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Why would an academic speak up for Scientology? Dr. Stephen Kent has an answer.

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Rod Keller continues to dig deep into Scientology’s online and social media offerings, and this week, he takes another look at the organization’s newest website…

This week we spoke with another non-Scientologist featured on Scientology’s new website promoting the organization’s recognition and acceptance as a religion. We also spoke with Dr. Stephen Kent about how some academics view Scientology, and how such positive viewpoints might be developed.

Dr. Derek Davis is the former director of the J.M. Dawson Institute on Church-State Studies at Baylor University. He is an author, the former editor of the Journal of Church and State, and is also an attorney now in private practice. He is a recipient of the Human Rights Achievement Award by Scientology’s Freedom magazine in 2004. At Scientology’s new website, here’s some of what Davis says in a video…

I had the opportunity to read a number of his writings, and I don’t think there’s been anybody that I’m aware of who was more prolific as a writer. So quite an impressive fellow. There have been people throughout history who were brilliant men. I think of people like Isaac Newton and Albert Einstein, Thomas Jefferson – these people were brilliant people, but those people didn’t have the range that he had.

So I think the world could benefit a lot from L. Ron Hubbard. It is an ideology that has captured the minds and hearts and trust of millions of people around the world. A lot of people had their lives improved, greatly enhanced, through reading about L. Ron Hubbard and his ideas, becoming members of the Church of Scientology. And millions would testify to the benefits of being a Scientologist. So in that respect he has made a real contribution to human life.

When we spoke to Davis this week, he recalled making several videos for Scientology, but none recently. He was unaware that the video is available for viewing on the Internet. “Which video? I don’t know where I was, it might have been in L.A. or in my office. It is probably six or seven years old.” He first encountered Scientology as an academic. “I was Director of the Church-State Institute at Baylor which served to examine the relationship between religion and government, both domestically and internationally. Scientology was very strong in their recognition of the separation of church and state and their support for freedom of religion. They did a lot in the community. They had an active drug prevention program, and supported poverty programs. I made some friends in Scientology, and read some of their materials, which are voluminous. There were some from Texas, some from DC, and some from Hollywood, Germany, Russia and different countries. So I got to know a lot of them. I didn’t always agree with what Hubbard wrote, but he was obviously a very intelligent person. I read Dianetics, and it was interesting. He dealt with how to access the human mind, and how to deal with people’s hang-ups.”

I asked about allegations of human rights abuses by Scientology, and the reports of mistreatment from former members. “I’m aware of all those problems, all those accusations. I even interviewed some former members, it was probably 15 years ago. They were pretty critical, and I’ll just say that I wouldn’t be a member. A lot of that may have some basis in fact, some may not. There are critics of all religions throughout history. There are Muslims and Jews who accused the Christians of a massive genocide. In the Bible, the book of Judges when Israel came into Palestine, they destroyed literally tens of thousands of people. Same thing with the Crusades. So every religion at some point has been accused of being bad or heretical. The Protestant Reformation was an accusation that the Catholic religion was heretical and abusive, and before that the Catholics broke from the Orthodox Church for some of the same reasons.

“I try to look at the positive side of Scientology – the good things that they do. Do they do harm? They probably do some harm. But you could make charges like that against any religion throughout history.”

I asked where he got the figure about there being millions of Scientologists. “I think there are millions. I forget the number that they claim, about 4-6 million Scientologists. I never did any independent study on the veracity of that figure, so it could be off by quite a bit.”

 
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Dr. Stephen Kent is Professor of Sociology at Alberta University and studies harmful groups including Scientology. I sent the link to Dr. Davis’ video and asked him for comment.

It’s astonishing in this day and age that he can heap praise on Hubbard in the face of so much critical information about him and the organization that he founded. He praises Hubbard for being something of an astronomer and a biological researcher! Scientology must have fed a lot of information to him, which he accepted without checking other sources. Even 15 years ago, critical but insightful information about Scientology was on the Internet. An accurate commentator needs to be intellectually curious, and this curiosity doesn’t seem to exist here. He also says that he spoke to former members. If they made allegations about Scientology’s own human rights and religious freedom violations he doesn’t seem to have assimilated the implications of these probable violations. Intellectual curiosity should have motivated him to pursue further whatever the former members relayed to him, but he likely did not treat their insights with the seriousness that they deserved.

 
HubbardTomato

 
Baylor is a private Baptist university. I’m not familiar with how conservative the institution is, but in some conservative circles people are afraid that religion in general is under attack by secularists and that religion as a whole needs to respond to the attack. Scientology’s claims to be a persecuted religion may be enough to make one come to its defense. While academics with faith-based backgrounds don’t agree with Scientology’s doctrinal claims, they still may feel that even ‘wrong’ religion is better than no religion. By supporting Scientology, one is indirectly protecting one’s own religion and opposing a more secular society. Also in these conservative circles, the widespread distrust and fear of secular media likely prevents them from either viewing or accepting information about Scientology that appears in various print, audio, and visual sources. This distrust is not just of things like celebrity tabloids, but more broadly extends to the intellectual press, most recently in evidence by the widespread support for Donald Trump.

 
keller42p5

 
I don’t think he is representative of academia, and most academics would not believe the version of Hubbard’s life-story promoted by Scientology. A perspective exists within the sociological study of deviance known as the “bad apple” theory, which claims that organizational problems are the fault of a few renegade members.When sociologists, however, examine organizational deviance, we tend to look at structural issues – issues which assume that individuals usually are acting according to the rules that the structure requires of them. That structural perspective can include the realization that psychological, social-psychological, and psychiatric issues involving organizational leaders can set the norms for members’ beliefs and behaviors. Hubbard’s likely malignantly narcissistic personality certainly colored the doctrines of Scientology and the people who operated within it, and now Miscavige’s personality does the same. I’m not clinically qualified to say definitively what constitutes his personality construction, but at the very least he seems to be problems around aggressive and suspicious impulses. One can’t understand contemporary Scientology and the Sea Org today without understanding what goes on within Miscavige’s head.

Our great thanks to Dr. Kent for providing us such a detailed reply.

 
— Rod Keller

 
——————–

Our Scientology year-in-review: June

We’re continuing our look back at the year of 2016 here in the Underground Bunker, and today we’re looking at the stories we published in June.

Ross Blocher and Carrie Poppy finished up their nine-episode podcast series after their infiltration of the Church of Scientology had finally been discovered by church officials. As we said then, “their shows were consistently great, and they filled in a gap in Scientology watching that we just don’t get from reading Scientology materials or interviewing ex-members.” In the end, Carrie pronounced Scientology “ridiculously creepy.”

With the passing of the Greatest, we recalled the time in 1981 when Scientology took a run at Muhammad Ali by roping him into a goofy music video, “Get High on Yourself.” Ali was one of many sports and entertainment celebrities to take part, including Bruce Jenner, Magic Johnson, Julius “Dr. J” Erving, Henry Winkler, Carol Burnett, Hervé Villechaize, and even a few film legends, including Paul Newman and Bob Hope.

We’ve been following the story of Dani and Tami Lemberger since the mission they run in Haifa, Israel, the Dror Center, broke away from the Church of Scientology in a bold rebellion. On June 9, we published Dani’s “declare,” the church’s document that spells out a member’s excommunication. It’s getting more rare to get our hands on declares, so it was very interesting to read one about a former member who has so publicly stood up to Scientology leader David Miscavige.

Another bold move we admired was Cathy Schenkelberg’s decision to take her one-woman show on the road. Cathy has distilled her experiences as a Scientology “public” who gave the church about a million dollars into a stage show, “Squeeze My Cans,” that has been getting rave reviews. She plans on taking her show in the road again in the coming months.

With shrinking membership and controversies on many fronts, how does David Miscavige push back for public acceptance? Would you believe, re-issuing L. Ron Hubbard’s ponderous 1982 science fiction doorstop Battlefield Earth after 34 years? Rod Keller took a close look at the campaign to push the book, which was definitely an effort by the church itself.

On June 20, we wrote our first story about the Russian-language media kerfuffle being kicked up by a Kazakh mother who said her 20-year-old daughter, Rigina Hikmatulina, was being held against her will by the Church of Scientology in Florida. Later, we heard from the family itself in this dramatic story.

A few days later, we had a lot of fun writing about what happens when Scientology sort of permanently messes with your ability to think. Just take a look at our rundown of Randy McDonald’s bizarre self-published fever dream “The Watergate Hoax,” and you’ll see what happens when you take L. Ron Hubbard’s words a little too seriously.

On June 25, we reported the death of Megan Shields, a Scientologist doctor that many former Sea Org members remember as the person they were sent to for check-ups and treatment. Shields also vouched for Scientology’s quack drug rehab program, Narconon.

It was also in June that we were the first to let the cat out of the bag and announce that Leah Remini was shooting a television series about Scientology. We had no way of knowing what a huge hit Scientology and the Aftermath was going to become.

And finally, we had fun with the newest round of Scientology “OT Phenomena” from Advance! magazine. When its spokespeople send letters to the media, Scientology pretends to be about personal growth and social betterment. But these great magazine pieces show what really keeps Scientologists in year after year and forking over the big bucks: They want the super powers told in these ghost stories by high-level OTs.

A LOOK BACK AT JUNE 2015: We wrote about that time Jim Jones talked about Paulette Cooper from his Guyana compound. We wrote about a person in our book, the inspirational Len Zinberg. We did some live-blogging from the epic Toronto conference organized by Jon Atack. We broke the news that Scientologist Ponzi schemer Reed Slatkin had died. Some poor schlub went to prison after trying to hack Mike Rinder and your proprietor on behalf of Scientology. And we had our biggest audience yet with Paulette Cooper in Clearwater, the belly of the beast.

A LOOK BACK AT JUNE 2014: Another distressing disconnection story: Where is Sami Sterne? A rare audio recording captures L. Ron Hubbard and his wife Mary Sue using an e-meter to come up with the space cooties portion of Scientology. Why we think Original OT 8 is not a hoax — the George White story.

A LOOK BACK AT JUNE 2013: Channel 4’s documentary about Marty Rathbun, Scientologists at War, Neil Gaiman’s Scientology history behind his novel The Ocean at the End of the Lane, and Joe Childs on Denise Gentile’s blunts.

 
——————–

3D-UnbreakablePosted by Tony Ortega on December 26, 2016 at 07:00

E-mail tips and story ideas to tonyo94 AT gmail DOT com or follow us on Twitter. We post behind-the-scenes updates at our Facebook author page. After every new story we send out an alert to our e-mail list and our FB page.

Our book, The Unbreakable Miss Lovely: How the Church of Scientology tried to destroy Paulette Cooper, is on sale at Amazon in paperback, Kindle, and audiobook versions. We’ve posted photographs of Paulette and scenes from her life at a separate location. Reader Sookie put together a complete index. More information about the book, and our 2015 book tour, can also be found at the book’s dedicated page.

