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OREGON SENATOR RON WYDEN ASKS IRS FOR SCIENTOLOGY REVIEW

US Senator Ron Wyden (D-OR)

US Senator Ron Wyden (D-OR)

The Underground Bunker has obtained an e-mail written by Ron Wyden, the senior US Senator from Oregon, who has formally asked the Internal Revenue Service to explain why the Church of Scientology enjoys tax exempt status, 21 years after that exemption was granted in a controversial decision.

Wyden’s inquiry comes at the same time that we have also confirmed with a former member of the church that IRS Criminal Investigation special agents sought and held a meeting with him recently to gather background on Scientology’s activities — including hundreds of pages of documents from Monique Rathbun’s harassment lawsuit in Texas and the federal fraud lawsuit brought by Luis and Rocio Garcia in Florida.

After two decades of inaction, could the IRS finally be ready to revisit its legendary capitulation to Scientology leader David Miscavige?

On October 8, 1993, Miscavige announced to a capacity crowd at the Los Angeles Sports Arena that “the War is Over”: the IRS had caved after years of combat with the church. A confidential deal had been worked out that not only granted tax-exempt status to many of Scientology’s entities, but it also saved Scientology from a billion-dollar tax bill that it would not have been able to pay.

The IRS had been brought to its knees by a litigious organization that at the time was at its height in size and power.

Two decades later, Scientology is dying. Facing numerous crises, the dwindling church is a shadow of what it was in the early 1990s, and its alleged abuses have resulted in numerous lawsuits and damaging press stories.

In the fall, a longtime reader of the Underground Bunker with a background in non-profit management grew incensed at the repeated revelations about Scientology that had been coming out in news stories. She had been affected by reading about the Rathbun harassment lawsuit as well as the forced-abortion lawsuit filed by Laura DeCrescenzo in Los Angeles, stories that were developing nearly daily here at the website. She was also livid after reading Mike Rinder’s account of learning about the death of his mother, who had “disconnected” from him.

“This young woman, Laura DeCrescenzo, was subject to what amounted to torture by a non-profit organization. And the disconnection that rips apart families — what Mike Rinder and Claire Headley have gone through, for example. All of this is public record, and yet the organization that promulgates this is given 501(c)(3) exemption?” the woman tells us.

Her background in non-profits made her aware, more than most, that Scientology’s recent history suggested that it was regularly violating the terms of its tax-exempt status. So she wrote to Wyden, asking him if he was aware of Scientology’s reported abuses.

“I’m a mother and a fourth-generation Oregonian. I wrote to him, based on my experiences with non-profits, what Scientology has been doing to these women is clearly a violation of the non-profit statutes, and it’s been going on for a long time. Why is it allowed?”

She submitted her inquiry, and then she waited.

Several months later, on Tuesday, she got a reply. We’re posting an image of the e-mail the senator sent her (click the image to enlarge it), as well as a transcript of it.

 
RonWydenEmailRedacted

 

Thank you for contacting me about the tax exempt status of Scientology. I appreciate hearing from you, and I apologize for the delay in my response.

As you may know, churches and other religious organizations are exempt from federal income tax under IRC section 501 (c)(3). Among other things, this means their mission-related income is exempt and they’re allowed to receive tax-deductible contributions. The IRS granted tax-exempt status to Scientology in 1993, and that decision has come under much debate ever since.

In order to ensure that your concerns are adequately addressed, I have forwarded a copy of your correspondence to Catherine Barre, the Director of the Legislative Affairs at the Internal Revenue Service, and asked her to respond directly you. Because I am also interested in her reply, I have requested a copy of their response be sent to my Washington D.C. office.

Again, thank you for keeping me apprised of the issues that are important to you. If I can be of further assistance to you on this or other issues, please do not hesitate to contact me.

Sincerely,

Ron Wyden
United States Senator

 
While Wyden waits for a response from the IRS, the tax agency itself is already making its own moves. For several months, we’ve been hearing unconfirmed reports that the IRS was finally beginning to show signs that it was aware of Scientology’s alleged abuses, and was beginning to ask questions about them.

Then, this week, we got confirmation from a former church member that he had met recently with IRS investigators who were eager to learn about Scientology’s recent activities, including revelations in court documents.

“They asked for a half hour meeting that ended up going more than two hours,” the former church member tells us.

He estimates that he turned over approximately 500 pages of documents, many of them from the Rathbun and Garcia lawsuits. In the Rathbun lawsuit, for example, Scientology made the surprising decision to admit that it had, in fact, been behind a bizarre 2011 operation involving several church members who disrupted the lives of Monique and Marty Rathbun at their South Texas home. It was an operation that involved multiple private investigators and attorneys and must have cost substantial amounts, and was done, Comal County Judge Dib Waldrip found, to protect Scientology’s business interests.

The Rathbun case and many others, critics say, demonstrate that Scientology is a moneymaking enterprise that spends huge amounts to harass and stalk perceived enemies — activities that don’t fit its status as a tax-exempt religious organization.

“I explained to the investigators that Scientology has always acted this way, and it got its tax exempt status by fraudulent means,” the former church member tells us.

The CI special agents, he says, specifically wanted documents that showed Scientology’s activities after 2010.

Scientology’s history with the IRS is a long and contentious one. Our legal expert, Scott Pilutik, laid out in great detail that history and why the IRS might review its decision to grant Scientology’s exemption in a piece he wrote for Forbes two years ago. Rather than try to summarize it, we’re going to reproduce Scott’s analysis in full here.

Spend a few hours Googling “Scientology” and the questions will start piling up in your mind: How can a religion be so profitable? Why does it attract so many celebrities? Do they really believe that we’re all descended from an intergalactic overlord named Xenu?

But the most fascinating question has nothing to do with Scientology’s beliefs: Why is Scientology tax exempt? (And should it, perhaps, not be?)

The best way to begin answering this is to first puncture a popular misconception. People often conflate recognition as a religion and recognition as a tax exempt § 501(c)(3) entity as being effectively the same thing. But the IRS does not make determinations of an entity’s religiosity. In fact, the IRS is constitutionally prohibited from even entertaining the question. Whether Scientology is or is not a religion is thus a red herring — a philosophical as opposed to legal question, far outside the scope of the tax exemption question.

The IRS instead considers whether the organization maintains a “religious purpose,” which the IRS attempts to divine by asking (1) whether the beliefs of the organization are “truly and sincerely held,” and (2) whether the practices associated with the organization’s beliefs are not “illegal or contrary to clearly defined public policy.” Crudely restated, a qualifying religious organization must not be a sham, and it must not be morally repugnant.

