tells me that the judges often don’t read the information given to them by the lawyers. His chances of winning vary dramatically depending on the judge he has. He also has the wild card of feminist judges. His clients aren’t wealthy people that can afford to hire a legal team, or have Allan Dershowitz on retainer, to figure out an appeal. It is cheaper and less soul consuming for them to take what the judge gives them. Anyway, not one judge in the world can be some kind of robot that administers the law completely without the bias of their education and background. All a person in court can hope for is a chance at justice. Scientology knows this and perverts it.

      To me, the lack of justice is that Hubbard didn’t spend the second half of his life in jail. That Miscavige is not there today. That Scientology, the only criminally convicted religious organization in the history of my country is still established. That the Guardians Office was destroyed in name only. That the incidents that look like wrongful death are not investigated more thoroughly. And so on.

      I have heard that this nation needs a “new toolbox” to fight Scientology in the courts. Maybe so. Obviously I am no lawyer. But I think we need to enforce the existing laws.

      • Betsy

        ^^^^, thanks, Mighty K.

    • DamOTclese2

      The insane crooks used to be ordered to try that line with protesters. “You have never been a Scientologist so how do you know we murdered Lisa?” and other comments along the lines of “you were never a customer” — as if you have to step in front of a locomotive and get dismembered to suggest one should not step in front of trains.

  • richelieu jr

    Ha! Palisson’s blog posting is called ‘Minority Report’ in French!

    And why we’re on the subject of fun with names, his is very, very close to meaning ‘doormat’. How unfitting!

    • Glom_of_Nit

      To me, he sounds more like Calisson, a Provence delicacy.
      http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Calisson

      • richelieu jr

        Never much liked candied fruit, myself…

        and my GF is telling me that my version is totally regional…

    • Panopea Abrupta

      France’s loss is Montreal’s gain – he is brilliant.

  • Phil McKraken

    There’s a term for teaching judges about Scientology in judge school — it’s Safepointing. But in this case, it’s the public that is made safe, not Scientology fraud and abuse.

  • Pierrot

    Protect innocent victims from co$ entrapments
    Join the RED X team
    Allez la France, allez les bleux
    FLAG AWAY co$ fraudulent advertising on CraigsList

    https://whyweprotest.net/community/threads/taking-down-co-on-craigslist-co-ads-on-craigslist.113779/page-75#post-2447448

    Your doubts are VALID. Call 1-866-XSEAORG
    FREELOADER Debt is legally UNENFORCEABLE. Call 1-866-XSEAORG

    Ty AP

    • AnonRedX

      Allez! allez!
      On va GAGNER.

    • Graham

      Done!

    • Panopea Abrupta

      Done – Albuquerque has one that is merely 30 minutes old.
      Make sure you do Boston For Sale – book-sales in RECENT
      – he spammed it with dozens of ads last night.

  • It’s always a hoot reading about Scientology’s Keystone Cops manuevers in France. One thing you can count on with these guys is that they will never, ever admit to having done anything wrong. I mean, what do they hope to accomplish with this nonsense? Do they honestly think anyone is taking them seriously or that they are somehow going to gain public favor? Dream on.

    I wanted to put a plug in for the new Surviving Scientology podcast. Doing these interviews is really fun. I highly recommend volunteering for this to anyone out there. It’s a chance to tell your story and get the word out, perhaps even to those still-in, about how life outside the cult of Radical Scientology is sooooo much better than being in. And Jeff asks really awesome questions that spark more questions that lead into all sorts of interesting areas. Just sayin’, I can’t think of many other things to do for half-an-hour that are as much fun and possibly as helpful as this. At least not in the ex-Scientology world

    • Sherbet

      You and Jeff are truly a Dynamic Duo.

    • aquaclara

      Loving your vids, Chris.

    • K2P2

      Chris, What a great half hour interview with Jeff! It hinted at a part 2? Hoping.
      Biggest shocker: Local org pays to rent auditorium and put on the events. What?
      Confirmation: $cientology is ALWAYS worse than you think.
      Hope: Your speaking out (along with other exes and Jeff’s Surviving $cio series) will have a serious impact on exposing this “religious organization”. Keep at it.

      • Thanks a lot K2P2. Yes, I have done some more interviewing with Jeff. Don’t know when those will go up. I’m sure they have some other people on their line-up too. There are so many of us coming out and telling our stories and it’s exciting to see the truth getting out there more each day.

        • ThetaBara

          Thank you for speaking out! It makes a difference.

    • TheHoleDoesNotExist

      I’ve really missed Tom Smith’s, “The Edge” Hawkradio interview programs. I hope they were archived, but when I last looked, couldn’t find any. There was one with a Russian who was part of the marriage for green cards at Flag and what he experienced when he arrived in Clearwater. I never knew about this scheme before and to hear his nightmare through the eyes of an unsuspecting immigrant was hair raising. There were other memorable moments with the likes of Bill Franks, Denise Brennan and so many more.

      So I am happy to see the tradition is being carried on. Once again, new information and stories that expose the raw and dirty details of life behind the curtain are coming to light in up close and personal although painful storytelling.

      I can’t help but believe that all of our stories and the documentation of the scientology mind experiment are going to be used as a serious and scientific examination and analysis. I’d like to believe that somewhere down the road it will prove to be at least a small specimen under the microscope that will forward a new understanding of our need for exploration and explanation of human behavior. That’s what sucked most of us in in the first place (well, except for the regges). But then, I’m such an optimist.

    • Ruby

      Chris, on MY last day of staff, when I walked out the back door of the org, I had the same thought as you…”I am free!” I laughed when I heard you say that on the podcast and I SOOO totally get how you felt at that moment. 🙂

      • Michael Leonard Tilse

        When I was moving out of southern california and into my home state of Oregon, carrying my last load over the mountains. I knew I was done with scientology, and green green Oregon was again my home, I laughed and laughed and sighed big sighs as I drove down out of the mountains into the verdant valley where Ashland was. I was free.

        • Qbird

          Verdant brand new days ahead ~ i’m loving this thread. cheers Michael..

      • I know you know how I felt. 😀 It’s so nice to have that monkey off our backs, huh?

    • Xique

      I’m happy your mother has her son back. 27 years is a long long time. I’m imagining the two of you sitting and sharing a delicious meal together. I enjoyed listening to the podcast.

    • Eugene K

      Great job, Christ!

      • Once_Born

        The perfect typo for Easter : -)

        • Eugene K

          Damn! Thank for catching that… ops 🙂

      • Douglas D. Douglas

        Christ?

        Easter hangover?

        • Eugene K

          lol

    • Michael Leonard Tilse

      The videos and podcasts are really great. I like that you get into the specifics of what sea org life is like. Too often it seems people have a distorted view of what actually goes on. It is bad, but it should not be thought of as ‘concentration camp’ bad.

      You talk about food in the podcast. Back in my time in the sea org, especially in 1977, we had great food. I was on the EPF and worked with the mission operations pac move mission headed by Marc Ingber. Estates under Miriam Earls ran the EPF. We had a multi grain cereal and fresh raw milk and orange juice and eggs (scrambled) for breakfast. Lunch was sometimes sandwiches but most often was a full meal with veggies, bread, meat and fruit. And dinner was a full dinner with a meat dish or pasta dish or sometimes fish. We had steak occasionally. Potatoes (mashed) salad stuff and so-on.

      That changed after the pressure went on for renos and the orgs were not providing as much money to the estates for feeding their EPF staff the beginning of the 80’s and by 1984 the third trip through the sea org, the food was much less appealing.

      I was reading an old book last night about Joe “Yellow Kid” Weil, a famous conman of the thirties. His story of Horse Race confidence games using the “Wire” (Western Union) was exactly what they did in the movie “The Sting.”

      Anyway one thing he says struck me: That the conman knows that the way to keep people from calling the police or exposing the conman is the make sure the mark (the person being conned) knows that the reason he lost the money was because he screwed up. The con is structured so that the mark thinks he is going to get this big payoff but he has to place his bet or something, and the conman arranges that the mark makes a mistake that “ruins” the payoff. So he is stuck with this self guilt. The mark focuses on his “mistake” and blames himself for the failure, not the conman. And that leaves the door open for another try to make it big.

      And this is exactly how hubbard rigged all of scientology, if you are not getting results, it is your fault. It is your ‘overts’ it is your failure of application, your inadequate devotion that is the problem.

      I wouldn’t be surprised that hubbard got the insights on how to boobytrap scientology from reading this exact book.

      • Once_Born

        Your account of the con artist’s book reminds me of an academic paper written in 1952 by the sociologist Ervin Goffman called, “On Cooling the Mark Out” http://www.tau.ac.il/~algazi/mat/Goffman–Cooling.htm

        Goffman describes how con artists who are afraid that their mark will go to the police after having been stung, employ an operative who ‘cools them out’ – i.e. persuades him to keep quiet by attempting to repair their injured self-esteem.

        Goffman noted that similar interactions can be seen in everyday life – and now Scientology.

        • Michael Leonard Tilse

          Wow, that is a great paper. I especially like his description of the way one identifies ‘self’ and how it is related to what one finds valuable. And that losing what one values (money, job, social position, etc.) is like a death.

          The ‘scientologist’ self-identity dies when you leave scientology. And along with it all the effort and commitment you put in over the years. Surprisingly scientology does not cool it’s marks out. it just hamstrings them by taking away even more of their life.

          I think it does attempt to ‘cool-out’ the marks who are leaving the sea organization. It’s all the sec-checks and routing-forms are efforts to either keep the person in the con game or convince them no recourse is possible and get them into an acceptable frame of mind about being out of the sea org.

          By not using this clearly workable ‘cool-out’ technology of confidence tricksters scientology makes its former members even more implacable enemies.

    • Mighty Korgo of Teegeeack

      Thanks for the interview, Chris. There was a lot of new information there and I’m a guy who thinks he knows everything.

    • TDA1541A

      How Ironic:

      http://mikemcclaughry.wordpress.com/the-reading-library/scientology/scientology-roots/scientology-roots-introduction/

      “In Scientology speak, the guy with a service facsimile will not admit he was wrong.”

    • J. Swift

      Chris, great to have you on the new show and thanks for doing the interview. We have parts 2 & 3 in the works and it gets more intense and detailed.

      • Betsy

        If you haven’t gotten the idea already, you and Karen and Jeffrey are doing an INCREDIBLE thing. Jeffrey is a great interviewer, very knowledgable and easy to listen to. The first two broadcasts have kept me in my seat listening without a thought of putting anything on pause.

        Thanks and kudos to all of you…heroes of the revolution!

    • OTVIIIisGrrr8!

      As an “Out Create” of “Surviving Scientology Radio” we in RTC are launching Ideal Org Radio. We plan on an 24/7/365 broadcast of Chairman Miscavige’s inspirational speeches. For example, who can forget his dramatic and historic 2012 speech wherein he opened Ideal Org Cincinnati Ideal Org before a crowd of 22,000,000 Scientologists and their friends and well-wishers?

      A yearly subscription is only $539,995 plus the required sec checks and security bonds that are to be signed before one can listen.

      http://otviiisgrrr8.files.wordpress.com/2014/04/chairman-dave.png

      • noseinabk

        Waiting with bated breath to send my $539,995, as I know you will be using the latest technology to reach the masses!

      • valshifter

        is this the Hoi Poloi people mentined on Hubards lectures.

  • Sherbet

    Oh, for God’s sake, scientology. Shut up.

    • aquaclara

      Great response, Sherbet. The French have to be thoroughly annoyed. The cult just does not stop. Ever.

      • Sherbet

        As long as there are still a couple of bucks left for lawyers, cos never cries “Uncle!” And judging from the tax returns, there are more than a couple of bucks in the cos piggy bank.

        • aquaclara

          It’s depressing, isn’t it? I had hoped that the lawsuits and buildings were draining the coffers…..

          • Once_Born

            Remember, all of these documents refer to the ‘book value’ of buildings. They are really only worth what buyers are willing to pay for them.

            It’s the cash reserves that matter. If they dry out, and the CofS has to resort to selling a significant number of buildings, this will surely provoke a backlash among long-suffering donors.

            • Espiando

              Yep, it’s what they say the buildings are worth, so factor in ego inflation from the start. And John P.’s always made the argument, and numerous people have agreed with him, that, if it came down to nut-cutting time, the already-finished Idle Morgues will have to be sold at a huge loss because of the quantity of customization and physical repurposing that needed to be done in order to meet Niblet’s requirements du jour. The buildings are now, in general, useless for anything but an Idle Morgue unless you do a gut rehab.

              They can cite book value all they want. I can say that I’ve got a Ferrari F430 with a book value of $200K. But if the engine’s blown and it’s up on blocks in my backyard, its book value doesn’t matter to prospective buyers.

            • Robert Eckert

              It’s just not whatever they “say”. It reflects how much money they actually sank into buying the real estate (minus depreciation for buildings, though not for land). The amount they could get back out is not always the same as what they put in, and indeed huge losses should be expected.

            • Espiando

              Well, what I meant by “whatever they say” was the figure that each individual Idle Morgue was transmitting via telex to Int Landlord and hence to Davey, Master of the Toy Navy. They’re very likely to inflate the figure they send to Int Landlord, not in order to try to fool the donators, but to puff themselves up and push their stats higher. It’s probably something required of them by the uplines retards, because their figures can be used to push other prospective Idle Morgues into dick-waving contests regarding donations (“Portland spent $15 million to go Ideal!” Surely you’re not going to let them beat you?!”).

              The figure’s inflated, but we’re going to need experts to tell us by how much.

            • Robert Eckert

              That is precisely how this does not work. The “book value” is the amount actually spent to purchase the assets, minus a depreciation amount. It is not something ambiguous that you can make up, and it is not something that they would misreport on forms filed under penalty of perjury.

            • Douglas D. Douglas

              Yep. On tax documents, it is advantageous to under report assets and income. And Scientology is always looking for the advantage.

            • kemist

              Even if you pay no taxes ?

            • Douglas D. Douglas

              You haven’t been paying attention…! The forms we are discussing are 990-Ts. As Tony says in his presentation of each:
              Scientology has enjoyed tax-exempt status since 1993, and churches are not required to submit annual returns. However, following a change in the law in 2006, even church organizations are required to submit returns for “unrelated business income,” known as 990-T reports. Those returns don’t reflect the church-related income taken in by Scientology (an organization built on the idea of paying large sums for spiritual advancement), but the forms do ask for a corporate entity to report its “book value” — an indication of that entity’s total assets, such as real estate.

              Yes, these are tax documents. And the scammers at Scientology will try and get away with putting the lowest possible numbers on them. That is why the numbers that are coming to light are of such concern.

              What is the reality?

            • kemist

              I thought they were required only to submit these as a matter of transparency (ha!), not to actually pay taxes on them.

              Are religious organisations required to pay some taxes they were not paying before since 2006 ?

