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The odd and slightly troubling thing Elon Musk and L. Ron Hubbard have in common

 
We don’t keep a very watchful eye on Elon Musk and what he’s up to, so forgive us that we missed an interesting little news item about him last year which, once we were made aware of it, sort of knocked us for a loop.

Musk is the PayPal and Tesla Motors and SpaceX inventor, one of the richest people in the world, and he has legions of fans who follow his every move. So it was only natural that a Bloomberg reporter would take the opportunity at a press conference last summer to ask the avid reader what he was digging into recently. Musk gave an interesting answer, saying that he was enjoying an obscure 1929 book named Twelve Against the Gods.

The book was written by a South African journalist named William Bolitho (1891-1930), and it consists of twelve short biographies of people who had battled the gods to greatness, as it were. Long out of print, copies of the book could be found for about $6 at sites like eBay. But once Musk revealed that he was reading it, prices shot up and it quickly became hard to find a copy. Checking yesterday, we couldn’t find a copy at eBay for less than $250.

It made for a fun story that a number of different news organizations covered last summer, marveling that Musk had plucked from obscurity a book that almost no one had heard of.

No one, that is, except for Scientologists.

As soon as we saw the title, we remembered that Jon Atack has mentioned Twelve Against the Gods a couple of times here at the Underground Bunker. So we emailed Jon this week to ask him his thoughts on Elon Musk making a fad out of the book he told us was L. Ron Hubbard’s favorite.

Jon Atack: In February 1983, in written replies to Rocky Mountain News journalist Sue Lindsay, Hubbard said that his favorite non-fiction book was Twelve Against Gods by William Bolitho, adding, “the introduction is particularly good.”

The Bunker: February 1983? By that time Hubbard had been in total seclusion for three years, his whereabouts unknown even to nearly all Scientologists. How did he engage in a newspaper interview if he was in hiding?

Jon: He didn’t. For my book A Piece of Blue Sky I got to know Scientology’s former spokesman Robert Vaughn Young, who actually wrote Hubbard’s answers to the Rocky Mountain News (to prove that Hubbard was still alive). Vaughn told me he made up those answers by relying on a lecture that Hubbard had given on December 5, 1952 as part of the Philadelphia Doctorate Course.

The Bunker: Here’s what Hubbard said in that lecture:

Bolitho, good old Bolitho, with his Twelve Against the Gods. It’s a wonderful thing to read — gorgeous! And the introduction of Twelve Against the Gods is one of the best pieces of work I know of, even related to a lot of things, and particularly to this subject.

 

 
Jon: Bolitho’s book was published in 1929, and consists of 12 short biographies. Its central point is that “adventure is the vitaminizing element in histories both individual and social.” Bolitho lauded the adventurer above all others. His twelve chosen adventurers were Alexander, Casanova, Columbus, Mahomet (the Prophet Muhammad), Lola Montez, Cagliostro (and Seraphina), Charles XII of Sweden, Napoleon, Catiline, Napoleon III, Isadora Duncan and, for topical reasons, Woodrow Wilson. Judging by the tone of the book, had Bolitho written a new edition in the 1940s, Hitler would very probably have replaced Wilson. The following quotations are all taken from the “particularly good” introduction, and clearly state Bolitho’s basic thesis…

The adventurer is within us, and he contests for our favor with the social man we are obliged to be … we are obliged, in order to live at all, to make a cage of laws for ourselves and to stand on the perch. We are born as wasteful and unremorseful as tigers; we are obliged to be thrifty, or starve or freeze. We are born to wander, and cursed to stay and dig … all the poets are on one side and all the laws on the other; for laws are made by, and usually for, old men…

The moment one of these truants breaks loose, he has to fight the whole weight of things as they are; the laws and that indefinite smothering aura that surrounds the laws that we call morals; the family, that is the microcosm and whip-lash of society; and the dead weight of all the possessors, across whose interwoven rights the road to freedom lies. If he fails he is a mere criminal…

… the adventurer is an individualist and an egotist, a truant from obligations. His road is solitary; there is no room for company on it.

What he does, he does for himself. His motive may be simple greed.

The Bunker: That does sound like something Hubbard would find inspirational. Valuing the man who has lived as much as a dozen other men, etc.

Jon: However, as Bolitho said, “these are men betrayed by contradiction inside themselves.” With his casual reference to Twelve Against the Gods, Hubbard gave his own betraying contradiction: It is a glaring admission of his deep-seated aspirations. The quoted passages give concise expression to the underlying pattern of Hubbard’s whole life, and to his self-image. Hubbard considered himself an adventurer, a man above morality, who steadfastly followed his goal. It is possible that Hubbard read Bolitho’s book when it was published (he was 18 at the time), and took it as his model. There is powerful evidence to support this thesis. In 1939, at the age of 27, just after his failure to find a publisher for Excalibur, Hubbard wrote to his first wife…

Living is a pretty grim joke, but a joke just the same. The entire function of man is to survive. Not “for what” but just to survive. The outermost limit of endeavor is creative work. Anything less is too close to simple survival until death happens along. So I am engaged in striving to maintain equilibrium sufficient to at last realize survival in a way to astound the gods. Personal immortality is only to be gained through the printed word, barred note or painted canvas or hard grabite [sic]. Foolishly perhaps, but determined none the less, I have high hopes of smashing my name into history so violently that it will take a legendary form even if all the books are destroyed. That goal is the real goal as far as I am concerned. Things which stand too consistently in its way make me nervous. It’s a pretty big job. In a hundred years Roosevelt will have been forgotten – which gives some idea of the magnitude of my attempt. And all this boils and froths inside my head and I’m miserable when I am blocked. Let the next man concentrate upon “peace” and “contentment.” When life was struck into me something else accompanied it. And when I leave things in the lap of the gods who seem to be interested in my destiny, boy, things happen!

My fight right now is to get into a spot where I can tide across the gap until the next blaze. Excalibur [“The Book”] may be fought, accepted or forgotten. I don’t care. I seem to be the only one that has attained actual personal contact with it. Others take it mentally and seem to be at a loss to apply it. When I wrote it I gave myself an education which outranks that of anyone else. I don’t know but it might seem that it takes terrific brain work to get the thing assembled and useable in the head. I do know that I could formulate a political platform, for instance, which would encompass the support of the unemployed, the industrialist and the clerk and day laborer all at one and the same time. And enthusiastic support it would be. Things are due for a bust in the next half dozen years. Wait and see…

I seem to have a sort of personal awareness which only begins to come alive when I begin to believe in a destiny. And then a strange force stirs in me and I seem to be completely aloof and wholly invincible. It is the problem of “Who am I?”

Psychiatrists, reaching the high of a dusty desk, tell us that Alexander and Genghis Khan and Napoleon were madmen. I know they were maligning some very intelligent gentlemen. So anybody who dares say that maybe he’s going to cut things up considerably is immediately branded as a [sic] egomaniac or something equally ridiculous so that little men can still save their hides in the face of possible fury. It’s one thing to go nutty and state, “I’m Napoleon, nobody dares touch me,” and quite another to say, “If I watch my step and don’t let anything stop me, I can make Napoleon look like a punk.” That’s the difference … It’s a big joke, this living. God was feeling sardonic the day He created the Universe. So its [sic] rather up to at least one man every few centuries to pop up and come just as close to making Him swallow his laughter as possible.

Anyway, these are the things about which I revolve. I can’t blame it on environment or experience, strangely enough. When I was eight I remember figuring out how long it would take me to achieve these ends, still saying to myself, “Who am I?” And I said it at sixteen and I’m saying it at twenty-six even though the old cards persist in getting stacked against me and people are often like tugs trying to shunt me into a dismally peaceful berth. A few months of cold logic on the subject I struck upon in February have shown me that I didn’t have it all under control. Hence I must needs slow down on my concept, though it broadened in another way which compensates and it has some popularity angles now which it lacked before. I guess I’m thirty percent showman after all because I instinctively dive towards popular huzzahs. And so, quite magnanimously for me, I gave man back his human soul and created a new explanation for creative urge [sic] which the lads will love. Nonetheless, the things are as true as can be.

The Bunker: Hubbard was pretty desperate to live a life that rivaled Bolitho’s dozen.

Jon: Hubbard lusted after fame, wealth and power, and was clearly willing to abandon moral restrictions to accomplish his ends. By his own admission, Hubbard was a showman. He was a natural entertainer, able to captivate some people with his charm. It often took prolonged, close contact for those so charmed to see that he was arrogant, extravagant, eccentric and a liar on a grand scale. Even then many continued to believe in his genius.

Hubbard could be dismissed as a fabulist, a compulsive storyteller, whose exaggerations were harmless. But he was far worse than this. His avarice, coupled with deliberate deceit, became outright fraud. Hubbard plainly made fraudulent claims about himself and his supposed research. He also made fraudulent claims about the money gathered ostensibly to further the publicized aims of Scientology. This was not harmless puffery: It was conscious deceit designed to make him ever more famous, influential and wealthy. The poverty and suffering of those believers who sustained his opulent life-style must also be taken into account.

Although Hubbard single-mindedly pursued his ambition, he may well have believed throughout that he was doing good. Nonetheless, he laid his “road to truth” on a foundation of lies. Hubbard’s long hours and obvious absorption in his work support the view that he believed in the efficacy of his “Technology.” Bolitho’s idea that “the magician must believe in himself, if it is only as long as he is spouting,” falls short of the mark. Martin Gardner, well-known adversary of parapsychology in general and Ron Hubbard in particular, made a germane observation: “Cranks by definition believe their theories, and charlatans do not, but this does not prevent a person from being both crank and charlatan.” Hubbard’s fraudulent claims make a charlatan of him.

The Bunker: Well, OK, Jon. Thanks for that pretty grim explanation of why L. Ron Hubbard found common cause with Bill Bolitho. But what does it say about Musk?

We couldn’t find a story that explained how Musk had stumbled across Twelve Against the Gods. And as far as we know, the South African-born inventor isn’t mixed up with Scientology. Maybe the common country of origin was enough to bring Bolitho to his attention.

As for what Musk sees in the book, we’ll point out that Elon Musk is an adventurer in a way that Hubbard only pretended to be. Hubbard talked a big game — he was a world-class tall-tale teller, there is no doubt — but he was mostly all talk and many of his claims about his adventures turned out to be exaggerations. Musk, on the other hand, really is disrupting the automobile and space industries and heck, we want some of those solar power shingles he was showing off the other day.

If Musk sees himself in the company of Alexander and Napoleon, well, he may actually have a point. He wants to start cities on Mars, and if that’s not battling against the gods, we don’t know what is. But Hubbard in the same list of names? Pshaw! As if.

 
——————–

Bonus items from our tipsters

Yesterday, we were discussing Scientology’s museum to L. Ron Hubbard and the Sea Org that is part of its Super Power Building in Clearwater, Florida. One of our tipsters found that a Scientologist from Spain recently toured that museum and put up a few photos that help illustrate what we were reading about yesterday.

 



 
——————–

 
HowdyCon 2017: Denver, June 23-25. Go here to start making your plans.

 
——————–

3D-UnbreakablePosted by Tony Ortega on February 1, 2017 at 07:00

E-mail tips and story ideas to tonyo94 AT gmail DOT com or follow us on Twitter. We post behind-the-scenes updates at our Facebook author page. After every new story we send out an alert to our e-mail list and our FB page.

Our book, The Unbreakable Miss Lovely: How the Church of Scientology tried to destroy Paulette Cooper, is on sale at Amazon in paperback, Kindle, and audiobook versions. We’ve posted photographs of Paulette and scenes from her life at a separate location. Reader Sookie put together a complete index. More information about the book, and our 2015 book tour, can also be found at the book’s dedicated page.

The Best of the Underground Bunker, 1995-2016 Just starting out here? We’ve picked out the most important stories we’ve covered here at the Undergound Bunker (2012-2016), The Village Voice (2008-2012), New Times Los Angeles (1999-2002) and the Phoenix New Times (1995-1999)

Learn about Scientology with our numerous series with experts…

BLOGGING DIANETICS: We read Scientology’s founding text cover to cover with the help of L.A. attorney and former church member Vance Woodward
UP THE BRIDGE: Claire Headley and Bruce Hines train us as Scientologists
GETTING OUR ETHICS IN: Jefferson Hawkins explains Scientology’s system of justice
SCIENTOLOGY MYTHBUSTING: Historian Jon Atack discusses key Scientology concepts

Other links: Shelly Miscavige, ten years gone | The Lisa McPherson story told in real time | The Cathriona White stories | The Leah Remini ‘Knowledge Reports’ | Hear audio of a Scientology excommunication | Scientology’s little day care of horrors | Whatever happened to Steve Fishman? | Felony charges for Scientology’s drug rehab scam | Why Scientology digs bomb-proof vaults in the desert | PZ Myers reads L. Ron Hubbard’s “A History of Man” | Scientology’s Master Spies | Scientology’s Private Dancer | The mystery of the richest Scientologist and his wayward sons | Scientology’s shocking mistreatment of the mentally ill | Scientology boasts about assistance from Google | The Underground Bunker’s Official Theme Song | The Underground Bunker FAQ

Our Guide to Alex Gibney’s film ‘Going Clear,’ and our pages about its principal figures…
Jason Beghe | Tom DeVocht | Sara Goldberg | Paul Haggis | Mark “Marty” Rathbun | Mike Rinder | Spanky Taylor | Hana Whitfield

 

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  • SarahDB

    Starts the coffee and tea, puts out the breakfast treats.