Before considering how Scientology fares by this analysis, let’s first look at its tumultuous history with respect to the question of tax exemption.

The history of the Scientology religion is peculiar in that it began not as a religion but as a self-help therapy—a psychotherapeutic process designed toward self-betterment, as detailed in L Ron Hubbard’s 1950 book, Dianetics. Hubbard gradually refined Dianetics, which urged readers to audit themselves, to become Scientology, which administers the auditing under its strict auspices.

Sixteen years after Hubbard successfully foisted Scientology on the world, the advantages in labeling it a religion dawned on him when he was confronted with the problem of transferring assets from one non-exempt corporation to an exempt but inactive one. He wrote in 1966:

So we’re getting all straight now, it seems. And good news! As all auditors will be ministers, ministers have in many places special privileges including tax and housing allowances. Of course anything is a religion that treats the human spirit. And also Parliaments don’t attack religions. But that isn’t our real reason – it’s been a long hard task to make a good corporate structure in the UK and Commonwealth so the assets could be transferred.
– HCO Executive Letter Of 12 March 1966

This reconceptualization from psychotherapy to religion afforded Scientology a few distinct advantages: (1) protection against government regulation (with respect to Hubbard’s quasi-medical claims); (2) immunity from liability against claims of fraud; and (3) the monetary benefits of the tax exemption. Whereas most religious beliefs predate the tax exemption, Scientology grew in its enticing shadow, and indeed seems to have been molded by its allure.

The IRS responded to Hubbard’s redefining Scientology as a religion by rescinding Scientology’s exempt status in 1967, which triggered decades of costly litigation between the two. In the most important of those cases, Founding Church of Scientology v. United States, the IRS successfully argued that Scientology failed to qualify for 501(c)(3) exempt status because its net earnings inured to the benefit of private individuals, namely founder L Ron Hubbard.

Scientology took another, ultimately more effective, tack against the IRS, when it organized a number of its parishioners to sue the IRS for disallowing deductions for payments they made for Scientology auditing under Section 170 of the tax code, which allows individuals to claim deductions for charitable contributions. Dozens of cases were filed across the country, leading to different results — the First and Ninth Circuits courts (in, respectively, Hernandez and Graham) agreed with the IRS that auditing payments were non-deductible, but the Second, Sixth, and Eighth Circuits (in, respectively, Foley, Neher, and Staples) agreed with Scientology.

The Supreme Court consolidated the cases in 1989, now called Hernandez, and resolved the circuit split against Scientology. It found that, structurally, payments for auditing services was in essence a quid pro quo transaction. A true donation, the court reasoned, does not trigger an expected return such as that present in the Scientology/parishioner auditing transaction. The dissent in Hernandez instead recommended examining the benefit itself for evidence of religiosity—if the benefit is purely religious, the inquiry as to whether a contribution is a donation should end there.

Losing in the Supreme Court usually represents the end of the road, but Scientology was persistent and tenacious. In 1991 it filed another Section 170 challenge, this time in the Eleventh Circuit (Powell v. U.S.), conceding the quid pro quo argument it lost in Hernandez but raising another argument, that the IRS was administratively inconsistent in allowing, for instance, rental fees paid by Protestants for the privilege of sitting in a specific pew at religious services, while denying Scientologists their auditing payment deduction.

As Powell was being remanded to the district court, however, the IRS suddenly caved and gave Scientology everything it asked for in 1993 — deductions for auditing and its restoring its tax-exempt 501(c)(3) status. The war was over and Scientology won.

So what happened — why did the IRS crumble? A 1997 New York Times story revealed how Scientology had paid a number of private investigators to personally investigate and surveil IRS officials, financed front groups, including a fake news bureau, to attack the IRS politically, and made an unscheduled visit to the IRS’s national office in Washington D.C., where Hubbard-successor (and current leader) David Miscavige was permitted to meet with then-Commissioner Fred T. Goldberg, a meeting Goldberg denies took place.

Scientology’s aggressive conduct shouldn’t have come as a surprise to the IRS, since nine Scientologists, fourteen years earlier, were convicted on an array of indictments, including burglarizing government offices, in an attempt to infiltrate the IRS among other government agencies, which resulted in prison sentences for each defendant. Some of the goals of “Operation Snow White,” as the infiltration program was internally called, were met when Scientology and the IRS settled in 1993.

We may never know whether sinister skullduggery made the IRS fold, but it could also simply have been that the IRS was being drained of limited resources and unable to continue litigating on so many fronts, and with no end to the lawsuits in sight, threw in the towel.

Regardless of how it played out behind the scenes, the substantive issues that led the IRS to rescind Scientology’s exempt status and deny its parishioners’ auditing deductions, have not changed, or ever been publicly addressed by the IRS, which refuses to even acknowledge the validity of the secret agreement published by the Wall Street Journal in 1997.

Accordingly, despite the IRS having circumvented its result, Hernandez remains good law, and the Scientology-IRS agreement exists in direct contravention of the Constitution. This was noted by Ninth Circuit Judge Barry G. Silverman in a recent case brought by a Jewish family (Michael and Maria Sklar) who argued that if Scientologists can deduct auditing payments, they should be permitted to deduct their children’s religious school tuition:
If the IRS does, in fact, give preferential treatment to members of the Church of Scientology—allowing them a special right to claim deductions that are contrary to law and disallowed to everybody else—then the proper course of action is a lawsuit to put a stop to that policy.

The court found against the Sklars, essentially reasoning that two wrongs don’t make a right. But how then to right the Scientology wrong? An argument might have been made that perhaps a citizen-taxpayer might have standing under the taxpayer standing exception under Flast v. Cohen, but after the Flast decision was so restrictively narrowed in 2007’s Hein v. Freedom From Religion Foundation, it would seem that the IRS-Scientology agreement is immune from anyone even bringing a legal challenge.

If someone were to break through the catch-22 and challenge Scientology’s exempt status in court — how might that go? Returning to the stated IRS criteria requiring, first, that entities have sincerely held beliefs, it seems likely Scientology would clear this hurdle. Scientology would have little difficulty demonstrating that its beliefs are sincerely held.

However, if Scientology’s practices were to be examined under the second IRS “religious purpose” criteria, requiring that an entity’s practices not contravene public policy, significant questions are raised, given how Scientology (1) forces its members to “disconnect” from family members; (2) mistreats children; (3) coerces abortions by its staff members; (4) maintains a practice of what it calls “Fair Game” by which its perceived enemies can be and often are retaliated against in extrajudicial manners; (5) operates in every way as a taxable for-profit business, by accepting money in a quid pro quo exchange for its services; and finally, (6) continues to personally benefit an individual (inurement), this time Hubbard’s successor, David Miscavige.