            • ze moo

              The clampire pays taxes on the restaurants and hotels and other side businesses it operates. The 990s just show what this taxable income being ‘taxed’. Please note in this 990, former ‘losses’ are being carried forward and used to negate any taxes currently due. As all business can do this, so can the clams.

            • kemist

              Ok.

              So there are other religions in the US which operate restaurants and hotels, which made this law necessary ?

              That’s so very weird. I’d never even heard of a religious organisation operating a freaking hotel or restaurant before (beyond a cafeteria and rooms for its clergy and occasional visitors).

              What next, they’ll start a casino ?

            • mirele

              The Mormon church owns a shopping mall and condos in downtown Salt Lake City conservatively estimated to have cost around $3 billion. When the ribbon was cut on the mall, the president of the Mormon Church, Thomas S. Monson, said, and I quote: “Let’s go shopping!”

              Unfortunately Jesus did not show up to kick some money-grubbing booty.

            • kemist

              You wouldn’t believe how weird this all sounds to me.

              Back when I did believe and attended mass, “shopping” was pretty much the antithesis of what we might call a spiritual experience. In fact, anyone proposing this shopping mall to the parishioners of my church would probably have made the church members kick their blasphemous, money-grubbing asses out of there with no need to wait for Jesus to do the honors.

              We were encouraged to consume less, not more, and to share whatever we had. The church was supposed to be where you forgot material things for a while.

            • Betsy

              How old ARE you, kemist? Shopping is the modern religion! (I remember those days too, though I was Episcopal. The emphasis was always on giving and not “hoarding.”)

            • kemist

              I was catholic.

              As far as I know, the church where I used to go has not started preaching the prosperity gospel after I stopped attending, or my still religious family would have left.

              As far as I can remember, the priests never had much good to say about money and consumerist society. Among the bible verses we were taught as kids (at that time, school boards were religious and you either went to catholic school or protestant school), the one about how difficult it is for rich men to enter haven has always been prominent.

              I remember how the parishioners started disliking one particular priest because he’d taken a vacation in a resort, refused to live in the presbytary and went around in a posh car.

              If one of those bling-covered, teflon-haired preachers we see in the US had ever set foot in my church, he’d have found it completely empty on the next sunday.

            • Betsy

              Thanks for your remembrances. As an official old person, I can vouch that this was a general idea among the religious at one time. There are still little outposts of giving and not grabbing in the world, I think. In a tiny town near me there is a saintly priest who serves his very poor village with such true non-hoardingness and generosity that when he dies the lamentations will echo for counties. No matter what, there is still that line about rich men getting through the eye of a needle. Can’t change that. (It was frequently offered up when I was a child and a kid was about to pitch a tantrum about wanting something. As I remember, it worked, too…partly because the “shopping is religion” idea wasn’t so much alive then.)

            • ze moo

              Terry Jones the Koran burning nutjob from Florida, operates a used furniture business. His ‘disciples’ work in the business. How ‘ecclesiastical’ are your couch and bedroom set? This is not an isolated example. Look at the entangled relationship between governments and the Salvation Army.

              http://www.onlinecardonation.org/charitynews/archives/156

              There is one huge difference between the ‘Sally’ and CO$, the Sally actually has soup kitchens and really does run drug and alcohol rehabs. If you’re in that rehab, you have to go to church on Sundays and twice on Good Fridays. I have no idea what the success rate is, I shall ask a friend who might know.

            • Espiando

              Salvation ala mode and a cup of tea beats the fuck out of the Purif any day.

            • ze moo

              Chocolate bunnies work for me.

            • Douglas D. Douglas

              I have worked for religious organizations that included “taxable” activities on properties. For example:
              Gift shops. There can be a book ‘n Bible shop in a church, or on the campus of a religious institution.
              Cafe/coffee shops/cafeterias. Christians gotta eat. And coffee shops are everywhere.
              Parking concessions. Really.
              Apartments/housing. Student rentals and old folks homes can be either non-profit or for-profit. They can then be taxed as income.
              Hotels? You bet. I know of one Christian college that ended up purchasing and running a hotel that was adjacent to campus to ensure that they wouldn’t open a bar on the premises. (I guess they felt that if the students want to drink, they’d need to sneak into town the way their parents did!)

              I worked on one property where we literally had to move shelves of merchandise from one side of the facility to the other, as one side was taxable and the other wasn’t.

            • Jgg2012

              The reality is that Scientology is primarily commercial, and the Church income should also be taxable (and its not included in these forms).

            • kemist

              Scientologists, afraid of perjury ?

              They’d just drag this in court beating their chests about their religious freedom to lie to the IRS. Those are just wog laws, after all.

            • Robert Eckert

              No, no, no. Their sweetheart deal with the IRS is the last thing they would ever jeopardize.

            • Once_Born

              I know a copper who relies on the greed of the fraudsters he peruses.

              He freely admits that, if the crooks he pursued worked a good scam then fled and never repeated themselves, they would likely get away with it every time.

              However, human nature isn’t like that. If a fraud is profitable, they will do it again, and again, and again. Eventually the bad guys begin to think they are invulnerable, and grow careless. By this time, the police know every detail of their SOP – and are they ever surprised when the handcuffs go on.

              I suspect that the CofS have lost any fear of the IRS. They beat them once, and have never been inconvenienced by them in the years since. They think they are invulnerable. Carelessness and arrogance may be enough to jeopardise their “sweetheart deal”.

            • ze moo

              It appears that they have violated the 93 agreement in several ways. Refund scheme is unconscionable, the ‘separate’ trustees of the various corporate entities are not independent and the inurement of clam clebs.

            • TheHoleDoesNotExist

              In the last year there seems to be a fairly consistent ratio of staff to public who are showing up at major events, about 75% to 25%. Keeping in mind that public have an ethics gun to their head, that their family members are on that list of staff that show up or else, and that even their own children might report them if they don’t slap their asses on the chairs, that means 100% of remaining members are not there of their own free will. The only ones who do are the criminals profiting. I don’t consider them as real members.

            • Once_Born

              To clarify, when I spoke of “fraudsters” I was thinking of Miscavige and those few ‘executives’ who put in place the policies which lead to abuse. I should have added that, to my mind, the overwhelming majority of Scientologists are victims, not perpetrators.

              I speculate that the remaining members of the CofS consist of:

              1) Public who would leave tomorrow if it were not for the fear of disconnection, persecution and blackmail.
              2) Staff who have been in for so long that they doubt that could not function in wider society, and stay not because they want to, but because they fear the alternative.
              3) ‘True believers’ who will not question the word of the ‘Church’, for any reason ever. These people are likely to have emotional &/or psychiatric issues.
              4) New members, the overwhelming majority of whom leave spontaneously at the best of times.

              Recruitment seems to have collapsed and the CofS is concentrating more of its shrinking human resources efforts on keeping existing members in the dark. This is very unstable situation, overdue for catastrophic collapse.

            • kemist

              Depreciation is where the biggest overestimate of value will be, at least for those buildings they did not build themselves (I would not even enter those).

              It’s an amount based on normal building degradation, if maintenance is done properly.

              I suspect that maintenance was not very good, which will lead to accelerated building degradation. The state of toilets, about which ex-members often complain, is a good sign of what is done, re care of infrastructure. If plumbing is neglected, you’ll get water infiltration. If the toilets, which the public can actually see, are in such a sorry state, just imagine the state of, say, the ventilation system.

            • John P.

              Robert, you’re right. However, there is one way the cult could boost the numbers to make the book value stats higher, even on a form signed under penalty of perjury, like the tax returns.

              It is possible that they could take the amount of donations to the Ideal Org as the cost basis (i.e., book value), rather than the “hard” cost of the building plus renovations, which is what most people would assume the book value to be. Basically, they could award a “construction management” contract to an organization in the overall structure (they have a couple of real estate entities set up whose names I forget) with an amount equal to the difference between the contributions and the “hard” cost of the building purchase plus renovations.

              Let’s say they raise $11 million for an Ideal Org in West Cupcake, Iowa. They pay $3 million for the building and another $2.5 million in renovations. A for-profit business would recognize this as $11 million in sales, $5.5 million in expenses, and $5.5 million in profit. If a for-profit business paid a $5.5 million construction management fee to a related entity, they’d go to jail because it reduced profits improperly (and probably fraudulently).

              But the cult could treat a similar deal as $11 million in revenue, then pay the same $5.5 million for building and renovations, pay a $5.5 million “construction management” fee to a related entity and be OK. That’s because the $5.5 million in excess payments over costs for the building, which would be profit for a for-profit company, is tax free to the cult. In other words, inflating the cost basis of a building via a payment to a related company would not be a problem because it doesn’t reduce taxable income artificially because nothing is taxable. They might be forced to change the reporting of it in a tax return if it were audited but they wouldn’t have committed a crime.

              They would have some incentive to do this: a big book value when released to some of the whales would help bolster the image of success that DM is always so insistent on trying to create. And being able to say, “we raised $24 million for the Ideal Org and you can see that the book value for this entity went up by approximately $23 million this last year” helps gull the unwary, potentially assuaging those whales who dare to push back even a little bit on suspicion of financial irregularity.

            • Once_Born

              I can see why they call it “creative accounting”.

            • J. Swift

              1. This link is a brief article discussing the basic details of the two building purchases in Portland in 2008 and 2010 by the Church of Scientology: http://portlandpreservation.wordpress.com/2010/06/09/church-of-scientology-purchases-sherlock-building/

              2. The Church purchased the Stevens Building in 2008 for $5.3 million. This was to be Ideal Morgue Portland. The Church then decided this building was too small to hold services in after the purchase. Why the Church did not think about this before spending $5.3 million is left unexplained. Needless to say, the building must have had lath and plaster crimes against David Miscavige.

              3. The horribly downstat and suppressive Stevens Building was sold in 2013 for $4.35 million, a $950,000 loss to CSI: http://www.oregonlive.com/front-porch/index.ssf/2013/11/stevens_building_in_downtown_p.html

              3. The Church purchased the Sherlock Building cost $6,400,000 as a replacement for the Stevens Building.

              4. To make matters worse, local Scientologists in Portland must now raise $5 million to renovate the second building.

              The numbers for the Portland Ideal Org Scam add up this way:

              1. The Stevens Building cost $5,380,000 in cash and was sold at a $950,000 loss.

              2. The Sherlock Building cost $6,400,000 in cash.

              3. Remodeling is estimated to be at least $5,000,000.

              The Portland Ideal Org cost

              $950,000 – loss on the Stevens Building + cost of selling

              $6,400,000 – purchase of the new Sherlock Building

              ~$5,000,000 estimate to renovate the Sherlock Building

              Total: cost to open Ideal Morgue Portland: $12,350,000. This would presumably be the Book Value.

            • Robert Eckert

              Yes, that would be book value before they started lessening it by depreciation. And as JohnP points out, that ~$5M is where a lot of monkeying could occur.

            • And I don’t rent cars!

              Have you seen this YouTube channel by Operationsee4yourself (aka Juliya Keaton)? If you remember, last year she smuggled in spy cameras into Flag as a Sea Org member but was eventually caught by OSA. She has posted audios and videos in the past two months that OSA apparently didn’t confiscate. (??)

              This particular video is a confidential presentation about the fundraising for the Portalnd Ideal Og and its opening:

              https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=b8MOkUMwWGI

              Several other videos are about Portland’s grand opening such as “lies in Sea Org” and “Portland song.”

              Miscavige’s speech(s) at Portland Ideal Org opening are titled: “Is that really happened” and “David Miscavage talks about Portland (audio)”

              Others are interesting as they give a view inside the Flag Sea Org bubble and the cult’s propaganda and its revisionist history machine at work to rally the troops (Sea Org). The Narconon ones are equally fascinating (e.g., Ojai, CA, Celebrity Narconon). And so are the pep rallies on regging and the Sea Org’s living conditions.

              Hope this is new to you and helps somewhere down the line.

              Another great radio interview with Chris. You’ve got a voice perfect for radio/podcasts!

              ETA: spelling & Disqus formatting issues

            • ThetaBara

              You had me, until you mentioned penalty of perjury. What’s penalty of perjury compared to your ETERNITY?!
              😉

            • TheHoleDoesNotExist

              Maybe on paper, but remember these Ideal Orgs, the renovations, down to the furniture, have all been a Gift to scientology. Members paid for it, but don’t own it. I swear when I heard that they then had to pay rent, I about fell over. Now I am hearing one by one about whales paying the rent to keep the doors open. So it’s not like they don’t know they’ve been scammed. It’s one of the reasons why I say that those who are still supporting this scam are Not there for their soul’s eternity but something else entirely.

              I do believe their book value listings give them deductions that will help balance other areas out and one way or another, keep the IRS off their backs.

            • Betsy

              Very good point, RE. The amount I pay in taxes on my house has very little to do with the amount I might realistically get if I put it on the market right now. And I am not a tax-free organization.

            • GalacticGreg

              Zero losses for $cientology Inc. All bldgs and renos are from members money, not the cherch’s. The sales will be pure profit to the Cult.

            • kemist

              Considering that much of the construction/renovation was done by unqualified slave labor, I suspect the actual value of said building to be much, much less than stated on the actual market.

              A buyer from outside of the sciloonyverse cannot expect his wog clients to accept to live, sleep, eat or work in buildings that do not respect construction norms. They do get inspected, but from what I got from Jillian Schlesinger’s videos, the inspections are staged in advance. We also know that the CoS is not above bribing or blackmailing officials to get what it wants. After the IRS, city engineers would be pushovers. I’d be curious to see the number and severity of all the construction code violations and shoddy practices aimed at saving money that can be found in all those heavily decorated empty shells.

              I certainly wouldn’t buy any of them for more than the value of the land on which they are built. After having it analyzed for various types of contamination, mind you.

            • KingofSweden

              “After having it analyzed for various types of contamination, mind you.”

              Like thetans?

            • TDA1541A

              I know a place where they can cure that for you for a nominal fee.

            • TheHoleDoesNotExist

              Nova Construction.

            • GalacticGreg

              IAS cash reserves are approx. $1 billion estimated by Rinder. Hidden cash/investments $1 billion estimated. So they won’t hurt for a long time.

              Plus, $cientology Inc. does not care if they have to sell any/all of their Idle Morgue buildings at a huge loss. Because *they didn’t pay for the buildings or the renos*. All paid for by $cilon members. *Any* $$$ they get from building sales will be *all profit* for $cientology Inc.

            • Once_Born

              Disgraced CEOs who have led huge companies into bankruptcy are living proof that even the largest sums of money can evaporate with astonishing speed when those who manage it touch with reality.

              Times change. Scientology doesn’t.

              Also, selling too many buildings would surely disaffect droves of members – principally those who paid for them.

              It’s a daunting sum of money – but its in the hands of idiots, and you know what is said about a fool and his money…

            • ze moo

              Any whale who has been paying the ‘rent’ on an clam owned building is not going to be happy if the building is sold from under them. A major exodus will accompany the sale of any big mOrg. Even the whales has a limit (I hope).