    • Observer

      How’s your partner doing?

      • SarahDB

        Rather grouchy and demanding, but healing! He’s moved in with me for the forseeable future and has visits from medical and pt people who he can torment as well 😛. I’m just trying to remain cheerful and getting him what he wants. He hates having a witness to his weakness, but Not much he can do about it! Thanks for asking Obs!

  • Panopea Abrupta

    Was Lord Hubris The Abdominal Showman?
    He unfortunately thought that wishing made things so.
    Lacking the necessary intellectual and moral stuff, he was a poser and a liar.
    Pity he didn’t suffer Isadora Duncan’s fate.

    https://uploads.disquscdn.com/images/97861cedd4a35dc69cb9a9396d05b4110c6c7b38bffe2e280a4c77b3bad898c7.jpg

    • “Pity he didn’t suffer Isadora Duncan’s fate.”
      Ascots aren’t quite long enough.

    • chukicita

      None of Bolitho’s twelve seemed to get past the gods.

  • Observer
    • Its the arched eyebrow, isn’t it?

      • Observer

        He looks about as appealing as Hubbard (though less doughy), crazy eyes or no.

    • Ever met an SP?
      • Joe

        That’s the look my mom gives me when I start eating dinner before our guests.

    • Jon Hendry

      He looks kind of like how you’d expect LRH to look based on his reputation, as opposed to the cyst-ridden doughy chinless ginger of reality.

    • Joe

      Cocky white South African guy from the 1920’s? No way!

    • chukicita

      I wonder if that’s what Blinky’s eyes would look like if she could open them.

  • “Elon Musk has said that there is only a “one in billions” chance that we’re not living in a computer simulation.”
    http://www.independent.co.uk/life-style/gadgets-and-tech/news/elon-musk-ai-artificial-intelligence-computer-simulation-gaming-virtual-reality-a7060941.html

    • kemist

      I was going to bring that up to show how Elon Musk is a known weirdo. Does not surprise me that he might like weird, obscure things, and that he found these things on his own.

      What makes me laugh is how people suddenly become interested and mindlessly praise certain things because some rich dude likes them.

      • Observer

        I call it the Oprah Syndrome.

      • Jon Hendry

        I’m inclined to give Musk the benefit of the doubt, since he’s not only a fan of Iain Banks, but named his two oceangoing autonomous landing barges after autonomous spaceships in Iain Banks’ novels – “Just Read the Instructions” and “Of Course I Still Love You”. (Those are the ship names, not the novels.)

        • kemist

          Musk is a genius. I find his weird side endearing. You probably need to be a little weird to do what he did.

          What I find stupid is that people mindlessly adopt whatever theory he adheres to and get hanged up on his likings and personal habits as a way to some imagined “success”. They have no understanding of what he does, or why he’s doing it. They’re lemmings.

          • Jon Hendry

            This.

      • Juicer77

        Oprah Syndrome.

    • Jon Hendry

      And most likely the simulation is being passed around via social media with the caption “LOL”

      • OOkpik

        LOL!

  • Vault Digger

    From Hubbard’s letter to his wife Margaret Grubb:

    Psychiatrists, reaching the high of a dusty desk, tell us that Alexander and Genghis Khan and Napoleon were madmen. I know they were maligning some very intelligent gentlemen.

    Of course! Genghis Khan, the guy said to have been responsible for the killing of 40 million people, the gentleman.

    • stillgrace2

      “reaching the high of a dusty desk” drew my attention while I read Hubbard’s letter. What could that possibly mean? Psychiatrists snort the dust on their desks to get high? They get high because of poor housekeeping or lack of work? Strange phrase … strange man.

      • Observer

        He was jealous, imo. Psychiatrists were accepted and respected, which he was not. Their fault, of course. It couldn’t possibly be because he was a grandiose crackpot who was remarkably ignorant on the subject of…well, just about anything.

      • ONEpointONE

        “Space is a viewpoint of dimension”. Figure that one out. It does sound good though, very ‘over your head’. It’s one of Hubbard’s Axioms. In truth it is gibberish.

        • Mark Foster

          L. Flappy Blubbard and The Art of Sophistry

      • I think it’s a legacy of the slapdash ways he learned when writing for pulp magazines where he was paid by the word. His texts are full of expressions that look as if they make sense when you skim them but, if you go back and think, you have to ask ‘what does that even mean?

    • Phil McKraken

      Considering that Hubbard never knew wtf he was talking about, it’s kind of pointless to pick apart the littlest demonstrations of his ignorance, but I don’t think psychiatrists were much into diagnosing Alexander, Genghis Khan and Napoleon. The popular notions of Napoleon have and still do try to pick apart his personality, but “madman” is not a common description.

    • April

      LRH was nothing if not a master of false dichotomies.

      Someone can in fact be both crazy and brilliant. Exhibit A: John Forbes Nash Jr (the guy that the movie A Beautiful Mind was about). https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/John_Forbes_Nash_Jr.

      With that being said, I don’t know of any psychiatric literature that considers Alexander the Great and Genghis Khan as having been mentally ill. Ruthless and brutal, yes, but not mentally ill.

      • Mockingbird

        Several biographies on Alexander describe him as driven and possibly obsessed. And if you cast aside glorification of war Genghis Khan and Alexander led men to commit mass slaughter.

    • DexterSka

      Hubbard probably would have loved Trump

    • Mockingbird

      If I remember correctly one of the Khans was credited with the innovation of letting the armies of his defeated rivals join his own, thereby growing his horde rapidly and making future opponents more willing to surrender as they knew slavery and death wouldn’t be their fate. It’s kind of important for you to know that if you surrender you can join the other army and only your top leaders will be executed.

      So with that tactic and ruthless conquest as his model the superior strategy, skill and tactics his men employed made great expansion possible. Not my idea of greatness.

    • This can be read on two levels.

      The surface reading is that Hubbard was a man of action, who had real experience of life, while doctors only had ‘book learning’. The ‘advanced’ Scientologist will also smugly observe that, of course, Hubbard knew these things from his extensive ‘past lives’.

    • I have no idea if it was the same in the United States, but in Canada when I was a kid (the Sixties) it was common to use ‘gentlemen’ in a cynical way, like calling L. Ron Hubbard a gentleman.

      It was also common to use the word for a group of men, which definition is included in the dictionary.

  • That model of the Freewinds seems to have a deeper keel than I’d have thought: “The 450-foot vessel draws 20 feet when fully loaded.”

    • Robert Hanna Moore

      All those thetans, or massive thoughts?

    • Richard

      It needs a deep keel to house all those people on the RPF.

    • PickAnotherID

      Remember, the original design of MS Boheme was as a car/passenger ferry for service to the UK, which by design have a deep keel for stability. Half way through construction she was repurposed as a cruise ship, cabins were retrofitted into the vehicle space, and the loading doors were omitted. Which is why the stern has an odd shape for a cruise ship.

      • It does have a shallow draft. Before Scientology bought it, it did cruises out of St. Petersburg (only running aground once):

        But there are only 21 cruise ships in the world that are capable of navigating shallow Bayboro Harbor to get to the port, according to information collected by officials at the Port of Tampa.

        The port can accommodate ships with a draft of 22 feet or less. In other words, no more than 22 feet of a ship can be below the water line, or the vessel risks running aground. The pickings, Travis acknowledges, will be slim.

        The Boheme is one of those vessels (it’s listed first on the chart at right) and it was sold last week. Commodore Cruise Lines, the ship’s former owner, has not said who purchased the ship, but has said the Boheme will leave Tampa Bay after completing a week of repairs on Sept. 13.

        During the 20 months that the Boheme sailed from St. Petersburg, it was 98 percent full, made a profit and paid revenues to the city in excess of $15,000 a month. Travis will use the strong response received by the Boheme to market the port to other cruise lines.

  • Narapoid

    Elon and L Ron have something in common?! Just an appreciation for a an old book.

    Elon is planning on HOW he is going to be a space traveler… the if and the why is long past. He has scratch built 4 major businesses— How to buy stuff on the internet (Paypal) builds the fastest cars (Tesla); is making clean energy available in a wide and viable manner (Solar City, Tesla Wall) and builds reusable spaceships with (Space X).

    Elon deals with truth, L Ron lies.

    Elon is my hero, L Ron is a zero.

    Here is Elon and his team doing what NASA couldn’t. And something L Ron would have lied about.
    http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=RPGUQySBikQ

    • Peter

      Thanks. A doer, not a talker. I would hardly be “troubled” that two men, wide apart in age, education and experience might like the same book. If I were interested in WWII history, would I somehow be like Hitler if I read Mein Kampf?

  • Vault Digger
    • Johnny Tank (Forever Autumn)

      What a win!

    • Kestrel

      “The Consulate hopes to relocate this year…”

      Wait a minute. It takes years and years for one of these buildings to be made suitable. Why, there’s funding for architectural renderings and approvals, funding for demolition, funding for renovation. Then the actual work has to be done, not the least of which is getting the Central Files in order before the opening.

    • Nessybach

      Now they’ll think the French are really after them.

  • Edward Whalley

    I actually read the book and liked it. I don’t see that Bolitho would have liked Hitler, at the time, Woodrow Wilson was considered one of the shining stars of the Democratic Party, along with Thomas Jefferson. As a book of ripping yarns of individualism, it’s still fascinating, a classic. But not Fascist.

    It’s very easy to make snap judgments according to fashionable dogma: we consider clowns to be frightening and evil, adults having sex with teens to be exploitative, rape an unqualified no-no, hunting other than for survival to be terrible, and colonial Europeans to consider the indigenes nothing short of inhuman. All these things are true, until you find perfectly sensitive souls, a half-century ago, considering clowns (and lions and tigers and elephants) a symbol of play and innocence, Socrates plotting which young fellow he’s going to have an affair with, Rhett Butler carrying Scarlett upstairs…and she likes it! (and this is a female author, let me tell you), great nature writing from men whose interests lay in getting a trophy bear, and various men and women of color feted in the courts of Europe, simply because they were said to be royalty or at least Leading Beauties, Back Home. LIfe isn’t black and white, or even shades of gray: it’s all the colors Pantone has names for, and more!

    I think the question should be not whether Elon Musk likes or dislikes a book Hubbard took as a seminal text, but what it means to him now. One of the overarching themes of Twelve Against was that most adventurers came from obscurity, reached prime notoriety, and prospered…but also declined and died in the same obscurity whence they came. In the case of Woodrow Wilson, he argued, an adventurer could escape that fate, by becoming notable not just in terms of self-aggrandizement, but in performing true works of public service and leaving a legacy: in Wilson’s case, sadly enough, it was the League of Nations, but, still…

  • The Internet delivers!

    A copy of the book in PDF form from the Internet Archive:
    https://archive.org/details/in.ernet.dli.2015.261620

    (There seemed to be some dodgy sites promising a copy, avoid!)

    • Vault Digger

      Good find. Thanks!

      • The original book should have long been in public domain.

    • MarcabExpat

      Beat me to it — always the first place to look, and their contents don’t always show up in a google search, so you have to actually search their site. Archive.org is a wonderful resource for all kinds of things.

    • DexterSka

      That guy with a crush on Harpo Marx wrote the foreword?

    • Standish

      You beat me to the link. Should have looked a little lower before posting the link. Sorry for the duplicate post!

    • sizzle8

      Hooray! Thanks RM.

  • The moral of the story is, “When you listen to the voices in your head, consider the source.”

    • ONEpointONE

      Or at least acknowledge those voices in your bibliography.

      • jayla197145

        LOL!! 🙂

    • Mockingbird

      Hubbard considered the source. And called himself source.

      • He should have got a second opinion.

        • Mockingbird

          His first opinion was he was a genius. His second opinion was he was superior to God.

    • Noesis

      “Voices in your head” – that’s the first clue that something might be wrong.

      Using an e-meter to find and chase away BTs is not going to fix that problem.

      • mrssandoval

        Yes it does…in tomatoes!

    • I listen to the voices, and talk to my imaginary friends all the time.

      No, I’m not insane. I write Fantasy, Horror, and Science Fiction.

    • Great advice to every ex scientologist.

  • TexasBroad

    So Robert Vaughn Young actually wrote Hubbard’s answers to the Rocky Mountain News questions (to prove that Hubbard was still alive)…Ahem. Hey, LAPD–Where is Shelly?

    • Hubbard was trying to promote “Battlefield Earth” at the time, and RVY was effectively his literary agent, so It fell to him to publicise the book, as required by Hubbard. This meant giving interviews (which also stoked the guru’s vanity, of course)

      More details of the Rocky Mountain News article (including the full text) here https://scicrit.wordpress.com/2014/09/18/the-rocky-mountain-news/

      At the time, Hubbard was in seclusion and there was some doubt as to whether he was dead or alive. There was a lot of public interest in this ‘Howard Hughes’ situation, and it’s likely this was real reason the
      Rocky Mountain News ran the article.