We, as a country, presumptively bestow exempt status on religious groups because we believe religious groups provide a net benefit to the larger community. In sharp contrast, Scientology, by its morally repugnant practices, benefits itself at significant cost to the larger community. It’s high time the IRS rescinded Scientology’s exempt status.

 
A couple of notes in response to Scott’s piece: We have asked Marty Rathbun multiple times about the 1991 visit he and David Miscavige made to see then-IRS commissioner Fred Goldberg. Each time, Rathbun has told the same story (and you can see it for yourself in the excellent Channel 4 documentary, Scientologists at War). At the time of that meeting, the IRS had been hit with about 2,400 lawsuits by individual Scientologists as part of the church’s all-out war with the tax agency. Rathbun says that he and Miscavige let Goldberg know that those suits would go away overnight if the two organizations could come to an agreement. It was that prospect, Rathbun says, that convinced Goldberg to begin a formal study of Scientology’s status. Tax experts we consulted tell us that once Goldberg made that decision, there was little question that a settlement resulting in the church’s tax-exempt status would then be worked out — even though it took two more years, after a new president and a new IRS commissioner had been sworn in.

One of the provisions in the agreement that was hammered out obliges Scientology to give refunds when members request them. One of the reasons the CI special agents may be interested in the Garcia case is that it is the latest and perhaps most potent lawsuit that takes aim at Scientology’s refund process, which members have long complained makes it almost impossible to get back the thousands of dollars that Scientologists put “on account” for future services.

There’s clearly a lot for the IRS to consider. But it’s also important to keep in mind the federal government’s track record. The FBI intensely investigated Scientology for human trafficking allegations in 2009-2010 before dropping its probe. The Department of Homeland Security then began its own investigation before it too appeared to peter out. Now, we believe the IRS is beginning to revisit one of its most embarrassing defeats. Does it really have the will for another protracted fight with L. Ron Hubbard’s outfit?

We are very eager to find out.

 
——————–

Claire Headley podcast, part 2

Another strong interview with Claire Headley by Jeffrey Augustine…

 



Live streaming video by Ustream

 
More chaos for Flag Down as venue changes

The Flag Down conference is going through more upheaval as a new venue will host speakers Friday, and the event’s primary local organizer announces she is washing her hands of the whole thing.

According to the original schedule, Thursday was supposed to feature a beach party with speakers returning to Minnreg Hall in Largo on Friday evening. But this afternoon, a live feed suddenly came on, with Pete Griffiths announcing that Friday night’s program will occur at a Holiday Inn near the beach. Shortly after the live feed began today, local organizer Laura Flynn announced that she was no longer connected to the event.

So what happened? We talked with one of the organizers of the event who is in from out of town.

“John Sweeney was upset that the first night was really unprofessional,” we were told. Sweeney usually uses a video presentation when he speaks, and he was stunned that he couldn’t do that at Minnreg Hall on Monday night.

“He encouraged us to find a better venue,” the organizer says. “Minnreg is just a gym, it’s not really a conference hall. We had to put people on milk crates because the podium was too high. It was embarrassing.”

When the participants came to Clearwater Beach today, two of them went looking for a better venue, and found it at the Holiday Inn. They booked it, and will not return to Minnreg on Friday.

This afternoon, they decided to put on some additional speakers, and asked to use a room at Post Corner Pizza. That’s where the live feed is coming from right now, but we’re told the wifi there has severe problems.

But the organizers are hoping for a much better final night, with Jamie DeWolf and John Sweeney at the Holiday Inn.

“We’re trying to make the last night more professional.”

When we pointed out that Laura Flynn had publicly resigned when tonight’s live feed had begun, the organizer told us, “We were not expecting anything different.”

 
BunkerFlagDown

 
——————–

Posted by Tony Ortega on May 8, 2014 at 07:00

E-mail your tips and story ideas to tonyo94@gmail.com or follow us on Twitter. We post behind-the-scenes updates at our Facebook author page. Here at the Bunker we try to have a post up every morning at 7 AM Eastern (Noon GMT), and on some days we post an afternoon story at around 2 PM. After every new story we send out an alert to our e-mail list and our FB page.

Learn about Scientology with our numerous series with experts…

BLOGGING DIANETICS (We read Scientology’s founding text) 1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 7, 8, 9, 10, 11, 12, 13, 14, 15, 16, 17, 18, 19, 20, 21, 22, 23, 24, 25

UP THE BRIDGE (Claire Headley and Bruce Hines train us as Scientologists) 1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 7, 8, 9, 10, 11, 12, 13, 14, 15, 16, 17, 18, 19, 20, 21, 22, 23, 24, 25, 26, 27, 28, 29, 30, 31, 32, 33, 34, 35, 36, 37, 38, 39, 40, 41, 42, 43

GETTING OUR ETHICS IN (Jefferson Hawkins explains Scientology’s system of justice) 1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 7, 8, 9, 10, 11, 12, 13, 14

SCIENTOLOGY MYTHBUSTING (Historian Jon Atack discusses key Scientology concepts) 1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 7, 8, 9, 10, 11, 12, 13, 14, 15, 16, 17, 18, 19, 20, 21, 22, 23, 24, 25, 26, 27, 28, 29, 30, 31, 32, 33, 34, 35, 36, 37, 38, 39, 40, 41, 42, 43

PZ Myers reads L. Ron Hubbard’s “A History of Man” | Scientology’s Master Spies | Scientology’s Private Dancer

 

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  • outraged

    I see the slimey SCION child abuse right between the lines. Jada and Will: Parent your children OR SOMEONE ELSE WILL!!!!!!!!

    http://www.celebitchy.com/364807/will_jada_smith_think_willow_13_is_very_mature_were_covert_pedophiles/

    • aegerprimo

      Another example of BAD PARENTING by Scientologists.

  • j238

    Ron Wyden used to be one of the House’ leading anti-tobacco representatives. Then he abruptly abandoned the cause.

    Not the most reliable guy in Washington.

    • aegerprimo

      Can you name a reliable ANYONE in Washington? LOL.

      • outraged

        Yes. I have a good friend that lives near the Cathedral.
        Her name is Nori. :-}

  • SOL

    ok… Food trucks = Portland = the Frying Scotsman = best fish and chips* outside of the UK. (*I’ve ever had)

    And the absolute worst Mexican food was in Oslo… but bless their hearts, they tried.

    • Suppressive Meritorius

      Ever try mexican food in Melbourne, Australia? Take my advice, and just don’t.

      • SOL

        What should I eat in Melbourne?