            • TheHoleDoesNotExist

              They should have demanded a refund the minute they learned the millions thay forked over to purchase the building, renovate and refurbish did not give their local org the deed, much less a new, ongoing lease expense considerably higher than the old one.

            • ze moo

              And risk being declared ‘counter intentioned’ to the COB? Anyone with eyes and ears saw the reselling of the Basics and GAT1 for what it was and left. Today the clampire is the Miscavage admiration society. If the whales were really in it for the ‘tech’ and and worship of Lroon, they already left. What really keeps the current whales in the scam?

            • aquaclara

              I suppose if one had the time, one could add up the approximate value of all the buildings, and then see what the difference is between the book values and the buildings’ values to determine the relative cash position, right? It’s probably still a lot of cash.

            • Once_Born

              I remember Derek’s account of the state of (I think) an old hospital used as Sea Org ‘berthing’.

              All of the ‘conversion’ work was done by unqualified labour, to an inadequate standard – then the building was poorly maintained and overcrowded for years. It’s worth less than the land it stands on, because the buyer would have to pay to have it demolished.

              It’s probably enough, at this point, to know that the real value of CofS property is a fraction of its book value – and while this might still be a “lot of cash”, it has to be balanced against their liabilities. $1 billion dollars is less impressive if you own $1billion and one dollars.

            • TheHoleDoesNotExist

              I can verify none us who provided slave RPF labor for Big Blue were qualified for squat.

            • ThetaBara

              They were obviously wasting your talents! And most likely, those of your colleagues.

            • Betsy

              Hole, I truly hope you were not required to do any health-endangering things as Jillian S. was.

            • aquaclara

              So Big Blue book value might only equal the value of the land, minus tear-down costs, minus any outstanding liabilities from victims who sue, perhaps? Hmmm.
              And the boat is worth bupkus. No one would pay for that thing.

            • Once_Born

              Quite – but the book value of the Good Ship Freewinds is doubtless still quite impressive.

          • Betsy

            We would love to think that, but I’m sure there will always be more than enough to allow DM to buy several Pacific Islands, outfit them with mansions, expensive cars, and motorcyles, and continue to live his life in his accustomed manner…as long as he can get out of the US before he gets grabbed. Once he is in such a situation I would imagine that the “religious” aspect of the Chorch, including worrying about the fate of anything that doesn’t contribute directly to his life, will cease completely.

            • Once_Born

              There are two main reasons he might run like . One is that he is under criminal investigation, in which case assets would at least be frozen. Miscavige lives, like it or not, in a networked, post 9/11 world. He cannot get away with hiding as Hubbard did.

              The other reason is that his position as head of a ‘religion’ is no longer viable when he has no parishioners left to defend him against all of the enemies he has made over the years. If the CofS ceases to operate as a ‘Church’ it is surely time to wind it up and distribute the assets to members.

        • joan nieman

          It reveals the impending evil of the monster, Scientology.

      • kemist

        If they think they can cry “religious freedom” and “bigotry” in France, they are in for a big surprise. The french take secularity (laïcité) much more seriously than americans.

    • Observer

      Like esleaziastical leader, like cherch.

      • Sherbet

        Right-o, Observer. Long past the time that anyone might be interested in finding a kernel of truth in anything they say, the cult yammers on. And on.

        • Observer

          And the amp is turned up to 11.

          • Sherbet

            LOL!

    • Captain Howdy
      • Sherbet

        Yup, like that.

    • mirele

      Go home, Scientology, you’re drunk.

  • aquaclara

    These tax returns are gripping. I am stunned by the amount of money accumulated from the relentless regging,fundraising and “emergency” programs. I hope every whale sees these, and wakes up.

    Yet they won’t stop the harassment of of ex-members are Monique, nor end the lawsuits with Laura. And they won’t pay David Love what he is owed, nor the families who have lost loved ones.

    This money thing will implode at some point. I just hope it’s soon.

    • TheHoleDoesNotExist

      Some of the whales are reported to now be paying the rent on those same buildings, Aqua. You tell me why they are still supporting this scam even after they become aware.

      • joan nieman

        I don’t know why they would just keep on giving. I suppose it is some valiant idea of saving the planet. Utter foolishness and clearly mind control.

        • TheHoleDoesNotExist

          I keep thinking, Surely this year. sheesh.

      • aquaclara

        I wish I knew….then we could get to them. Some of these people have run companies. How do they NOT know at this point?
        There is hope that their kids will see stuff on the internet and speak up.

  • NOLAGirl

    Another great podcast J. Swift. Thanks to you and Chris for shedding more light on the money-grubbing Co$. Looking forward to the next installment.

  • Panopea Abrupta

    Thank you, Jonny.

    Never having read Arnaud Palisson’s refutation of Mme. Gounord’s (French $ciloony and PR hack) pathetic attempt to attack his doctoral thesis on $cientology, I have just had a ton of fun.

    If you read French, this is as good as it gets.

    Here is the $ciloony attempts to attack his thesis, widely distributed to French media:

    http://fr.calameo.com/read/000025404a9f28a4879b4

    Palisson refutes:
    He shreds it.
    His reply drips with venom.

    Unassailable logic, impeccable references and a disdain for the dishonesty and stupidity shown in the $cilon attack on his thesis (as well as an excellent lesson in spelling and grammar for Mme. Gounord), it has it all.

    http://fr.calameo.com/read/000025404181a048cc822

    • kemist

      Dear Bob, she can’t even spell “Wheatstone bridge”.

      I just love how he throws passages of scientology’s own books and definitions right back at her. Delicious. And even better read in the original french.

      • Robert Eckert

        It’s even better in the original Klingon.

  • i-Betty

    The podcast was brilliant once again. There’s something about no moving pictures that allows you to really focus on what it being said. I can’t wait for part 2. Thanks to J Swift and Chris Shelton.

    • Betsy

      These two broadcasts are indeed wonderful! I can’t wait until the next one…J.A. is a great host, and the 2 interviews I’ve heard have been full of information I didn’t have.

  • aquaclara

    So how come the church couldn’t afford to buy their own cross?
    Garcias must be wondering…..

  • Barb Snow

    Scientologists look for monsters under every bed but their own.

    • Captain Howdy

      Scientologists think that monsters are heroes and the heroes are monsters. Like the sheriff said in Night of the Living Dead “They’re all messed up”.

  • Sherbet

    I’ve been wondering about these tax returns — are they typed on an actual typewriter on an actual paper form (vs. computer generated)? That’s what they look like to me. Welcome to the 1950s. Scientology: Always a few decades behind.

    • Captain Howdy

      One of the few things i appreciate about the cult is their retro-ness.

      • Sherbet

        I hope that’s the only thing you appreciate about the cult — its funky throwback charm.

        • Captain Howdy

          Some of the clamettes are pretty saucy.

          • Sherbet

            You are SO SHALLOW, Howdy. Get yourself one of those clamettes…and then run the other way when she opens her mouth and starts preaching lrh-isms.

            • Captain Howdy

              Not to change the the subject but Rita Jeptoo of Kenya just set a new women’s record in the Boston Marathon…and the only thing they’d be preaching after I got hold of them is the Joy of Howdyism. I’ve converted more than a few in my time, lol.

            • Sherbet

              Ha! I’ll bet you could, Captain, I’ll bet you could. I’m one of your acolytes.

              Yay, Rita Jeptoo! I don’t know who she is, but that’s great for her.

  • BosonStark

    You can’t help but love this Palisson guy. I guess with $7 billion, Sciloontology will have a lot of appeals.

  • Captain Howdy

    I remember reading about former Inspector Arnaud Palisson a few years back (probably on Jonny’s blog), and about the cult’s attempts to fair gamed and dead agent him, and i remember thinking that he is one of heroes in this whole sordid affair.

    At the time I imagined he looked like Inspector Lebel from Day of the Jackal. Actually he looks more like a movie star than the movie star.

    http://umontreal.academia.edu/ArnaudPalisson

    • Sherbet

      He certainly has news anchor good looks.

    • aquaclara

      and more here, plus a link to Jonny’s blog account. OCMB has a nice translation of Arnaud’s comments.
      A great read.
      http://ocmb.xenu.net/ocmb/viewtopic.php?f=11&t=53562

    • TheHoleDoesNotExist

      Ooh La La.

  • anti-niblet

    Excellent podcast. Thank you Jeff. It is amazing how the story is repeated by so many who are out. Someone should prepare a brochure, Read this before Joining Scientology, to hand out to people going to sci buildings, with similar testimonials, links to websites such as the bunker, etc. The pervasiveness of the abuse is appalling.

  • Sejanus

    Try as they might with their appeals, there is nothing appealing about this church.
    They just don’t know when to stop talking.

    • TheHoleDoesNotExist

      A sociopath has predictable activity and behavior when told No or stopped from destroying. They will hit back relentlessly. If that avenue finally is exhausted, usually after years depending on resources, they will attack another target that is similar in some ways and start the pattern all over.

  • BosonStark

    The jump in the value of CST could be the money they spent on storing Shelly with extra security.

    • TheHoleDoesNotExist

      And filling up all their holes in their straight up and vertically rising depositions.

    • Mooser

      “She’s considered a religious artifact.”

      She is evidence.

      • BosonStark

        She’s glitchier than an emeter and she works 100% of the time, non-stop.

        In Scientology, asking Shelly’s whereabouts would be like a Mormon asking to see the golden plates. You just don’t do it!

        • Mooser

          Golden plates were stolen after Smith translated them. You know how it is, you leave a set of divine golden plates covered with a new dispensation from God delivered by an angel unattended for one moment, and somebody makes off with them.

          • joan nieman

            Isn’t it a pity? Stolen. And no one has ever found them again.

            • Sherbet

              In the “Indiana Jones” warehouse with the Ark of the Covenant and the Holy Grail.

            • Dr_Orpheus

              Ron’s research notes are probably sitting in that same warehouse.

            • Sherbet

              “research notes” = “stack of Readers Digests”

            • joan nieman

              Ha ha! Well, that is good to know!

          • RMycroft

            I thought they were overdue and had to go back. You don’t want to piss off God’s librarians.

    • Betsy

      Or buying her daily rice and beans.

  • Mark

    The French cops smell a rat… (refresh):

  • TDA1541A
  • Still_On_Your_Side

    Thank you Johnny Jacobs for staying so on top of the litigation in France. The dire situation in France appears to be a perfect gambit for church fundraising, so why aren’t there emergency fundraising appeals? The church turns almost everything else into a fundraising opportunity, why not this? For example, several months ago, Mike Rinder posted an email he had received about a fundraiser claiming they needed money to help further fund an alleged US grant on the use of the Purif in helping the US military deal with PTSD. The email claimed that money was desperately needed to help 70,000 soldiers/vets with airfare, food, lodging and the like so they could participate in the study. (The email was rescinded, and some strange, garbled language used to explain why. In reality, the grantee probably learned the church had done it without his/her knowledge and got justifiably worried because of the fraud involved. Government funded grants are subject to audit. How would they explain fundraising letters discussing airfare and lodging for 70,000 soldiers/vets that don’t exist? )

    Why aren’t parishioners flooded with fundraising letters about the legal fight in France and all other litigation worldwide? I’ve said it before, the Internet, like water, eventually breaks through every barrier. By not alerting members to the legal fights, Miscavige only manages to put off for another day, week or month members learning the truth about the sinking ship.

    Also, thank you Jeff and Chris for another great podcast. Chris, could you explain why you were declared when you moved to Minnesota when you weren’t declared for moving to Sacremento? The way OSA treats members who route out is similar to the way parolees are treated. OSA seems to believe that it has the right to decide what kind of life you will have and where you will have it. The arrogance is overwhelming. The US criminal justice system is given that right by law when it comes to paroled felons, it is outrageous that a church believes it has the same authority and power when it comes to any member or former member of the church.

    • Captain Howdy

      Great comment and really good observation about Tiny Cancer not wanting the bubble boys and girls to know about the fraud conviction in France.

    • TheHoleDoesNotExist

      A possible answer is that the fundraising for the great French suppression has been ground in since at least 1999, possibly earlier. To continue to remind IAS donors how scientology has not stopped the SP’s in their tracks might get the curious to accidentally find out that scientology was found to be the actual SP. and that would be bad.

    • DamOTclese2

      Why aren’t parishioners flooded with fundraising letters about the legal fight in France and all other litigation worldwide?

      Because then their surviving customers — all 20,000 of them world wide — would get to learn that their crime syndicate was criminally convicted of being organized crime, fraud, human rights crimes committers. Far better the crime bosses hope their surviving customers don’t hear a word about it.

  • Anonymous

    Here is an oddity that is actually related to yesterday’s article by Tony that included a bit about the church using the Hubbard’s membership in the Explorers Club as a bizarre fundraising gambit.

    Curiously, when one enters the names of notable current and former members of the Explorers Club into the search field of their website http://www.explorers.org/ numerous links to articles and documents related to those people are provided.

    When one enters Hubbard into that search function, nothing appears. That sees odd. Hubbard and the church make a great deal out of his association with the Explorers Club, yet they make no mention at all of Hubbard when one searches their site for article, documents, links etc.

    • TDA1541A
      • Anonymous

        Yes that certificate, posted on a Scientology website, looks very authentic.

        Note the date it was created – the nineteenth day of February 19th.

        That seems legit, doesn’t it?

        I’m sure the Explorers Club would be interested in the provenance of that particular document.

        Heh.

        • Once_Born

          I once came across a bloke on eBay, who was selling certificates of membership of the SAS (supposedly for soldiers who had lost theirs). Just email your details, and your new certificate would be in the post the next day.

          The best bit, is that they were available in frames, to hang on the wall, for an extra charge (which the vendor promised would impress the ladies). Not the kind of thing that a member of a famously secretive elite regiment might be expected to need.

          If Ron was around today, he would definitely have bought one.

          • Anonymous

            Its the sort of thing that can be produced (counterfeited) in less than 5 minutes on virtually any computer on earth.

            It’s an embarrassingly poor piece of work.

            • Truthiwant

              I agree. It looks fake.
              It doesn’t actually have a date. It just says 19
              However it would have been from the 1940’s. I’m not an expert on handwriting, but those two signatures don’t look like they have the ‘style’ of how people wrote back then. Also, there is something about the printed lettering that looks modern.

            • Anonymous

              It’s the sort of flimflam nonsense for which the church is infamous.

              Phony certificates, fake diplomas, photoshopped event attendees, stolen letterhead stationary…it’s all of a package.

              And that package is labeled FRAUD INSIDE.

            • TDA1541A
            • BosonStark

              “…eradicating mildew with infrared light.” Dr. Hubtard had the wrong end of the spectrum. It’s ultraviolet light which kills mold and mildew.

              Who could forget Dr Hubtard’s immortal ass-backwards life-force “research,” to provide food for the entire planet. Crazy clams.