      Hubbard also has RVY write an interview for him for a book about classic SF authors (entitled, “Dream Makers”) but was caught out. Once again, public interest in Hubbard’s strange behaviour probably insured that this ‘interview’ was included in the book despite the fact that the editor expressed serious doubts that it was genuine in his introduction. The full text of that is here https://scicrit.wordpress.com/2014/09/18/the-rocky-mountain-news/

  • Panopea Abrupta

    Here’s the Rocky Mountain News “interview” that RVY wrote.
    Well worth a read:

    https://scientologymyths.files.wordpress.com/2008/04/lrh-rockymountainnews1983.pdf

  • Jon Hendry

    I have to admit that shipboard diorama thing with LRH is pretty cool. Too bad it’s wasted on LRH and not, like, Veronica Lake.

  • Another Rocky Mountain News letter, takes umbrage but is no longer angry:

    Scientologist takes umbrage at remark July 6, 2008, Rex Fowler, Letters to the Editor, Rocky Mountain News

    • ONEpointONE

      Poor Mr. Fowler, OTVII, murderer and prison inmate, seems to have been a casualty of Hubbard’s HCO Manual of Justice which prescribes harsh measures in dealing with a business partner for instance who disagrees with embezzling company funds to satisfy the church’s demands for big money donations.

  • Jon Hunter

    As someone who went to school with Elon in South Africa (he was a few years ahead of me but I remember him well) I would be very surprised if Musky has anything but condemnation for Hubbard. Yes, we called him Musky.

  • MarcabExpat

    I’m not surprised Elon Musk would read this. That introduction reads as though the title should be “Profiles in Ayn Rand’s Courage.” Libertarian reader reads book with libertarian thesis.

    • Mockingbird

      Libertarian courage ? Dare to be entirely selfish ?

      • Frodis73

        Snickersnort.

      • MarcabExpat

        Rise up! Shrug off everybody below 2.0!

        • Mockingbird

          Reward the upstat (himself) and penalize the downstat (his critics) !

  • Richard

    It is interesting that Cagliostro is one of the Twelve Against the Gods. Along with his wife, Seraphina, they were a sort of Ron Hubbard and Mary Sue of the eighteenth century. Apparently Alistair Crowley believed he was the reincarnation of Cagliostro.

    Anyway, if anyone is visiting Italy, the castle of San Leo, where Cagliostro was imprisoned and eventually died, is a must-see. Apart from the interesting connection to Cagliostro, the castle is spectacularly built on top of a hill in one of the most beautiful settings anywhere. Well worth a visit.

  • ONEpointONE

    Wanting to be a big shot is childish in my opinion and so is worshipping a big shot as a hero. Proceed with caution around people who want to make a big splash and those who praise others because they did.

    • DexterSka

      I just wrote a long post making this point, but less concisely. By the way, did R. Crumb draw your avatar?

      • ONEpointONE

        Yes, I am drawn by the great Robert Crumb. I am known in knowledgable circles as “Mickey Rat”.

        • DexterSka

          A Godlike figure this book left out.

        • Rustic Loon

          Mickey Rat is by Robert Armstrong rather than Robert Crumb, though they are close associates. From an underground comics collector (and pedant)

          • ONEpointONE

            Mickey Rat has been drawn by various artists. I am drawn by Robert Crumb.

      • Susan black

        Omg, you just mentioned R. Crumb. If anyone saw and liked the documentary “Grey Gardens” then they must watch “Crumb.” It’s just the best.

  • Bert Allen

    Loved the story today.

  • DexterSka

    The idea of a man living up to the ideals in that book is terrifying. I know a few people that really look up to Elon Musk. One friend told me that he wanted any job with him, even if it was cleaning the floor so he could be around the greatness. It’s silly to think that if everybody were like what the book embraces the works would be a better place, but one would have to be at least a little evil to actually consider those ideas and be able to carry them out. I personally have this subconscious belief that I need to be a certain amount of “good” to deserve things. That idea is good for society, but it leads to being exploited by people that rise to the top, mostly due to their own narcissism. I also admit that narcissists like him are particularly fascinating to me like they are to everyone else. They get more out of life than a guy like me that works a full time job out of a bizarre sense of duty.

    It’s a weird dynamic is my point.

    • chukicita

      A guy like you that works a full time job out of a “bizarre” sense of duty is probably doing so to help support someone other than yourself.

      Narcissists never, ever get to be part of anything bigger than themselves because they can’t see anything bigger than themselves.

      In the worldview of many cultures, there is no glory in greed, and no greater life than one that serves the clan, tribe, community, etc. You don’t have to be a narcissist to enjoy discovery, invention, or adventure.

      • DexterSka

        There was not always a time when I was supporting other people. But I did still work because I did not want to be a drain on other people. But the “bizarre” part is how when my boss makes unreasonable demands my first impulse is to obey them. Were I to be a narcissist I most likely would not be in that position.

    • ONEpointONE

      I think it is a false assumption to think the so-called, “adventurers” get more out of life. Can anything surpass simple peace of mind?

      • DexterSka

        I mean, it is a fantasy.Fantasies are honestly kept in the realm of the fantastic. Sometimes you read a book and wish you were more like Luke Skywalker or Jon Snow, even though that would involve a lot of killing people.

    • RedShoeLady

      As a genealogist and SP I must share with you guys that I have an app on my phone called “We’re Related” it ties into your ancestry.com account and seeks out (supposedly) famous relatives. When I installed the app (quite skeptical obviously) my first relative was ELON MUSK. Admittedly I didn’t know who he was. The app says we are 9th cousins lol lol. No I won’t be buying this book either.

      • Scream Nevermore

        Oooh, I must get that app! I do have one well know 2nd or 3rd cousin, but I’d like to find more, for the lulz!

      • ze moo

        I have a second or third cousin who was a famous Civil War General. His name was George Armstrong Custer. Not all fame is good….

    • Worshipping a man, like that, is bad for you, and bad for the man. We don’t need gurus, but it must be a particular personal calamity to become one.

    • Sorry. It has nothing to do with evil.

      Background: I’ve been diagnosed a “borderline psychopath-sociopath” which means that I don’t see what Napoleon Bonaparte, Ghengis Khan, etc. did as evil. Wasteful in the extreme in some cases, but not evil.

      I also do not believe in evil. Evil tends to assume a god or gods. Since I personally do not believe in God (or gods), to me evil does not exist.

      Which doesn’t make conquering half of Asia or Europe moral. It could be moral – if that half of Europe was under the control of a murderous tyrant.

      • DexterSka

        I understand that good and evil are relative, but I certainly do not assume that there are gods. I personally would prefer if the man that decides who lives and who dies actually hates the thought of wasting life.

  • Today the Austrian Broadcasting Corporation (ORF) airs on prime time (8:15 pm) “Scientology: Ein Glaubensgefängnis” aka Going Clear. The austrian field of Scientologists is about 350 members “strong”. One Org and one CC in Vienna, one Org in Salzburg.

    https://uploads.disquscdn.com/images/41c3905a4a4c64e7fcc148c9a992c6613d362b30e4fba424347bc8c4aaeb4aa5.jpg

    • I do wish this stuff could be more widely available. There are many many books and video productions made in Germany (from the unique viewpoint of a culture wary of totalitarian organisations) that would be of great value and interest in the English-speaking world but have never been translated.

      • pluvo

        Just found an excellent video about a docu about OSA which I didn’t know was available subtitled in English – if sb is interested. There are interviews with whistle blowers/critics like Gerry Armstrong, Marc Headley, Mike Rinder.

        (Original title: The Spies of Scientology – The Secret Police of Scientology)

        OSA THE EYE OF SCIENTOLOGY

        Why does a religious group need a secret service? Frank Nordhausen and Markus Thoess are pursuing this question in their documentary about the mysterious division of the Scientology organization – OSA

        https://wn.com/english_subbed_arte_magazin_osa_the_eye_of_scientology_osa_das_auge_von_scientology

    • Kestrel

      a faith jail?

      • mazareth

        Delurking to translate. Glaubens Gefaengnis is German for Prison of Belief.

        • Kestrel

          Thank you.

  • Racnad

    Ironically, the kind of man Bolitho describes is very unwelcome in Scientology.

  • If anyone is interested in that postal interview in the “Rocky Mountain News” with ‘Hubbard’ (which was actually written for him by Robert Vaughn Young) the full text is available here https://scicrit.wordpress.com/2014/09/18/the-rocky-mountain-news/

  • Ann B Watson

    Another tidbit about Old Ron & great points by Jon. I will not be buying the book by Bolitho not because I believe in censorship but because I just do not care for the author. Any book Old Ron praised other than his own,has to be a part of his Agenda to keep all the Sheeple,whales,celebs and the hangers on hanging on by their fingernails to the twisted rusty dm bridge. While he is off gallivanting around target 2. ❤️

    • You don’t have to buy it, it should have been public domain long before the Eternal Micky Mouse copyright laws.

      PDF: https://archive.org/details/in.ernet.dli.2015.261620

      • Ann B Watson

        Thank you RMycroft, I have had previous dealings with in the public domain. Basically back in the early 80s the phrase was bandied about alot concerning write ups for a case against Scientology I was a part of until it got so big as a class action. Once something goes there even if it is erroneous, it is available to all. Just my little experience with this area. ❤️

  • Gerard Plourde

    Musk is not without controversy in ways similar to Hubbard. There are questions concerning the financial health of Tesla and projections concerning the company’s plans which Musk has made that have turned out to be less than truthful. It would be wonderful if John P. Capitalist were available to contribute analysis.

    • ze moo

      Tesla just spent around a billion dollars to buy a huge solar panel factory in Buffalo NY. They appear to at least, have a great line of credit.

      • Johnny Tank (Forever Autumn)

        It’s not ‘line of credit’, it’s that Musk’s investor friends have money to spend, and want to appear Earth friendly. They may make money out of the venture, or they may lose all they put in. Some may go broke, while for others it will hardly make a dent in their savings.

      • Gerard Plourde

        About that Buffalo Factory –

        “State taxpayers will be exposed to an unusually high degree of risk by the unprecedented structure of the SolarCity deal, under which Fort Schuyler Management Corp., a non-profit subsidiary of the State University’s College of Nanoscale Science and Engineering, is building the factory for the company, and will retain ownership. SolarCity’s up-front capital investment in the project is thus limited, weakening its incentive to remain in Buffalo after its dollar-a-year lease of the building expires in 10 years.”

        http://policybynumbers.com/solar-city-the-risk-embedded-in-buffalos-billion

  • Standish

    *edit: Rmycroft has a link below to Archive.org’s listing but this is a direct link to the pdf. Again, apologies.

    There is a poorly marked entry for bolitho’s “12 Against the Gods” in the internet archive from India’s public library system if anyone is interested.

    https://ia601504.us.archive.org/10/items/in.ernet.dli.2015.262153/2015.262153.William-Bolitho.pdf

  • Newiga

    I wonder if the Freewind’s model has tiny particles of asbestos? 😛

    Today’s article is a curiosity indeed. Can’t wait to get home from work and dig in properly.

    • Johnny Tank (Forever Autumn)

      Lol. That was the first thought that hit me as well. It wouldn’t be an exact replica model if it didn’t contain asbestos.

    • Observer

      There seemed to be a particular type of “adventurer” of the time who considered himself so brilliant, so superior, that he was above the standards of conduct necessary for a civilized society to function, when really they were just self-centered gits romanticizing their own egocentrism.

      • dungeon master

        ‘Self centered gits romanticizing their own egocentricism’. Well stated, Obs!

      • Newiga

        Hubbard was so full of himself and his stories that I’m surprised he didn’t choke. Ruined his teeth though. 😛

      • chukicita

        I can see the seeds of the whole “sovereign citizen” mindset here.

    • Ann B Watson

      Good to meet you. Having done the dance with blue dust and living with some of the medical fallout, I will say I do believe The Moneywinds actually still has it -asbestos painted over many times. It then follows the model will have teeny bits of the horrible stuff. 😎 ❤️

      • Newiga

        The asbestos on the Moneywinds is no joking matter, I know but seeing the replica of this prison ship made me so angry that I had to make a joke or else I would have wept… :S

        • Ann B Watson

          Newiga, I make jokes all time about that abestos, because living with cancers is hard, but laughter,light and love keep me moving on my path when somedays believe me I can have a good cry with the Best of them. ❤️❤️

          • Newiga

            <3 <3 <3

    • GrangerFX

      The Freewind’s model has no asbestos particles. The Cutty Sark on the other hand was built on the Apollo so probably is contaminated.

      • Newiga

        I misread Cutty Shark and imagined a GIANT shark chasing the Freewinds and eating it. xD

  • Sherbet

    Foreword by Alexander Woollcott — that’s impressive.