Learn about Scientology with our numerous series with experts…

BLOGGING DIANETICS: We read Scientology’s founding text cover to cover with the help of L.A. attorney and former church member Vance Woodward
UP THE BRIDGE: Claire Headley and Bruce Hines train us as Scientologists
GETTING OUR ETHICS IN: Jefferson Hawkins explains Scientology’s system of justice
SCIENTOLOGY MYTHBUSTING: Historian Jon Atack discusses key Scientology concepts

Other links: Shelly Miscavige, ten years gone | The Lisa McPherson story told in real time | The Cathriona White stories | The Leah Remini ‘Knowledge Reports’ | Hear audio of a Scientology excommunication | Scientology’s little day care of horrors | Whatever happened to Steve Fishman? | Felony charges for Scientology’s drug rehab scam | Why Scientology digs bomb-proof vaults in the desert | PZ Myers reads L. Ron Hubbard’s “A History of Man” | Scientology’s Master Spies | Scientology’s Private Dancer | The mystery of the richest Scientologist and his wayward sons | Scientology’s shocking mistreatment of the mentally ill | Scientology boasts about assistance from Google | The Underground Bunker’s Official Theme Song | The Underground Bunker FAQ

Our Guide to Alex Gibney’s film ‘Going Clear,’ and our pages about its principal figures…
Jason Beghe | Tom DeVocht | Sara Goldberg | Paul Haggis | Mark “Marty” Rathbun | Mike Rinder | Spanky Taylor | Hana Whitfield

 

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  • Intergalactic Walrus
    • Harpoona Frittata

      More straight up and vertical growth for the cult! At that rate, they’ll soon be finished clearing this planet and will be off to the next in a great, theta-tastic, planet-hopping diaspora of $cilons throughout the known universe. I don’t know about you, but I can hardly wait to see them off!

  • Sarah James

    Dr. Kent is ” off by a bit” LOL.

    • chukicita

      That wasn’t Dr. Kent. It was Dr. Derek Davis who never looked farther into Scientology’s claims than what they handed him themselves. Plenty of neutral sources are available to him, but he chose instead to accept Scn’s perception of itself.

      • Sarah James

        You are right! My mistake.

  • nottrue
    • Hence – Religious applied philosophy. My ass.

  • nottrue
  • mockingbird

    Happy holidays to all the Bunkeroos, lurkers and even OSA operatives too. Whether you celebrate Christmas, Hanukkah or R6 , happy holidays and a great new year to you !

    I have tremendous respect for the work Doctor Stephen Kent has done regarding Scientology and though I certainly lack his credentials and expertise as a mere layman I strongly concur with several of his opinions and conclusions regarding Hubbard, Scientology and David Miscavige too.

    • What happened to your avy?

      • mockingbird

        Long story. I blame Facebook.

  • chukicita

    Do they mean… *that* Mohammed?

    What actually happens at an IAS World Tour event?

    It’s funny, at work we participate in public meetings that involve city and county official agencies dealing with big events that impact the city like the RNC in 2012 and the Super Bowl and even smaller ones like annual community celebrations. But there wasn’t even a logistics meeting about this major event coming up on Saturday:

    https://uploads.disquscdn.com/images/381ccc98ee3b8f159fc8abd8e3d66ae8f13f255668c23ffd99c098628df2ff49.jpg

  • mockingbird

    One idea from professor Kent that really impressed me – and frankly I hope it isn’t just because I separately reached the exact same conclusion myself – is in this quote:

    “When sociologists, however, examine organizational deviance, we tend to look at structural issues – issues which assume that individuals usually are acting according to the rules that the structure requires of them. That structural perspective can include the realization that psychological, social-psychological, and psychiatric issues involving organizational leaders can set the norms for members’ beliefs and behaviors. Hubbard’s likely malignantly narcissistic personality certainly colored the doctrines of Scientology and the people who operated within it, and now Miscavige’s personality does the same. ” Stephen Kent

    I cannot emphasize enough that supporting evidence exists for this perspective from the ancient philosophy of Greece to A Theory Of Cognitive Dissonance by Leon Festinger to linguistics work by George Lakoff to more modern neuroscience by folks like James Fallon (not the one from Saturday Night Live) and David Eagleman to “classic” cult experts like Robert Jay Lifton and Margaret Singer.

    Even newer cult experts like perhaps the top one for Scientology in particular Jon Atack and Steven Hassan and Rick Alan Ross have excellent information on this and Doctor Daniel Shaw has focused like a laser on the relationships that are abusive and cultic with his book Traumatic Narcissism.

    I as many people here already know personally see Hubbard as a narcissist of the highest degree and quite likely a malignant narcissist as doctor Kent described and the subgroup within that classification of traumatic narcissist that Doctor Shaw elaborated further on.

    His personality as a model for Scientologists to emulate is unfortunately one of the worst kinds possible to follow. Jon Atack recently wrote an article on predators and in my opinion whether they are called narcissists or sociopaths or psychopaths they hurt and abuse people as a way of life and Hubbard was one and David Miscavige is one.

    • ReallyMGM

      Excellent comment, MB. The reading list is essential reading for someone wanting to understand how someone gets duped any dangerously cult or organization. I started with snippets from the older experts years ago in a university communication class (which was taught much differently than a sociology of religion class), then since coming to the Bunker have read the “modern” experts. I have gone back to read more of the older experts work since thanks to your recommendations. I have even read a number of apologist’s opinions.
      I find it striking how similar the techniques for recruitment, retention of members/workers, and punishment are in the dangerous cults of the past and present. I have often wondered what the founders and leaders reading material included, who influenced them and if there are any commonalities.

      • mockingbird

        Thanks.

        I think several key factors influence the similarities in cult leaders methods. Daniel Shaw has commented on this at length as has Margaret Singer, Steven Hassan and Rick Alan Ross.

        I concur with the idea that the dynamics of an abusive relationship are the inner core of a cult and reflect the abusive and predatory traits of a cult leader himself or rarely herself.

        I think the personality traits we attribute to narcissists, sociopaths and other predators are the most basic building blocks for a cult. Additionally tools like methods from earlier abusive relationships as in totalitarian regimes and cult and covert persuaders like some hypnotists or gurus get borrowed then experimented with and expanded.

        The biggest predictor of cult membership is past cult membership in another group, similarly the biggest predictor of being a cult leader is likely haven been in an abusive or cultic relationship before.

        It’s been remarked that some disturbed or deranged individuals get very easily radicalized like Timothy McVeigh who reportedly read the Turner Diaries or Dylan Roof who read white supremacist propaganda online.

        The ones who become cult leaders often have experience with cultic groups and information on past cults or effective persuasion.

        Many cult leaders emulate Hitler and use his propaganda techniques. Many cult leaders use the methods of past ascended masters like Madame Blavatsky herself.

        They use whatever they find in my opinion. Whatever boosts their individual egos and seems effective to them.

        Fascism and abuse often fit the bill. Hubbard took elements of both.

        Some just use lies, most use scapegoating the vulnerable and social pressure, gaslighting is older than writing and false promises are probably older than the spoken word. A few dozen common methods are practically universal in cults.

    • Harpoona Frittata

      I was going to use that same quote as a point of departure myself. Instead of using the word “colored” to describe how Elron’s malignant narcissism relates to $cn doctrine, I’d use much stronger language to describe it as “dominating and pervading” every aspect of what is now looked on as the religion’s holy scriptures that were handed down as if from on high by infallible Source, and are now interpreted by lil davey alone.

      Elron died still trying to telepathically exorcise all those hundreds and thousands of imaginary demonic spirits that continued to haunt him, while lil davey refuses all auditing, despite having free and ready access to the most advanced levels of spiritual processing known to man. Not exactly a ringing endorsement by either of the two clowns who’ve gained the most from running this con!

      • Ben Franklin

        For a Scientologist, refusing to be audited is like a Christian refusing to pray. DM somehow gets away with it and no Scientologist can dare question him for refusing to be audited.

      • mockingbird

        I am extremely cautious about elevating one anecdote to a place of explaining and tying together a lot of information on the mind and beliefs of Hubbard. The Sarge special Emeter story is one claim.

        It even if accurate as far as what Sarge witnessed doesn’t magically transform Hubbard into a truth teller in that moment. Pathological liars and collapsed narcissists are notorious for never revealing the actual truth.

        I just see the claim as first unproven. Then if Hubbard did ask Sarge for the Emeter as claimed it alone doesn’t prove Hubbard was entirely honest with Sarge.

        There’s a lot of complexity to the minds of gurus and Hubbard was no exception.

  • Jenny Griffith

    So, I was volunteering at Blue, today. Handing out free, pre-paid phones, so they can call their families. Of, course I was followed, and pictured, all the way back to my car. I thought I lost them in the alley. But they got me!
    There was a group of young people, from Africa. I confirmed that they are sea org. They wanted the phones and took them inside, but security, quickly confiscated them and brought them back outside to me. I called the police to make sure those foreigners were safe. Police can’t do anything unless someone screams for help. I stayed three hours, circling the building and told them a group of us will be here, everyday, for the next month, or so. https://uploads.disquscdn.com/images/0cb64933b66bc8d457a62719fab585b39cba20fafb4e4682a96a9038d1dfc183.jpg https://uploads.disquscdn.com/images/e8b67bce59582fb0e983fdaad2dcf3361667aa23f13d7ab2f2efd01f0e786906.jpg https://uploads.disquscdn.com/images/97b16378b8f9eb82e1aea32e0d3f39420a9d3dfafc0f12005042692ae80c3010.jpg

    • Wow… this is good…real good – going out!

    • Great work. Thank you.

    • Harpoona Frittata

      Excellent work! All of these foreign nationals that the cult has suckered into the scam are particularly vulnerable, due to being unfamiliar with the culture and their rights here in this country, and a result of being dependent on the cult for food and shelter (forget about the money). Not to mention the fact that their passports have been confiscated and, after their visa stay is up, the cult can threaten to turn them in to the authorities and tell them whatever lies they like about that process.

      I’d truly like to know how many foreign nationals that the cult is currently exploiting in just the L.A. and Clearwater areas. My bet is that it’s a significant and growing number. After all, other than a few second or third gen $cilon kids, there’s almost no one who hasn’t been clued in about the cult yet and how much of a waste of your life it is to join the $ea Orgy. Next, they’ll be smuggling them out of North Korea, which is about the only place where the level of mind control and brainwashing are even worse 😉

    • You are awesome.

    • You are awesome.

    • Free Minds, Free Hearts

      This is wonderful, Jenny – how scary bat the young people from Africa. I am 95% certain they are victims of human trafficjkgin snd do not have freedom of movement.

      There is a local LA group http://www.castla.org Their hotline (LA) is 888-KEY-2FRE(EDOM) or 888-539-2373.

      I think of you call them and report what happened, perhaps they will followup.

    • Missionary Kid

      You can tell them that it is illegal for anyone to hold their passports. All they have to do is to contact their embassy or the police or sheriffs.

      Someone else can advise you about what the exact procedure is or law. Make sure you have the correct information before you pass it on.

    • Missionary Kid

      Don’t do it alone! Make sure you have people with you. Now that $cientology knows who you are, they will take measures.

    • TheMirrorThetan

      Wouldn’t it make more sense to hand out prepaid phone cards and coffee cards?
      Things that they may be able to use and hide from the guards. Because they confiscate every thing they are given from any non scientologist, and phones are too hard to hide in your pocket, even if they wanted to keep them. And please be careful, they love nothing better than to set up watchers, especially lone ones, and they will outright lie to police and in their court statements.

  • OT: Any1 have the youtube link with Jenna Elfman confronting & shattering screaming about killing babies?

    • Liberated

      No, I’ve seen that but don’t recall where.
      I do know exactly where the utube video is where she tells Seth Meyer ” she would blow a horse if she could watch Netflix ”
      I had originally thought it was on Letterman but I was wrong.
      It’s on late night with Seth Meyers…….may 2014. She was promoting a new tv show she was beginning and she wore a brown dress and her hair was short. Only thing it says the video is no- longer available.
      I’ll never forget Seth’s face when she said that….I couldn’t believe it either.

      • hmmm… maybe they have tried to clean up all their insane stuff… that’s not going to happen on my watch.. Damn!