            • DamOTclese2

              The insane criminal claimed to reporters that he did not eat tomatoes because he heard them scream — and yet the insane fuck was often seen eating them with one of his wives, Mary Sue, on board the converted cattle ship.

            • Betsy

              Retch. Maybe it’s good Elron was wearing gloves for this one. Even tomatoes have their limits.

            • Anonymous

              Right.

              Dr. Hubbard was a scientist of the first order.

              His work is widely acknowledged at all of the great institutions of higher learning.

              Heh.

            • RMycroft

              It’s not a lie, it’s a reenactment.

            • TDA1541A

              “Reenactment=Dramatization

              -TDA

            • Betsy

              “I’m not a doctor, although I play one on TV, and I urge you to try these healthful cigarettes.”

            • Betsy

              Thanks for pointing that out. I hadn’t noticed that “19..” was left strangely incomplete.

          • TDA1541A
            • Betsy

              I’m dubious because a real birth certificate would note that he was able to read and speak 5 languages at birth, and also that he was already 4 quadrillion years old and had been the buddha and Cecil Rhodes.

            • TDA1541A

              lol

          • Mighty Korgo of Teegeeack

            Hubbard would be selling them.

        • TDA1541A
          • TDA1541A
            • Once_Born

              Which is a low resolution scanned image of Ron’s purported glider log.

              These days, he would not have had enough flights to qualify to go ‘solo’ (less than 20) and comments include “Sought assistance” and “Crashed”.

              Some adventurer. I hope the club was insured.

            • TheHoleDoesNotExist

              Would you ride shotgun with this 20 year old in a soaring glider? Already looks disturbed. And angry. Very angry.

              http://i.imgur.com/uKjMeT7.jpg

            • TDA1541A

              Tommy Davis is his son out of wedlock ?

            • TheHoleDoesNotExist

              hahahahahaha. Ewwww. Okay, are those snake eyes are are those snake eyes?

            • TDA1541A

              He looks like a teen who’s mother took his X-box away

            • Phil McKraken

              Yeah, I too have a feeling that Mrs. Hubbard didn’t care so much for this particular duckling, which explains his disturbing obsession with her attempts to abort him.

              Should he have sought psychiatric care? A talking cure? Nah. It’s kind of like Tony Soprano and Dr. Melfi. It’s a sociopath using his therapy to better understand how to perpetrate his destructive behavior and manipulate everyone in his life without having panic attacks. Hubbard was dangerous enough already. Tell me about your mother. Did she try to abort you repeatedly throughout millions of lifetimes?

            • Betsy

              Not to mention related to Donald Duck.

            • Missionary Kid

              The standards for glider pilots were completely different in 1932.

              Most gliders at that time were very simple craft, and the only way that they could be flown is solo, because they couldn’t hold two people.

              It’s too bad that a friend of mine who solo’d in a glider in 1930 recently passed away. He could tell me more about what the procedures were.

            • Betsy

              According to Russell Miller he conveniently left off the glider part in later revelations and claimed on occasion to have been a full pilot.

        • Betsy

          The Explorers’ Club is not the only entity that would like to know the provenance. I think it is clear that the Bunker would like to know also.

          Given how many other “documents” Elron created or had created to document his fictional life, it would be no surprise to find out that this one is a total shuck.

          From postings here I gather that the Explorers’ Club is…well, not at its peak, to put it kindly. I wish there were someone in charge there who was lively enough to want to debunk this, but possibly there is not.

          • Anonymous

            I think it’s reasonable to assume that Hubbard actually was a minor member of the Explorers Club.

            Hubbard’s nearly invisible membership in that esteemed organization is the subject of a chapter of a book I’m writing called “Who Cares?”

            • Betsy

              SKREEM! What a great idea for a book…if it’s real, I want a copy. Of course, with that title, it could well extend into the multi-volumes, like an encyclopedia.

            • Anonymous

              ” I’m writing a book…called “Who Cares? ” is an old joke, but I thought it was appropriate here.

              A ex-navy pilot friend of mine used to say it often when telling a story about something he found distasteful.

            • Betsy

              Well, I still want a copy!

            • Anonymous

              He he he…if it gets written, you are on!

        • Douglas D. Douglas

          Like it or not, L. Ron Hubbard was made a member of the Explorer’s Club in February of 1940. They maintain a file on member Hubbard, and his “dispatches” are peppered throughout their documents and journals during the time of his membership.

          Interestingly, the dispatches that LRH sent to the EC over the years do NOT match up to the “official” (ie: sanitized) biography that the CoS currently maintains for Dear Founder. It does, however, confirm (in detail) the charges that most critics level about his phonied-up life story.

          • Anonymous

            I never said (or thought) that Hubbard was NOT a member of the Explorers Club. Not sure why you implied such above. Read the posts again.

            Like it or not.

            • Douglas D. Douglas

              The whole tone of this exchange was of disbelief. Not saying each person participating was saying it was a lie.

            • Anonymous

              That sad little “certificate” that the church has posted “proving” Hubbard was a member of the Explorers Club is so pathetic that it almost has me feeling pity for them. Somewhere is a semi-literate person who created that fake piece of nonsense and they probably believe they helping to “salvage this sector of the galaxy” by doing so.

              To the rest of the roughly 7 billion people on planet earth that fake certificate is just more evidence that the church has virtually nothing genuine to offer.

            • Douglas D. Douglas

              And I have no reason to believe that the certificate is fake. I haven’t been able to find an image of a typical Explorer’s Club membership certificate from 1940. But this looks like something that they would issue.

              Besides, it doesn’t really matter whether or not it is fake– he was a member. That is a fact of history. How he became a member and what it means is open to interpretation.

            • Anonymous

              You are missing the point entirely.

              It is not in question as to whether Hubbard was a Explorers Club member – its clear that he was and it was never stated (at least by me) that he wasn’t.

              The post I made that started this thread questioned why Hubbard and the church made / make such a big deal about Hubbard’s club membership, while the club does not mention Hubbard at all on their site.

              That’s the oddity. One can read all sorts of things into that reality, as many did in the ensuing thread.

              Creating fake credentials, certificates, news items, shore stories, scandals and rumors is part and parcel of the history of Scientology. There are policies on how to do these dishonest things and people who have trained on those policies.

              Honest people / organizations do not fake credentials, certificates, news items, shore stories, scandals and rumors.

              The long history of fake “proofs” that the church has produced to try and somehow back-up Hubbard’s many, many provable lies about his accomplishments and activities are sufficient evidence to create questions about other “documents,” especially when those documents, reputably from trusted organizations, have gross typographical errors and / or omissions.

              With an in depth understanding of how the Scientology PR machine operates, based on the still in use policies of Hubbard, comparing the “documents” presented by the church about Hubbard’s Explorers Club membership and the actions of the obvious shills presenting him post-humus “awards” from Potemkin organizations at fake Explores Club events, I called bullshit, and I still do.

              What is true for you is subjective, as it is ultimately for everyone, however the evidence indicates that the church is greatly exaggerating Hubbard’s status with the Explorers Club.

              It is clear that they are trying to position Hubbard (who has a horrible reputation) alongside the Explorers Club (which has a good reputation) hoping that some folks will be duped and will continue to either support the church or at least ignore the well documented false claims made by Hubbard throughout his entire life.

              That is what Scientology PR is supposed to do, per the written policies. If one is trained in it, it is plainly visible.

            • John P.

              Fortunately, it is exponentially more difficult to insert fake documents into “files” with the dawn of a) electronic document management, b) computer security on document management systems that documents user ID, location, time and other parameters for every document added to a system, c) ability to audit back against physical access logs to buildings, etc. to find out who was in the building when a given record was added to a given system. Gone are the days, for the most part, when a low-level file clerk or secretary can sneak stuff into an unlocked filing cabinet and have the contents accepted as truth just because they’re in the physical files.

            • Anonymous

              Agree that electronic document tracking does increase file security (most of the time.) That technology of course was either non-existent or in its absolute infancy during Hubbard’s lifetime when he was deliberately salting the files of the Explorers Club with a bogus paper trail “documenting” his exploits.

              Creating fake documents does not only include wholesale counterfeiting.

              It also includes putting deliberately false information in an otherwise benign document that will be accepted because of its seemingly banal nature.

              Years later, that planted false information can be “discovered” and the otherwise benign document hauled out as “proof” of some complete fiction that has now been artfully archived in the bowels of a respected organization.

              This is ancient “tech.”

              It is important to remember that Hubbard was a cable traffic router in WWII. This role placed him into a quasi-intelligence bureaucracy and given his proclivity for plagiarism, it is pretty clear that a great deal of the work of the old Guardian’s Office and now OSA, is based on military intelligence techniques.

              Deception, misdirection and false fronts are the foundation of Scientology PR.

              Bogus celebratory events where silly post-humus “awards” are given by the head of a Potemkin organization (see the above thread) as a photo-op, are all part of the Scientology PR operation. That PR operation is now run almost entirely for the “benefit” of the few remaining active Scientologists, but the fake PR is also used by the well paid horde of enabling professionals (lawyers, PI’s, press shills, etc.) that try to deflect the growing tide of civil and criminal justice actions that are close to swamping the church.

              It is a small circle of folks convincing each other that the lies they were told and accepted are still true. They still tell those lies to each other and make up new ones to cover the holes in the old lies where otherwise the truth might seep in.

              It’s a leaky boat, but the patching of the holes is done cleverly and needs to be pointed out.

            • Douglas D. Douglas

              The only thing we have seen from the EC is a certificate, which I see no reason to doubt is authentic. The plaque is NOT from the EC. It was created (obviously) by Scientology to commemorate the very real fact that Hubbard carried the EC flag on one of his early trips. That entire episode is laid out in detail in Bare Faced Messiah.

              We understand each other. You believe the Explorer’s Club archive has been salted with false documents. I believe the archive is a collection of contemporaneous material. The veracity of these items is a matter of dispute (as is anything written by LRH). But the point is that whether true or false in all details, these contemporaneous documents stand in stark contrast to what LRH and the church later claimed in his biography.

            • Anonymous

              “But the point is that whether true or false in all details, these contemporaneous documents stand in stark contrast to what LRH and the church later claimed in his biography.”

              Agree with you on the point quoted above.

              We have NOT however, seen a certificate from the Explorers Club.

              We have seen a JPEG of a piece of paper with some lettering on it, posted on a Scientology controlled website. Those are two very different things.

              That JPEG of a lettered piece of paper that looks like it might be a certificate was put on that church website for a reason.

              Uncritical acceptance of appearances is EXACTLY what the church hopes will occur by the general public when they manufacture fictional documents and information. This is a foundational aspect of the PR training that folks in OSA (and formerly the Guardian’s Office) go through when they study Hubbard’s PR policies.

              Reversely, when a OSA staffer is being debriefed following a mission, they are NOT ALLOWED to render opinions about what they saw or heard. They are required to reports EXACTLY what was seen or heard, without addition, opinions, evaluation or speculation. NO inferences at all.

              There is a huge gulf between us in the understanding of how the church deliberately manipulates appearances.

              The reason for my overly long posts on this thread is to provide a brief education on how the church PR machine operates to create fictional appearances that serve its malevolent purposes.

              That information may be useful to some who think they may have something to learn.

      • And I don’t rent cars!

        Is this another fine example of their forgeries as there is no year on that certificate? Marc Headley has told us that Gold Base has several excellent forgers on staff.

        • John P.

          In the old days, forgers were highly skilled at art, engraving, printing, photography and all sorts of other stuff. Nowadays, forgers are usually 8th graders who know how to use Photoshop.

      • Qbird

        I bet you dollars to doughnuts – FAKE!
        LRH fake crap par usual.
        That’s just Great.
        Something else stupid and meaningless to dust.
        Brought to you from Scn. Inc.

        • TDA1541A
          • Qbird

            Liars! Stolen symbols!! Bloviating Braggarts!!!

            • TDA1541A
            • Qbird

              AAAAAaaaaaaaaaaaaaaagh! spittin’ mad – this is the FAILED sea voyage he went on with his 1st wife up to Alaska – captain dumbass was shore bound for most ALL of the {{{expedition}}} with a busted up dinky vessel. It was also the last time they as a couple did anything together – POS crap leader LRH was.

              ETA: on his 1st expedition, the whole crew hung him in effigy from the yardarms! He was that crappy of a “leader”.

            • TDA1541A

              Do you know real explorer club members? didn’t an explorers flag go up to the moon too ?

            • Qbird

              I do not. But I’ve known many a captain at sea. The captain’s responsibility is to keep the boat & the crew safe while accomplishing the mission (whatever that is) – Hubbturd was a shitty captain. period. My feeling is that The Explorers Club is just some exclusive bullshit club – “an international multidisciplinary professional society” i.e. a place where rich men go to lie & cry and get drunk while telling each other stories of their adventurin’.

              One of those flags should have gone to the moon – again, I do not know.

            • TDA1541A

              thanks

            • Betsy

              There is actually an old Explorers’ Club member across the street from me, but he is such a ranting right-wing son-of-a-bitch that I would rather eat my own foot than talk to him about it. He plays Rush Limbaugh at the highest possible volume when he comes home in his “Explorer Model” Jeep.

            • TDA1541A

              thank you

            • Betsy

              And on the “Alaska Exploration” he ended up getting a loan from an Alaskan bank that he never paid (and was quite testy about when they tried during the years to recover the amount.)

            • Qbird

              Yeah. Betsy, a person is only as good as their word. Hubbard was a bum; he used & abused every person he ever got close to. This is true.

            • John P.

              If you check out the Explorers Club’s own page about rules of the flag, it should surprise no one that the cult is in violation. Note Rule 6 on this page: http://www.explorers.org/index.php/about/club_flag_and_club_properties

              Section 6. The use of Club name, logo, stationery or publications for commercial or internal political purposes is a violation of Club Bylaws and subject to appropriate disciplinary action in accordance with Article XIV, Discipline.

              Ahem. What could the cult possibly be doing with the Explorer’s Club logo other than using it for commercial purposes if they are displaying it with the intent of using it to get you to donate to them?

            • Anonymous

              Scientology’s multiple decades of over-the-top exploitation of Hubbard’s minor affiliation with the Explorers Club via constant trumpeting of his membership is one logical explanation for why the club itself makes no mention of Hubbard on it’s own site.

          • Betsy

            Oh, Jeez. I wish one of the remaining Explorers’ Club members would get some help to get out of his big easy chair and hobble over to the telephone to raise a protest.

      • Qbird

        I bet you dollars to doughnuts – FAKE!
        LRH fake crap par usual.
        That’s just Great.
        Something else stupid and meaningless to dust.
        Brought to you from Scn. Inc.

      • A. D.

        Nice try, but it lacks the professionalism (and the red seal of truth) of this wonderful exemplar:

    • Betsy

      Whoa! This is VERY interesting! Thanks, Anon.