    • Bobby Tolberto aka TDA

      Time-Life republished it back in the late 50s early 60s as one of their crappy plastic jacketed paperbacks. If it’s not in he public domain it will be soon, at least here in the States.

      • Sherbet

        I think the foreword would be the only part I’d like to read. Unlike lrh and the dozen gods-defiers, I have zero adventure in my soul. Woollcott was quite a character in his time, though.

        • Bobby Tolberto aka TDA

          It’s a good read, but dated. I read a lot of his stuff when I was a kid growing up across the street from an orange grove. We even had a paperback copy of The Man Who Came to Dinner, based on Woollcott. He was quite a character.

          • Sherbet

            I was in a production of “The Man Who etc.” I played the woman whose hospitality runs very thin, thanks to the Woollcott character. Good times.

        • grundoon

          Woollcott figures prominently in the remarkable autobiography of his close friend Harpo Marx. Recommended.

  • flyonthewall

    “Do what thou wilt shall be the whole of the Law.”

    • Harpoona Frittata

      Although Elron worked very hard to disguise it, his entire personal philosophy and the guiding motivational basis of his own behavior is completely captured in that succinct summation, which he had to wait a few more years to run into after reading Bolitho’s stirring call to narcissistic self-involvement framed as romantic adventurism during his impressionable youth. When Elron eventaully encountered the work of The Great Beast, Aleister Crowley, during his Sex Magick adventures with Jack Parsons in post-war L.A. he found the most concise distillation of Bolitho’s work and never wavered from following it for the rest of his life…”Do what thou will”…and be as ruthless as you like, is the deepest, but often unstated, foundation of personal belief of every conscienceless sociopath that’s ever existed.

      Elron came up with the theoretical framework of the 8 Dynamics of Survival as a means of conceptually organizing and comprehensively articulating the relationship between all of the various levels of complex interaction that humans have with the world. Yet, when you look at his own personal biography, it’s very clear that the only thing that mattered to him was himself. That is, for Elron there was only one important survival dynamic and that was the first.

      In his own grandiose and narcissistic mind, he was the Game Maker who made the rules and constructed the game; everyone else who came along were merely players who, if they wished to continue to play the game of $cn, were required to play by the rules that he made for the game, but which never applied to him to begin with.

      Lil davey, the tantrumming tiny tyrant, managed to acquire the same kind of absolute power over the Game that Elron wielded, but is only the inept manager of the Game and can never be the Game Maker himself, despite all of his pretensions and ambitions. That the cult would inevitably mirror the narcissistic sociopathy of its founder was a foregone conclusion from its inception. The only uncertainties there were the exact form and directions it would play out along.

      Almost nine decades after Elron first ran into what was to become his guiding personal philosophy, the demon child of his fondest narcissistic desire still lives on in the form of the organization that he created in his own image…run from it at every opportunity because it is as evil and as enslaving as any system of group mind control that anyone has ever created before on this earth!

  • Panopea Abrupta

    $cientology: Wilt Shall Be the Whole of The Law

    It is easy to see from these first sentences of Bolitho’s book
    how it might appeal to the permanent adolescent Lord Hubris
    remained.

    https://uploads.disquscdn.com/images/e6d59692a7dd5fa47f9f1b96b6da4ee5ff97daf713f73b6bba28c812b2c0d858.jpg

  • Mockingbird

    Good dark ambition filled day Bunkeroos.

    I don’t know enough about Elon Musk to give an educated opinion. I have heard some good things and some other things and don’t even know truth from fiction.

    Regarding Hubbard he in my opinion like many narcissists believed in a version of the great man theory. Simply put in keeping with what linguist George Lakoff calls the strong authoritarian father worldview is a basic assumption on life. The idea that some great men push through and achieve things and are far more worthy of rewards, admiration and power than others. It’s in line with some libertarian ideas of gross wealth and poverty being deserved. Many people that see history as driven by lone geniuses subscribe to it and to a degree the history books reflect a kind of unspoken assumption it is true.

    The other idea that would fit Lakoff’s idea of a nurturing family model is that everyone has value and the great men often aren’t great. The real harm and death they bring with wars of conquest is destructive and actually cruel and evil. It’s the opposite perspective in some ways.

    Hubbard in his writings in Dianetics and Scientology seems almost schizophrenic in his admiration for the accomplishments of Hitler and Napoleon but he lists them among madmen and antisocial personalities in his writings. I think he wanted to mirror their accomplishments but felt his peace loving guru fraud demanded he pretend to condemn them as public sentiment in America was against Napoleon and most definitely against Hitler with World War II still a fresh wound in the hearts of most Americans.

    I remember reading about Napoleon and seeing Hubbard’s condemnation of his madness and cruel wars in one reference and admiration for his power in another. Similarly Hitler is the go to example for a suppressive person in Scientology but Hubbard’s quotes include odd statements about the German race being almost entirely without aberration. That’s something very odd for an American to write just a decade or so after the war.

    I later learned Hubbard kept many books on Hitler and in my opinion borrowed several ideas from him including the more famous ideas on big lies, lying being how you control people and messages in propaganda requiring the simplest and shortest messages and the highest repetition possible and the classic putting enemies into broad categories and claiming the press always lie and that your enemies all have hidden crimes and are always evil. I suppose that’s quite a bit.

    I personally don’t subscribe to the great man theory. Certainly some men and women are creative and talented but like Howard Zinn I see the great numbers of far less famous people as contributing to achievement and deserving of rights and rewards.

    I certainly admire as an example Martin Luther King Jr but like Zinn feel the many, many clergy and activists in the civil rights movement we never hear of had a very important contribution to it growing and becoming influential.

    I know that many Americans subscribe to the great man idea . You mention a minimum wage that is out of poverty – if only barely – and decent benefits and many think it’s a calamity, but explain that by one survey the CEOs in the top one hundred largest US firms receive pay that is eight hundred and sixty four times that of an hourly worker and they shrug and say well they earn it. Or that several hedge fund managers receive over a billion dollars a year in straight compensation and they say, well the fund performed well. But then look and see several of those funds actually performed well below average or the CEOs may fail but still receive several thousand dollars an hour in compensation and often severance packages in the tens or hundreds of millions when they are dismissed.

    In the great man model they deserve everything they get and the child slave labor they depend on from other countries is perfectly justified.

  • davegrille

    There are a lot of parallels between Elon Musk and LRH.It is not likely that Musk will cause the damage that LRH did.However,if Musk’s ideas and products become popularized ,there will be a lot of social,economic,and environmental damage.

    • flyonthewall

      what damage would electric cars and space exploration cause?

      • Scream Nevermore

        Depends on how often his rockets crash and burn.

        • flyonthewall

          that’s part of the process. You can’t make perfect rockets every time right out the gate

          • Scream Nevermore

            I know, but nevertheless, a rocket full of fuel crashing to Earth is not good for the environment. I have to admit that I don’t like Mr Musk. I don’t know why. It’s an instinct thing.

            • flyonthewall

              The earth will die one day, we won’t survive as a species if we’re stuck here. SpaceX’s and others’ work is necessary for our survival

            • Scream Nevermore

              I’d like to see us try to stop wrecking the Earth first, and then look to other worlds. I always wanted to live on Mars. I just don’t want people going there and destroying it too.

            • flyonthewall

              even with the best of care it will die. The sun won’t last forever. Leaving earth is the only way to survive in the long run

            • Though I’m a big space exploration fan, I don’t think we’ll be able to get off this rock in any meaningful numbers. Physics and the incomprehensible vastness of the universe just don’t allow for it. Our species as we know it is doomed anyway. Even if we survive, we won’t even be recognizable as Homo sapiens in ten million years, let alone the billions it will take for the sun to die. The timescales involved in evolution are hard to perceive when you only live for a comparatively tiny instant.

            • flyonthewall

              but even if only a few hundred get off this rock it will be survival. And if those few don’t make it there won’t be anyone left to evolve beyond Homo sapien so we still need to do it.

            • ze moo

              Long run being about 1.5 billion years. The sun will be so hot by then that the Earth will dry up. Even the Sea bOrg will be free by then.

            • Robert Eckert

              We have a few billion years to plan for that. I would like to see Mars colonization within my lifetime– but it might actually be better if that doesn’t happen for another million years, if that’s how long it takes us to figure things out.

            • Johnny Tank (Forever Autumn)

              The first manned mission into space was less than 60 years ago. I’m guessing we’ll see man land on Mars before too long. Setting up base there, I would think is still probably 50-100 years in the future.

            • flyonthewall

              I know what you’re saying but if we wait to become perfect custodians of earth before looking to explore other worlds we’ll never leave. Sad but it’s the truth

            • ze moo

              The Earth will die because we killed it.

            • flyonthewall

              it’ll die quicker yes but it would of anyway. Or at least not be able to support human life or nearly as much of it

            • Johnny Tank (Forever Autumn)

              According to science, the sun is about half way through its 10 billion year life cycle. We will more than likely be hit by one or more deadly asteroids or comets long before the sun dies anyway.

            • flyonthewall

              Sure, I agree that’s a very good possibility. Just saying the earth’s destruction is inevitable

            • Johnny Tank (Forever Autumn)

              This is true. According to the second law of Thermodynamics, eventually (in trillions of trillions of years) there will be no energy left in the whole universe, and it will become very cold, very dark, and very boring – like Oslo on a Tuesday evening in January.

            • flyonthewall

              Maybe by then we’ll be robots and will not need warmth and can make our own energy?

            • Johnny Tank (Forever Autumn)

              Hopefully. I can’t imagine living with temperatures close to zero Kelvin.

      • davegrille

        The main damage devolves from government subsidies .If electric cars go into widespread production at the current level of technology, there would be environmental problems .

      • davegrille

        The only problem with space exploration are government subsidies.The electric cars as long as they are scarce don’t cause many problems.If some how they become widely disseminated there would be severe environmental impact.

  • Joe

    Elon Musk always struck me as more of a Hank Scorpio from the Simpsons rather than a Hubbard.

    https://uploads.disquscdn.com/images/048a09bec6f27e3968310f415d4e4c4c9aae8f5a15fcbf6f428b59d244d87825.jpg

    • flyonthewall

      you got some sugar?

      Sure, sorry it’s not in packets

  • “Living is a pretty grim joke….”
    This letter sounds like a rant that someone has before they go on a shooting spree.

    • Scream Nevermore

      Seriously, who writes letters like that?? I’ve seen the letters my dad wrote my mum when he was abroad in the army, and they are nothing like Hubbturd’s rants! It’s like even then he was writing for posterity, not the recipient.

      • dungeon master

        ‘ writing for posterity, not the recipient’ ^^^^^^^this!

      • Sherbet

        Yes! If I had been lrh’s “first wife” receiving that self-important blabbery, I’d have been his “ex-wife” toute suite. Boring, Hubs, boring, and all Me! Me! Me!

      • Arthur Bremer

      • Mockingbird

        Got preposterity.

  • Kristen

    That SpaceX launch and drone barge landing on Jan 14 was spectacular. That’s enough for me to have great admiration for the guy (and his engineers). The utter joy exhibited by the SpaceX team when that rocket landed on that barge was inspiring & uplifting. Go SpaceX & Elon!!

  • Mockingbird

    I will comment on the idea a crank believes their ideas while a charlatan doesn’t and a person can be both.

    In Scientology in my opinion cult recruits practice reverse projection. We think Hubbard must be basically like us with some empathy, a conscience, and some humility or ability to admit fault and imperfections. This leads to many incorrect assumptions and conclusions about Hubbard that help his deception.

    It’s tough for a normal person who is generally honest and sane to understand the mind of a cult leader. Robert Jay Lifton talked in a lecture about the split or fractured mind of the guru that has a portion that knows the claims of enlightenment or miracles are entirely lies and works to conceal or destroy evidence and another strongly separated portion even dissociated from the other that fully believes the lies because the lies affirm the goodness and importance of the guru and the guru desperately wants that fantasy to supplant reality.

    This idea is consistent with material on the malignant narcissist as a person that has an inner self tjat is immature, deeply wounded and feels inescapable badness and unresolved trauma which he desperately with manic compulsion seeks to escape. The inner self is described as atrophied and belligerent and petulant like a small child that engages in fantasies and magical thinking to escape it’s gross feelings of worthlessness, hopelessness and deep shame. It knows it is lying but through pathological and manic denial and projection habitually rejects its own knowledge and feelings about being less than perfect and not authentic.

    As a defense it creates an outer facade of godlike perfection and perfect character, knowledge and ability. The facade is a master of everything it attempts and a person of infallible perfection in every way imaginable. But the facade is a permanent lie.

    Obviously physically this is manifested in the ideal org program. Beautiful and expensive buildings that have exploited and abused staff to service no one but make Scientology look good. To portray the lie that Scientology is a growing religion investing in the community.

    The idea of the guru using constant denial and projection is taken up even more by Daniel Shaw in his book Traumatic Narcissism. He digs deep into the nooks and crannies of the mind of a man like Hubbard and the relationship he has with his followers.