        • Liberated

          Did you try?
          Go to the Seth Meyers show Jenna Elfman and the date and see what happens…remember you’re better at this stuff than I am.

          • Ok so you think it was a clip from a show? It’s not the “blow job” i need it’s the clip where she scream like mad to someone “How many billion Babies have you killed today???” or something like that

            • Liberated

              The only time I’ve seen her attack a reporter “still raping babies ” ” still killing babies ” was on the red carpet when she was going inside an award show.
              You know how all the celebrities stand around and talk about fashion before the show begins, it was one of those deals.
              I know try the “emmy’s” and see if there’s footage there.
              Has-been tv stars love to go to those type of events. Makes them seem relevant, of course Bodhi was hanging on to her for dear life…or should I say paycheck?

            • yeah that’s the one. tnx!

            • Post the link if you would.

            • can’t find any links..

            • It read like you had found it.

            • nope sorry!

            • April

              I thought she screamed “how many babies have you raped?” on a sidewalk in public. I could swear that I’ve seen the video somewhere. I want to say there was some protest going on, perhaps?

            • yeah me too.. a very short clip.. lot’s of text on this… but that clip 🙂

            • Robert Eckert

              I don’t think it was captured on video when she shrieked at the guy with the T-shirt about killing babies. It was talked about immediately afterwards (and of course angrily denied). My memory might be mistaken though.

            • this is funny… i am so sure i saw her face freaking out like this. But if your right, this is called something else in technical terms. A mystery to be solved 🙂

    • I believe it only exists in text story form.
      http://www.tmz.com/2006/06/13/when-elfmans-explode/

      • Not text but…

        According to Roecker, whose encounter was first reported on LA’s KROQ-FM’s Kevin and Bean Show, the invective started to fly after he made several references to Scientology theology and its reported central tenent, the story of Xenu.

      • No it was on youtube or rutube some time ago, but tnx… it must be somewhere!

    • Harpoona Frittata

      “Elronic”…love it!

  • nottrue
    • April

      For comparison, I just asked my Alexa (Amazon Echo) “what is scientology” and she tells me it’s a “body of religious beliefs…based on the work of author L Ron Hubbard.”

      I also asked her if I should become a scientologist. She said, “I don’t understand the question.”

      • ReallyMGM

        I asked Siri and she sent the first paragraph of the Wikipedia page which starts with the same sentence, but since she didn’t say it I feel cheated.
        A friend has an Alexa and we spent an hour one night asking it totally ridiculous things just to see what it would say back to us. Same thing when Siri came out.

  • OT: New Twitter Activist @bertleahy please follow!

  • Kjibbers

    Let me ask you all something?
    Leah Remni said Scientology makes you feel like you are saving the planet. How can giving the “church” so much money for classes make you feel like you are “saving the planet”?

    I do not mean that in a sarcastic way at all. Serious question. I know celebs are treated differently, but how can the person and celeb feel this way? What are they doing to “save” the planet?

    • gtsix

      Because one is told so. You believe, because you have been taught too, and your teachings, in their oppressive repetitive manner have indoctrinated you to not question. Questioning is not allowed. When you are told the church’s front groups are helping, you believe. When you are told your church is expanding, you believe. You do not question, because you cannot question. And so it goes.

      Hope that helps.

      • April

        And if a scientologist asks questions about where all of the money is going, they’re quickly whisked off to “ethics” and made to pay thousands of dollars for “security checks” because only a criminal with ill intent would question the CO$.

    • jazzlover

      The pretense of “higher purpose” is one of the initial hooks. It gives good-hearted individuals a sense that they are joining a group that helps mankind, and sets them up for the bigger cons.

    • Ben Franklin

      Scientologist are led to believe that the organization is doing things that would literary save the world by getting rid of all human problems such as wars, crimes, diseases etc. Think of it as being somewhat similar to a person giving money to, let’s say, a charity organization such as Greenpeace because they believe in the cause, and trust that the organization is saving the planet by doing important things that will save the planet from destruction.

      • Kjibbers

        LOL they don’t help anyone. Their “yellow shirt” people go out and recruit and waste resources. Oh my.

      • Kjibbers

        One I can’t get over is Leah Remni being told she didn’t have the rank to ask about Shelly.
        Think about that..
        you don’t have rank to ask about another human being.

    • madame duran

      Scientologists believe that by donating money to various Scientology projects and paying for the “church” courses, they are not only improving themselves but are also helping/saving/improving humankind…much in the same way as any non-Scientologist would feel when donating to charitable causes. Scientology teaches its followers that it is creating a “new civilization” of superhumans (Homo Novis) and ONLY SCIENTOLOGY is capable of “saving the planet”. Scientologists truly believe that Hubbard is “mankind’s best friend” and are willing to give their all to support Scientology above everything else. Scientology must become top priority.

      The cult frames itself as the ultimate solution to the world’s problems then takes advantage of a person’s idealism, goodwill and ambitious drive to achieve Scientology’s sinister goals under the guise of “for the greater good”. The cult approaches its mission with a sense of urgency…much in the same way as governments are trying to stop ISIS or deal with climate change. Before you laugh, think of a cause or passion that’s dearest to you and reflect on how much time, money, and effort you’ve already spent (or are willing to spend) on it. Don’t you want a cure for AIDS/cancer/Alzheimers? Don’t you strive for equality and political reform? Don’t you want a better environment for the next generation? Well, how much are you willing to sacrifice to achieve those things? “C’mon! Scientology isn’t as important as that stuff!!” you’ll say (and I agree). But that’s YOUR frame of mind, not a Scientologist’s own.

      It’s a reasonable expectation for donors/students to see results for their expenditures and for there to be transparency. This is what separates the legit charity organizations from the shady ones. Scientology is big on fundraising but short on actual charity. There’s no Scientology hospital or orphanages or food banks. Scientology is only interested in three things: money, power and control. The cult is constantly pressuring its members to donate large amounts of cash but it always has to create the illusion that it is helping, expanding, achieving greatly. It either hides the true information of the leader’s intent or keeps members distracted from noticing anything awry. Keep them busy with opening new org buildings and re-doing courses 2-3 times. Keep up the urgent pressure to “save the planet” instead of addressing inconvenient questions. There’s no time to waste or think on anything that would suppress the work of Scientology, mankind’s greatest hope. Eventually some Scientologists will get tired of the lies or excuses to explain the lack of results but some will buy into that urgency again and again.

      • Kjibbers

        Oh wow.
        Thanks for answering.. this a lot to take in..

  • Anne

    I’m a conservative Catholic and no one of faith that I know supports Scientology (I mean come on, a lot of Scientology’s defenses of their abuses are a thinly veiled attack on Christianity and the Catholic Church in particular– anyone who’s cared to do even just a little research would know that). Then again, I grew up in Hollywood just blocks away from the PAC base, so I’ve always been somewhat familiar with the Scientology environment since I was little. Perhaps Dr. Kent’s explanation certainly is true for lukewarm, holier-than-thou cafeteria-Christians who parade themselves as religious champions just for the sake of being religious (I have noticed that the ones who are generally accepting of Scientology are evangelical Protestants…).

    Off tangent personal story: one of my distinct memories growing up in the 90s and early 2000s was my mom taking me to the Ukrainian Catholic church on De Longpre Ave. The church’s parking lot is connected to another lot next to an apartment building on Fountain Ave. I remember walking to church with my mom and seeing large groups of people on Fountain dressed the exact same way (navy dress pants, white shirt) and almost moving the same way, like robots. Most of them looked pretty glum too. I eventually figured out they were Scientologists and it wasn’t until a few months ago when I found out that that apartment building on Fountain is mostly occupied by Scientologists (I think it has a name but I forgot what it was). It always creeped me out as a kid and I remember wishing my mom would take some alternate route to church so we could avoid that particular crowd.

    I think it would be a mistake to say that religious people are accepting of Scientology just because “religions have to stick together these days” (an idea that I personally do not agree with whatsoever– even my own Church’s hierarchy is not off-limits when it comes to my criticism). Quite a lot of us are smart enough to see a profit-driven corporation using the religious label as a disguise to take advantage of tax-exempt status for what it is. I think it was Tony himself who said once that no other religious organization copyrights their scripture like Scientology does.

    • You make some valid points.

      I don’t think Dr. Kent meant to suggest that all religious people are that way. Just that the religious people who are, are that way for those reasons.

    • Missionary Kid

      It really isn’t a matter of smartness to end up avoiding $cientology. You were fortunate to observe $cientology in their own back yard, so you could see how they live. The hatred and dislike for $cientology is palpable in Hollywood.

      Many people end up in $cientology, the Moonies, and Hare Krishna because they are approached at a vulnerable time or are seekers and love bombed. It’s an emotional decision to join Co$.

      Scientology is all PR. They try to manipulate people in ecumenical movements, just like they do for drug programs with Narconon and the way they use medical mistake or over medication issues for anti-psychiatric propaganda. (The interesting thins is that most psych drugs are not prescribed by psychiatrists). Scientology is a wolf in sheep’s clothing that tries to get whoever they can. After all, lying is a sacrament in $cientology, and they use it all the time to advance their PR.

    • What’sup

      Ain’t love grand.

      • gtsix

        Guffaw.

    • April

      At first I thought the lettering on the bottle said “Weed Fund.”
      I need to get new reading glasses.

    • Supper Powers

      Looks like they are cut from the same cloth.

  • Humanity is about to get over the entire religion thing. Science, humanism.

    • Ben Franklin

      Only temporarily before someone finds another way to cash in. Those three things will only go away forever when humans finally figure out the origins of life.

      • I want science and humanism to stay.

        • Missionary Kid

          I don’t accept that religion and science are somehow connected. It is based upon belief. If you draw a Venn diagram, the circles don’t intersect. Unfortunately, there are people who deny evidence, and many are in particularly fundamentalist groups.

          Humanism will always be with us. It is actually in some parts of religious attitudes. Some religions like to claim that without religion there is no humanity. I disagree.

          I am a humanist, and I realize that many of my humanist attitudes came from my religious upbringing, but I also realize that religion isn’t necessary to care for your fellow man and woman.

      • kemist

        We mostly know.

        Some don’t want to accept it, because the answer they want has nothing to do with the truth, and more to do with their ego.

    • Missionary Kid

      I disagree. I’m an atheist and over religion, and I’m a humanist, but I would say that religion will always be with us. The reason? People have a need to believe in something invisible that causes things to be the way they are, because they cannot see causation, or, to them, (and everyone else) some things are unexplainable.

      The universe is, to me, random, and science doesn’t have all the answers, because there are many things that are not yet explainable by science. Some people, define god as the unknown. I do not.

      Many people cannot put up with an idea that life is, to a certain extent, a crap shoot. They want certainty, and religion often supplies certainty. Many people can’t abide by the thought that this is the only life for us, so they posit that there is some afterlife or spirit world, or thetan or a human spirit that exists beyond our meat sack.

      For those reasons, religion will still be with us.

      • kemist

        Science is optimized to yield truth, not comfort.

        There are a lot of answers which are already there, that people just won’t accept. Just look at the evolution of species. It’s a powerful theory that explains pretty much everything there is to know about the origin of humans. But evolution does not make us special. It makes us a species of primate and forces us to see our humble origins as mammals, who share common ancestors with fungi.

        Some people can’t stand this idea.

        • Missionary Kid

          Good points. Belief overrides knowledge all the time.

          • April

            “Belief overrides knowledge all the time.”

            It doesn’t have to, though. My mom was both a microbiologist and a devout christian. She had no qualms about accepting the science of evolution and fitting it within her belief system. She also studied evolution in college, which I’m pretty sure 99.9% of creationists never have.