    • Zer0

      Yeah, you’d think there would be at least ONE mention of Hubbard in the Explorer’s Club database.

      One thing we know is the Hubbard used the Explorer’s Club in NYC as his mailing address for people trying to collect debts from him, like the US Navy.

      • Anonymous

        Smoke, mirrors and fancy letterhead stationary.

        That is Scientology in a nutshell.

    • aegerprimo

      I remember reading in one or all of the various biographies of LRH, “Bare-Faced Messiah”, or “Messiah or Madman” or “A Piece of Blue Sky” or all of them – that his expeditions to Central America and Alaska were flops, that he had to BEG the Explorer’s Club for membership and to fly it’s flag, and lied/elaborated about the contributions and value of his expeditions.

      It would not surprise me if the Explorer’s Club “fundraising dinner” scenario was as you suggest, Anonymous – “…an undercurrent of the Ocean FM fiasco…”

      • DamOTclese2

        Bare-Faced Messiah, Russel Miller notes that the Club did not bother to check to see that Hubbard lied about everything, absolutely everything.

      • Anonymous

        If the Explorers Club were proud of Hubbard’s membership, it seems likely that there would be some evidence of his accomplishments and contributions SOMEWHERE on the club’s site.

        But there isn’t.

        • Douglas D. Douglas

          It is odd that there is no mention of LRH on their web site. They maintain a file on his activities as a member. read all about it here:

          http://www.newsweek.com/exclusive-new-texts-scientologys-l-ron-hubbard-63163

          • Anonymous

            Had seen that article some time ago.

            It provides a back storyline that would be typical of Hubbard…he or his minions salted the files of the Explorers Club with stuff that was later “discovered” but which somehow just doesn’t line up with other docs.

            Hubbard (and his alter ego Scientology) operate on the principle that if you lie and deceive in a manner that is overly audacious, many people will not challenge your lies as they almost never encounter anyone that dishonest thus they are not expecting deception at every turn.

            • Douglas D. Douglas

              Actually, the file on Hubbard has not been questioned by anyone– even his critics. His supporters’ official position is that Hubbard was working as some sort of “spy,” and therefore was sending cover stories to the Explorer’s Club. The problem, of course, is that the so-called “cover story” aligns with all other known facts and history. The biography that Scientology promotes, on the other hand, falls apart at every turn.

            • Anonymous

              “Actually, the file on Hubbard has not been questioned by anyone-”

              I’m confused by this statement.

              Virtually the entire referenced Newsweek article is a compendium of contradictions between the records in the Explorers Club files and documents / reports from others about the same events which are contradictory to Hubbard’s self-serving nonsense.

              The Newsweek article highlights a life-long pattern of Hubbard’s: when talking about himself, the simple truth was never good enough. He always had to embellish events to make himself sound spectacular.

              The folks I’ve known in life who do this are insufferable and to be avoided. As is Scientology, which epitomizes this trait of lily-gilding to a degree that makes the entire subject as repulsive as it’s “Source.”

            • Douglas D. Douglas

              I am saying, simply, that the Explorer’s Club file, which contradicts the later embellishments in the life of L. Ron Hubbard, has not been questioned as an authentic collection of contemporaneous material about the life of L. Ron Hubbard. There are some here who are suggesting that Hubbard or others went so far as to plant phony material in the file. That makes no sense, as they would have placed material that supported the fanciful biography that is now promoted by the CoS, rather than the matter-of-fact stuff that is there, which supports the true historical record.

            • Anonymous

              History is made one event at a time.

              Habitual liars do not know what the future may bring, thus lies told one year have a habit of becoming inconvenient in the next.

              It is only when all the events of a lifetime are available for backwards inspection that the contradictions in the lies become unavoidably clear.

              Scientology PR policies COMMAND that fake documents be created and planted in the files of legitimate organizations. The burglurizing of the U.S. government in the 70’s was done not just to TAKE documents, but also to PLANT them.

              Making / planting / distributing fake documents (as well as creating false shore stories to spread useful rumors) is what has enabled Scientology to bilk the public of billions of dollars over the course of it’s 60+ year history. It is still happening today, however the bulk of the planet’s population is now on to the various scams.

              Hubbard’s membership in the Explorers Club has been exploited by the church for decades in an attempt to burnish Hubbard’s horrible reputation by associating him with a reputable organization. That exploitation is still happening today.

              Noting and exposing the PR mechanisms behind this exploitation is an important task (among many) to reduce the ability of the church to continue to bilk an otherwise uninformed public of dollars and support for an organization that has a sinister history and malevolent intent on the future.

            • Douglas D. Douglas

              I am baffled by this whole exchange.

              Hubbard was a member of the Explorer’s Club. They allowed him to carry their flag. He sent them a number of dispatches over the years. These are indisputable facts.

              Whether Hubbard was burnishing the truth in the things he sent is, as always, a distinct possibility. Reading this material makes it clear he had done so.

              But there is no evidence that any material was planted/added/salted into the archive of the Explorer’s Club. The whole tenor of the archive tends to support Hubbard’s actual life, as opposed to the fanciful version that is being promoted by the Church of Scientology.

            • Anonymous

              Don’t be baffled.

              Consider for a moment the remote possibility that there is something to learn that may not fit into the framework of what you currently believe to be true.

            • Douglas D. Douglas

              Noted.

    • DamOTclese2

      The club did in fact grant Hubbard membership, not botering to check to see if any of the frauds and lies that Hubbard spewed were actually true. As Russel Miller pointed out in Bare-Faced Messiah the club never bothered to check to see if Hubbard was a liar.

    • Observer

      I started looking around for copies of Explorers Club membership certificates to see what one of that era would have looked like, and stumbled across this. Every time I hear this kind of fulsome praise of ol’ Ronnie I don’t know whether to laugh, gag or cry.

      Also, this Don Hartsell character makes me suspicious. “World Air League” sounds like something Ron would have come up with–grandiose but meaningess. Can’t find anything on course completions on truthaboutscientology.com for him though.

      http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=6Rp481xX2Rw

      • Betsy

        You’re absolutely right…”World Air League” does indeed sound like an Elron production…much like the “Scottish Highlands Quietude Club” or whatever they called Int when they bought it.

      • Anonymous

        A quick web search failed to locate anything substantial about the “World Air League.”

        There is a miniscule (one page) LinkedIn presence and 2 (that’s right TWO) “likes” on the World Air League Facebook page. There is also a shoddy press release attempting to link the “World Air League” somehow to UNESCO.

        If I had to guess, I’d say the World Air league is a Potemkin organization, created by a Scientology operative, to burnish Hubbard’s reputation with a contrived award from a phony group which appears to operate out of a P.O. box in Houston, TX (which by the way, is the city where Don Hartsell lives.)

        All of the above “documents” about the World Air League have the collective appearance of something put together by someone sitting around in their underwear in their mother’s basement and thrown up on the web one rainy afternoon.

        There is no evidence anywhere that the “event” celebrating Hubbard’s 70th anniversary as an Explorer Club member was anything other than a rented room at the club with some folks invited by Galaxy Press to fawn over Hubbard’s fiction works. It does not appear to be an actual Explorers Club event at all.

        Why is none of this surprising?

        • Qbird

          Ha!!! tks Anonymous.

        • Lurkness

          The award plaque said worldskyrace.com. There is more information here including about Don and WAL: http://www.worldskyrace.com/advisory_council.htm

          • Anonymous

            The plaque in the video is clearly inscribed at the bottom as from The World Air League. Don Hartsell is described by the videos announcer as the Commissioner and Managing Director at World Air League. Hubbard is given “recognition” on the plaque as “Explorer Patron” of the World Sky Race.

            The World Sky Race is apparently the main “activity” that can be attributed to the Potemkin organization known as the World Air League. That “activity” appears to center around issuing embarrassingly poor paid press releases and attempting to create the appearance of endorsements by prominent individuals and organizations.

            Here is what the website says about this “event” :

            “The World Sky Race® will be the largest man-made event seen by live spectators in the history of the human race.”

            Their website has CGI videos of flyovers of the Statute of Liberty by a blimp with the Photoshopped logo of the World Sky Race prominently displayed.

            Now where have we seen this sort of hyperbole before?

            Here’s a little more from the website:

            “Economic Development – Globally
            – This is a BIG PROJECT. It will created advanced aviation jobs for
            early adapters. For nations that are natural gas producers, it will add
            value to exports by extracting, not wasting, the Helium contained in
            natural gas. It will eliminate supply isolation for communities around
            the world, reducing the shipping costs and improving year round
            accessibility. It will allow governments around the world to
            re-evaluate infrastructure requirements by enabling faster, cost
            effective, environmentally sustainable commerce.”

            That all sounds legit, right?

            Sort of like the Super Power building will be the catalyst for clearing the planet!

            The entire thing has all the earmarks of a OSA-style PR operation.

            I’m not saying it IS an OSA op, but it has the odor and appearance of simplistic, overblown elements that a group of amatuers would produce if they were following Hubbard’s PR policy letters.

            The op is designed for internal consumption by still-in Scientologists and cannot withstand even cursory inspection by non Kool-Aid drinking outsiders.

        • Robert Eckert

          Houston, Texas? I thought there was no connection whatsoever.

      • Lurkness

        More on Don and WAL:

        Don R. Hartsell, World Air League (WAL) Commissioner and Managing
        Director
        Chairman and CEO Solex Environmental Systems, Former CEO Solex
        Robotics Systems
        Member of the Explorers Club

        http://www.worldskyrace.com/advisory_council.htm

      • TDA1541A

        Selling hot air as usual or “a piece of blue sky”

    • Douglas D. Douglas

      LRH was a member. But he could nat have sat at the “exact” table in the location described. The Explorer’s Club moved into the building they currently occupy in 1965, years after LRH wrote Terra Incognita. Unless, of course, they simply identified the table and then moved it along to the new location. No need to let the facts get in the way of a good story. (LRH certainly knew that!)

      • Anonymous

        I do not doubt that Hubbard was an Explorers Club member. But like most other things, he had to gild the lily and make it seems like he was one of the luminaries of the organization.

        Apparently the club does not think he was that important as there is no mention of Hubbard, Dianetics, Scientology or the Terra Incognito article in the searchable portions of their public website.

    • JonHenke

      I’m late in seeing this, but the Explorer’s Club notes L Ron Hubbard’s membership in a couple places on its website.

      http://www.explorers.org/index.php/campaigns/legacy/legacy_society

      THE LEGACY SOCIETY
      * denotes member is deceased

      L. Ron Hubbard*

      http://backup.explorers.org/res_col/collections/deceased.pdf

      Deceased Members of The Explorers Club, 1904 to 23 May 2007
      ….
      Hubbard Lafayette Ron 1911 1986

      • Anonymous

        Good catch…thanks for finding these.

        It remains a mystery as to why these two mentions of Hubbard on the Explorers Club website are not indexed in that sites search function.

        Nor are there any indexed references to the many, many stories told by Hubbard throughout his voluminous Scientology writings regarding his exploits as a club member.

        Maybe the club is embarrassed that he was ever allowed a membership?

        • JonHenke

          I’m sure they are not exactly thrilled at his membership, but I would guess the lack of indexing is more about a poor database search function rather than intentional exclusion. I searched for a couple other deceased members and got “Your search did not return any results” for each of them.

          • Anonymous

            Understood.

            Again, the oddity is that there is NO indexed information at all about Hubbard on the Explorers Club site.

            But there are mountains of references by Hubbard about his membership in his Scientology writings.

            It appears to be an asymmetrical relationship with Hubbard (and his alter ego, Scientology) hoping to gain credibility by virtue of his membership in a well know organization.

            Reversely, the Explorers Club apparently does not want to make much of Hubbard’s membership as doing so carries a negative connotation.

            • JonHenke

              They are probably just eagerly awaiting Hubbard’s report from the next level of OT research he’s busy doing in his current exterior state.

            • Anonymous

              I wonder if he’s carrying the Explorers Club flag on Target 2?

  • The French branch of the criminal organisation known as the “church” of $cientology knows all about privacy. One of the various heads of OSA had their name removed from a court document published on-line on the grounds of privacy. So, a critic was convicted of breaching the privacy of an OSA person who had been found guilty in the first instance (acquitted in the second instance because the main prosecution witness, a former OSA “volunteer,” had killed himself).
    Remains to be seen for how long this organisation can continue to take advantage of the due process of law. Maybe there’s some “vexatious litigant” status they could be heading for. They have basically made it clear that they do not consider that the law applies to them. I wonder how long it will take before the law decides it’s not up to the criminal organisation to make that decision…

  • Panopea Abrupta

    Red-X Red-X Red-X

    $cientology Tax Returns: CST Book Value : $447,192,921
    CST Real Value: $ 0

    Go get those worthless lying ads.

    https://whyweprotest.net/community/threads/taking-down-co-on-craigslist-co-ads-on-craigslist.113779/page-75#post-2447448
    ty Mark

    • aquaclara

      X’d lots of ads this morning….let’s make them go away!

    • aegerprimo

      DONE! The Tampa ads that promote no license needed to help ill or injured people makes me sick.

  • And I don’t rent cars!

    ….

  • Greetings from France.

    Here are a couple of old videos for your enjoyment.

    • aquaclara

      Roger is excellent at explaining this stuff. Loved how the audience is listening closely – that’s more people hearing this crap firsthand.
      Excellent. Thanks for sharing. Anyone know if Roger is still an active critic?

  • And I don’t rent cars!

    This is the image used in Arnaud Palisson’s blog to illustrate his opinion of these cases in front of France’s justice system (Dec 2013). Just by skimming through, it reminds of Mike Rinder’s blog and sense of humor.

    • Captain Howdy

      We need an “Arnaud Palisson” in the FBI. Actually, we had one as it pertained to a certain other cult, but he was too “flashy” and “noisy” for the the powers that be and we all know how that ended

      .http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/John_P._O%27Neill

      • And I don’t rent cars!

        Thanks. I had never heard of him since I haven’t read Lawrence Wright’s book, “The Looming Tower.”

        How tragic that O’Neill starting working at the World Trade Center on Aug. 2001 and died on 9/11.

        This quote is especially poignant, “In late August, [O’Neill] talked to his friend Chris Isham about the job. Jokingly, Isham said, “At least they’re not going to bomb it again,” a reference to the 1993 World Trade Center bombing. O’Neill replied, “They’ll probably try to finish the job.”

        A moment of silence.

        • Captain Howdy

          There’s a PBS documentary about John P. O’Neill. After i watched it, my mind became undone for a moment. It definitely relates to this ongoing nightmare in some capacity.

  • joan nieman

    Thank you Chris and Jeffery for a most informative and interesting interview. A good ” go with” my coffee this morning.

    Always a pleasure to hear from Jonny with the latest developments in France. Thank you .

  • ShoopZ

    Two Tweets to the Twit (refresh)

  • And I don’t rent cars!

    .