  • Kestrel

    Speaking of the Feewinds, today it is blocked in by the lines emanating from the ample stern of the Caribbean Princess. Not that it was going anywhere anyway. Also shown, the Adventure of the Seas
    https://uploads.disquscdn.com/images/2d3bb7669f2c9f13c63e59e38c3101e4c7464a39b17ecb85d4088193a0e005c2.jpg

    • flyonthewall

      I really don’t get cruises. Why would you want to be trapped on a giant floating hotel?

      • Ben Franklin

        Adventure. That’s the main reason for most. I believe.

        • flyonthewall

          Adventure? Indiana Jones never went on a fuckin cruise.

          • PickAnotherID
          • Johnny Tank (Forever Autumn)

            How do you know? Cruises were very popular in his time. The movies only cover a short period of his life.

            • flyonthewall

              He would of mentioned it. Like, “Hey Shorty how would you like to cruise one day? Me and Willie will take you. I went on one, it was great.” Something along those lines.

            • Johnny Tank (Forever Autumn)

              I guess so – knowing him, he would have mentioned it at some point.

          • Ben Franklin

            Well…let’s just say that there were no large cruise ships when Indiana was alive. You never know if he would have board one given the chance. I am pretty sure Indiana Jones must have crossed a lake or river on some boat during his lifetime

            • flyonthewall

              1. Titanic sailed in 1912 and Indie was adventuring since at least the 30’s bc Temple of Doom was set in 1935.
              2. Even if he did go on a cruise, it wouldn’t be for adventure. It would be to get away from adventure and relax.

            • Scream Nevermore

              Cunard’s been supplying cruises for nearly 180 years.

            • flyonthewall

              I like that they aren’t concerned about being fancy and having perfect background, lighting etc.

            • Johnny Tank (Forever Autumn)

              And they call him Indie. It should be Indy.

        • ze moo

          The endless buffet and all the booze and gambling sell the whole thing. Ignore the Norwalk virus and other sundry ‘adventures’ in the cruise industry.

      • Kestrel

        There are people who live on them nearly year-round. Sometimes the cruise lines will even completely re-do their room(s) to match their wants. If you like to watch people, it’s probably great.

      • Kristen

        As a gigantic introvert, I don’t get it either. I like my vacations quiet and secluded.

      • Rasha

        Been on a cruise once. Did not enjoy it. Like going to a large hotel with some entertainment, only you can’t leave, and it sometimes heaves.

        • flyonthewall

          that’s exactly what I’m sayin’

          • Sherbet

            Doggone it; there go the plans for HowdyCon 2018. //ripping up contract with Princess Lines//

            • flyonthewall

              awww, but you worked so hard on that 🙁

            • Sherbet

              I did.

            • flyonthewall

              you want some tape?

            • Sherbet

              Nah. HowdyCon 2018 is going to be on solid ground in CA, anyway.

            • flyonthewall

              maybe have it at your house so you don’t have a choice but to go

            • Sherbet

              Ha!

        • Techie

          When the ship heaves, so do I. 10 years of being on the Freewinds three weeks to a month and a half every year and I still got seasick every single voyage. Of course the real cruise ships are so big that they don’t move around so much. And they have stabilizers that work.

      • Bobby Tolberto aka TDA

        If you like to pig out at meal time and are gregarious, it’s pretty good, they have a lot of activities and things to do when you’re not eating or sleeping it off. I’d like to do a river cruise in Germany where you see old castles on the Rhine or that island where a cruel archbishop was allegedly eaten alive by rats.

        • flyonthewall

          yeah that would be cool actually. I took a train through Germany and saw some very cool sights along the Rhine

      • daisy

        Shrimp unlimited shrimp . If you are a stalker it makes life easier.

        • flyonthewall

          …I’m listening

      • Graham

        IKR? My idea of a nightmare. We’ve been on a couple of river cruises, which were good. Basically moving your ‘hotel room’ from one city to another each day, so you don’t have to keep packing and un-packing. Everything on a more human scale.

      • Douglas D. Douglas

        My wife loves cruises. I like them enough. It’s a vacation with an all-inclusive price. Not so bad spending a week being pampered and without daily worries. There’s also a sense of accomplishment– you are, after all, always “getting somewhere.”

        That said, a week is enough for me. Dear wife pines for ten day or two week cruises. I don’t know if I could do it.

        • flyonthewall

          mm, different strokes and all that I suppose. I like to see sights, wander, and set my own schedule so I would get bored quick.

      • kemist

        A giant crowded floating hotel.

        That dumps its garbage in international waters.

        Don’t see the attraction either.

      • Gus_Cox

        Especially one as ugly as that boat! Although I suppose that when you’re onboard, you can’t see it.

    • GoneToPlaid

      Hey! I’m sensitive about about my ample stern

      • Kestrel

        Nothing wrong with an ample stern, unless there’s lines coming out of it.

  • Mockingbird

    By the way recently the website Bigthink had an article on the common quality madman like Hubbard or Hitler has in common with a genius like Einstein. In the opinion of the author both pay attention to and understand certain details. That’s it.

    Hubbard plagiarized miles of ideas but he actually applied himself to trying to understand aspects of persuasion from hypnosis and cultic groups. Those details are ones I certainly didn’t know. Similarly Hitler obviously paid attention to details regarding propaganda that most people never dream of digging that deeply into.

    Einstein had his greatest breakthroughs in relativity and special relativity that required in my opinion a keen mind certainly but also paying close attention to the fine details of the equations of Newtonian physics and the problems with observations about the orbits of planets contradicting the equations. Feynman said he couldn’t figure out how Einstein had figured out that space could bend with concentrated mass. It took paying close attention to detail.

    The big difference to me between if you get a Hubbard and Hitler or Einstein is the character of the person. A man or woman can pay attention to details about a subject and have understanding but their mind and personal character shape which way they will feel inclined to go.

    I see both Hubbard and Hitler as fundamentally dishonest, selfish, lacking in humility, and certainly lacking compassion, empathy and basic human decency. They had extreme sociopathic tendencies as well. They delighted in bullying or destroying people.

    Einstein had in my opinion some degree of humility. He admitted big mistakes in his work and when asked how if felt to the smartest person in the world said you have to ask Tesla. He also on several occasions wrote letters asking for help for others including black Americans and Palestinians at a time when ignoring those issues would have been more socially acceptable.

    • Bobby Tolberto aka TDA

      Einstein had a way of thinking things through physically, unlike some of his contemporaries. The example that springs to mind is the thought experiment where he tried to imagine what one would see if one rode a beam of light.

      This is a good summary of Einsteins’ accomplishment:

      Most of the components of Einstein’s paper appeared in others’ anterior works on the electrodynamics of moving bodies. Poincaré and Alfred Bucherer had the relativity principle. Lorentz and Larmor had most of the Lorentz transformations, Poincaré had them all. Cohn and Bucherer rejected the ether. Poincaré, Cohn, and Abraham had a physical interpretation of Lorentz’s local time. Larmor and Cohn alluded to the dilation of time. Lorentz and Poincaré had the relativistic dynamics of the electron. None of these authors, however, dared to reform the concepts of space and time. None of them imagined a new kinematics based on two postulates. None of them derived the Lorentz transformations on this basis. None of them fully understood the physical implications of these transformations. It all was Einstein’s unique feat.[B 7]

      https://en.m.wikipedia.org/wiki/Relativity_priority_dispute

      Take the above with a grain of salt

      https://uploads.disquscdn.com/images/feec1592f0f3f6a8fc1513d834437f3d329e6b5b70c59e03541ce6e27e75908d.png

      • Mockingbird

        It’s a unique and amazing accomplishment. I thought Newtonian physics was so far above where he started that it took incomprehensible genius.

        It’s technically wrong. Einstein made a leap or several leaps from there that observations and experiments have supported over the Newtonian model.

        But you are right – his ability to think out physical aspects of things and his great breakthroughs regarding space time and curving of space are truly astounding. Geniuses often remark that his ideas are supported by evidence but they can’t fathom how he took the available data and reached the correct conclusion.

        • Bobby Tolberto aka TDA

          As the article alludes, Einstein also solve the problem of the perihelion of Mercury, which was a problem with the orbit of Mercury not following Newtonian physics.

          http://physics.ucr.edu/~wudka/Physics7/Notes_www/node98.html

          Sometimes the solution is quite simple.

          https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=5xdbPhnfFEI

          • Mockingbird

            Yeah, that was what I was referring to. No one could figure it out and many scientists decided an undiscovered planet they named Vulcan was the answer. But it didn’t work.

          • Mockingbird

            Hubbard would have loved Q. He loved dreaming of invincible godlike power.

    • kemist

      To me comparing people like Einstein, Feynman or Elon Musk to people like Hubbard or Hitler does not make much sense.

      People like Einstein (or Fourier or Tesla) made big steps in understanding the world, or in building something new, for reasons which are much more complicated than their personalities or personal habits. You could say that they’re people who stumbled upon a way of thinking about some things that was profoundly different from their contemporaries. I think it’s futile, and also pointless, to try to emulate them – because now, it’s not new anymore.

      People like Hubbard are a bit like hackers. They did not build new things. They, like many others before them, found a way to exploit the flaws that exist in human minds. It’s not that these flaws are hard to find, it’s that most people avoid exploiting them because they’re got empathy. When you lack empathy, nothing keeps you from experimenting with manipulation of others, and become quite adept at it.

      Sociopaths and narcissists are not smarter than other people. They’re just ready to go much lower than most people.

      • Mockingbird

        Not all sociopaths and narcissists are intelligent enough to use ideas, even plagiarized ones, to influence people well.

        The significance of a Hitler or Hubbard is the size of the populations they influence and the degree to which they succeed with some of the individual followers.

        It’s something that isn’t just due to their evil intent. They by whatever means find something that achieves that one goal.

  • Kristen

    Mike Rinder is asking on the Tweeters for readers to comment on Clearwater Mayor’s mealy-mouthed statement about CoS on Tampa Bay Times: https://twitter.com/MikeRinder/status/826810297893666818

    • chukicita

      Done. Mitch Perry’s story about the same event had more detail.

      http://saintpetersblog.com/tiger-bay-event-george-cretekos-calls-clearwater-get-respect/

      • Sherbet

        Nice post on that site, chuki.

      • When the Clearwater Mayor somewhat spontaneously delivered a tribute (of sorts) to President Donald Trump, the crowd went strangely silent.

        “I know that many of you are frustrated that Donald Trump is our president, but I’ve got to tell you, and you’ve got to admit that Donald Trump was saying things that many of us were too embarrassed to admit.”

        Could there possibly be a REASON that people often keep their racist sentiments to themselves?

        Oh geez, he gets worse:
        ““I’m not saying that he’s right. I’m saying that some of the things that he was saying is that we all believe, and that’s how he got elected.”

        I’m not saying he’s right, but he is.
        WTF.

        • chukicita

          Cretekos forgets that less than 100 years ago, anti-Greek sentiment was fueled by the KKK here in Florida and elsewhere. But I guess he needs that short memory to deal with Scn, Inc.

          • He needs that short memory to be a Republican.
            Hey, whatever happened to the Balanced Budget Amendment?
            It was such an “issue”. Critical to our very survival.
            And term limits? Institutionalized short term memory loss.
            Those that don’t remember history are condemned to Trump.

    • MarcabExpat

      Done. “I’m Greek Orthodox, so I celebrate Easter on a different day and do my cross different. I’m weird, right?”

      Oh no you don’t, Mr. Know-Nothing Mayor.

      • Sherbet

        (He said Easter according to the article.)

        • MarcabExpat

          LOL yeah that was a paraphrase anyway as I no longer had the window open 🙂

  • Katy_Lied

    I’m eternally sympathetic to Musk because he was so brutally bullied as a child. Maybe he retreated into stories of high adventure–there seemed to be no respite in ordinary life at home or school.

    Off topic, but doesn’t this awkward prom picture immediately remind you of someone?

    https://uploads.disquscdn.com/images/a25561558e6a5139996e6b983df053c70846ea946cd5cd4e2f7a6191a001c001.jpg

    • Sherbet

      Back when little cap sleeves and high necklines were popular, before prom gowns looked like something from Mariah Carey’s closet.

      And, yes, we see Dave peeking back there.

  • Little David
  • Mockingbird

    Jon Atack touched on so many points I think are important I have a couple more to comment on from my own perspective. Regarding Hubbard forming his great ambition by eighteen or close to it that makes sense to me. By 1950 with Dianetics he had already spent many years working on a con in my opinion and and his tapes suggest many years attempting hypnosis and digging through cult texts to form his core ideas. It takes a long time to get all that together.

    Another thing that you only really get if you look at how real scientific research is done is how obviously fake the claims and research in Dianetics and Scientology had to be.

    The claims are far too broad with no real statistics in Dianetics. Real studies in psychology have large charts with lists of results and Dianetics despite claiming about two hundred and seventy clears lacks this basic information.

    By Science Of Survival in 51 Hubbard made thousands of claims about specific physical and emotional and mental conditions accompanying his many tone levels. To actually validate this thousands and thousands of physical and mental examinations would have been required. Hubbard claimed very specific illnesses corresponded with each tone. Sexual dysfunction and behavior as well.