        • Suppressive Meritorius

          Greek gyros… the best I ever had… even outside of Athens!

    • Robert Eckert

      Yeah, well try the Norwegian food in Tijuana!

  • aquaclara

    I just want to say that that in 2014, it is a shame that never-ins in Clearwater still fear the cult. How sad is this? And if never-ins feel this way, wouldn’t it be worse for exes?

    What a day this appears to have been. I was out for most of the day, get texts from two people saying Saturday’s plans have changed, are off. I can’t figure out why. I read Tony’s update, and there is no mention of the raid being cancelled.

    Is the raid still on? Is anyone going? And at the risk of stirring up a troublesome pot, is WBM going? (Not intended as a political statement, but just trying to an answer for some good friends.)

    By the way, how were the speakers tonight? Hope they were good. Wishing everyone luck in Florida! Yesterday’s pics were amazing!

    • outraged

      I am a never in and I fear the cult and don’t even live in Clear water.

      • aquaclara

        I share your outrage, Outrage.

        Damn discus on an iPad lets me read 40 messages or so, then drops off completely. I am now back three hours of messages, and still can’t figure out what happened. Whatever it is is scaring some good friends in my old home town. I guess tomorrow will turn up more.

        • outraged

          It gets ahead of itself.

          Just close the tabs. open new ones.

          It is a Mahjor Pain in THe pattootie.

    • Bury_The_Nuts

      Baby again. Yep protest still on! Don’t know if WBm showing up .

      • aquaclara

        Thanks, Baby-hope you’re having fun. Can you see if so done can put some posts up tomorrow that say so? I am too far away, but you know Clearwater is near and dear to my heart.

        Roots run deep.

        • ScientolOhGee

          A crop of 2

          • Elar Aitch

            sweeeeeet!

    • Mark Bunker

      I wouldn’t be going. If the raid is off, then Scientology spent a crapload of money closing their sidewalks for nothing. I shot a little video as I was driving home tonight:

      https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=vlv6LHvalc8

      • aquaclara

        Hi, Mark,
        I am sorry the LMT injunction still stands, and impacts your life in Clearwater, more than you might imagine. It was bad to begin with, and time has not helped it.

        I am sad to admit that I knew the Judge. Not well, but I did know him. Perhaps one day soon, it will be ever-so-sanely overturned, especially if someone with money and persistence to fight the cult can get this in front of judges who have not been threatened or bought off by the cult.

        I wish people didn’t have to be afraid of the cult.

        Thanks for responding.

      • ScientolOhGee

        Nice to see that footage! Thank you.

      • Sarah James

        David Miscavige wastes money like it’s on sombody elses dime. Oh, wait…

        • Missionary Kid

          Sarah, I’m putting that on the list of Things Said about David Mi$cavige. I’ll post it later. If Sarah’s your real name, I’d like to attribute it to you.

      • SOL

        Heck, the porta-potties alone must have set them back quite a bit. (Or are those standard issue for staff?)

        • Jon Hendry

          Staff has to sleep somewhere, and they’re an upgrade from the Fort Harrison.

          • Elar Aitch

            snort!

      • Missionary Kid

        I noticed all of the people that walked around the “sidewalk closed” signs from what is supposedly a closed sidewalk.

  • richelieu jr

    I take it this was the celeb tripe that Tony wasn’t commenting on (that much)?

    http://www.dailymail.co.uk/tvshowbiz/article-2616809/Hilary-Duff-exploring-Scientology-marriage-split.html

    • aegerprimo

      That is one of DOZENS of articles. LOL.

      • richelieu jr

        First I heard… So much for my finger on the pulse of this nonsense!

        I don’t even know who that chick is, besides someone surfing on the ‘I Kissed a Girl..” free publicity wave…

        • Sibs

          I think you had to be a child of the 90s/early 2000s to know who she is (she used to star on a Disney Channel show back then, and she had some movies too).

  • valshifter

    wow!!!!!, Im almost out of breath with the news, “thanks long time reader” for contacting your senator, and gracefully receiving a response, holly cow!!!!, this stone went far and made a little crack and hopefully will create a lot of noise. yeah is time the conn gets put on the spot. as Tory says tick tock

  • aegerprimo

    Another pic of Flag Down today posted by Smurf at ESMB. (refresh)

    • aegerprimo

      And another (thanx Smurf).
      ~ refresh ~

      • richelieu jr

        He has achieved the certificate of ‘Patronus Green-Ringus Maximus’!

        Good for Unum Refillus Gratuitus por Una CocaColacus Dietus wik Citronus Sliceus!

        **(notus goodus withus any otherus offerus. Offerus expiresus the firstus Junus.)

    • richelieu jr

      I’d love a version of this photo where you can move features around and put them on other people: Mark’s beard, the blonde hair with bangs, glasses…

      “Wise Bangs Man”.. Not so clever now,a re you, Mark (but oh-so-cute!)?

      • aegerprimo

        That would be funny, but I don’t think she would look good with a beard.

  • aegerprimo

    RED-X time!

    The Co$ spams Craigslist with ads to get people into their Idle Morgues or to buy books – to con people out of their hard-earned cash.

    STOP THE CLAM SPAM! Click on the link to help with this ongoing project.

    https://whyweprotest.net/community/threads/taking-down-co-on-craigslist-co-ads-on-craigslist.113779/page-80#post-2451869

  • SOL

    Just out of curiosity… anyone here ever had Mexican food in Mexico? I hear they do a pretty good job. 🙂

    • ScientolOhGee

      Some of the greatest vegetables, fruit and spices anywhere, with a variety of tastes in various regions. Pure delight.

      • richelieu jr

        Yes! Yes! Yes!

        And they do, fresh/sweet/spicy like nobody’s bizness!

        I had a mango/chilé/cilantro salsa there last time that was revelation and seemed to change composition with each bite!

    • Missionary Kid

      There are a lot of different regional types of cooking in Mexico. I’ve had some that wasn’t that good, but it was always in the tourist traps, where the menus were both in Spanish and English.

    • aegerprimo

      Yes. I traveled a lot in Mexico. The best eats are where the locals eat.

      • Missionary Kid

        That could be said about just about anywhere. When I travel, I ask for recommendations from locals that have no connection to the tourist industry. Sometimes, I’ve had some bad meals, but all-in-all, I’ve had some truly memorable meals in unexpected places as a result.

        • aegerprimo

          Yes, that’s the way I roll when traveling. A memorable meal and maybe an adventure to find it.

          • Missionary Kid

            People seem to appreciate that you’re trying to experience their food and culture. That’s probably why I’ll never take a cruise to visit other lands. I’ve had some of the best experiences of my life, and some of the most depressing when traveling, but I’ve always learned something, and sometimes it’s more about myself.