            • Missionary Kid

              What people forget is that many, if not most, Christians believe in evolution. It is the fundamentalists that don’t believe in it, and make the claim that they have the truth,as well as that they represent all Christians.

              The Catholic church kind of learned it’s lesson with Galileo, but it took them centuries to apologize for maintaining that the earth was the center of the universe and for imposing their theory on Galileo.

              Most creationists misstate what the theory of evolution, and go through all sorts of logical and mental gymnastics as well as self-deceptions and ignoring of facts.

              The biggest dildo, as far as evolution is concerned, is Ben Carson, who doesn’t believe in evolution, in spite of the fact that he’s an MD, but he’s a Seventh Day Adventist. I’m sure that he ignores the fact that he sees evolution in the bacteria that are changing right in front of him as successive generations acquire immunity by natural selection.

            • Robert Eckert

              He doesn’t do pathology, so he doesn’t have to think about bacteria. He would disbelieve the germ theory of contagious diseases, if his church told him do.

            • Missionary Kid

              You’re right about the not thinking about bacteria.

              I believe he’s a willful idiot.

    • gtsix

      Oh you drunken optimist you. Adorable.

      Will respectfully disagree. Luvs ya.

  • jazzlover

    The grim reaping of 2016 creeps along. Today, one of the founding members of jazz fusion super group Weather Report – drummer Alphonse Mouzon – died of a rare form of cancer at the age of 68. Here he is with guitar great Tommy Bolin:

    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=XufniaDQam4

  • ithilien

    Has anyone ever done a touch assist with someone while they were ‘on the cans’?

  • ithilien

    So a persons grasp really should exceed their reach, after all

  • Tony Ortega

    I’m trying to read the stories from the Tampa Bay Times “Money Machine” series (Nov. 2011). But none of the links on this page seem to work: http://www.tampabay.com/specials/2009/reports/project/part9.shtml

    Does anyone know where the original stories might be backed up? And Tampa Bay Times, what the fuck?

  • AntoniaW

    Well there are “academic institutions” which are also seriously crap in terms of world rankings. http://www.evolutionnews.org/2006/09/new_disclosures_in_baylor_deni002590.html

  • Observer

    Joy really does look lovely in spite of whatever that is on her head. I just hope they choose not to bring any second-generation Scientologists into the world.

    https://uploads.disquscdn.com/images/bc2c99520952bfd7ddfd7f0cdaab9021d9f20d9792ecd6fca3847a19e41b21f4.jpg

    • i just wonder.. who is paying for who, in this?

      • jazzlover

        Do you mean that metaphorically? LOL. As far as realistically, his family’s got a considerable amount of money, so…..

        • his fam… thought so 🙂 she will stay until, i mean if, she get’s her own $

          • jazzlover

            Could be a while 😉

  • Supper Powers

    I have spent the last 4 days with my sister. After telling me I’m weird for watching the church, she is now interested. She has seen the A&E ads and is going to start watching the show. I have tried to explain what Scientology is, what is supposedly does, what is wrong with it and why this show is so devastating. I cannot adequately answer her. Is there a video y’all would recommend for her to watch that sort of sums it up? I find Tony to be the best person to explain it in a nutshell. Anyone have any recommends for the first introductory piece? Thank you.

    • What’sup

      It’s a little long in the tooth now, but America’s Book of Secrets is a excellent starting point. Our man’s in it too.

    • jazzlover

      Mine was “Going Clear”. My jaw was dropped enough to investigate further. Sara Goldberg’s story was the cherry that sold how evil the cult is for me. Also: tax shelter (theft and criminal infiltration of United States government), hiding behind the veil of religion to deny people the rights the church stubbornly claims it’s entitled to (hypocrisy) and Nuremberg type rallies (genocide). Those just to start. Warn your sister that she’ll be in for the long haul 🙂

    • Supper Powers

      Thanks for insight to people who reply. I’m now starting her on Episode 3 of Leah’s show. I’ll get to other recs tomorrow. Much appreciated.

    • Missionary Kid

      Another suggestion is to simply click on the links above that follow the small plug for The Unbreakable Miss Lovely (Which is something she could read). The links are following, “Learn about Scientology with our numerous series with experts…”

    • Qbird

      I think Jason Beghe’s interview by Mark Bunker is very cool. Followed by John Duignan’s series.
      The 1st, a rich celebrity’s experience, the 2nd, an average joe’s experience.
      There was an interview of Tony more recently that I thought was a great overview but I can’t remember which one it was! 🙁
      Carrie & Ross’s series was fun. Cut her loose in uTube & XENU TV and she where she goes. 🙂

      • Supper Powers

        It’s a guided Youtibe tour. Digestible pieces. Thanks for the idea about Beghe. That video is good.

        • Qbird

          do you need a link for “Going Clear” – to watch for free?

  • Gib

    somebody needs to give Dr. Derek Davis a SRA

    THERE ARE NO CLEARS OR OT’s

    what’s all this fuss about religion, LOL

  • davegrille

    Academics are often immersed in a very separate reality .One can be against the excesses of Scientology and endanger all religions .

  • Intergalactic Walrus

    Leah sneak preview is on A&E now.
    ETA: It was a 15 minute clip of tomorrow’s show with Marc Headley explaining what happens at CO$ events and that the statistics given out there is bunk used to extract money from the clams.

    • chukicita

      Awesome!

    • Missionary Kid

      I wouldn’t have seen it, but I’ve got my DVR to record anything new. Again, it’s kick-ass.

    • jazzlover

      Which one? LOL

  • Observer
    • Qbird

      okay, can you say serendipitious?! I just got home from work & my desk is in shambles! Everything except the monitor & the mouse pad is knocked off & all over the floor. The cats must have had a rumble right on top of it & shit is everywhere… so I clean it up, turn on the ‘puter & see this post Obs! hahaha!

  • Tom Klemesrud

    The larger significance has once again been missed at the bunker.

    https://books.google.com/books?id=LFWgAwAAQBAJ&pg=PA478&lpg=PA478&dq=korshak,+get+high+on+yourself

    • Tony Ortega

      Our MK-Ultra programming prevents us from revealing those connections, you know that Tom. Don’t be silly.

      • mockingbird

        Yikes. Conspiracy theory stew anyone ?

        I recently found a post someone might be interested in regarding Hubbard and the sources he plagiarized from to create Scientology and Dianetics.

        Is exposing “sacred science” and effective tactic in stopping a cult
        Posted by: E.P. Grondine

        Re: Is exposing “sacred science” and effective tactic in stopping a cu
        Posted by: E.P. Grondine ()
        Date: April 01, 2008 03:02AM

        In my first message on this topic, I noted that when
        your deal with a con man who writes, which generally
        describes any cult founder, then inevitably you’re
        also dealing with a plagiarist. The question
        at hand then is who did Hubbard plagiarize.

        I tracked Hubbard’s life to the
        point of demonstrating to a fair degree of certainty
        that Hubbard had likely plagiarized author A.E. van
        Vogt, president of the Los Angeles Sceince Fantasy
        Society which Hubbard participated in, and I pointed
        out the van Vogt himself had likely been inspired by
        the work of black science fiction writer and LASFS
        member Volney Mathison.

        Now, thanks to science fiction fan Darat at:
        [forums]. randi.org/ showthread. php?t=107533,
        we can show that Hubbard did indeed plagiarize
        “dianetics” directly from van Vogt:

        “From his height of greater understanding he assured
        the younger individual that the affective incident
        must be looked at from a different angle than that of
        a frightened youth. Assured him that fear of pain and
        fear of death were emotions that could be overcome,
        and that in short the shock incident which had once
        affected him so profoundly no longer had any meaning
        for him. More than that, in future he would have
        better understanding of such moments, and he would
        never again be affected in an adverse fashion.

        “It was one more Null-A training make-shift, as had
        been all the others. But is was a system of
        self-therapy that was scientifically sound, and which
        would bring definite benefits.

        “Relax,” the voice soothed on. And because of what he
        was doing, every word meant, “Relax the tensions of a
        life time. Let all those past fears and doubts and
        uncertainties be discharged from the nervous system.”

        “The effect did not depend on any belief that
        something would happen, though conviction made it more
        powerful. But it would take time. There were many
        suppressed memories that would have to be skillfully
        brought out in the open, before the therapy could be
        used on them.

        from The Players of Null-A, A. E. Van Vogt, 1948. The
        publication year for that book again was 1948.
        Published in 1948, and written by Hubbard’s friend van
        Vogt earlier.

        Hubbard lifted van Vogt’s work and concepts and ran
        with them. As with most plagiarists, Hubbard then
        filled in his “research” by going back to van Vogt’s
        sources. While Hubbard’s ex-wife Sara’s memories of
        exactly what occurred must be viewed with some
        caution, there is little doubt about the dates she
        gives:

        “Sara Hubbard told me: “In the late forties I remember
        reading “Science and Sanity” by Korzybski, and I
        became very excited. So I began reading aloud to Ron
        and he became very excited too. He became a big
        follower of Korzybski… .” “And much of Dianetics
        relates back to the works of Count Alfred
        Korzybski… .” Interview with Sara by Bent Corydon
        from L.RON HUBBARD, Messiah of Madman?, Bent Corydon
        and L. Ron Hubbard, Jr. (a.k.a. Ronald DeWolf)

        Of course, Korzybski had been van Vogt’s main
        inspiration long before Betty ever met Hubbard.

        van Vogt’s research on hypnotisim from 1945, which
        Hubbard also had full access to, was published much
        later “Among other things, I wrote “The Hypnotism
        Handbook”, for a psychologist. That was in late 1949,
        though it was not published until 1950″ – from the
        Charles Pliatt interview with A. E. van Vogt. Which is
        strange, as we know from materials elsewhere that van
        Vogt was working on this book in 1945.

        We not only know from other accounts that van Vogt was
        working on this book in 1945, but that Hubbard
        practiced hypnosis with him. Undoubtedly a look
        through the bibliography of van Vogt’s book will
        reveal other sources which Hubbard used to fill in his
        plagiarism.

        “In his book “The Mneme”, published in 1923, Richard
        Simon used the term “engram,” which he considered to
        be a “stimulus impression” that could be reactivated
        by the recurrence of “the energetic conditions which
        ruled at the generation of the engram. ” In this
        connection Sara Northrup, Hubbard’s second wife,
        married to him during the inception of Dianetics,
        mentioned that prior to Dianetics he was familiar with
        Simon’s work.” Interview with Sarah by Bent Corydon
        from L.RON HUBBARD, Messiah of Madman?, Bent Corydon
        and L. Ron Hubbard, Jr. (a.k.a. Ronald DeWolf)

        So how essential was van Vogt’s work to Hubbard?

        “You see previously I had met Hubbard in 1945; I had
        dinner with him and about a dozen other persons, and
        it became apparent to me that he was very mystically
        oriented. [in other words, Hubbard was practicing
        Aleister Crowley’s OTO “magick” with Jack Parsons.] So
        when there was, later, not a line of that in the book
        [Dianetics] I thought, by God, this has really got to
        be a good system, because it has already knocked that
        out of him!” Charles Pliatt interview with A.E. van
        Vogt. Sadly, van Vogt never did seem to realize that
        Hubbard had simply found a new con. But then Hubbard
        was both a very good hypnotist as well as being a con
        man.

        How complete was Hubbard’s con? van Vogt would later
        complain that Hubbard’s followers had harassed him,
        but he never seemed to realize that it was Hubbard
        himself who was guiding those followers. Perhaps it
        was cognitive dissonance, perhaps it was hypnotic
        suggestion, or perhaps Hubbard was just a really
        really good liar.