  • And I don’t rent cars!

    Take #2 – New uses for scientology’s triangles (ARC, KRC, etc.)

  • TheHoleDoesNotExist

    Whew. Finally listening to the Shelton/Augustine interview. I have two questions for Chris. Did you say that Sea Org members are now told that none of their family members, no matter who, no matter what generation, will be barred from scientology forever? What about existing scientologists who are on staff or are paying public?
    Okay, three Q’s. Have you seen and examined your social security history from the government yet?

    It would be interesting to find out if there are inaccuracies and when I say inaccuracies, I mean big fat frauds. I’m looking at mine right now. Three years I have 0 showing for income. Then there is one low figure but even that is more than received. Then there are several whoppers. I do remember that at least one year there was commotion and fear among us in the SO that we might actually have a tax liability! This is because our income was so inflated. Only found out after the fact that line items like room and board were Added to our gross income earnings. Never did find out what that was really all about, but I didn’t owe any taxes at least. But still, it was a real kick in the head to hear that we were being Charged for our pigsties and slop and at prices that did not reflect the shit we slept in or ate.

    My social security history during my SO years is a wild and crazy fluctuation. But not a single year shows anything close to what I actually received. Oh, and why are you having taxes taken out of your $50 or less? Your gross income is far below the max level where you won’t owe any taxes, so why are they taken out?

    And by the way, you stated that food and uniform allocations were often not paid because there wasn’t enough money. The truth is that the finances are rigged so that destructive percentages, like 70 to 85%, are taken off the top of Gross income and shot up lines and guess what. For every link on the food chain above your org level, they all have to get Their $ stats up each week or else. So it is rigged to keep staff poor, nutritionally starved, sleep deprived, and sparse to keep them under tight control. Hey wait, I never got my $500. How much compounded interest would that be over 20 years? 🙂

    Which leads me right back to the beginning subject of a creator or god in the sea org. Would love to see that doc, btw, Jeff. The introductory levels ambiguously state scientology accepts all religions, beliefs and gods. It doesn’t take long that you are drilled on the concept of god as Hubbard’s 8th dynamic, which is infinity. As you approach the OT levels, you are indoctrinated to believe that You are infinity with infinite, godlike powers. It is those pesky BT’s and SP’s are keeping you from being all that you can be. Nancy Cartwright really stuck her foot in her mouth when she accidentally answered truthfully when asked about god in scientology. Wonder how much That slip cost her?

    • And I don’t rent cars!

      I think the Social Security issue you bring up is VERY important. I urge everyone to get, or look up, their Earnings Report. Last I knew, fraud through incorrect S.S. filings and withholding at sources is taken very seriously by the federal government. I know of small employers getting away with a reprimand and a fine, but a large organization like Flag (I’m assuming that’s who issues Sea Org statements or makes the withholdings) would have a decades long opportunity to commit large scale fraud and, I would think, this would be of interest to the Social Security Administration – especially since it too is broke, we are told. Just saying.

      • aquaclara

        And given the excellent sleuthing from commenters, if we could amass a collection of these, perhaps it is possible for people to note what’s on there, and what’s missing. Hmmmm.
        Here’s the link.
        http://www.socialsecurity.gov/

  • Jgg2012

    Can you imagine the Narconon plaintiffs (or Laura D., or Mosey) winning and getting punitive damages? Punitive damages are based on wealth of the defendant. Imagine the punitive damages against a defendant worth $1.5 Billion.

    • NOLAGirl

      “We can’t afford that large of a settlement/refund your Honor”

      “Here’s a video showing our oh-so-busy Pope opening billions of dollars of buildings, he’s WAY TOO busy to give a deposition.”

      Good luck with all that Co$

    • aquaclara

      reaaalllly????
      This makes me oh so happy.

      • Jgg2012

        Aquaclara, Co$ is the ideal defendant (for any plaintiff lawyers out there). They are rich; have locatable assets, most of them in the USA; they have no scientific evidence backing them up; they have had lots of bad publicity; they have a bad public image; and they have taken contradictory positions in court on almost everything (I could list a dozen of them easily).

        • Panopea Abrupta

          They practise insurance fraud (via Narconon)
          Credit-card fraud has been rampant.
          They practice medicine without a license – e.g. the Purif.
          They make all kinds of unfounded and fraudulent claims for their Bridge.
          They are almost certainly guilty of inurement.
          Their unspeakable fair game shenanigans and their outrageous civil-liberties and civil-rights violations.

          Ugh, just ugh.

          • NOLAGirl

            Has anyone ever sued them over what they promise and don’t deliver? There would be lulz a plenty seeing them have to come to court and defend OT levels.

            • Jgg2012

              Several suits are pending now vs. Narconon. That reminds me–are Chris Shelton and Jillian Schlesinger thinking of suing Scientology? Some of their potential claims have a one year Statute of Limitations.

            • aegerprimo

              I’m sure they don’t have the $ to hire a lawyer. Since it is known that very few lawyers will take cases dealing with the Co$, there are probably no lawyers out there that would take pro bono cases against the Co$. Just my thoughts.

            • Jimmy3

              I’m sure Hambo would, but he is rather busy at the moment suing the hell out of Narconon and saving poor children from burning buildings and what not.

            • aegerprimo

              The world needs more Hambos.

            • Jimmy3

              That it does.

    • aquaclara

      reaaalllly????
      This makes me oh so happy.

  • TheHoleDoesNotExist

    I wonder if JohnP knows he urgently needs to get on the Purif? Stumbled on this from my daily Black Rob fix:

    https://whyweprotest.net/community/threads/i-have-a-thetan-who-does-things-to-my-mirror-and-its-annoying-what-should-i-do.105033/page-106#post-2447417

    • Sherbet

      Wow. It’s a wonder Black Rob can keep his sanity while reposting that gibberish.

    • Jimmy3

      “Everything about this program felt standard.” What a very Scientological thing to say.

    • John P.

      Thanks for the heads-up. That guy didn’t really ever work at Wall Street, even though he claims to have spent 8 years in the business. He says, “before doing this program, I hadn’t had more than 6 hours of sleep in 10 years. Last night, I had over 8! Before doing this program, I suffered from headaches so bad I was popping 8-12 pills a day just to cope.”

      That testimony marks him as a lightweight. If you sleep 8 hours a night, you won’t have enough time to do all the stuff you’re supposed to do. I rarely get more than 5 hours a night, because I have to be in the turret at 5:30 to do all the morning calls with Europe before we get to our own morning meeting. Then, as the day is winding down, I have to attend to the Asian market open before I can catch a quick bite with Supermodel #1 and then do a couple hours of reading before crashing at midnight or 1am.

      And as far as only taking 8-12 pills a day to cope, we have techs in the copy center at Global Capitalism HQ who need to do more pills than that to cope with the stress of their job. And I promise you they’re not taking Tylenol. So I call bullshit on this guy.

      And if he still worked on Wall Street, I guarantee he would never be able to find 5-6 hours a day to sit in a Sauna and cook his brain cells, because he’d be fired by then for not showing up. As Little Orphan Annie famously put it, “it’s a hard knock life for us.”

      • TheHoleDoesNotExist

        He probably was the janitor of wall street then!

        • aegerprimo

          Ha ha! You know how Scientologists are = lying liars that lie. Janitor is probably the true story.

      • Jimmy3

        “And I promise you they’re not taking Tylenol.” I suspected as much. Wall Street has always seemed more aspirin-ish or ibuprofen-y to me.

      • EnthralledObserver

        “5 hours a night”
        Stuff THAT!
        I like my sleep… good career choice not to head in a ‘Wall street’ direction. 🙂

    • jeff

      Copyright CSNY? Is that Crosby, Stills, Nash and Young?

  • Panopea Abrupta

    Red-X Red-X Red-X

    Let’s make like the French and put these liars on the run.
    Lots of new ones if you scroll down, delicious, fresh, yummmmy

    https://whyweprotest.net/community/threads/taking-down-co-on-craigslist-co-ads-on-craigslist.113779/page-75#post-2447448

    ty ap

  • Jimmy3

    Thanks for the Monday Funnies, Jonny Jacobsen. I read the first part and let out a hearty guffaw! Those silly Scientologists are always scrambling to blame someone or something. It is quite comical.

    Excellent podcast series so far, J Swift. One request: Is there somewhere you could upload these as mp3 files? I’m aware that I can rip the audio from YouTube, but I’m lazy and that requires too many steps.

    Here is a picture with words …

    • Techie

      Nobody seems to have answered. It is survivingscientologyradio.com and there is a download link.

      • Jimmy3

        I had no idea about that. Thank you.
        “Nobody seems to have answered.” I have been told by many that I am easily ignorable.

  • TheHoleDoesNotExist

    Okay, I am hoping Someone might know the answer to this burning question:

    Is scientologist Colleen Bigler the one who made Heber Jentzsch and Mike Rinder dolls for Miscavige? Lives in Cancyon Country, CA now, at one time lived in Hemet, San Jacincto. She has an IAS doll on her site, named Ted. Loony vulture IAS Ted Braggin? And there’s one of Michael and Liz Baybeck, one just of Mike. I wonder if anyone knows Colleen and knows if she made those Heber and Mike dolls? (saw her Mikey doll over at WWP, tks!)

    http://colleensartdolls.com/gallery/

    http://i.imgur.com/tn47UhB.jpg
    Michael Baybeck

    http://i.imgur.com/Xkc27LWl.jpg
    IAS Ted Doll

    • Jimmy3

      I don’t know, but I know that I am terrified of this doll lady.

    • Michael Leonard Tilse

      Ted “I was on the streets of New York, broke and despondent and I had a cognition that changed everything” Braggin?

      He was the IAS reg on the ship when I went. Total fucking asshole. He twisted me up so much that I wound up TRANSFERING EARTHLINK STOCKS REMOTELY BY TELEX FROM THE CARIBBEAN SEA through my broker and directly into the IAS trust stock account where they were sold and the resulting sale was credited to my IAS account.

      In fact, I don’t know if those stocks were even sold. They could have gone somewhere else and I would have been none the wiser.

      • TheHoleDoesNotExist

        That’s about the nicest thing I’ve ever heard anyone say about Ted.

        Your broker should have receipts, surely?

        • Michael Leonard Tilse

          Oh, I got receipts showing the stock was transferred to an account that was supposedly the IAS account at Merrill-Lynch, but it was a direct transfer, It was not sold first.

          Then it was supposedly sold on market by IAS, and that proceed was credited to my account. But I only have the IAS word on that.

          And I’m still unclear if this direct stock transfer rather than selling first and donating the money was a kind of tax fraud or not. I was told it was not. Because I donated the stock itself instead of selling first, I didn’t make a profit on the sale so didn’t have to pay tax on gains. But I was able to take a deduction of the value of the stock I had “donated.”

          I’d actually like to see what John P. says about this. Most of the $150K or so that I was scammed out of in my last 4 years of scientology was just this way, direct stock transfers of ELNK stock options that I had exercised.

          • TheHoleDoesNotExist

            Definitely time for an expert answer on this. IAS rep should have given you concise and clear paperwork on it. I hope you can get an answer to this, if nothing else. I understand how these question marks can bug and annoy forever until figured out. Still hoping for compensation though. 🙂

            For those who don’t know who we are talking about, Ted Bragin is the ideal vulture reg. Mention his name, even to those still in, and you will see people’s heads explode like a Dianetic volcano. He gets a mention in this Tampa Bay Times article about donation pressure. I don’t think it even comes close to the experience. Even I got caught in the trap once, different IAS reg, but one of “those”. To this day I ask myself, “What the hell happened?”. Not even Glengarry Glen Ross movie comes close.

            http://www.tampabay.com/news/scientology/scientology-amped-up-donation-requests-to-save-the-earth-starting-in-2001/1201989

            • Michael Leonard Tilse

              I was trying to be polite. Ted is one of the fucking psychopathic malignant narcissists that rise to the top in scientology. He manages to use every weakness you have to rape you of your money. And on the ship, you can’t even walk away. It’s relentless pressure. It’s probably the ONLY thing you are actually given permission to do during your course time: See the IAS Reg.

            • TheHoleDoesNotExist

              I was trying to be funny. Was on that ship…Once, when they lovebombed me after so many yers out, into taking my mini vacation on that rustbucket. St Kitts, St Thomas, fantastic! I left calling them little nazi’s. Didn’t know the Godwin rule back then.

            • TDA1541A

              http://markrathbun.wordpress.com/2010/06/02/black-dianetics-at-the-top-of-the-bridge-more-on-ias/

              Mary Jo’s reports:

              November 26, 2007 to RTC Reports Officer

              Things that shouldn’t be IAS interview/Reg cycle Ted Bragin, Marion Vugger

              I was in an IAS reg cycle last Saturday the 17th of November with Ted Bragin from the WUS Office.

              I had
              been told I needed to get an appointment for a briefing and I was
              hesitant as I do not have the funds to donate now and I am also very
              busy with my OTA hat as the OTA IC of Latam. Last year, in 2006 MV I
              donated 150K and in one month completed a Patron Meritorious cycle: I
              went from 15 K on the IAS to 250K in 12 months and it was a very BIG
              deal for me, I got into debt big time. I was thrilled and proud to do it
              but had to follow that up with a lot of production. I am a single woman
              and while I do own my business it is not one that makes so much profit
              to allow for such sizeable donations. I basically got a second mortgage
              on my house to do it.

              After
              course on Tuesday the 13th, I was approached by Claire Taylor (FCS LA
              Fdn.) and was told I had to have an interview with the IAS, that all the
              OTs in the field had to be interviewed. There was no reference or no
              reason given to me. This is a generality and it is an arbitrary that
              “all OTs have to be interviewed”. I don’t think an enforced interview is
              OK, especially when I am active and have donated so much. But I
              reluctantly agreed.

              Since Ted
              Bragin regged me before I agreed to get this briefing from him and
              asked him to please be brief as I had lots to do and did not want to sit
              there and tell someone how I did not have money. It is not OK to sit
              there and talk at length about debt, etc- it just brings one downtone
              and makes a postulate there.

              I had set
              aside 1 hour for this and Ted was late (which was fine he was in
              another cycle) but when we started 20 minutes late I was anxious to get
              the cycle going. Ted made small talk, commenting about people who had
              made recent huge donations and told me I needed to be with that group of
              people, hang out with them. I said I had no time to hang out with new
              people, I was a bit puzzled at the comm. I asked him to please give me
              the briefing and he said it wasn’t a briefing, it was an interview,
              which he said was the new name for a reg cycle. I was BIs, I was told I
              was getting a briefing. It is not OK to lie about the purpose of a
              meeting, which was not what I agreed to do.