            • ThetaBara

              I think you’re always going to be insulated to some degree on a cruise, no matter how hard you may try to have the local experience. OTOH, having actually met you, MK, I would say you are better equipped than many to go find the actual reality. Please do keep us posted!

            • Missionary Kid

              I had an experience on a ship as a child. It was interesting because I was the only kid on a freighter coming back from China with my parents. I even got to steer it.

              I’ve also lived in Hawaii and watched the tourists come off the cruise ship, trying to experience as much as they can of the local color in their limited time ashore. The ship can’t sit there waiting for them because the cruise is all about going to different places, and they’re not making money sitting dockside.

              I would go for an anti-$cion cruise, or something that I’d be learning about, but that’s something that can also be done at an event like Flag-down.

              If I travel, I want to spend as much time with the locals, as far away from any tourists who want to take their culture and environment with or try to turn the locals into an extension of their home. I’ve been invited to visit my relatives in Sweden this year, but finances are tight. We’ll see.

            • ThetaBara

              You know what I always say: go visit your family! 😉

    • Simi Valley

      I had some pretty good chow in Old Mexico and some that was just OK.

    • richelieu jr

      Very rich and varied cuisine in Mexico. I went to high school for 6 months in Chihuahua where the cuisine is different from say, Baja (more seafood) or the Yucutan…

      I’m not a fan of Tex Mex, but some Americanizations of the Mexican cuisine I like a lot- Crunchy taco shells, for example… Others, nt so much- Why is every salsa either Verde, Red or Pico de Gallo? Ay caramba!

      • SOL

        Never been to Mexico, but grew up outside San Francisco and was able to feast on great eats in the Mission District (and beyond). Salsa-wise I confess I only make pico de gallo (wash your hands immediately after handling jalapeños, or you’re sure to accidentally scratch something… zero fun), but when I buy salsa it’s always Mrs. Renfro’s (from Texas). Their green salsa (jalapeño) has been a household staple since about 1980, and their mango habanero is great too.

      • ThetaBara

        Hey, lay off Verde! 😉

        • richelieu jr

          DOn’t get me wrong, I love all those things— I do! It’s just like if there were only Ketchup, muster and mayonnaise as choices for all American food, y’know?

          • Robert Eckert

            There are other choices besides ketchup, mustard, and mayonnaise?

            • richelieu jr

              Well, there’s your salt, your pepper, your mixing the three condiments together.. and then there’s getting the hell outta America if you don’t love it, you commie bastard! Ketchup is what made this country great… Why Abraham Lincoln his self used to eat ketchup sandwiches between two slices of dried mayonnaise…

        • richelieu jr

          Well, that definitely counts me out, then…
          I’m a child of the 70s and 80s…

    • richelieu jr

      I used to spend a lot of time in Mexico, ate everything and never, ever got sick (I did stick with beer and coke, though…)

      • Missionary Kid

        There are Mexicans who get sick in the U.S. because they encounter different bacteria here that they’re not used to.

        • richelieu jr

          If I were a Mexican in the US I would never stop throwing hop each time I turned on Fox News…

          • Missionary Kid

            You don’t have to be a Mexican to do that.

    • Missionary Kid

      One time, about 50 years ago, i was traveling in Mexico and I saw the item, “Quesadillas synchronadas” on the menu. Curious, and since my Spanish wasn’t that good, I couldn’t figure it out. What it meant was that they were quesadillas that were made with tow tortillas, putting the cheese and some of the ingredients inside, with salsa and guacamole on top. It was great. I’ve seen it at one other restaurant since, but it may be common, and I’ve just missed it.

      • SOL

        Sounds yummy (and messy). By weird coincidence I had a quesadilla tonight for dinner. Tillamook pepper jack cheese (local Oregon dairy) with Trader Joe’s tortillas. Low brow, but good.

        • ThetaBara

          Quesadilla = “Tex-Mex” which != “Mexican.”

          • SOL

            Just responding to MK… not making any claims about the origin of the quesadilla.

    • Huh?

      • SOL

        Slightly snarky reference to all the comments below about Mexican food in the US.

        • Oh.

        • outraged

          NYC has excellent mexican food.

          • Missionary Kid

            Years ago, a student and I flew across the country in a Cessna 150 )(Which, for a long cross country flight like that can be torture in that plane. We eventually made it to NYC for the last 200 miles by airliner, because the weather turned bad.

            After visiting there, and a couple of other places on our way back, we were so starved for Mexican food (NYC didn’t have anything decent then) that on our way back, we flew 100 miles out of our way to land at an airport in Amarillo that had one on the field.

            A friend of mine used to live in Oshkosh, WI, and I’d stay with him when I attended the airshow. There had always been a mediocre Mexican restaurant there, but when a second one opened up, some idiot wrote to the paper, saying, “How can Oshkosh support one more Mexican restaurant? We don’t have that many Mexicans here.”

    • Barbara Angel

      Slightly off topic there SOL ???

  • outraged

    Just to go completely off topic, BeyOnce Never Grew a Baby in her Belly That became Blue Ivy.

    Truth will out.

  • Erica

    I just sent off my letter to Mr.Wyden, a political figure I have always admired and respected. I really appreciated today’s post and encourage everyone else to write as well. The more voices the better. I also really enjoyed the interview with Claire Headley, she is somebody you just instantly like. She is bright, articulate and incredibly down to earth.

    • ThetaBara

      Good work!

  • outraged

    What the hell is He building in there?

    http://youtu.be/nMqxNPsfN50

    • Sir Hemet TC Burlwood, VIII

      Reminds me of another performance art piece: http://youtu.be/RV7Qz640OeM

    • Missionary Kid

      Blair Witch Project Redux?

  • Sherbet

    I couldn’t sleep, so I visited the Bunker for the latest from Clearwater, and what do I get? Mexican recipes and the NFL draft. Should’ve stayed in bed and listened to Mr. S snoring. Goodnight (again). I’ll see you in the morning. You know, when I’m supposed to be working. 😉

    • ScientolOhGee

      Priceless! G’night Ms S.

      • Sherbet

        Goodnight back atcha, ‘Gee.

    • Jimmy Threetimes

      Teh NE Pats drafted a burrito did u know ?

      • SOL

        For what position?

        • Jimmy Threetimes

          No position. Gronk hungry.

          • SOL

            Montana/Young Forever!

      • Sherbet

        Hahaha!

    • ThetaBara

      LOL. I just woke up and your “7hours ago” post is where I’m @ now. Don’t tell OSA about our army of insomniacs!