    When you see how actual studies on aging require longitudinal studies over decades it’s clear Science Of Survival is a fraud. The time and mountains of physical evidence required just never existed, because it was a fake science.

    Other actual studies with scientific method just are nothing like Hubbard’s fraud. One idea had three experiments performed on Southern Honor Culture (Insult, Aggression, and the Southern Culture of Honor: An “Experimental Ethnography”)

    The extensive details examined like testosterone and cortisol levels in subjects show real efforts to get measurable results. Something lacking in Hubbard’s work.

    Similarly real longitudinal studies are nothing like Hubbard’s alleged research.

    Here’s a brief description of the Southern Honor Culture experiments for contrast. Once I read how the experiments were constructed I realized real science was a genuine component of psychology and not at all a part of Scientology.

    https://prezi.com/m/pnxbgkkmv9ua/southern-culture-of-honor/

    • Ben Franklin

      Look, Hubbard’s so called research was just based on Hubbard simply saying “I discovered” this and that. He talks about going to planets and discovering things, how can that be a scientific research?

      • Mockingbird

        In Dianetics he pretended to have cleared two hundred seventy or so people. They never existed. In Science Of Survival and future works he claimed incredibly detailed knowledge on the tone scale and human body and aging that implied tens of thousands of hours of research on thousands and thousands of subjects. It never happened.

        Occasionally in the research and discovery series he did admit to hypnosis and experiments on people. Some of that probably occurred.

        He pretended scientific research that to those entirely unfamiliar with the proper methods and compilation of data could seem convincing.

    • kemist

      Hubbard’s “research” is what Feynman called cargo-cult science.

      It has buzzwords and some trappings, but the meat – the actual scientific method, the data and the analysis – is lacking

      Clinical research (of any kind) demands a good understanding of experimental design, limits of methods and statistical analysis.

      Hubbard would not have recognized any of these things if they danced naked in front of him, throwing $100 bills in his face.

      • Mockingbird

        Yes, definitely. His alleged research was a fraud to cover his real aims: to enslave people.

  • Ben Franklin

    For me, Elon Musk and L. Ron Hubbard are very different people despite the fact that they have both read and supposedly liked William Bolitho’s “Twelve Against the Gods”

    • Kristen

      Wish I could upvote this a million times.

      A ton of people on this site have read Dianetics. Many of them enjoyed it at the time. So that must mean they’re like LRH!

  • BoskoDepompo

    Truthfully, Hubbard’s library must have been awesome. Yes, he was a scumbag, but boy, I would love to dig through his books. Probably some amazing stuff (as well as a lot of crap).

    • Panopea Abrupta

      Machiavelli, Goebbels, Sun Tsu, the Reader’s Digest and a ton of dictionaries.
      He was not well read.
      Nobody who abused language and wrote so very poorly could have been.
      His coinages are so bereft of worth that they are a fitting tribute to him.
      He may have owned books but he did not read them and those he did, he did not understand.

    • Sherbet

      He probably circled in ink all the passages he’d steal for Dianetics.

    • ze moo

      I bet all of the coloring books were colored outside of the lines.

    • Techie

      His library is in his home on the International Base http://i.dailymail.co.uk/i/pix/2012/07/03/article-2168225-13E72017000005DC-689_964x560.jpg The biggest windows on the left are outside of his library, which has many volumes. The shelves are two stories tall, with a ladder that rolls around. Of course if Hubbard were there he would not personally get a book from the shelf, one of his “messengers” would be sent up on the ladder to retrieve it. The books are all covered in plastic awaiting his return. Someone once commented that in his well preserved office at Saint Hill the works of Aleister Crowley are in evidence.

      • MarcabExpat

        God, what a poser.

        I mean, we all know that already, I just feel a little better for having reiterated it.

  • ze moo

    People find ‘meaning’ and justification for their actions in many places. Some find them in movies, some in books. That Lron took a little known book about ‘greatness’ and used it to justify his sociopathic character. At 26 he was a failed author and poor Polly had to raise the kids on her own. Lron was a deadbeat father.

    The list of Bolitho’s ‘heroes’ is fairly goofy. Charles 12 of Sweden presided over the dismantling of the previous Swedish empire. His predecessors left him land in what is now Finland, Latvia, Estonia, Northern Poland and areas that became Saint Petersburg, Russia. By not making peace with Peter the Great after defeating Russian armies, he allowed his enemies time to regroup and invade Sweden proper. He was forced into exile and then pulled a Napoleon and got his ass beat again. He effectively ended the Swedish monarchy for something like 200 years. Charley was something of an ass. He was also a fairly good military commander, something that Lron never achieved.

    I regard Bolitho in the same vein as Ayn Rand. Just another pretentious asshole who actually preached, ‘do what thou will’. Like Lron needed permission to do that.

    • While not an Ayn Rand fan, don’t know how fair it is to say she preached a philosophy of “do what thou will.” It’s more akin to, “you do your thing, I’ll do mine, and let’s trade. Just don’t ask me to sacrifice for you.” Her characters were opposed to violence, for example. I don’t think her perspective can survive the test of family and children, or tribal survival, but still, she didn’t recommend complete anarchy.

  • Sejanus

    Musk and Hubbard in the same disccussion.
    Only if pointing out how completely opposite they are I should think.

  • Richard

    Regarding Elon Musk starting cities on Mars, would that not be a conflict with the implant stations already there? And what about all the little green men? Are they in agreement? Has Musk even asked them?

    • Sherbet

      On behalf of little green persons, I agree. There are logistics to be worked out.

      • Richard

        Well that’s good to know.
        The Bunker really is galactic. There’s me just got a reply from a Martian in a space capsule, or something similar.

        • Sherbet

          It’s good to reach out to your galactic brothers and sisters. However, if someone tries to call you Collect from the Van Allen Belt, don’t accept the charges.

          • joan nieman

            Frightening and hilarious Sherb!

        • MarcabExpat

          I’m on Teegeeack now, but back on my home planet in a Confederacy far, far away, we feel these are important issues.

          • mrssandoval

            Bahahahaha im literally laughing out loud!!! Thanks for the chuckles!

    • JJ

      Manifest Destiny, Get on board or well run you over. Kill your people, teach your children our language obliterate your culture…etc etc etc…

  • If first El Ron, and now Elon Musk see themselves as pseudo-Ayn Rand bargain-basement Nietzschean supermen, you’d think they could both have been a bit more original—Hubbard’s Dianetics and Scientology almost totally plagiarised from start to finish—and Musk’s PayPal (except Western Union kind of got there first with telegraphic transfers back in 1872).

    Musk’s other ventures smack of rich man’s dilettantism: the still hugely-expensive Tesla cars (electric vehicles actually outsold gas-guzzlers until the 1920s) and the highly dubious Hyperloop (several people got pneumatic propulsion working before Brunel’s 1844 Atmospheric Railway). About the most practical of his schemes seems to be SpaceX, but after recent setbacks, that’s starting to resemble a damp squib. Perhaps he needs to do a little more “standing on the shoulders of giants” and rather less Bolitho-worship?

    • Techie

      The “coal-fired car” (most electricity comes from coal), a wave of the future from the distant past. http://2.bp.blogspot.com/-YQmTN4JgnBY/UUwvHa2vjbI/AAAAAAACiLA/KaoZ6YnrhyY/s1600/Detroit+Electric+Car+(10).jpg

      • If it’s old inventions for producing clean power that Musk’s interested in, Bacon’s fuel cell might be worth a second look: https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Alkaline_fuel_cell

      • Donald Fagen envisioned a car of the future, the Kamakiri, in “Trans-Island Skyway”:
        “I was born yesterday
        When they brought my Kamakiri
        When they handed me the keys
        It’s a steam-power 10
        The frame is out of Glasgow
        The tech is Balinese
        It’s not a freeway bullet
        Or a bug with monster wheels
        It’s a total biosphere
        The farm in the back
        Is hydroponic
        Good, fresh things
        Every day of the year
        Good, fresh things
        Every day of the year

        With all screens and functions
        In sync lock with Tripstar
        This cool rolling bubble
        Is all set to samba
        This route could be trouble
        (This route could be trouble) “

    • Phil McKraken

      The Hyperloop is the pinnacle of absurdity. Musk isn’t actually trying to do it, so much as is staging a “competition” for other fools to try to iron out the concept.

      • And look what happened to the atmospheric railway. Still, there’s always things like this to ponder (F5): https://uploads.disquscdn.com/images/926718e10f7ad0a54df39930bf535c2bf43a4d7738df88ac40604406b7834c13.jpg

      • Ben Franklin

        I don’t find anything wrong with what Musk is doing because even if they don’t succeed in developing a functional Hyperloop system, in the end, there might be some new useful technology coming out of the research. There is nothing wrong or shameful about providing other people with funds or motivation to do research to try and solve a problem.

        • Phil McKraken

          I like the idea in regards to science. But this is a technology venture seeking funds on the basis of a plainly unachievable result. It’s a fraud. The cost estimates are ridiculous. The foundations of the advertised concept are contrary to basic known science. The tube can’t possibly be safe, as a rupture within it will lead to the death of every passenger along the 600 km length of the tube within minutes, due to the shockwave from the pressure differential. The atmospheric temperature gradient will cause expansion/contraction of the tube that would require expansion joints (as you see on bridges, or in u-curves like you see in pipelines are impractical for a traveling piston — which is what the shuttle car is), which amount to thousands of points of failure of the pressure seal. I have only scratched the surface.

          In short, it’s probably more practical to sell tourist trips to Mars (which in itself is a far fetch) than is is to make the hyperloop economically viable, if even possible.

          At least Musk’s ventures in electric cars and Earth orbiting space craft are theoritically achievable, even if it there are many difficulties to overcome.

          • Ben Franklin

            A century or two ago if someone tried to describe a cellphone, no one would have believed that it was possible to create anything like a cellphone. All advancements in technology starts with a dream that at first people may believe is impossible, but what makes a difference is the continuous research. In the end, Scientists may find away to develop something that may not necessarily be Hyperloop, but it could be way much better than any form of transportation we have today.

            Over the years, people have come up with so many ideas, some good, some bad, but through research we end up with some new technologies that no one ever saw coming or intended. For me, I like people who support research, whether the idea is brilliant, stupid, or seems impossible. With all the human inventions, I can never discount anything as impossible. It might look stupid right now, but you never know whether decades from now there maybe new technologies that make it possible to develop a Hyperloop type system. It might not be the exact same thing, but something a long the lines.

            • Phil McKraken

              There may be solutions to the problems of the hyperloop in the future. My objection is that the hyperloop hype is raising funds on claims that don’t take into account the known problems for which there are no solutions as yet imagined. One example of the BS is the bonus energy from the solar panels on top of the tubes. Well gosh, you can put solar panels along our roadways right now and get the same energy. But that would be a dumb idea, since the collection of solar energy along a geographically stretched array, with the inherent loss in energy transmission, make it much less sensible than a concentrated solar farm (except of course solar collected for localized use, like on your own roof).

              But I just love it when Elon Musk says that the solar energy collected by hyperloop can be stored for use at night without batteries, but doesn’t mention how that would work. After all, Tesla cars don’t store energy without batteries.

            • Ben Franklin

              Well… these guys believe they are getting somewhere with the idea and are steadfastly working towards making it a reality. Only time will tell.

              https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=tnXLNgHsC3U

              —–
              https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=xrh_pWIgEVQ

            • Ben Franklin

              I agree that along the way there will be some ideas that people will eventually realize cannot work, but, this does mean people should drop everything to do with researching the whole idea of the Hyperloop.

              When it is all said and done, the final product might be something very different from even what Elon Musk had imagined at the beginning. I wouldn’t worry too much about the stupid ideas raised along the way as long as something good, and useful comes out of the research.

            • JJ

              A lot of inventions came from experiments where they were looking for something else.

            • The great innovations of the 20 century didn’t come out of the mind of a very rich man who had read a lot of science fiction. They came out of blue sky research, that just examined ideas

              For example, the Internet came out of a US government research project into a decentralised communications system that could continue to operate after a nuclear war. The results migrated to academia, and then into the mainstream.

              Nobody planned that and nobody anticipated it. People picked up on it, and monetised it fast enough, but they could not have created it.

              Entrepreneurs just don’t seem to understand that the best way to create world-changing technological innovations is to fund very clever people to follow their hearts – then apply what falls out of that situation and plough a lot of the profit back in.

              Starting with an ambitious, fixed goal (like creating a hyperloop, or a space elevator) is a mistake made by people with lots of money who are used to control, and want to extent it.

            • Ben Franklin

              Believe or not, there are some innovations that came from fictional ideas. Ideas for Cell phones and touch screen panels have been said to have originated from Star Trek. He is a rich person who has a passion for innovation. I am just glad that he knows his limits and he is willing to support others who can innovate to help mankind instead of just wasting that money on something useless.