        Did van Vogt ever receive any justice?

        “I think at this juncture, dead or alive, he [Hubbard]
        fell into his own insanity, and that’s quite
        sufficient punishment. That is the most terrible jail
        of all, to be trapped inside his own head. With him it
        must be like being locked inside an exploding
        fireworks factory with no way out.” – Ron Hubbard Jnr,
        Penthouse Magazine interview.

        “And really, as far as crimes go, I think my father
        has received the ultimate punishment, which is being
        locked and trapped in his own insanity. There’s no way
        out for him.” – Ron Hubbard Jnr., Penthouse Magazine
        interview.

        What drove Hubbard to lie and con throughout his life?
        I suppose that is a question for professionals more
        skilled in that sort of work than myself. More
        knowledge about the minds of cult founders would
        undoubtedly be of great benefit to many.

        A pressing problem at hand is what help we will be
        able to give the scientologists of today as their
        belief system collapses, and the organization’ s abuses
        end.

        Some people knew her as Betty,
        E.P Grondine

        • jazzlover

          Oops! I thought you were the other bird, then I read your first sentence. LOL

          • there are so many birds and then there is still the other bird 🙂

        • So who did Van Vogt plagiarized? Eh?… eH… Eh! The virgin Mother? j/k

          • mockingbird

            Well, some authors do research in different ways. Harlan Ellison has described his vast collection of thousands of comic books as his research.

            • I knew it. and Van Vogt was writing Sci-Fi in a magazine called “True Story” it all make sense and now we are doomed.

            • mockingbird

              I don’t know about our doom.

        • In his first publications of dianetics, Hubbard used ‘connenome’ https://scicrit.wordpress.com/2014/12/05/terra-incognita-the-mind-l-ron-hubbards-prototype-for-dianetics-and-scientology/ (I’ve probably spelled that incorrectly ‘cos I’m in a rush) and then ‘Norns’ https://scicrit.wordpress.com/2015/03/11/dianetics-and-scientology-in-astounding-science-fiction-part-three-the-big-reveal/. This was changed at the last minute, for the book, because Norns were mythical creatures and Dr Winter (part of the ‘Inner Circle’ with John W Campbell) thought it didn’t sound Scientific. He suggested ‘engram’ (the scientific term for ‘memory trace’) instead.

          So it wasn’t taken from AE Van Vogt. Besides, SF writers at the time passed each other’s themes and ideas back an forth like the Jazz musicians of the time did with music. Both AE and Hubbard’s ‘interviews’ in Platt are here: https://scicrit.wordpress.com/2014/09/12/dream-makers-an-interview-with-l-ron-hubbard-in-exile/

          Although Hubbard undoubtedly did plagiarise (and downright steal ideas from people – e.g. ‘study tech’) it’s too easy to see it everywhere. Fringe groups arise out of the ‘cultic milieu’ – ideas that are ‘in the air’ at the time, and just dress the same few up in different ways. Hubbard was just a lot more catholic about his sources.

          • mockingbird

            I have heard the comanome idea in a very old tape lecture. I thought the quote was interesting.

          • Robert Eckert

            *comanome, from coma (as in “deep trance”) + nome (Greek root for “law”)

          • mockingbird

            Regarding the he stole study technology anecdote. That has long been a kind of break on critical analysis of study technology. I have examined it and his statements on a variety of topics and analysis of it from multiple sources.

            Study tech as it was presented by Hubbard in my opinion is designed to fulfill his intentions as described in several references and highly unlikely to have been plagiarized exactly as it is. In fact it’s nearly impossible.

            The form it is in is so tied to dozens of Scientology concepts it’s almost impossible in my opinion. He may have stripped parts from others and filed off the serial numbers and then put together what became study technology but that is far different from pure plagiarism.

            • I forget their names, but the story is that two teachers were going to present their ‘research’ at a dianetics meeting (back in the early days, when the ‘advance ‘ of dianetics was supposed to be a cooperative endeavour).

              They submitted the documents in advance, then attended a Hubbard lecture. They were astonished to hear everything they had written presented by Hubbard as his new research.

              I think the amount of stuff he just plain stole is underestimated, as is his consistency. The history of Scientology isn’t that of a carefully researched plan coming to fruition – it’s a series of ad hoc responses by a man who used others and was often off his head on various drugs.

              ‘Study Tech’ probably appealed to him because of its simplistic nature and they way in which it could be used for control. For example, the notion that the only reason you do not understand a text is that you have gone past a misunderstood word (constantly reiterated in Scientology material) operated to make the text infallible – there is no longer any option to suggest that the writer is wrong, or has made the slightest mistake.

              That would appeal to Hubbard. It harmonises with his unfalsifiable claim that Scientology is 100% effective if applied correctly – and may even have been influenced by that doctrine.

              It could have been stolen as a whole, and incorporated into Scientology as Hubbard went along. This is certainly the line of least resistance, which he seem to have preferred.

            • mockingbird

              I have done several hundred hours of research that supports the idea he combined elements of hypnosis or dependence producing methods with everything he took. I can provide hundreds of Hubbard’s quotes that support the idea he tried to combine his understanding of cultic attempts at persuasion and hypnotic techniques and his extremely limited understanding of psychology.

              The idea that he just took study technology whole cloth is just not plausible to me. He twisted and turned every bit of it to tie into other concepts in Scientology.

              I have heard that anecdote about him stealing study technology and using it unaltered and don’t find it to be useful for examining study technology.

            • mockingbird

              Especially to the ex Scientologists and Scientologists that don’t understand undue influence or thought reform simple short answers are dangerous. They can accept them and then never look further or weigh and consider evidence.

              Here’s part of a post on what Hubbard did that ultimately refers to study technology. He used it because he felt it fulfilled his purposes laid out here:

              It’s been said that in the very earliest years of Dianetics and Scientology Ron Hubbard wasn’t as good at hiding his intentions as he would later become. I examined the transcripts of several tapes Hubbard made in the early fifties and some from the sixties as well. I found the tape from the Philadelphia Doctorate Course numbered 39 that described the games maker actually outlined how he created Scientology in extreme detail.

              Here’s a group of quotes from that tape that describes this with a commentary afterword.

              The MEST universe would have you believe this is the only game there is anyplace in the whole of anything. That’s not true! Not even vaguely true.

              Games are going on with all kinds of rules, terrific interest levels and so forth. All right, I’m going to read off for you this paper just so we’ve got it on the tape. How many minutes we got? – five minutes. That’s plenty.

              „The aberration above time is ‘there must be a game’. Now there’s a postulate up there, ‘there must be a game’ and there’s an interest level and therefore it enters into a flow. And ‘there must be a game’ and ‘there must not be a game’. So you have the Un-maker of Games quite as important as the Maker of Games.“

              Now we get „The rules of games are as follows: Limitations on self and others, obedience to rules, unconsciousness of rules to add reality“ – we pretend the rules are real.

              „ARC with others to play. Pain as a penalty which will be obeyed“ – you have to have a penalty that will be obeyed. Otherwise, nobody will stick with the rules.

              „Agreement to rules and penalties is necessary to continue a game.“ And boy, are they! „Deterioration of a game until no game“ – cycle of action shows you the whole game is an object with no action.

              You know, the… the… the wienie finally becomes everything there is, and there is no action even to get the wienie.

              „Work is admission of inability to play“ – if you have to work, you can’t play, obvious. They really yap about that here.

              „A game of complexity and levels“ – the Tone Scale is such a game. It’s just a map of MEST universe games.

              „Peculiarity or liability of a maker of game, people attempting to play the game of Maker of Games“ – it’s a game itself. Your big capitalista or commissar will do that.

              „The game called Maker of Games results in No Game. And the game called Unmaking Games results in a game. 8008.“

              „There’s a game called freedom,“ which is what you’re playing right at this minute. „

              And Games contain trickery and misdirection to win“ – your 180 degree vector of Have and Agree. „

              The prize of winning is making a new game“ – what do you know? „Or permitting a new game to be made or making it possible for a new game to be played.“ Those are all prizes, and that’s all the prizes there are. ”

              “The necessity“ – oh, of course, there’s these gimmicks, these wienies and so forth. But everybody just knows that they’re spurious as hell. Uh… „The necessity to have a new game coded before one ends the old game.“ Otherwise, everyone becomes a maker of games with no game.

              Now, “The value of pieces. Ownership of pieces may be also the ownership of players. And the difference between players and pieces, and the difficulty of pieces becoming players“

              boy, when a piece becomes a player, there’s really a hell of an upset in the game; it’ll just blow. Oh, the quarterback walks out of the football game and all of a sudden starts to run the whole football game, and nobody can tell him „No.“ That football game’s dead.

              Now… so you’ve got to hide the rules from the pieces, otherwise this is going to happen.

              „Now the caste system of game consist of this: The Maker of Games, he has no rules, he runs by no rules.

              The player of the games, rules known but he obeys them. And the assistant players merely obey the players. And the pieces obey rules as dictated by players, but they don’t know the rules.“

              And then, what do you know. There’s broken pieces, and they aren’t even in the game, but they’re still in the game.

              And they’re in a terrible maybe: „Am I in the game or am I not in the game?“ Now, „How to make a piece. This is how to make a piece: First, deny there is a game. Second, hide the rules from them. Three, give them all penalties and no wins. Four, remove all goals“ –

              all goals. „Enforce them… their playing. Inhibit their enjoying. Make them look like but forbid their being like players“

              – look like God but uh… you can’t be God.

              „To make a piece continue to be a piece, permit it to associate only with pieces and deny the existence of players.“

              Never let the pieces find out that there are players. Now out of these you’re going to get games.

              Now here’s a process that has to do with the making of games, and all this process adds up to, is you just address to those factors which I just gave you, oh, run and change postulates and any creative process that you can think of and shift postulates around, you get a whole process.

              But remember, that up at the top of it there is a big postulate, „There must be a game.

              “ Therefore if you want to regain the Spirit of Play, people have got to unmake postulates they’ve made all along, saying, „There mustn’t be a game. There mustn’t be a game. It can’t be a game. Don’t play with me. I mustn’t be played with. Life is serious. This isn’t a game. We’re playing for keeps. I’ll never get out of this,“

              and so forth. In other words, the postulates which they’ve made to convince themselves that these are the rules and the only rules that can be played, and these that I’ve just read off to you.

              I’m going to have this typed and you can figure it out more or less as you want to. I could, of course, give you even further rundown on this, if you wanted me to, but it takes… takes a little while to do so. It’s actually the backbone of what we are doing. But let’s take a break. (TAPE ENDS)

              It has the blueprint for a cult. Make rules, hide them. Use claims that are 180 degrees from the truth.
              He foreshadowed his later claims that life is serious.
              He foreshadowed his statement that we’re playing for keeps or his claim that we’re playing for blood, the stakes are earth.

              “We must come to orderly cause-point on every post. We must, we must, we must.

              We’re playing for blood. The stake is Earth. If we don’t make it nobody will. We’re the sole agency in existence today that can forestall the erasure of all civilization or bring a new better one. If we aren’t willing to be hanged for our mistakes we’ll surely fry for them.”