      • Sherbet

        Yeah, they think we’re getting paid to do this all night long. You know — the Big Pharma checks.

        • ThetaBara

          Hell, I’d settle for free meds.

  • Todd Tomorrow
    • Todd Tomorrow

      Thank you Troy I repressed this until I saw this. He was a son of a bitch!

  • Missionary Kid

    “If a man, holding a belief which he was taught in childhood or persuaded of afterwards, keeps down and pushes away any doubts which arise about it in his mind, purposely avoids the reading of books and the company of men that call into question or discuss it, and regards as impious those questions which cannot easily be asked without disturbing it–the life of that man is one long sin against mankind.”

    William Clifford, The Ethics of Belief – 1877.

    I just came across that quote. To me, it sure applies to $cientolgy, and that includes Indies.

    • outraged

      definitely. who is William Clifford?

    • SOL

      “It is wrong always, everywhere, and for anyone, to believe anything upon insufficient evidence.” From the same work, and something else the Scientologists should think about. Let’s see some evidence guys.

      • Missionary Kid

        A friend of mine has this at the end of his signature on every email: “A claim made without either proof or substantial argument is merely the mindless blathering of the ignoramus.”

        Benjamin Franklin

        lrh fits this perfectly.

        • SOL

          “We are the authorities on the mind.” — Tom Cruise

          • Missionary Kid

            You got the quote wrong. The correct quote is, “We are the authorities on the empty mind.”

            • Missionary Kid

              They know how to empty minds and wallets.

            • SOL

              They replace common sense with lunatic ravings, and exchange meaningless, fancy-ass diplomas and “status” certificates for money. I guess they’ll keep doing it as long as it’s profitable and “legal.”

            • Missionary Kid

              The return on investment is incredible: thousands of dollars for a mounted certificate that, even framed, costs less than $25. They’ll keep it up as long as they can.

  • valshifter

    Scientology is know for “morally repugnant practices”

    • Missionary Kid

      $cientology consists of “morally repugnant practices.”

  • media_lush

    Big double page spread in today’s The Sun….”I was Stalked by Scientology”, Flag Down report, Veronica Britton story… It’s a pay site so no link; hope these grabs from my iPad edition are readable

    • media_lush

      Spread split into 2 pages… should be clearer

      • Graham

        Thanks ML. That’s a very big thing to come from a very small meeting. Great stuff!

      • Barbara Angel

        Yep a ***Weird and Evil Hustle*** that’s co$ for you and I just Love, love, love seeing headlines and articles like this. Congratulations to the author and to ML for sharing with us. Thank you.

    • Barbara Angel

      Well all I can say is pay site or not, the More Headlines and Articles such as these the Better. co$ is crumbling and it sure must suck to be mustravage, kicking, hitting and screaming while his empire crumbles around him. How’s your blood pressure plonko davey?
      Maybe time for you to detox all that alcohol from your system? Oh wait it’s all the SP’s bad vibing you that causes you to drink to oblivion?

      • media_lush

        Even though it’s a pay site the print edition (which this is an exact copy of) is UK number 1….. Quite massive figures, really:

        The NRS estimates the combined weekly readership of The Sun across seven days at 13.6m in print and online versus a total weekly UK readership of the 12.2m for the Mail titles and Mail Online.

        • Barbara Angel

          Now you’re talking. Thanks for the Good News, 13.6m and 12.2m is ***Music to my ears*** Oh what a happy day. co$ is crumbling and mustravage must be close to hysteria. Lets hope he has a stroke and is left mumbling and drooling in a wheel chair at the mercy of those he tortured with such delight.

    • Elar Aitch

      Excellent

    • whingeybingey

      What a great piece!!

  • SOL

    Random thought: Maybe instead of torches and pitchforks, the angry villagers could go after COB with an assortment of these: https://tinyurl.com/mdkvgry

    • Graham

      You so corny.

  • Graham

    “John Sweeney was upset that the first night was really unprofessional”

    It must have been bad, because I wouldn’t say John was fussy. He was happy with our ‘Skeptics in the Pub’ venue, which was just a crowded room up a flight of steep stairs over a city-centre pub. It did however have facilities for plugging in his lap-top so he could ‘talk to’ his video presentation. Good to see that they’ve now found somewhere more appropriate.

    And such bad luck to have chosen the same week that $camatology was forced to close sidewalks for urgent building repairs. What are the chances of that eh?

    • GaLAXee

      About as coincidental as a priest volunteering to provide pastoral care to a Boy Scout camp out, I reckon.

    • Silence of the Clams

      That sidewalk is always being “worked on”. You know people can’t paint the outside of their house without some dick making them get a permit and pay yet a cult just blocks off main sidewalks and …. Crickets. Clearwater is a fair mixture of culties and spineless officials.

    • aegerprimo

      Coincidence? I think not.

  • Bury_The_Nuts

    It WAS unprofessional.
    Period!

    • Eivol Ekdal

      Go to Bed!

  • Pierrot

    Outraged by co$ abuses, exploitations and impunity.
    Frustrated, sick and tired of co$, flag them the hell out of CL

    https://whyweprotest.net/community/threads/taking-down-co-on-craigslist-co-ads-on-craigslist.113779/page-80#post-2451869

    FREELOADER Debt is ILLEGAL and CAN’T BE ENFORCED.
    DON’T route out, BLOW, Get HELP, get OUT.
    CALL 1-866-XSEAORG.

    Ty Ap & Barbara

    • Pierrot

      Mark is unhappy that co$ has been posting on his turf again.
      Help him clear the UK

      http://oxford.en.craigslist.co.uk/bks/4460025060.html

      • Graham

        Mystified as to why Bournemouth $camos should choose to advertise in Oxford. They are about 100 miles apart- a significant distance in English terms- and there’s no obvious connection between the two places. Plus Oxford hardly strike me as fertile ground for cult nonsense. Anyhow- duly zapped as requested.

        • Sibs

          Trying to find someone in Oxford who will give credibility to their “Oxford”-developed personality test?

        • Once_Born

          And they are selling their wares for ‘only’ £4 (~ $6.76).
          Perhaps they have a lot of unsold printed matter building up.