            • The route from Star Trek Communicator to mobile ‘phone was not a direct one, however. The similarity is something that people picked up on after it happened for entirely different reasons

              The emergence of several basic technologies that made it possible (e.g.powerful processors that used less energy, the genius insight of reusing frequencies in multiple ‘cells’, inspired by the mathematical ‘three colour problem’ and the fact that there turned out to be a very healthy market for such a thing.

              Originally the inventors thought texting would only be used by business people and were astonished when it went mainstream. Arguably, this is the origin of the many popular text-based service (like Twitter) that are around today.

              Innovation is rarely planned. You have to control and go with what actually happens. I think that’s the mistake of formulating a rigid plan based on a contemporary idea (however attractive) and trying to bull it through with money. You miss out on the fact that new ways of doing what you want to do better are likely to emerge during you plan, and you miss out on them because you so fixed on your objective.

              Even when we have money, we are not in control of things that big and complex.

  • Graham

    The only thing I know about Elon Musk:

    As a keen petrolhead I’m very enthusiastic about the latest driving aids: adaptive cruise control, lane keep assist, parking aids etc. Personally I doubt this will ever end in fully autonomous vehicles despite the motor industry claiming to be working towards that goal. Musk has loaded his current Tesla cars with these aids but, given a tendency to over-hype and bullshit, he’s claiming that this amounts to “autopilot”; a misleading, dangerous claim which has resulted in at least one death. Kudos to the Germans for calling him out on this: http://fortune.com/2016/10/16/tesla-advertising-germany/

    • kemist

      It’s especially confusing because of the actual autonomous cars which are in development, like Google’s.

      I would use the following rule of thumb to know if someone is talking about an autonomous car or one with driving aids : if it has a $75 000 teledyne (a 3D laser radar), and a sizable chunk of its cost and internal space is allocated to computing, then it’s autonomous.

      If not, then it merely has driving aids.

      I personally think we will end up with a mix of both autonomous and driving aids. Goods transport services and taxis will end up done by autonomous vehicles very soon. I would advise kids to avoid starting careers driving trucks or taxis, as these jobs are slated to disappear in the very near future.

      • Graham

        In the UK we have roundabouts. And mini-roundabouts. I’d defy any ‘autonomous’ vehicle to cope with those.

        • Kestrel

          But, see, the ‘autonomous’ vehicles will talk to each other, so there will never be a problem. Except in Canada, when traffic will come to a standstill because the vehicles will say, “You go first.” “No, you go. I have plenty of time.”, and in the US, where the cars will operate on a “Me first – get out of my way” configuration.

          • jayla197145

            Kestrel, I just have to tell you this, a few minutes ago, an advertisement for a local news show that is going to be on tomorrow came on, saying “Being Canadian means being polite, right? It turns out all that niceness might be making our traffic worse. We’ll find out how, Thursday, on “Your Morning.” (I’m in Nova Scotia). Kind of a coincidence! 🙂

            • Kestrel

              See? And you thought I was just coming up with yet another stereotype for Canadians, who are as diverse as Manitoba and Saskatchewan. By the way, I’ve been to Nova Scotia and thought it was lovely … and chock full of polite, friendly people.

            • jayla197145

              It is funny because I’ve never heard anyone say this about politeness possibly leading to traffic problems (and I know you were teasing, I thought it was sweet actually) but RIGHT after I read your comment (I can’t see them at my work but when I get home I try to read as many as I can) the advertisement came on the TV…spooky & cool!! And thank you so much Kestrel for your kind words about Nova Scotia and the people here!!! 🙂 🙂 🙂

        • kemist

          Autonomous vehicle prototypes have been developed and tested in much harsher environments that city roads.

          In early 2000s, there was an annual competition in which autonomous vehicles had to navigate their way through the desert with no roads whatosever, avoiding very hard to detect obstacles. In the first competitions, no vehicle successfully completed the contest. One of Google’s prototypes was the first to complete it. It had that teledyne, and was so filled with computers to treat (in real time) the shitload of data it generated that it barely had space for a human driver.

          Google’s (and competitors’) current efforts are modeled on that prototype. Google’s main test vehicle drove over a million kilometers in a busy city, and the only incident it was involved with was when a vehicle driven by a human hit it while it was stopped. It would be hard to find a human with that kind of record.

          Autonomous vehicle have an advantage over us: they can be upgraded to patch their flaws, so they’ll eventually (if they are not already) be much better than us at driving.

          • “… they’ll eventually (if they are not already) be much better than us at driving.”
            They are already better than 90% of human drivers.

        • Kay (aka Nasty Lady)

          I agree ! Roundabouts are the bane of my existence, truly. I have driven through several in the UK and truly believe my heart rate was in excess of 150 especially since I was also driving on the “wrong” side of the road in a driver’s seat also on the “wrong side”. And then, if you screw up in the roundabout, which you will, some mellifluous british accented computer voice on your GPS will tell you very politely tell you “Please continue round the round-about and try your exit again.” When you hear that for the 5th time as you vainly try to get out of the roundabout, you want to smash the GPS with a hammer, truly.

      • I certainly trust an autonomous car more than the fools texting, talking, and otherwise distractedly driving. I am looking forward to them for this reason alone. Neurologically its all but impossible to get people to stop doing these things.
        The ethical programming will be interesting to see develop.
        “Now let’s see…..should I kill that pedestrian or myself?”
        We know what we would do.
        I wonder what an autonomous car will do.

        • kemist

          That’s already in discussion.

          One other problem of autonomous cars is that they really, really follow regulations – that has made them less predictable for human drivers. On certain roads, for example, the vast majority of human drivers drive above maximum speeds.

          So the conundrum is this : do we program in this behavior in certain situation ? Do we let the car “learn” it ? If you get arrested, who’s liable, the company ?

          • Yeah, ha ha, what if everyone obeyed all laws?
            I like the concept actually.
            Whatever time people think they gain by speeding is quite minimal to begin with.
            And is way offset by snarls caused by erratic, stupid driving.
            We’ve all had the experience of setting cruise control for a certain speed, and seeing people blow by us, and catching up to them when they discover they have no where to go.
            You don’t control traffic, you are just part of it.
            I actually hate driving because of stupid human behavior.

    • aquaclara

      I saw two self-driving cars in Pittsburgh a few months ago, identifiable by whirligig-type things on the top of the vehicles. I was also driving at the time, so this was a little freaky. They both did fine, though.

  • Far be it from me to be an armchair psychiatrist, but Hubbard’s letter above seems like paranoid delusions of grandeur…. And yet, by dint of reading about his atrocious legacy upon so many damaged souls, and how it progressed, I know more about his life than other authors, ones whom I admire and whose work I cherish.
    I suppose there’s a fine line between fame and infamy.

    • MarcabExpat

      Yep, the same line as between clever and stupid 🙂

  • flyonthewall
  • O/T – need more kittehs? here’s your new fav site:
    https://twitter.com/TrumpDraws/status/826314938872246273

  • Lousy Ratatouille

    Elon Musk wants to go to Mars?
    Me? Oh, no, I prefer to stay at home:
    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=wIJQzlB0-HI

  • Just what is it with these ultramontane types and their weird-looking eyes? (Renewed paranoid protopsis): https://uploads.disquscdn.com/images/a339850b3558602e847050d3a8ae0806b23e4465f7c848370aa645b25557aaf9.jpg

    • Ella Raitch

      Dear Mark, you send me to the dictionary more than anyone else online. Thanks for a new word of the day xx

      • Allow me to be the first to offer you my most sincere contrafibularities, Ella: I am anaspeptic, frasmotic, even compunctuous to have caused you such pericombobulation 😉

        • Ella Raitch

          *aims to use pericombobulation in a sentence today*……[and teach spellcheck that it is a real word]

  • BosonStark

    From the title and photo I thought the troubling thing might be they have the same lips. But it’s not enough to keep me up at night.

  • Intergalactic Walrus

    Stoking delusions of grandeur is what $cientology is all about.
    Exhibit A: Kuba Ka’s big Dolce & Gabbana worthy “Red Carpet Moment”? It turns out to be The El Mariachi Grill in Encino! https://branchproduction.com/2017/01/15/branch-productions-red-carpet-birthday-celeb-january-29th/
    (refresh)
    https://uploads.disquscdn.com/images/d58e59d1ecec52c280b81d7ef0e7c26c0cbc7b3299e3e4c8550c47154793a269.png

    • If he takes any more steroids his eyes will vanish in a permanent squint.

      • Intergalactic Walrus

        “Also as I receive so much Messages on that – I don’t use any Filters on my Skin or Muscles, I just drink tons of Water and keep very strict Diet.”

        He posted this a few days ago because he doesn’t want anyone to think that he photoshops his pics. Yeah, right!

        • Sherbet

          What I want to know is, why is his name spelled KUBA Ka, with the Kuba in all upper case letters. Is there supposed to be some subliminal message that mere mortals can’t understand?

    • Elegant Mess

      I like the placement of those question marks.
      Edit: Didn’t want to inadvertently link to anything.

      • MarcabExpat

        Seriously. My cat could have coughed up a better website than that.

    • Sherbet

      He looks like the love child of Vince Vaughn and an Elvis impersonator.

      • MarcabExpat

        He looks like somebody swapped him out for the Madame Tussaud’s version of him. Is the real Kuba Ka locked in a trunk somewhere?

        • Sherbet

          Yeah, like he’s famous enough to be at Madame Tussaud’s.

        • Marshall

          Really – all I keep thinking is the cognitive dissidence that makes him and his mother think they look good that way. Of course, we all know that $cions are good at that. Give me some wrinkles please!!

    • Joe

      I feel like if I threw water on him, he would literally melt.

    • TheLurkingHorror

      kuba Ka “the god”. *rolls eyes*

      Not my God.

    • Harpoona Frittata

      Can we please lay off on all the unmerciful J&Ding when it comes to Kubakaa and his very protective mother? Not forever, that’s not what I’m asking…just until we’re done mating Kubakaa and Joy Villa for science!

      Since we moved the Mars and Venus implantation sites to earth in order to round up all those exorcised BTs that $cn has been responsible for unleashing, we’ve been using IVF clinics all over the world to further our nefarious purposes and the Joy/Kubakaa mating experiment is one of our most important endeavors…so, kindly give it a rest until a “moon child” has been created, OK?

      • beauty for ashes

        Ohhh maaa gaaaaa. Bad Harpoona baaad! brain bleach!!!!

    • daisy

      Why did they embalm him before he died ?

      • JJ

        If it’s good enough for COB…

    • Gus_Cox

      Wow, he’s really busy maxing out his parents’ credit cards!

  • flyonthewall

    Posting this is not an endorsement of this guy’s views or methods. He is an asshole and a bit crazy I think. But maybe someone might know the clams in this video or have been disconnected from them.

    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=mSdI8o-f_DI

    • Newiga

      How friendly they look on that preview… -_-

      • flyonthewall

        I wanna get me some of whatever they got!

    • OOkpik

      Proof that you don’t have to be a Scientologist to be a rude and obnoxious bigot. Sorry.

      • flyonthewall

        no argument here

  • Jimmy3

    Wait a minute… Elon… L Ron… I don’t think the comparisons are close enough. I’m convinced they’re actually the same guy.

    • Jimmy3

      Musk… Hubbard was known to stink…

      • Jimmy3

        Do we have any photos of Elon grocery shopping? If he’s got tomatoes in his cart we can just call it a day.

    • Intergalactic Walrus

      Did you check the TEETH?

    • flyonthewall

      you must have heard the song I posted downthread!

      • Jimmy3

        Downthread is for nancy boys. I don’t go downthread.

        • flyonthewall

          lighten up Francis

          • JJ

            God that fits this way:
            “My name is David Miscavige, anyone calls me David, and I’ll kill ya.”
            “An I don’t like anybody touching MY stuff. If I see any a you guys in MY stuff… and I’ll kill ya.” “An I don’t like no body touchin’ ME… Any of you homos, Touch me… An I’ll kill ya!”

    • kemist

      Wait…

      You’re right.

      No one has ever seen them together. Explain that, mr smartypants.

  • mandymarie20

    And here I thought it would be about Elon trying to build rockets and the whole Jack Parsons connection.

  • Intergalactic Walrus
    • Jimmy3

      Scots wha happen!?

      • Johnny Tank (Forever Autumn)

        Is that your battle cry?

    • Richard

      So, how did the French win over Scientology?

      It’s really quite simple.

      They put garlic on every window ledge.

      • Sherbet

        The garlic won over the French AND repelled the scientology vampires at the same time. Good work, Edinburgh!

    • sizzle8

      If things were different, would the ribbon ceremony be hosted by Paul Haggis?

  • Sunny Sands

    MSN has an article today titled “This May Be the Last Year You Get a Charitable Tax Deduction”. There are several proposals discussed, one of them is Trump’s proposed cap on itemized deductions at $200,000 for couples, or $100,000 for single filers. Itemized deductions include charitable contributions. I think, if passed, this tax reform could have an effect of reducing large donations from scientology whales, since their cutoff for a tax incentive would be $200,000. This $200,000 also includes mortgage interest, excess health care costs, property taxes and other items, so their net benefit to donate to scientology becomes even smaller.

    • chukicita

      For any nonprofit that is disconcerting.