              He then
              started to ask me about my finances and I said I did not want to discuss
              specifics or my debt, that I had expressed to him this. I did tell him I
              had no equity in the house. He became irate, that HE was the IAS and I
              had to disclose everything as I worked for the Church and per policy
              they needed to know. I asked him for a reference and he pulled out the
              Les Dane book and referred to the section on qualifying a prospect and
              said “This is LRH”. I protested this saying this was absolutely not LRH
              source and then asked him if
              then anything was mine, did I own anything? Did I have a say on my own
              finances and how I was going to handle them? It seemed so bizarre. Ted
              said I was now OT VIII and very self-determined but he “could show me
              what self-determinism was”. This was all done in a hostile tone. He went
              and got a staff member from the Flag office who is a trained Flag MAA
              and is on a mission here in LA, her name is Marion Vugger, and when I
              explained to her that I was not in agreement with the force of the cycle
              she told me I sounded disaffected! I am one of the most upstat and
              active OT Ambassadors and Scientologist on the planet, according to OT
              Operations Office Int who wrote this before my clearance for the ship to
              do OT VIII eligibility. Then Ted said, “you know I love you don’t you?”
              and when I said “no…” he said, “that is the first lie you say tonight, I
              would lie in front of you and give my life so that you and only you
              could go free” – it was all very melodramatic and introverting. What is
              one supposed to answer to that? Marion told me if I could not give money
              I needed to walk in and say to the IAS “what can I do for you”? I told
              her I was already very committed as an OTA and could not glibly say that
              as I would not be able to deliver. She did not answer that. I have to
              create income and am already very active helping the OTCs in Latam. Ted
              then said that we had to do it all. When I said I was already “doing it
              all” (I do not qual for the SO or staff and Ted knows this) he got
              angrier with me.

              I was
              told I had to give “everything” to the IAS, that I work for the Church
              and that I had to be there on the same terms as the SO and that COB
              needed funds NOW. When I said I could not give what I didn’t have, that
              it would be out ethics, he got furious and said, “don’t you think LRH
              was out ethics when he almost broke his back researching the OT levels?
              He was out ethics on the first dynamic and on the second dynamic, he had
              a family, he was a husband, don’t you tell me you can’t be out
              ethics!”. He turned to Marion and she nodded in agreement! At that point
              I just remained quiet and decided I needed to not protest anymore to
              end the interview. I said I was working on creating more income; that I
              was with the program and understood what I was being told. At that point
              Ted told the MAA that I was more active than over 90 % of parishioners
              he knew and then told me I could leave. Marion left the room and Ted
              offered to walk me to my car. As we walked I chatted lightly and he
              asked me 3 times if I was OK. I was not showing any signs of not being
              OK, it was as if he was concerned that the cycle had been very rough and
              he wanted to be sure I was OK.

              Ted
              looked very tired; I have never seen him this aggressive. I am not sure
              what references they are operating on but this type of treatment and
              comm. is unacceptable and the comment about LRH being out ethics and
              making it OK and even necessary to be out ethics to be an upstat IAS member, is completely unacceptable. I think this needs to be looked into.

              This is true,

              Mary Jo Leavitt

              OT VIII, OTA IC Latam, Patron Meritorious, FSM

              RTC Reports Officer Int

              Mary Jo Leavitt, New OT VIII September 20,2009

            • Michael Leonard Tilse

              Wow. Yep, he uses the whipsaw of burnishing your pride for what you have done and the hell and damnation for not doing more. Back and forth endlessly. Pretends to be your friend until you buy it and then he abuses you in the very next breath.

            • TDA1541A

              Can you scan a picture of him and slam it on here please

              This guy has no face prescence on the ol’ Internet(yet)

            • Michael Leonard Tilse

              I have no photo of him.

            • TDA1541A

              Well than it saves you from a few nightmares

            • TheHoleDoesNotExist

              Hey, I noticed that too. Did you catch the picture in the lower right hand of the IAS doll?

            • TDA1541A

              I looked just now Is that laughing little baffoon him ?

          • John P.

            If your IAS donations are tax deductible, it won’t matter to your tax treatment whether you gave them cash or doing as a direct stock transfer. I suspect that they would rather take the stock because then if it is one that is likely to go up they can keep ownership of it and not have to incur the commissions of repurchasing it. There may be other tax treatment issues or strategic issues that I’m unaware of, since my charitable donations are always in cash.

          • Sunny Sands

            It’s a legitimate way to donate to charity.
            Where it gets fraudulent is when some people try to say their asset is worth way more than it really is, like a precious stone or something.

          • Robert Eckert

            “Because I donated the stock itself instead of selling first, I didn’t make a profit on the sale so didn’t have to pay tax on gains. But I was able to take a deduction of the value of the stock I had “donated.”” See, those two things cancel out. If you donate the stock, you can write off the amount you spent for it. If you sell it first, the profit is income but your writeoff is now the money you sold it for, and offsetting the writeoff for the money you got and donated, minus the profit, puts you in the same place as writing off the money you originally spent.

            • Michael Leonard Tilse

              Thank you Robert.

              I need to clarify. It has been my policy on this board and in other forums to be honest and clear about what I did and experienced in scientology.

              The exact scenario was this:
              I was an October 1995 hire for EarthLink Network, Inc. (ELNK) This was way before the EarthLink IPO in early 1997.

              in 1996 I had been promoted to Manager, Network Operations Center and tasked with staffing and training up a 24/7 NOC monitoring staff that could escalate broader network and ISP interoperation problems to the subject matter experts within our own company and also in communication with other NOCs

              As part of that job I was given pre-IPO stock options as part of my compensation. There were several rounds of this, and it was at least 1500 shares, at from $.07 to $.19 as my exercise price per share. My shares vested at 20% per year. So it was pretty late 1997 before I had any shares to exercise.

              In 1997 I had again begun getting scientology services through some money from a short term loan and the sale of a personal item.

              When I was able to exercise my shares, they were in the $40 range on the market. I sold some and paid the proceeds to AOLA for services. I was able to claim that as a deduction.

              After some thought about the tax consequences of selling, making income and then donating, I asked about direct “donation” of my stocks with my registrar at AOLA who was Steven Kemper. (As I understand it, now deceased).

              I also discussed this with Howard Becker and Michael Roberts who were IAS Western United States Membership Tour registrars, with Ted Bragin on the “Freewinds” scientology ship and probably others such as Bridgett Kelleher. (Also IAS)

              As part of this it was worked out that I could direct my broker in Pasadena to transfer the stocks from my account directly to the account for AOLA or IAS or the ship Freewinds as the case may be. They told me the stock would be sold by the receiving brokers and the stock would be sold and my accounts credited based on the daily mean value (something like that).

              And they said and gave me to understand very clearly that I could then claim as tax deduction for the value they credited, not the pennies on the dollar I had paid when exercising those stock options. This was known to all the registrars I dealt with on that subject. So for those years I was claiming on my tax returns the “donations” that were on the accounts reports that AOLA, Freewinds and the IAS provided me with.

              Those stock sold on the market for between $20 to $75 per share in the time period between later 1997 and late 2000 when I could not work anymore and had to quit EarthLink (Giving up a large number of unvested stock options in the process.)

              I did not claim the price I paid for the options as tax deductions, I claimed the value the scientology organizations reported they obtained from the sales. I was told by these several scientology representatives that I could do this and that it was legal and ok.

              I believe this was common among ELNK scientologists and probably is still being done today. At that time most of it was done while the IRS secret agreement with scientology was still in force.

              From your paragraph, it seems to indicate that I should only have legally claimed as deduction the value I paid at my option price. I want to make clear that if that is the case I did not know it at the time and I had been informed otherwise by several scientology staff members and it must have been the regular operation basis of those registrars and the organization. In short, if what I did was a violation, it was known about and encouraged by Becker, Roberts, Kemper and Bragin.

              So, tell me what you think. It was over 12 years ago at this point, but if they conspired to mislead myself and others, it was a conspiracy.

            • Sunny Sands

              Michael, you were told correctly by scientology how to account for your donations. They even let you know they took the “mean” price, the average of the high and low, on the date of sale, which is correct.

              Here is an article that appeared in the Wall Street Journal earlier this year on how to value charitable stock donations.

              http://online.wsj.com/news/articles/SB10001424052702304137304579290290498278828

            • Michael Leonard Tilse

              i see there is some requirement for holding onto the shares for at least 1 year before donation in order to qualify for the donation at the appreciated level. I did not succeed in holding onto shares anywhere near one year after exercising my options. Most of the time it was within days.

              So unless the date of “owning them” was started at the granting of the options, not at the exercise, then it looks like they advised me wrongly unless the rules were different then.

            • Sunny Sands

              OK, I see what you mean. Usually, a computerized tax program will collect the buy, sell, donation or exercise dates and calculate the long or short term holding period. Most donations of appreciated stocks are long-term holds.

            • Robert Eckert

              Well, I’m not a tax attorney, but what I said above is the way that I would understand it.

        • Michael Leonard Tilse

          Yea I think so. He was much thinner in 1998.

  • DamOTclese2

    Scientology and their lawyers argue that at least some of the outside speakers hired by the ENM are critics of the movement — and that some of the judges involved in their cases attended their talks.

    Translation: The organized crime mobsters are demanding that victims of their frauds, human rights crimes, and quack medical frauds (i.e. “critics”) filed complaints with law enforcement agencies which resulted in these filthy criminals getting successfully convicted.

    The mobsters are trying to pretend that Judges who acquired training covering organized crime syndicates were treated to the history of organized criminals, including Scientology, ergo it’s all so unfair!

    Always something insane and criminal with these Scientology mobsters. Always.

    • Disaffected

      Of course they have no chance in hell to get that argument to stick. In fact it is good they are trying that one too. When that gets slapped off, it can not be used by them in the future.

  • GalacticGreg

    Ran into this after following (thdn)Exist’s lead down the black rob wwp rabbit hole. It may have been posted here by ShoopZ, I don’t know, I didn’t see it. Still- worth repeating.

    Krusty Alley maintaining her purification healthy living nutritionist lifestyle.

  • DamOTclese2

    In protest, the Scientologists had staged demonstrations outside.

    Did the insane criminals wear little toy Nazi uniforms this time?

  • TheHoleDoesNotExist

    HolyCow. Just saw that besides Russell Miller, now Jamie DeWolf will be at FlagDown2014 and puttin’ on a show. Oh hell yeah. Since this is going to be live streamed for one and all, if you can, donations still needed. I am getting so stoked.

    http://youtu.be/iaqbURp0w1c
    https://www.indiegogo.com/projects/flag-down-2014-exposing-the-fraud-and-abuse-of-the-scientology-cult–4#home

    • aegerprimo

      OMG! Flag Down 2014 is going to be quite a Pow Wow!

    • Free Minds, Free Hearts

      I wish I could be there.

      • Qbird

        oh man-o-man, me too Free Minds!

  • Panopea Abrupta

    $cientology: a way of observing reality from the outside

    • Missionary Kid

      I’m going to change that to make it clearer, with your permission, to “Scientology: a way of observing reality without it.” Let me know if that’s OK.

      • Phil McKraken

        If I get a vote, I’d go with the original.

        • Missionary Kid

          I’m going to put both on the list.

  • Thumbard

    I don’t know if this is an ethical question or rather an observation of religious groups that are given tax exempt status, how can a group that doesn’t make money as its primary purpose gain such incredibly large amounts of assets?

    Also, I have read that RTC is to send 90% of revenue/income (can’t remember which) to CST. Given that, how would the CST be worth some significantly lower amount?

    • Missionary Kid

      There’s no limit on the assets that they can acquire. If there was, the Catholic or other church, would have to divest themselves of assets. Most churches use a significant amount of their revenue for religious or charitable or educational activities.

      $cientology probably takes the revenue and expenses it for all sorts of crap between different entities. Sending money offshore to orgs in South Africa or Europe can go through all sorts of shell corporations and money laundering operations. They aren’t audited. Damn.

    • Dancing Cranberry

      hmmm… I thought money WAS CO$’s primary purpose?

  • Johnny Tank (Forever Autumn)

    Alexa update for Apr. 21: *refresh for images*

    Tony: US rank #24,599 – up 276 from yesterday. (Average rank last 3 months: 17,763)
    Scientology: US rank #58,173 – down 1,711 from yesterday. (Average rank last 3 months: 46,923)

    Difference: 33,574 – 1,987 more than yesterday. (Average difference last 3 months: 29,160)

    Clicks from India – 12,1% today.

    • Science Doc

      You’ve probably seen (or contributed to) the big discussion on Mike Rinder’s blog today about Google/Alexa.

      • Espiando

        It’s nice that Rinder finally had his come-to-Jesus moment with the Stats, but it’s a little disappointing that some of the respondents there were shocked, shocked, I say, about the numbers. Tank’s been giving them out for months. All they had to do was come here…oh, wait, a good portion of Rinder’s audience think that Tony’s the Anti-Christ and that we commenters here are Merchants Of Chaos And Entheta.

        It was great, however, to see me and Hole present the very same conclusions at almost the same time, then to have them posted simultaneously thanks to Rinder’s Censor-Queue. Scilons are big believers in repetition. Maybe they’ll have their come-to-Tony moment.

        • Science Doc

          Mike Rinder has posted one or two examples of the hate mail he gets from bogus addresses. If he left the door wide open without moderation the agents of Micavige would put some pretty ugly stuff on his blog. While Mike’s community includes some independents and some people on their way out of CoS, it’s part of the solution. I’ve had to cut back on Marty’s blog and the South African blog because they’re sometimes past my threshold for magical thinking. But I think Mike’s blog serves a very valuable purpose, and it is almost always good reading. Evidence of that includes the frequency with which Tony cites or quotes Mike’s posts.

          • aegerprimo

            I agree Science Doc that Rinder’s and the South African blogs are valuable and are good reading. I rarely comment there, and rarely read the comments (unless a Bunkeroo comments). I am an EX-scientologist, and I get a little sick when I read how caught up people remain in Hubbard’s “tech”. BUT, I have also read some of the books written about brainwashing and cult think (“Captive Hearts, Captive Minds” to name one), and understand how it is hard for some of those people to even read any of the multiple documented biographies on Hubbard that prove he was a very adept con man, a manipulator extraordinaire and a skilled liar.

            • Science Doc

              I agree. I also remember that this is the internet and the signal to noise ratio is not very good on the best of days. We’re all different people and sometimes the anonymity of posting removes most context.

            • TheHoleDoesNotExist

              The Hubbard is their last life preserver. They won’t let go until they feel safe.

        • Disaffected

          Rinder makes good reading and has good facts and he is extremely lulzy, so I frequently check his blog. I don’t comment too much these days either. But he does serve a growing number of people which is a good thing. The only thing I will never let go by is when some stupid commenter will berate or in anyway disqualify anonymous or the bunker. The gloves come off then 🙂 But, I think as a whole, we are on the same side for now.

          • 1subgenius

            I have a hands off policy there. Its virtually a miracle that he is doing what he’s doing. I see no reason to piss in any of the cornflakes there.
            Any side issues detract and distract from what that blog can do.