              (HCO PL 22 May 1959 Issue II CENTRAL ORGANIZATION EFFICIENCY)
              Hubbard required “obedience to rules, unconsciousness of rules to add reality“ – we pretend the rules are real.”
              He demanded extreme obedience. He used contradictions and deep layers of complex and compartmentalized doctrine for different caste levels so no one but he knew the rules. They were unknowable to everyone else.
              By having the rules be unknown they couldn’t be analyzed and rejected.
              It’s like how in 1984 ALL laws have been cancelled. This makes it so the government CAN’T break the law as there is no law to break. The government can legally do ANYTHING to ANYONE. So too do Hubbard’s hidden rules let him do anything to anyone.
              Agreement to rules and penalties is something Margaret Singer noted in her six conditions for a thought reform program. Cults use a system of rewards and penalties. Hubbard certainly learned this from his participation in and study of occult practices.
              “Scientology is the only game in the universe where everybody wins.

              We respect the other fellow whatever his status and give him his right to win the biggest prize of all, himself or herself. That prize is won by dedicated, exact application of Scientology and full support of our mission in our organization and the public.

              Organized, we can each one win the biggest prize that can be offered – a full recovery of self.

              There is no greater game in the universe than Scientology, for it is the only game in which everybody wins. And that places it far above all other games and makes it the game of games where everybody gets the ultimate prize of self . . .”

              (HCO PL 18 April 1965 Issue I CONTESTS AND PRIZES)

              The weinie is everything statement is similar to the eventual blind obedience to Scientology. It goes from a tool to a way of life. It goes from optional servant to inescapable master. You just do things FOR Scientology.
              Hubbard sought to escape work with his game. He wanted to have the pirates and bums attitude that life should just give him what he desired.

              Like in his reference to pirates and bums in the first lecture in the PDC series.

              If people believe in magic they can believe in a source of magic and Hubbard was only too happy to lie to claim both. He wanted it to seem detrimental to not have magical thinking and beneficial and logical to have magical thinking.

              “Well, he was able to take a very grand view of all this at first. Then later on when it became serious to him . . . And you know—you know, the way to get ahead in the world is “Work hard” and “Save your money,” and be respectful, respectful and polite, and willing, and very agreeable to your superiors. This is the old formula, and yet it’s dismaying to go around and find the (quote) “captains of industry” and find out that they’re a whole bunch of pirates and bums. They were never respectful to anybody. It’s just incredible! Yet there they sit in command of large works and industries. And these fellows, they didn’t save their money. They don’t save their money. They are not cautious with their investments. They buy the doggonest things. They get into the worst possible scrapes and trouble, and seem to keep right on going and getting right out of them again.” Ron Hubbard

              He suggested the magical thinker wins and the other kind loses in life as a rule.

              “And you sit around and say, “Well, that fellow’s going to come to grief sooner or later.” And after you’ve said that for about forty years, why, you get a little apathetic about it but you just know that right will triumph in the end. Of course the end of that track is MEST. Well, the fellow who hopes this, by the way, is already pretty well on that track and he’ll be MEST before the other fellow will, because the other fellow can still bend the MEST universe around and he doesn’t have to agree with it too much.”
              Ron Hubbard
              Hubbard intentionally made complexity to control people. He made the tone scale to map how he alone would persuade people with a series of lies about emotions. It’s entirely a fabrication from other plagiarized ideas.
              He said the game you are playing now is called freedom. It’s an Orwellian reversal. It’s slavery.
              “And Games contain trickery and misdirection to win“ – your 180 degree vector of Have and Agree. „
              Hubbard admitted his game contained trickery and misdirection to win. He used 180 degree reversals in his lies, projection and his Orwellian reversals. He called things their opposites. His bridge to total freedom was a route to slavery. He called his hypnotic illusions truth revealed. He called a method of adding guided imagination to create false memories a method to merely listen and guide.
              He called adding a cult identity clearing. He called obliterating independent, critical, linear and rational thought through high authority indoctrination study technology. He called removing the morals of a person ethics technology. He said auditing un hypnotizes people.
              His prize of making a new game is the illusion of a future as a free immortal spiritual being he claims Scientology prepares one to participate in. It’s a very generous empty promise of a counterfeit dream.
              “The necessity“ – oh, of course, there’s these gimmicks, these wienies and so forth. But everybody just knows that they’re spurious as hell. Uh… „The necessity to have a new game coded before one ends the old game.“ Otherwise, everyone becomes a maker of games with no game.
              He had several references on necessity levels. He had hundreds on the deadly serious nature of Scientology. When he spoke of having the new game coded it’s a sneaky method of persuasion. People think they are temporarily giving up freedom but it becomes permanent. A world without criminals, war or insanity is a very difficult goal.
              The necessity“ – oh, of course, there’s these gimmicks, these wienies and so forth. But everybody just knows that they’re spurious as hell. Uh… „The necessity to have a new game coded before one ends the old game.“ Otherwise, everyone becomes a maker of games with no game.
              Now, “The value of pieces. Ownership of pieces may be also the ownership of players. And the difference between players and pieces, and the difficulty of pieces becoming players“
              boy, when a piece becomes a player, there’s really a hell of an upset in the game; it’ll just blow. Oh, the quarterback walks out of the football game and all of a sudden starts to run the whole football game, and nobody can tell him „No.“ That football game’s dead.
              Now… so you’ve got to hide the rules from the pieces, otherwise this is going to happen.
              This quote really sums up why he hid EVERYTHING he really wanted. With his affirmations it becomes clear. Scientology was meant to make slaves for Hubbard that didn’t suspect it for a second.
              Next is the plan to have Hubbard be the games maker and his highest assistants like Nibs be players, until Nibs left him.
              Hubbard went on:
              “Now the caste system of game consist of this: The Maker of Games, he has no rules, he runs by no rules.
              The player of the games, rules known but he obeys them. And the assistant players merely obey the players. And the pieces obey rules as dictated by players, but they don’t know the rules.“
              And then, what do you know. There’s broken pieces, and they aren’t even in the game, but they’re still in the game.
              And they’re in a terrible maybe: „Am I in the game or am I not in the game?“ Now, „How to make a piece. This is how to make a piece: First, deny there is a game. Second, hide the rules from them. Three, give them all penalties and no wins. Four, remove all goals“ –
              all goals. „Enforce them… their playing. Inhibit their enjoying. Make them look like but forbid their being like players“
              – look like God but uh… you can’t be God.
              „To make a piece continue to be a piece, permit it to associate only with pieces and deny the existence of players.“
              Never let the pieces find out that there are players. Now out of these you’re going to get games.
              Now here’s a process that has to do with the making of games, and all this process adds up to, is you just address to those factors which I just gave you, oh, run and change postulates and any creative process that you can think of and shift postulates around, you get a whole process.
              But remember, that up at the top of it there is a big postulate, „There must be a game. Ron Hubbard
              Hubbard had a few trusted lieutenants but over time stopped trusting anyone. He became paranoid and the only player of games. High level Scientology Sea Org members were pieces Hubbard lied to Mary Sue and his closest advisors over time.
              Hubbard made pieces out of Scientology cult members by pretending there were no players. The players were people Hubbard stole ideas from. Hubbard pretended to be the only source of Dianetics and Scientology. It’s always been a lie. Hubbard would excommunicate people who exposed him as having other people contribute to Scientology. He consistently used ideas from others but clamped down hard on it by the advent of KSW.
              He used harsh ethics and the RPF to make broken pieces out of Sea Org members.
              He went on:

              Now here’s a process that has to do with the making of games, and all this process adds up to, is you just address to those factors which I just gave you, oh, run and change postulates and any creative process that you can think of and shift postulates around, you get a whole process.
              Ron Hubbard
              His process had many forms but added up to addressing the factors he laid out and run meaning use guided imagination aka hypnosis to change the decisions people make, the decisions they recalled making and the decisions they will make. Hubbard greatly expanded this over time to include any creative processes he can think of. That included the metered auditing taken from Volney Mathison’s guided imagery therapy, the objectives taken from hypnosis and occult practices, the study tech taken from a combination of hypnosis, loaded language and psychology and even administrative technology and ethics technology too.
              Hubbard continued:

              But remember, that up at the top of it there is a big postulate, „There must be a game.

              “ Therefore if you want to regain the Spirit of Play, people have got to unmake postulates they’ve made all along, saying, „There mustn’t be a game. There mustn’t be a game. It can’t be a game. Don’t play with me. I mustn’t be played with. Life is serious. This isn’t a game. We’re playing for keeps. I’ll never get out of this,“

              and so forth. In other words, the postulates which they’ve made to convince themselves that these are the rules and the only rules that can be played, and these that I’ve just read off to you. Ron Hubbard
              He told people they needed to regain the spirit of play. He put games at 22.0 on his tone scale so people thought they needed a spirit of play.
              He of course said it’s a deadly serious activity and not some minor game we are playing in Scientology. He said we play for keeps.
              Here’s the heart of it In other words, the postulates which they’ve made to convince themselves that these are the rules and the only rules that can be played, and these that I’ve just read off to you.Ron Hubbard
              He wanted to change your decisions so you would see his rules as the only rules that can be played. In other words his reality is the only truth and if it includes obedience to him, well that’s now your belief too. Hubbard wins the minds of men. That’s the game.

              The ideas expressed here find there way all through Dianetics and Scientology.

              Hubbard said “His spirit of play is sensation of play and is not just energy. It’s a tremendous sensation. A guy has practically lost it if he’s here on Earth at all .” On the PDC lectures too.

            • mockingbird

              I think he stole hundreds, perhaps thousands, of ideas from hypnosis as one example. He stole from likely a couple hundred sources on other subjects as well. Like Madame Blavatsky he plagiarized hundreds of books and had the audacity to pretend he didn’t.

              Many of his ideas ultimately contradict each other and that becomes more apparent the more you study certain topics and criticisms.

              That doesn’t change the fact that he had the goals I have often referred to. I probably should just write a post or series linking the essential references in my opinion like the affirmations, Skipper letter, PDC tape 39 on the games maker, excerpts from the Saint Hill Special Briefing Course tapes and several other quotes that highlight his awareness of and desire to exploit mental vulnerabilities involving hypnosis, confusion and what he called brainwashing.

              Study technology demonstrably has been altered (from any possible earlier non Scientology form) as it contains references to thetans, overts and witholds, prior confusions and many other concepts from Scientology.

              I can present several hundred examples if needed including the metered forms of word clearing and meter checks for students.

            • I agree that Hubbard plagiarised to the max. However, I think there is a danger of seeing specific ‘thefts’ in the works of others who themselves found those ideas in ‘the cultic milieu’.

              There is a small pool of ideas and justifications that recur, time and again in fringe groups. They have their own logic, and turn out more-or-less the same in different groups. The variations that people often mistake for real differences are superficial.

              Instead of one guru poaching ideas from another, what happens is that both found them independently. It looks like plagiarism because they both used the same sources.

              That’s not to say that I don’t accept Hubbard also plagiarised directly from others. He undoubtedly did. When he did, he wove it into the rest of the story – not always consistently.

              “{Hubbard’s] awareness of and desire to exploit” led him to plagiarise stuff that would fit into Scientology (and sideline it if it didn’t). He didn’t have to think of it himself -he only had to select stuff that he could use.

            • mockingbird

              I don’t think an original idea ever occurred to Hubbard myself.

              The ultimate original earliest source a guru uses is hard to isolate. There’s so much repetition of methods it looks like they all started with the same basic philosophy. Lying, bullying and exploitation are its core. Daniel Shaw elaborated in his book Traumatic Narcissism.

              Here’s a reposting of some of the evidence Hubbard sought to plagiarize extensively from hypnosis and to use it to achieve his desires.