        • Barbara Angel

          Reeks of Desperation, anywhere and location will do, that way they can put this in their stats maybe? Under some sort of false category. Anything to avoid the RPF

    • Barbara Angel

      Two of the Boston lists are already down. Yay x 1,000
      As for JJ and his scamming fake English lessons, well the “Pox on him” and all his future generations. I’m sick of the sight of those ads. I’ve become the, ‘organised genius’ as per the Scamming ads and go about Flagging them is an organised way. lol
      Also haven’t seen the idiot from Ventura for a while? Remember him and his post bait of, ‘dear bored person’? Well since then I pay particular attention to Ventura, so thanks Ventura Idiot for helping me feel as tho’ I’m having some success. And thank you Mr Pierott for all your hard work and for making it easier to go about Flagging in an *organised genius* way. Heeheehee Evil Cackle……

      • Innoculated

        I’ve been red xing some of JJs ads–am I doing it right? I just, you know, Red X and leave it. What does that do?

        • aegerprimo

          It flags the ad, and with enough flags the ad will be taken down.

          • Innoculated

            thanks

            • aegerprimo

              Thanx for helping!

        • Juicer77

          You’re doing it so right. All the red X’s help. Thanks!

        • Barbara Angel

          The more Red X’s the scamming liars ads receive, the more chance they are removed from C/L. C/L has a moral responsibility and formal protocol to allegedly protect people from dishonest scammers, but seemingly turn a blind eye. So thank you so much and please continue, *every Red X counts*. Wait until you see lists of 30-40 or even 50 ads in a row all posted on the same day, plugging ‘dianutic’ books. Books that they can’t get rid of. I strongly suspect the Ideal Morgues are stacked to the ceilings with this rubbish. So, *go get em* please.

    • Graham

      “The South Coast Mission is offering free information and help to anyone who is interested in learning about getting rid of depression.” Anyone who has any experience of helping people with depression would be very wary of using negative, aggressive images such as “getting rid of”.

      “The techniques that we use have helped millions of people over the last 50 years. Now, you can try it for yourself. They are scientifically proven.” No they’re not. LYING BASTARDS!!

      This is why I flag!

  • Tomas Santana

    This is the basic problem for the Church: Although the church claims that most of what it receives for services is a “donation,” this claim is invalidated by the fact that staff members who leave staff are handed “freeloader debts” for the services they received while they were on staff. These freeloader debts can sometimes run into the hundreds of thousands of dollars. Obviously, if staff members are being “charged” retroactively for services that they received while on staff, those are NOT considered “donations” by the church, but instead compensation in exchange for work performed by the staff member. In other words, an organization obviously cannot present someone with a bill for donations owed, as per the church’s own policy, staff members who break their contacts are to be charged at the highest rates for services rendered. Additionally, this raises a problem for staff members that the IRS has yet to explore or rule on: If staff members are receiving compensation in the form of auditing and training to the tune of tens or hundreds of thousands of dollars, staff members shuld be paying income taxes on that exchange per the IRS code. This means that virtually every staff member in the U.S. owes the IRS big time technically speaking for current and back taxes. The church would also owe the IRS certain employee taxes (although they are except from some as a religious organization).
    The IRS should be made aware of this situation, as well as state and municipal taxing agencies. It would cause an incredible problem for staff and for the church and it is a big chink in their armor with regard to their claim of the money they receive being a “donation”. (staff members cannot receive services until this debt is paid off, by the way, and the invoices the staff member signs states that they agree to pay in full in the case of contract breakage).

    • DodoTheLaser

      Good analysis/food for thought, Tomas.

      Considering the fact that staff/sea org members are “volunteers” and were paid almost nothing,
      I doubt they owe anything to anyone though, received “services” or not.

      The greed of this organization defines it and its final destiny.

      • Tomas Santana

        You see, that’s the point, it doesn’t matrter what your “status” is i.e., “volunteer,” “emplyee,” “independent contractor,” etc.; per the IRS code, if you receive an exchange you are supposed to pay taxes on it. Not to get to wonky, but this is exactly why the church does what it does. The initial response is to dismiss this point because staff members are just “volunteers” and don’t get pai anything (I kno because I was on staff and worked at the highest levels in finance, legal, etc). There is no situation thast I know of whee a “volunteer” gets charged for working. And my main point is that if th church itself puts a price on services and states that the staff member then owes that amount, then it can not possibly fit the IRS definition of a “donation.”
        As a side note, we were taught in the church that the best way to “dead agent” a source was to use their own words, practices, actions, etc., against them. The church can’t have it both ways: Either the amounts paid are voluntary donations given without expectation of any exchange, or they are hard and fast prices paid in exchange for services rendered. I know for a fact that the management of the church is well aware of this paradox and are just hoping it does not become an issue with the government because at this point they really don’t have a good legal argument that justifies their position on this. Instead, the strategy (when I was in) was to avoid the issue entirely by hiding behind the religious curtain. This way they would not have to explain an action for which there is no explanation.
        Trust me, they fear former staff going to the IRS to sort out this “freeloader debt” issue because it exposes them to potential investigation of their internal records.
        That woul cause an absolute freakout, and since some members of congress seem to be getting interested, it is just another potential source of investigation–and that is the real objective here.

  • Sibs

    It’s 4:03am PST and I almost started freaking out refreshing because a new article wasn’t coming up. When you know it’s time to put the phone away and try to get to sleep again…

    • ThetaBara

      Right? OMG, what is happening in Florida right nao?!

      • Innoculated

        Sleeping, my guess…

        • DodoTheLaser

          Tony rarely sleeps and when he does, he keeps a pillow under his laptop.

      • Juicer77

        One of the cats is sleeping on his keyboard 🙂

  • DodoTheLaser

    Somewhat related:

    “Fewer IRS Tax Audits Could Cost U.S. $3 Billion”
    http://www.nbcnews.com/business/taxes/fewer-irs-tax-audits-could-cost-u-s-3-billion-n99471

    Hmm…

    • Sibs

      Hmm…
      Guess it’s to be expected, though, that people and companies will keep their money and not pay as much taxes as they should if they can help it. But it doesn’t bode well for them having the fight-power to face the cult-monster all over again.

      • DodoTheLaser

        I guess. IRS can use some IAS’ cash.

      • Barbara Angel

        The cult monster is crumbling and mustravage won’t want to part with his personal stash of a billion. So he may have to piss off into hiding with his money bags, until someone trained by him to be brutal, cruel, vicious and mega greedy will topple him. You must have pulled all this in mustravage. lol

  • DodoTheLaser

    Master Of Puppets. Seems relevant.

    http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=xnKhsTXoKCI

    • noseinabk

      End of passion play, crumbling away
      I’m your source of self-destruction
      Veins that pump with fear, sucking darkest clear
      Leading on your deaths’ construction

      Taste me you will see
      More is all you need
      Good Choice Dodo.
      Partial lyrics.