            • Jimmy3

              I see no reason to ever piss on cornflakes. Unless, of course, maybe you are camping and they catch fire for whatever reason.

            • 1subgenius

              I’ve only had that happen 3 or 4 times, though.
              But the urine detracts from the nice carmelized flavor of the corn, somewhat.

            • Jimmy3

              That’s certainly an unintended consequence, but at least the scent keeps bears away. Or maybe it attracts them? I really don’t pay attention when Les Stroud is talking, I’m too distracted by all the happy little trees.

        • TheHoleDoesNotExist

          What timing. It was obvious to me, but I did go back and check the Tom Cruise footbullet timeline just to make sure.

    • aegerprimo

      Johnny Tank, are you the “…Special Correspondent who pulled it up on Google Analytics…” that Mike Rinder mentions on his blog today?

      • Johnny Tank (Forever Autumn)

        “Special correspondent” – sounds cool, but I’m afraid not 🙂

        • And I don’t rent cars!

          Well then, you’ll will be the Bunker’s “Special Correspondent” – as you have been all along. Thanks the time you put in on posting Bunker stats and you-know-who’s.

    • Disaffected

      Thanks Johnny!
      “First they ignore you, then they laugh at you, then they fight you and then you win.” M.K.Gandhi

      Seems like Co$ has moved passed the phase of laughing at us on the fringes of the internet. They are becoming more active “fighting” the countless testimonies pouring all over the net about their abuses.
      Keep faith fellow bunkeroo’s. They are getting frantic and try to battle us on our turf. But the numbers on different anti Co$ blogs add up way over the numbers of the “church”.
      And, for every nonsensical ad they might put on, there are numerous testimonies that reveal the scam. Plus we have the very effective RED X brigade too 🙂
      We will move to End Game very soon.

      I don’t think I need to spell out the outcome :)!

    • Douglas D. Douglas

      Looks like our friends at the CoS are going through the bunny hills…

  • And I don’t rent cars!

    DISQUS TIP for new Bunker readers and/or Disqus users:

    If you go to the top right of the comments section and locate your username (with a red dot in front of it), click on the down arrow next to your name, chose Hide Media from the drop down menu.

    This way you won’t have to refresh the page to see images. You just have to hit the little blue toggle switch beneath comments to “view media” or “hide media”.

    No more refreshing. How refreshing!

    • K2P2

      Thanks for the tip, Cars.

    • i-Betty

      I am happy!

      • 1subgenius

        That is good.

    • GalacticGreg

      Have that feature automatically on iPad. Was wondering how come didn’t have it using the PC/Mac browsers. Thanks Cars.

      • Jimmy3

        It’s available on every browser, but it seems to be set to ‘Hide’ by default on mobile devices.

        • And I don’t rent cars!

          I believe the default is ‘show’ on other platforms. I’ve gone through 3 -4 browsers and that is Disqus’ default on all of them. Go figure, trigger.

          • Jimmy3

            Yes, no matter what I have it set it to before I log out, when I log back in it’s set to Hide on my iPad and Display on my laptop (PC).

      • And I don’t rent cars!

        I’m not sure. I only know that most of us still write the word (refresh) to indicate to readers that an image is attached so I assumed that a lot of Bunker readers worked mainly off laptops (like I do) and desktops. It’s bloody annoying to refresh and lose your spot on the page (all the collapsed threads that you’ve already read become opened again) and then have to collapse them all again and find your spot to continue reading. The “media” feature is on “show” by default.

        It occurred to me that new readers or Disqus users might not be aware of it, so I wanted to post the tip so they could enjoy the images without further Disqus induced aggravation.

        • Robert Eckert

          Nothing is working differently for me than before (I am using Google Chrome on a Lenovo laptop). But here is how I “refresh”: I right-click on the time-stamp and click the “open in new window” option; this opens a new copy of the Bunker with the particular post where I wanted to see the picture highlighted and at the top, with the old copy still undisturbed.

          • And I don’t rent cars!

            That’s too bad. Your way works but it’s extra time and work for you. Eats up your computer’s resources, too. But you found a workaround that will be useful for others to know. I wish it had worked for you as it’s really a sweet way to deal with images.

            I’m using Firefox on a Dell laptop (shhh… I’m actually a member of that other cult – Apple).

          • GalacticGreg

            dang that disqus.com [credit: Nat2.0]

          • Sandy

            Now there is a GREAT tip!

        • GalacticGreg

          I am really glad you posted the tip!
          I’ve been wanting what I had on my iPad to be the same on the PC or Mac and it weren’t happening and I never noticed that feature you pointed out. Good show, Cars.!

    • jeff

      Eight months in…..now you tell me.

      • And I don’t rent cars!

        Just don’t ask me how long it took me to figure it out! 🙂

  • DamOTclese2

    The result? Jacquart ended up with a bill for 27,000 euros in damages and legal costs.

    Ha ha! Eat it, crook! Ha! And you know that the Screaming Dwarf won’t come to the aid of his fellow criminal and bail him out financially. 🙂 No, every fing criminal is on his own when the long arm of the law grabs the mobster by the back of the neck.

    No, it’s every criminal for himself.

  • Disaffected

    Liberté, Egalité, Fraternité! Viva la France :)!
    Why don’t they understand they wont ever get a victory in France. On the other hand, maybe its best to let them go to the very, very last appeal possibilities so that the verdict is carved in granite! Such a solid thing will be difficult to ignore in judicial systems throughout Europe… I’m thinking Belgium for a starter.

    • Missionary Kid

      They can also sent money abroad supposedly to pay for legal expenses. It’s another way that they can hide money offshore, IMO.

    • RMycroft

      It may be that they don’t really care what happens in France, just how much they can spin it for sympathy, rallying the troops and fund-raising in the US. I think their operation in Germany has been like that for a long time.

      Here’s what their Dead Agent site against France used to look like:
      https://web.archive.org/web/20020604165845/http://humanrightswatchfrance.org/

      • Disaffected

        I think your assessment seems spot on. They know they have nothing to gain there, just collecting more $$$ in the US to fight those French SP’s. Haha, would they be so stupid to put up a DA pack in French? I’m sure the magistrates would be real interested in that information. (as we very well know most of their DA packs are outright lies, it wouldn’t survive French scrutiny)

  • media_lush

    new post up http://scientologybollocks.blogspot.co.uk

    …. here’s a pic of some sci fi alien comic book covers showing what they each looked like from each of our planets… there’s a good (I’m guessing) chance that the a young teen Hubster might have read some of them… wonder which one influenced him the most? [full size on my blog)

    • flyonthewall

      love it, very cool

    • aegerprimo

      The Man From Venus. ☺

    • Science Doc

      Those aliens need to move up in status.

    • Phil McKraken

      The first thing I did was look for the freight train on Venus. But then Hubbard was so intellectually lazy, I assume he was simply confused about which planet he dodged the freight train on.

  • And I don’t rent cars!

    Looking at CST’s tax return, I’m starting to understand its valuation. If this photo is accurate, then I can understand the valuation. IIRS, the CST is the mother chnrch. Makes sense it would need its very own mother ship. Imagine the operating expenses on this baby!

    I also wonder which chnrch entity claims the new OSA drone(s), which we saw at the Ideal PAC re-re-reopening?

    • jeff

      oops.

  • aegerprimo
    • Dancing Cranberry

      for safety.

    • Panopea Abrupta

      Got ’em and gone.
      Get the fresh ones – JJ in Boston is a despicable predator.

  • ShoopZ

    2 Tweets (refresh)

    • ShoopZ

      (refresh)

      • And I don’t rent cars!

        Thanks for all your Twitter “good works.” Can’t imagine why John Alex Wood wouldn’t block you – you are relentless. 🙂

        I’ve attached an image that was posted on some blog years ago as a gag xmas gift for scientologists to give their children, called “my first e-meter.” I think it was made with a children’s camera and a jump rope. If you can use it some time, in some context, go ahead. Your other Tweet with the easy bake oven make me think of it.

        (refresh)

        • ShoopZ

          My First eMeter
          HubbardCoIncLLCLtd
          $209.99

          “My First eMeter” introduces both children and mentally incompetent adults to the exciting world of Thetan auditing, also known as “the removal of ghosts” to people ignorant of L. Ron Hubbard’s magical mystery mind. Get your children aged 1-7 detecting evil liar alien ghosts as soon as possible with My First eMeter, a fun toy both technologically advanced and crammed full of addictive fun! No, seriously, it’s literally addictive; My First eMeter secrets a mixture of neurotoxins and alien spores every 10 minutes to ensure your child never loses interest with their fascinating and highly religious device manufactured to be both flame retardant and waterproof.

          You’ll never have to worry about Junior misplacing My First eMeter, as HubbardCoIncLLCLtd engineers have programmed the device to emit a series of playful supersonic beeps and whistles capable of shattering glass and human eardrums miles away if the device has been inactive for 30 minutes. If mischievous little Junior ever attempts to purposefully or non-purposefully damage his My First eMeter in any way whatsoever, it will promptly punish him by activating the shiny Silver Shamrock decal next to the meter, causing his head to cave in and send out a lighthearted wave of scurrying beetles, snakes, and crickets from the mushy pulp previously known as his skull. This patented Silver Shamrock technology was created by L. Ron Hubbard in 1982 after his trip to Stonehenge, where he claims to have “bested a man-octopus in hand to hand combat” and “discovered important secrets to becoming a better dungeon master.”

          http://www.somethingawful.com/news/scientology-holiday-gift/

          • Jimmy3

            One day there will be an Internet Hall of Fame and Lowtax will be inducted in the inaugural class.

        • ShoopZ

          “Can’t imagine why John Alex Wood wouldn’t block you”

          I wonder if he even sees my posts. Maybe his Net Nanny is working overtime?

          • And I don’t rent cars!

            It’s bizarre isn’t it? Almost like there isn’t a human on the other end. “Lights are on but nobody home” syndrome. Sorta like the Idle Orgs.

            I don’t know.

            • Once_Born

              Could it be possible that these tweets are written in advance, in bulk, then posted automatically, at programmed intervals?

              All the posts seem to be pretty generic, and there is nothing particularly topical…

      • Narapoid

        All spot on Shoopz! I especially like the easy bake oven.

      • DodoTheLaser

        Thank you, ShoopZ.

    • DodoTheLaser

      Epic trolling with truth is epic.

  • Captain Howdy

    Why can’t Amy Acker be a scientologist?
    Then I might actually give a fuck
    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=76yWZcsgwF8

    • Jimmy3

      Why can’t The World’s Greatest Bagpipe Player be a scientologist?
      Then I might actually give a fuck
      http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=XCccPGtjaCU

    • Davka

      If Amy Acker were a Scientologist, there were would be much weeping in the land of Davka. And Joss would probably lose it. Or write something scathingly wonderful. And be sad. Ack. I shudder to think…..even the idea gives me the willies.

  • media_lush

    scientology street canvassing is getting desperate

    http://imgur.com/gallery/G46Izmk

    • DodoTheLaser

      Who let Xenu out?

  • DodoTheLaser

    Scientology failed to deliver Clear and OT, so it delivers pretty buildings now.
    Kind of like North Korea – tons of empty hotels and apartment complexes.
    Common denominator? Distraction and deception to hide their lies.

  • GalacticGreg

    Topic being $cientology money, here’s some $ of one of their celeb/whales, JT. Such a deal he made.

    “Unfortunately not every lucrative deal pays off. Take John Travolta. He
    waived his $20 million fee to get “Battleship Earth” — the scifi action
    feature based on the book by Scientology founder L. Ron Hubbard —
    commissioned for the big screen. In return, he agreed to a $10 million
    salary and an extra $15 million if the movie surpassed $55 million in
    ticket sales. Sounds great — but “Battleship Earth” tanked at the box
    office, totaling just $21.5 million. Travolta’s foolhardy move cost him
    $10 million.” — Morgan Korn, Daily Ticker

    • DodoTheLaser

      This movie actually had a good B flick potential. Too bad COB had to interfere.
      On a second thought, I am glad he did.

  • Why is the Larchmont address on CST’s tax form a shitty strip mall? probaby because they use a mail drop box for ther multi-jillion dollar CST enterprise.

    See for yourself: https://maps.google.com/maps?q=419+larchmont,+90004&hl=en&ll=34.077998,-118.323644&spn=0.000018,0.010568&sll=34.077975,-118.324164&layer=c&cbp=13,283.57,,1,-5.39&cbll=34.077998,-118.323644&hnear=419+N+Larchmont+Blvd,+Los+Angeles,+California+90004&t=m&z=17&panoid=eU8JWQEsYbWiTZM_bG1FBg

    • DodoTheLaser

      Interesting.

    • Jimmy3
      • DodoTheLaser

        For a second, I thought the neon sign on the right says LIVE SCAM.

        • Jimmy3

          It should. But look, the ‘P’ in ‘PASSPORT’ is out so it says ‘ASSPORT’. That made me laugh, because I have a 9 year old’s sense of humor.

          • DodoTheLaser

            P_O_BOX does not stands for Pope On the Box. See what you did?

          • i-Betty

            Me too, me too! 😀

  • valshifter

    Scientology wants to win for the sake of winning no mater what, in almost an obsessive insane act, so they go after whatever or whoever they consider might restrict their pathway of destruction and anarchy. Scientology places themselves in a fighting position first, even if not provoked or unjustly treated, is like fighting with an insane drunkard, they just want to fight, I wander what will it take, to knock them down. is upsetting.

  • DodoTheLaser

    Random post alert.

    It’s funny and very telling how Hubbard came up with the whole PTS/SP doctrine.
    If his “tech” was really so good, none of that defense nonsense would be necessary.

    But no, let’s pretend the shit is gold and punish anyone who says otherwise.

    It sure works. In the opposite direction. Imagine cognitive dissonance as a spark.
    Multiply thousands = major Fireworks.

    End of rant.

  • Douglas D. Douglas

    It’s late, and I’ve been out most of the day, but I did want to leave this for all my friends in the Bunker:

    (refresh)

  • DodoTheLaser

    Guess who is prospering and flourishing?

  • Pierrot

    Outraged by the way co$
    openly subverts the law
    How they circumvent their taxes obligations.
    Flag their ads as inappropriate.

    https://whyweprotest.net/community/threads/taking-down-co-on-craigslist-co-ads-on-craigslist.113779/page-75#post-2447448

    FREELOADER Debt is ILLEGAL and CAN’T BE ENFORCED Call 1-866-XSEAORG
    Get HELP, get OUT, Call 1-866-XSEAORG

    ty Baby

    • Toni m

      Good job, as always.
      DONE. Always done.

      • Pierrot

        Hello, stranger, long time no see.
        Glad to have you back!

  • DodoTheLaser

    Viva le France for kicking scientologie faux ass with all your beautiful weirdness.

    http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=AWh6UWJ18dk

  • valshifter

    The biggest lie in scientology is; NOW NOW NOW NOW!