              Here’s a few more Hubbard quotes to show his intentions regarding Scientology and what he wanted his auditing and indoctrination to achieve and that certainly includes the false purpose rundown.
              Back to the Philadelphia Doctorate Course (PDC) tapes
              Originally Posted by PDC-05 pg 7 SCALES OF HANDLING 2.12.52
              Well, that’s… that’s very interesting because we have hypnotism which can be demonstrated as a phenomenon,
              and we show that the greater and greater agreement,
              all you do to hypnotize somebody is just make him agree… agree… agree
              and after that he’ll see anything.
              He’ll do anything,
              he’ll see anything.
              He agrees, agrees, agrees.
              Originally Posted by PDC-15 pg 4 THE LOGICS:
              he has volunteered.
              And the next thing you know, you’ll find out he has agreed.
              How is all this done?
              It’s done by hypnosis; it’s done in various other ways.
              Hypnosis is just a sudden agreement.
              And uh… it’s done in various ways
              and then he comes down this whole long scale of agreement
              and things get more and more in agreement
              and they are probably more and more actually to his personal discredit
              and uh…
              antipathetic to his best beingness, habit he’s still going down the line,
              and goes down the line further, …and further, …and further, …and further.
              And this fellow goes into apathy and he goes further and further
              and further. And of course, he goes more and more under control. Ron Hubbard
              ALTITUDE INSTRUCTION
              “In altitude teaching, somebody is a ‘great authority.’ He is probably teaching some subject that is far more complex than it should be. He has become defensive down through the years, and this is a sort of protective coating that he puts up, along with the idea that the subject will always be a little better known by him than by anybody else and that there are things to know in this subject which he really wouldn’t let anybody else in on. This is altitude instruction … It keeps people in a state of confusion, and when their minds are slightly confused they are in a hypnotic trance. Anytime anybody gets enough altitude he can be called a hypnotic operator, and what he says will act as hypnotic suggestion. Hypnotism is a difference in levels of altitude. There are ways to create and lower the altitude of the subject, but if the operator can heighten his own altitude with regard to the subject the same way, he doesn’t have to put the subject to sleep. What he says will still react as hypnotic suggestion.” (Hubbard, Research & Discovery, volume 4, p.324)12
              One error, however, must be remarked upon. The examination system employed is not much different from a certain hypnotic technique. One induces a state of confusion in the subject by raising his anxieties of what may happen if he does not pass. One then “teaches” at a mind which is anxious and confused. That mind does not then rationalize, it merely records and makes a pattern. If the pattern is sufficiently strong to be regurgitated verbatim on an examination paper, the student is then given a good grade and passed.
              [End Quote]
              Ron Hubbard lecture 29 August 1950, “Educational Dianetics.” Source Arnie Lerma

            • mockingbird

              Here’s another reposting

              I keep referring to the Philadelphia Doctorate Course tape 39 from the lecture series in 1952. It’s because Hubbard himself revealed the basis for how he laid out all of Scientology there. He described a games maker and a series of caste system levels. I believe the Sea Org members are a low slave caste and the RPF members are meant to become what Hubbard called broken pieces. He meant to break them himself with his technology. That’s the reason for excessive confession, what Robert Jay Lifton described as the cult of confession. He knew people need a balance of worth or pride and humility. Balance, moderation and being reasonable or having doubts and taking a pause for honest self reflection and contemplation with the possibility of independent and critical thinking or intelligent disobedience have no place in Scientology.
              Lifton knew excessive confession can introvert a person too much as Hubbard would say, make them extremely uncomfortable and diminish their confidence in their own judgment severely. After all if I made horrible decision after horrible decision that led to evil acts, how good could my judgment possibly be ?
              To escape that terrible feeling one can seek a wiser, more ethical authority and Scientologists go to Hubbard of course to be that guru.
              Here’s a bit from PDC tape 39 and Hubbard’s intentions for Nora Crest and the rest of us.
              Now the caste system of game consist of this: The Maker of Games, he has no rules, he runs by no rules.
              The player of the games, rules known but he obeys them. And the assistant players merely obey the players. And the pieces obey rules as dictated by players, but they don’t know the rules.“
              And then, what do you know. There’s broken pieces, and they aren’t even in the game, but they’re still in the game.
              And they’re in a terrible maybe: „Am I in the game or am I not in the game?“ Now, „How to make a piece. This is how to make a piece: First, deny there is a game. Second, hide the rules from them. Three, give them all penalties and no wins. Four, remove all goals“ –
              all goals. „Enforce them… their playing. Inhibit their enjoying. Make them look like but forbid their being like players“
              – look like God but uh… you can’t be God.
              „To make a piece continue to be a piece, permit it to associate only with pieces and deny the existence of players.“
              Never let the pieces find out that there are players. Now out of these you’re going to get games.
              Now here’s a process that has to do with the making of games, and all this process adds up to, is you just address to those factors which I just gave you, oh, run and change postulates and any creative process that you can think of and shift postulates around, you get a whole process.
              But remember, that up at the top of it there is a big postulate, „There must be a game.
              “ Therefore if you want to regain the Spirit of Play, people have got to unmake postulates they’ve made all along, saying, „There mustn’t be a game. There mustn’t be a game. It can’t be a game. Don’t play with me. I mustn’t be played with. Life is serious. This isn’t a game. We’re playing for keeps. I’ll never get out of this,“
              and so forth. In other words, the postulates which they’ve made to convince themselves that these are the rules and the only rules that can be played, and these that I’ve just read off to you.
              I’m going to have this typed and you can figure it out more or less as you want to. I could, of course, give you even further rundown on this, if you wanted me to, but it takes… takes a little while to do so. It’s actually the backbone of what we are doing. But let’s take a break. (TAPE ENDS) Ron Hubbard PDC tape 39 1952
              13 Edit View
              mockingbird
              mockingbird 15 days ago
              Here’s a bit more to show Hubbard’s intentions for Scientology and Scientologists:
              RON THE HYPNOTIST
              Structure/Function: 11 December 1952 page 1
              „All processes are based upon the original observation
              that an individual could have implanted in him by hypnosis
              and removed at will any obsession or aberration,
              compulsion, desire, inhibition which you could think of – by hypnosis.“
              Hypnosis, then, was the wild variable;
              sometimes it worked,
              sometimes it didn’t work.
              It worked on some people; it didn’t work on other people.
              Any time you have a variable that is as wild as this, study it.
              Well, I had a high certainty already –
              I had survival. Got that in 1938 or before that. And uh…Ron Hubbard
              So he was trying to confuse a student, get them obedient and accepting his altitude and then his definitions for Scientology terms along with English words and his doctrine through tapes and writings.
              All this was to get people under his influence ? To overcome the limits hypnosis had of sometimes working and to also be applied remotely. Remember Hubbard described hypnosis as requiring confusion, which his method creates and altitude.
              So Hubbard was creating a confusion then with altitude trying to suggest his words as the answer to the confusion. A confusion from contradictions can create mental discomfort and cognitive dissonance. Cognitive Dissonance has a moment of blankness and hesitation.
              That’s where Hubbard inserted the suggestion. The confused person is meant to accept the suggestion without question. What is the suggestion ? Hubbard’s reality through his doctrine.
              Hubbard inserted his stable datum to relieve confusion, really to have it taken in on a hypnotic level. Hubbard knew his information didn’t need to be correct. It just needed to align information to relieve confusion and control a student.
              Here’s something else Hubbard said:
              Originally Posted by PDC-04 pg6
              HOW TO HANDLE THEM
              The hypnotist is only interested in one thing, really.
              The hypnotist is interested in taking the control of this individual. Ron Hubbard
              Originally Posted by STRUCTURE/FUNCTION:11.12.52
              I turned around and I had hypnotism.
              I had a little advantage there because I was using hypnotism that I had learned in India.
              And that doesn’t bear too much resemblance to Western hypnotism.
              You’ve got variety of hypnotism there. There are ninety thousand ways of putting a guy out – I swear there must be that many ways.
              I mean, you can just run on and on and on.
              There’s various things you do;
              you treat the perceptic lines in certain ways
              and guys go „Ka- boom!“ Ron Hubbard
              For further reading I will list several references and the areas they elaborate on.
              Regarding mind control in Scientology:
              Insidious Enslavement: Study Technology
              http://mbnest.blogspot.com/201
              Basic Introduction To Hypnosis In Scientology
              http://mbnest.blogspot.com/201
              Pissed It’s Not Your Fault !!!
              http://mbnest.blogspot.com/201
              The Critical Factor
              http://mbnest.blogspot.com/201
              The Secret Of Scientology Part 1 Control Via Contradiction
              http://mbnest.blogspot.com/201
              Burning Down Hell – How Commands Are Hidden, Varied And Repeated To Control You As Hypnotic Implants
              http://mbnest.blogspot.com/201
              Humbling Simplicity
              http://mbnest.blogspot.com/201
              The Empty Well
              http://mbnest.blogspot.com/201
              Why Hubbard Never Claimed OT Feats And The Rock Bottom Basis Of Scientology
              http://mbnest.blogspot.com/201
              Regarding Hubbard’s uses of loaded language with reversals of truth
              Propaganda By Reversal Of Meaning In Scientology
              http://mbnest.blogspot.com/201
              Regarding the narcissism and sociopathic tendencies in Ron Hubbard and his cult
              Scientology’s Parallel In Nature – Malignant Narcissism
              http://mbnest.blogspot.com/201
              Regarding Dissociation
              Exteriorization Versus Dissociation
              http://mbnest.blogspot.com/201

            • mockingbird

              By the way for accuracy here’s a quote on the couple credited with coming to Hubbard with ideas he took.

              According to some oldtimers, Charles Berner and his wife, Ava, were responsible for coming up with the concepts of “Study Tech” which Hubbard later co-opted as his own. By 1965, Hubbard “declared” Berner, and made him the church’s first “enemy number one.”

              From

              http://tonyortega.org/2015/03/17/more-proof-that-scientology-used-the-r2-45-method-to-intimidate-enemies/

            • mockingbird

              Here’s a post from ESMB on Charles Berner and his wife Ava. Now I personally think even if you disregard the loaded language and high authority methods of Hubbard the study technology is actually far worse than conventional study methods used in schools.

              It’s been highly criticized by linguists and other academics and found to be below average in comparison to regular educational methods.

              One of the most difficult things to do is report accurately.

              For example: I and several other Scio’s had dinner with Chuck and Ava Berner at the Forrest Row Hotel, it was June 1964, the night before Chuck and Ava were to meet with LRH to go over this new discovery they made to do with study.

              We were all enthralled with what they had discovered.

              Imagine the shock we had when LRH told us in a the lecture that night that he had made a momentous discovery in the field of study.

              The data he gave was almost word for word with what the Berner’s had discussed with us the previous night.

              There was no mention of the Berner’s who were in the audience.

              They were devastated.

              What made me sick was I made LRH right to do this……I did not support the Berner’s…..I simply went elsewhere.

              I put my own survival above my honor……what a price I was to pay for that.

              Not only me but all of us…….for I believe that is the moment that LRH went to the dark-side.

              That was also the last real lecture on GPM’s. It ended mid lecture -abruptly – then he flipped and began to talk about the study tech.

              I realize LRH was dichotomous, but so are we all….that is what the GPM Tech was supposed to handle.

              Alan

              From

              Alan Walter’s Opening Pandora’s Box

              http://www.forum.exscn.net/showthrea…wfull=1#post64

            • When I followed this up, I found Charles Berner memorialised as a member of a fringe group that had formed around an Eastern Guru. He had apparently been well liked by his comrades, and I could only wish that the woo-woo he embraced after Scientology proved more benign and fulfilling for him.