      You’re dedicated to
      How I’m killing you

      Come crawling faster
      Obey your master
      Your life burns faster
      Obey your master
      Master

      Master of puppets I’m pulling your strings
      Twisting your mind and smashing your dreams
      Blinded by me, you can’t see a thing
      Just call my name, ’cause I’ll hear you scream
      Master
      Master
      Just call my name, ’cause I’ll hear you scream
      Master
      Master

      • DodoTheLaser

        Ironic, isn’t it? Thank you for the lyrics, Nosei.

  • ScientolOhGee

    scientologysts ask, You want to know what was at stake in 1993, $cientology vs. I R S ? [Youtube video- David Miscavige about IRS Victory: Scientology Planetary Salvage.]

    Oh! Gee!!

    • DodoTheLaser

      Sure.

  • hatetomcruise

    Again, I’m just a lurker here, but why is the only coverage of Flag Down negative? The only two stories I’ve seen have been about the “drama” and “chaos”. When did it become the Mark Bunker show? I was so looking forward to everyone pulling together for an event that’s never been done before, and all I’ve seen is bickering and drama queens. Such a disappointment.

    • DodoTheLaser

      Don’t you worry.

    • D.Y.G.

      What do you want, daisies and unicorns? There are attendees and speakers saying it was unprofessional. Hell, one of their own organizers said it was “embarrassing”. There was a lot of drama and chaos. I suppose we could have all ignored it. There were people there trying to fix it.

      ETA: Nice snipe at Mark Bunker. The event was advertised as open to the public, which apparently meant public minus whoever they didn’t want to be there.

      Whatever.

      • hatetomcruise

        I was hoping to see coverage of the speakers and maybe even some interviews with attendees. My disappointment is that the only coverage has been about the negative aspects. The only photos I see are of Mark Bunker – not a snipe, just an observation.

        • DodoTheLaser

          It’s not over yet.

        • Sherbet

          I’m waiting for the post-game coverage. There may be some truth to what you say, and Mark Bunker has achieved rock star status, but IMO, the purpose was to enturbulate cos in a very public way, right under their noses. If the media do their job, then more people than ever will know the truth about cos. If that happens, then Flag Down was a good idea and a success.

          Regardless of the “drama,” I have to give the organizers props for taking this on.

        • Qbird

          gotcha fine there ~ “Every saint has a past & every sinner has a future.”
          Oscar Wilde

    • Juicer77

      Let’s all watch the live stream tonight, and rewatch the previous speakers. The drama will go by the wayside. The message is important. Tony will give us a recap when all is complete.

    • noseinabk

      Not ALL drama. It looks like many had a good time and some great speakers made do with what they had.

      • DodoTheLaser

        It’s a derail Op.

        • D.Y.G.

          Yeah you’re right. Sorry I got snippy.

          • DodoTheLaser

            No need to be sorry, brother.

        • Observer

          Since we’re already off the tracks, have you played Titanfall yet?

          • DodoTheLaser

            Not yet. Postulating to play Borderlands. Still nostalgic of Halo. I feel old.

            • Observer

              Both Borderlands games are amazing, and gorgeous to boot. The third one is in the works.

  • DodoTheLaser

    Kudos to Jeffrey and Claire for the radio podcast.

    • Qbird

      discernment. ?

  • media_lush

    well, bugger me! – who knew OJ Simpson was a scientologist?….here he talks about going clear… http://youtu.be/trFvqpmml_8

    • Barbara Angel

      Well that explains his behaviour, perhaps he thought it was ok to bash someone to death. She must have pulled it in? Grrrrrrrrrrrrrrr

      • Charlotte

        Fair Game. He disconnected from her.

        I feel ill.

    • Charlotte

      Just when I thought I couldn’t love OJ more.

    • D.Y.G.

      He said there’s nothing after “clear” lol

      • Barbara Angel

        A prison sentence maybe?

        • D.Y.G.

          Bloody gloves and a low speed Bronco chase.

    • D.Y.G.

      I think we can all agree his cause over the MEST universe was shit.

    • richelieu jr

      Well, O.J., what’s true is true for you (but it may not wash in a court of law!)

    • richelieu jr

      “If the definition of ‘clear’ is baloney
      then this man is guilty of a felony”
      ——–
      “If this man cannot define Clear
      sentence him to a Billion years, plus one year.”
      ——–
      “If he says ‘clear’ is all-knowing
      The up his someone smoke was blowing…”
      ——-
      “If his idea of clear is inadequate
      then don’t vote to acquit this idiot? Convict! Convict! Convict!”

      And if he still remains stubborn
      go dig up and convict Hubbard!”

    • richelieu jr

      “His understanding of ‘clear’ inspires pity, but–
      OJ Simpson, Scientologist, Idiot”:

      If something is dodgy and smells like Bullshit
      OJ Simpson, Scientologist, thinks you’ll believe it

  • Innoculated

    new post is up now

  • Sunny Sands

    If anyone was waiting for Victoria Britton’s speech, an organizer is reporting on WWP she has flown back home without giving one.

    • Juicer77

      I’m sorry to hear that.

  • Juicer77

    For clarity: Darth Xander on WWP says Victoria Britton’s return flight was yesterday (she was scheduled to speak earlier in the week). Could be that she had pressing matters/work to return to at home.

  • Sarcasmo

    Just a thought.

    How about a Bunker sanctioned/led, well worded petition to the White House demanding the IRS investigate the abuses of Scientology with the goal of revoking their 503(c) status.

    Regardless of the outcome, the petition would most likely generate the 100,000 signatures needed requiring a response from the White House. Major media would pick up on the story. At the very least, another PR nightmare for Davey and even more people in the general public would be made aware of the abuses of Scientology. Perhaps it would be another nudge for the IRS to actually take action.

    • Robert Eckert

      We’ve been there done that

      • richelieu jr

        Yup.

        • Sarcasmo

          I did a little Google search and see how there was an article back in VV days. I was reading the blog back then but was out of the country and lacked internet access for the months surrounding that post. Living in South America (un)fortunately means there is no one to discuss Scientology with as no one’s heard of it so I have to rely on the Bunker for my fix, unlike when I lived in Los Angeles and Tampa.

          • richelieu jr

            No offense intended, I’m sure. None of us are au courant of everything, not even Tony…

  • Bella Legosi

    😀

    I said it last year……hope this comes to fruition. Get that impeachable evidence and put these bastards where they belong……jail or the poor house!

    http://youtu.be/SbyAZQ45uww

  • 1subgenius

    And that’s why I’m no genius: mass media has not picked up this story.

    “You wouldn’t know a diamond if you held it in your hand
    The things you think are precious I can’t understand”
    (Becker/Fagen)

  • moisan4 .
  • deanblair

    YAY!