              I would be very interested in that link, but it comes up as 404 not found…

            • mockingbird

              Sorry, I had no problem getting to it but I am a member at ESMB and some posts are members only.

              There are several threads there on the Berners.

            • mockingbird

              I will put together a small list of posts that admittedly aren’t extremely short but have evidence Hubbard understood aspects of theories on hypnosis and cognitive dissonance in persuasion to a significant degree. He never used scientific method strictly and his overconfidence colored his research certainly. Meaning some of his ideas aren’t supported by good science, but understanding what he tried is relevant as is understanding the results he did manage to get despite the imperfections in hypnosis and his destitute madman’s understanding of psychology.

              There is an attraction to dismissal of his results or grasping simple explanations for his methods like the anecdotes on the stolen study technology or the Sarge special E meter. I recommend not letting any anecdotes stop serious detailed critical analysis of the methods of Scientology or the mind of Hubbard himself. On one hand an anecdote can be incorrect. It happens. Additionally it can be used to reach a conclusion that other evidence would not support but that evidence won’t be examined if the answer is seen as complete.

            • I think we are always going to agree to disagree about this one.

              With respect, I think you overestimate Hubbard intentionality and underestimate the extent to which Scientology itself emerged from a social situation which Hubbard created but neither understood not controlled.

              Those ‘anecdotes’ (like the testimony of exes) are the best information available from such a secretive and compartmentalised organisation. Dr Stephen Kent (who contributed recently) speaks of ‘triangulation’ – seeking verification from a number of independent accounts.

              Scientology lends itself to this approach because it is so inflexible and predictable.

              There is a danger of accepting the testimony that supports your case, and denying that which does not.

            • mockingbird

              I have accumulated hundreds and hundreds of Hubbard’s quotes on hypnosis. He had to understand what he wrote to some degree. If you wrote on something many, many hundreds of times and tried to covertly use it I would be illogical to think you didn’t believe in or at least have some understanding of all the information you wrote.

              I don’t understand why Hubbard had to not understand what he was trying to apply from hypnosis. Why ?

              Regarding testimony the single anecdote that some use to end all analysis of study tech stands alone against a wealth of information on the other side.

              It reminds me of an example that encouraged me to look at both sides in depth when there are contradictory and competing hypothesis.

              On 60 Minutes a female coach was passed up for a promotion to head coach. On one side of a board was one piece of evidence that she was fairly passed over and on the other were dozens of pieces she was discriminated against.

              In many cases the single anecdote against my hypothesis is alone. It doesn’t account for hundreds of Hubbard’s quotes. It doesn’t account for phenomena and methods identified time and again by psychologists and hypnotists from multiple schools of hypnosis as being their methods used covertly. It doesn’t account for numerous cult experts with similar or identical conclusions and statements by people like Singer and Hassan and Ross and Lifton supporting or agreeing with my conclusions.

              The single anecdote against hundreds of pieces of evidence is a poor false equivalence.

              I don’t see his many quotes on hypnosis as showing a high estimate of him. A person of average intelligence could study a subject like that for decades as Hubbard did and have knowledge of it. I have seen very experienced professionals in many fields that in general have average or below average intelligence but through decades of experience are very competent in their fields.

              I don’t think Hubbard was ever as good a persuader as he thought by a far measure, but understanding what he was trying to do is important to untangling what Scientology was and eventually seeing what he did do.

              I understand social pressure and other aspects of social psychology that people like Festinger, Cialdini, Lifton, Singer, Milgram and many others researched is relevant to understanding Scientology but that doesn’t eliminate the methods Hubbard tried to use.

              Plainly Hubbard’s use of hypnosis and cultic methods had some success but likely not entirely for the reasons he thought. But correlation doesn’t equal causation. Sometimes a hypnotist believes in mystic forces or animal magnetism and succeeds despite the pseudoscience, not because of it.

            • mockingbird

              Part of my analysis is based on details others who don’t study hypnosis overlook like Hubbard’s long and extremely detailed lists of dozens of phenomena that he claimed his fictional barriers to study created.

              These are a great list of synonyms for hypnotic and cognitive dissonance accompanying phenomena. Additionally he described them as accompanying hypnosis back in tapes from the early fifties which I have quoted extensively, he also in Scientology auditing describes the exact same phenomena as accompanying de hypnotizing people and giving them spiritual awareness when they occur in auditing.

              Practitioners of hypnosis and NLP look at the obviously hypnotic techniques and phenomena described in Scientology study tech and auditing and Dianetics and laugh at the obviously hypnosis based technology before them and the absurdity that what Hubbard described clearly as hypnosis in the early fifties in the Research and Discovery series he then turned into symptoms of being awakened in auditing and study difficulties in indoctrination then had the audacity to think anyone would buy three completely different explanations for the exact same thing.

              They don’t understand that most people don’t make lengthy studies of the symptoms of hypnosis to pinpoint those to see if hypnotic techniques are being used and additionally they don’t understand the quotes on early auditing involving hypnosis and the later ones on auditing and further on study technology are usually not all studied by any Scientologist.

              You would probably have to do the Saint Hill Special Briefing Course and numerous other courses to hear all those quotes and that would probably take at least a half dozen years or more of serious dedication to Scientology.

              In other words you would see those quotes mixed in with thousands and thousands of hours of indoctrination. It’s very unlikely a Scientologist would remain an objective and skeptical student that far into indoctrination.

              By looking at the perspectives of many critics of Scientology from different backgrounds I have gotten clues that won’t hold meaning for anyone that automatically dismisses certain subjects and opinions.

            • mockingbird

              I am beginning to think I will end up writing a very long series of posts or a book compiling evidence that Hubbard utilized his understanding of hypnosis all through Dianetics and Scientology. It’s a lot of work to try and compile then assemble into a relatively concise and relevant whole.

              Great.

      • Tom Klemesrud

        As you know Get High on Yourself was associated with Scientology. The Gus Russo book associates the event to the Chicago mafia, Henry Kissinger, and Ronald Reagan. No trite amount of whitewashing and pinkifying the news, will change these known and accepted facts–that you refuse to acknowledge, Tony.

        • FredEX2

          LOL 😆

      • FredEX2

        Many Scientologists I knew believed all that stuff about MKUltra and the Gov. experimenting with people and that there are hidden victims of this programming among the general population. ~It made it fun and easy to mess with them when you ran out of interesting stuff on your ‘time track’ and couldn’t come up with another traumatic incident in auditing. 😆

      • Andrea ‘i-Betty’ Garner

        😀

    • TheMirrorThetan

      Ok then… I might agree with your point if big pharma wasn’t controlling my every thought.

      https://uploads.disquscdn.com/images/3b3b2c5eed117f3a909f32963348b4e0fa33838c6d8b8a1292652eea4a5c0630.jpg

  • Intergalactic Walrus
    • Andrew Robertson

      I predict a large contingent of Taiwanese will be flown in to make up the numbers!

      Andrew

      • jazzlover

        Or to begin making scientology sneakers, for running around the pole at warp(ed) speed.

    • Douglas D. Douglas

      That has to be the worst knock-off “Olaf” I have seen. It looks like somebody took the monocle and top hat off a Mr. Peanut, spray painted him white and stuck a carrot on his nose.

      Here’s the real deal, via Disney’s own publicity (refresh):

      https://uploads.disquscdn.com/images/02c4b568817261487b895a7d28a6ef0e8166fd79bd65655e65b8ad356a944ef0.jpg

      • Intergalactic Walrus

        Yeah, and I don’t remember Olaf having a tongue, so who knows what that red thing is. Must be a pesky body thetan :O

        • Douglas D. Douglas

          Looks like he’s chewing on a condom.

  • coonellie

    Being involved in NRM research for over 20 years I can safely say that Dr. Kent is a favorite.

    Also, please, Cathy, come to Portland. Book the largest hall you can get. I’ll stand in line in the freezing rain for a ticket for me and Baby C (who’s double majoring in Psychology and another subject that is relevant).

    I wish Baby C would write her thesis on the psychological impediments fostered by LRH’s craziness. Of course, being in PDX might mean Baby C would never get a job.

  • Missionary Kid

    I think that A&E is going to continue showing Leah, possible adding episodes, because they’ve dropped the series on the KKK that was set to debut, IIRC, January 20th. They’ve cancelled it because it was discovered that payment was made for access to the subjects.

    It seems that A&E has some journalistic integrity that is lacking in a lot of other networks.

    • Newiga

      I needed that… Back to the office already. T_T

  • Dave Reams

    Substitute “Trump” with “LRH, Scientology” or and “Sea Org / C.O.B.” and the following article rings true
    http://www.newyorker.com/science/maria-konnikova/the-psychological-research-that-helps-explain-the-election

    • Thank you for that. Saved for later to savor. Or weep.

  • Nessybach

    It’s the “University of Alberta” not Alberta University. Not a huge mistake but I thought I would point it out.

  • Reg Borrow

    Interesting read.

    The book Dianetics is the bases for the religion of Scientology. And yes, “positive viewpoints might be developed.” No doubt, as Dr. Davis says,”A lot of people had their lives improved, greatly enhanced, through reading about L. Ron Hubbard and his ideas, becoming members of the Church of Scientology. And millions would testify to the benefits of being a Scientologist. So in that respect he has made a real contribution to human life.”

    While that may be true, it is not the real problem. The real problem lies within the administration and how the absolute control techniques work. It’s the abuses from the leadership where it takes on a darker form. The dynamics of coercive persuasive in it’s different forms, re-engineers the mind and how it thinks. It subtly breaks down the critical thinking process and takes on more of the leader’s. It becomes compliant in ways that it would not previous to this kind of indoctrination..

    Similarly, like the Bible, it’s not so much in the doctrine, as it is in how men have used it for their own nefarious reasons. And in any totalitarian, controlling system, it’s usually either money or power or BOTH.

    Just as Dr. Kent summarizes, “Hubbard’s likely malignantly narcissistic personality certainly colored the doctrines of Scientology and the people who operated within it, and now Miscavige’s personality does the same. I’m not clinically qualified to say definitively what constitutes his personality construction, but at the very least he seems to be problems around aggressive and suspicious impulses. One can’t understand contemporary Scientology and the Sea Org today without understanding what goes on within Miscavige’s head.”

  • Before Gordon Melton became a cult apologist, he approached the CFF, Citizens freedom Foundation, which later became CAN. He offerred to help for $5000. At that time, run by founders Curt and Henrietta Crampton, they did not have that kind of money. Do you think Scientology did? Curt and Henrietta’s homes were picketed by scientology, and they both died under rather suspicious circumstance. https://arnielerma.wordpress.com/2015/09/16/the-deaths-of-the-founders-of-the-anti-cult-movement-in-america/
    This tidbit was relayed to this writer by CFF Member Ida Maye Camburn R.I.P. two years before her death.

  • Jacob de Vries

    Baylor University currently is home to J. Gordon Melton, a man often referred to as the ‘Father of Cult Apologists’: http://www.apologeticsindex.org/m06.html

  • SJ Bobkins

    Hubbard created Hell on Earth the others mentioned were responsible for very positive growth n various fields advancing the collective knowledge of mankind in physics, politics, man’s desire to be free, etc. Hubbard built a system based on fantasy that enslaved many and continues to do so. How counterproductive to Jefferson’s writings could be a system be that forces people to return to Scientology’s Gold compound if they somehow find a way to escape? Billion year contracts?
    As far as a religion defending another religion they are diametrically opposed to from a doctrinal standpoint, I recall a full page ad in major newspapers in essence telling the US Government to get off the the back of the Unification Church’s leader Rev Moon. It would be very difficult to name any church that did not cosign the plea.