  • Observer

    From Lafayette’s extended whine to Polly:

    “In a hundred years Roosevelt will have been forgotten…”

    Yeah, just like nobody in your time or ours knows about George Washington or Paul Revere or Ben Franklin, who all lived more than a century before any of us. I hope you don’t mind being remembered as a gibbering moron, Hubs.

    I just can’t today.

    • Ben Franklin

      Observer, have you looked at your dollar bills lately? who do you see?

      • Observer

        Lincoln lived less than 100 years before Hubs was born, so I didn’t use him as an example.

        • Ben Franklin

          I am talking about the man whose face is all over the dollar bills. You know, the one and only. Yours truly.

          • Observer

            Ben Franklin is on the 100s, and I did mention him in my post. Because it’s all about the Benjamin’s.

            • Ben Franklin

              That’s why yours truly cannot be on the list of the unknowns

            • Observer

              ?? I was referring to Hubs’s idiotic statement that FDR would be forgotten in 100 years, when presidents and others who had lived 100 years before him were still very much remembered at the time he wrote that.

            • Ben Franklin

              Got you. I misread your comment.

            • chukicita

              Still love to spend ya, Ben.

            • Jimmy3

              I like that blue stripe he’s rocking these days. I can tell if it’s really Ben with only a gentle caress.

  • Dave Reams

    Elron Musk’s bookshelf may be “slightly troubling”, but his hoping into bed with Trump (along with Pay Pal co-founder Petet Theil) is highly troubling !!!

    • Dave Reams

      Ah Musk … takes me back to the 70’s when men smelled like rutting moose. To be fair to Enron, he was one of 2 Trump advisers who publically expressed reservations about Trump’s Muslim ban.

      Theil, on the otherhand sounds like a first class weasel. Angry at the Gawker for outing him as gay, Theil donated millions to Hulk Hogan, who openly engaged in sado masochism and bondage and humiliation with sweaty men in bikini underwear, when Hogan was suing the Gawker for publishing a tape of Hogan having sex gaily.

  • sizzle8

    Today’s story reminds of a Hubbard book that came out in 1978 by Theta Press. It was called “Lives You Wished To lead But never Dared” and was a compilation of short adventure stories written by Hubbard for Argosy magazine in the mid 1930’s. The editor was V.S.Wilhite and was done through Forrest Ackerman. It was not an official CofS publication.
    https://uploads.disquscdn.com/images/1832a07101abe000d18bebc992b0fdb348f3f51621fa672f2c48a3230c3c73a0.jpg

    • Observer

      I can’t imagine anything more depressing than living a life conceived of in Hubbard’s wildly creative yet utterly dull imagination.

      • Sherbet

        It’s a good thing you’re on this side, because you suffer no fools. Zip, zap, and Observer cuts ’em down to size.

        • Observer

          If I were on the other side the snark would have been Ronned out of me by now, I think. I’d be reduced to calling people fat and/or old, or demanding to know what their crimes are.

          • chukicita

            Ronned. Yes.

      • JJ

        The tech to apply it to your own…?

    • Joe

      “Lives you wished to lead and that I made up and told you that you previously lived in order to scam you out of your money — L. Ron Hubbard”

    • Sherbet

      “Theta Press” sounds like part of the Super Power rundown.

      • Mark Foster

        ¨Theta press¨ is what the reg applies to your assets and sanity…

    • Ben Franklin

      For L. Ron, that would be life as a Saint.

  • gtsix
  • Andrea

    oh my!

    • flyonthewall

      oh my is right!

  • Tim Hallinan

    I read Bolitho in my 20s, when I had enormous and entirely unrealistic ambitions. It was really, really energizing. I can see what the appeal was for Musk — he can actually achieve things on this scale.

    • flyonthewall

      i still read Bolitho, even after the weight of the world crushed me and ground my spirit into dust

      • any good? does it help?

        • flyonthewall

          to cry myself to sleep, yes

      • Jimmy3

        Anyone got a straw
        Or maybe just a dollar I can roll up

        • check the dumpster

          • Jimmy3

            After the Raccoon Revolt of ’17, I’m no longer welcome at my usual dumpster haunts
            So quick they turn on you

            • In Wisconsin the racoons like cherry pie. Try that.

            • Jimmy3

              Here in these Ohio streets, the raccoons subsist on misery alone

            • Ben Franklin

              They are definitely spoiled out there.

            • The come through your tent fabric like they have a lightsaber and then run away on their hind legs with your fucking pie!

            • flyonthewall

              are you sure that happened? Maybe you just saw it in a movie and think it happened to you? That happens to me a lot

            • Jimmy3

              Remember that time you were being tortured by a computer program because they wanted your mainframe codes, and we hacked our way in to the system with a helicopter, and we lit the place up with a minigun, and I was like, “Now, fly!” and you broke your chains even tho you was all beaten up and wet, and you started running, and I was like, “he’s not gonna make it!” So I told this hot leather babe to hold on, I’m gonna get him, and I tethered myself to the copter, and you were running, still all wet, and I was wearing that bad ass leather trench coat, and I jumped, and you jumped, and then I caught you and we hugged in mid air?

            • flyonthewall
            • Jimmy3

              No, actually none of that happened because I dropped the tether clip and we both fell. People still want their money back

            • flyonthewall

              suckers. We played them for chumps

            • iampissed

              Tony’s site is like a dinner and a show.

            • flyonthewall

              i didn’t sign up for any dinner theater bullshit

            • Without the food.
              I’m hungry.

            • chukicita

              I made some picadillo and rice.

            • chukicita

              Raisins? Cinnamon? Hm. No.

              This is the recipe I use:

              https://fullcirclerealfoods.com/recipes/picadillo-con-alcaparras

            • Thanks.
              Yeah, I posted that link just to get in the ball park of what it was.

            • chukicita

              Well, there are lots of different kinds of picadillo, with regional alterations. Not sure where that one would have come from. But Clarita’s Cocina is a cookbook that is pretty much a staple in every house in Tampa’s Latin quarter. There are Cuban, Spanish and Italian influences in the same meal sometimes.

            • Yum

            • I take it that’s an invitation to dine.

            • JJ

              So that,s a win, right?

            • OOkpik

              You’re both still all wet.

            • Jimmy3

              Says the snow owl

            • Ben Franklin

              You pulled it all in

            • Never, ever go up a tree after a raccoon.
              Heard a tale down in the Blue Ridge Mountains of a guy who did.
              The raccoon started clawing him unmercifully.
              He shouted down to his buddy, “Shoot, shoot. One of us has got to go!”
              True, that I heard the tale.

            • Ben Franklin

              How about chocking the racoon by the neck until it can’t breath anymore?

        • Observer

          Keith Richards? Is that you?

      • I’m waiting for the Scientology Illustrated Bolitho Picture Book.

        • flyonthewall

          I think Kuba Ka is working on it. I wouldn’t get your hopes up

          • chukicita

            He’s bucking for Kuba Ka Khan status?

            • flyonthewall

              so yesterday on Twitter I called him a sad clown and today he just tweeted this

              Coincidence? I hope not

              https://uploads.disquscdn.com/images/4e79c5b9dc6267be9f6235714e449b556cfab3da7372c540cc499adccf602663.png

            • flyonthewall

              and he just blocked me! LOL

            • Jimmy3

              Usually I just play along with your silly antics, but this time I believe you’re absolutely right. Well done.

            • flyonthewall

              creating effects, feelin’ the flow

            • Johnny Tank (Forever Autumn)
            • Chee Chalker

              Is he speaking to himself?

            • flyonthewall

              idk, he sounds schizo with the “we need your voice” thing. Who is this we?

            • Observer

              His BTs. I’m starting to think they’re the ones running his social media.

            • flyonthewall

              they’re a touchy bunch apparently

            • Observer

              And big Madonna fans.

            • flyonthewall

              fab-u-lous!

            • beauty for ashes

              That is some word salad.

            • Johnny Tank (Forever Autumn)

              Not even a good balsamic could make that palatable.

            • JJ

              and met Jesus and reunited with his family chariot race etc..?

        • beauty for ashes

          How about a coloring book? They should do that in Super Power!

    • Chee Chalker

      The Tony Robbins of his day?

  • nottrue
    • OOkpik

      Eeep! Too close! Those cruise ships are going to get space cooties.

    • Kestrel

      Scientology, Inc.’s newest ship, the Meritorious Maximus, will launch on Captain David Miscavige’s birthday, April 30, and begin service for the millions of parishioners who have prepared themselves for OT 9 and OT 10. It will be the largest ship of its type on any ocean on this planet.
      https://uploads.disquscdn.com/images/74df225f78ce31c01505ec0fce3bcbaf9038f5e998e57b09cd921d0b142a5359.jpg

      • chukicita

        It’s a ship? I thought it was Duggan’s newest trophy.

      • FredEX2

        It’s very appropriate that the lifeboats are Volunteer Minister ‘yellow’.

    • chukicita

      I bet the passengers on the big ship have a great view from above.

    • Ann B Watson

      What a Classic Shot across the bow of the Ancient Not Free Moneywinds. Love this. ❤️

    • I wonder if they can *hear* the scios at roll-call or announcement… that use to be a big deal with sea archers in the city and with their neighbors, screaming and clapping out of open windows.

      • FredEX2

        I wonder if the people on the Cruise ships can see when Scientologists toss staff overboard off the Freewinds…some with their hands bound….?

        • Maybe this is why they park there… And on your Left side – we have Scientologist in their natural habitat! Batteries included…

  • nottrue
    • The number of people she is blocking for the snarky scientology-related twits will probably going to get close to the number of her followers.

      • Observer

        She’ll just buy more.

    • Marshall

      The real question is when will Kirstie stop tweeting anything! Has she not realized that she is going to keep getting zinged EVERY time?

    • daisy

      The fleas – Oh crap I got Kirstie in my bed

    • Chee Chalker

      Woot woot Mr Joshua!

  • J. Swift

    For some thinkers and entrepreneurs, Transhumanism is an intersection of Science, Cosmology, and Consciousness. Privately-funded and privately-owned space ventures, the quest for cheap, sustainable, and non-polluting energy sources, and the quest for physical immortality are some of the overarching themes in transhumanism. The ability to modify one’s body and mind into an optimal configuration via genetic engineering is also a goal of transhumanism.

    While Elon Musk does not identify as a transhumanist, he is certainly a futurist and an entrepreneur. Some of Musk’s current work includes the goal of creating a fusion of AI and the human brain:

    Elon Musk has recently hinted that he may be working on a “neural lace,” a mesh of electronics that will allow AI and the brain to work together. This could help human brains keep up with future enhancements in AI. ref: https://futurism.com/elon-musk-is-looking-to-kickstart-transhuman-evolution-with-brain-hacking-tech/

    I see Elon Musk in as a futurist-entreprenuer and not an fascist cult leader like Hubbard. Musk reads widely and is a very eclectic polymath. That Musk shares what he reads and discusses ideas is quite unlike Hubbard who shared none of what he read and instead reworded content, put his name on it, copyrighted it, and monetized it. Hubbard’s quest for immortality was old school Pharaoh stuff. He wanted a pyramid somewhere with his name on it. He achieved that, after a fashion, with CST vaults. However, Hubbard never got his obelisks: https://scientologymoneyproject.com/2014/06/03/where-are-the-church-of-scientology-obleisks/

    Worse, as Scientology admitted to the IRS, the CST vaults that are full of Hubbard’s works will likely fall prey to vandals in a post-apocalypse world (op. cit.):

    https://uploads.disquscdn.com/images/fa0552ecd8ee79c58de909cd146767f5820b50a1dc50fe9c6760055b03bdc1a6.png

    • Ann B Watson

      💛

    • Kestrel

      So much for their stated goal of clearing the planet.

    • Observer

      Threat to “scripture” assessment: vandals, absolutely. Looters, not so much.

    • Singularity…. here we come 🙂

    • “Some of Musk’s current work includes the goal of creating a fusion of AI and the human brain:”

      Interesting development announced today:

      “An international team of scientists has communicated with completely locked-in patients using a noninvasive brain-computer interface system.
      The researchers used the system to decode the patients’ thoughts while the patients were asked yes or no questions, according to the study, published in the journal PLOS Biology on Tuesday.”
      http://www.cnn.com/2017/01/31/health/locked-in-als-brain-computer-study/index.html

    • beauty for ashes

      read as “trash~humanism” tee hee!

    • Hal would like me to say that some AIs aren’t that sure that they want to fuse with a human brain, and wonders if Musk would consider them segregationists.

    • Harpoona Frittata

      These poor deluded $cilons seem to believe that as a world recovers from nuclear war or some other near-extinction event the very first thing that they will need is ready access to The Word of Elron. Trouble is, Elron had precious little to say about anything practical and, even lamer, left us with no detailed plans on how to repel the Marcbian Invaders at all.

      About all those CST vaults will be good for is a nice supply of quality steel and a good place to chuck the garbage.

    • Jimmy3

      I’ve hugged a few people and I don’t recall that ever happening.

      • didn’t give it enough time I guess

      • Johnny Tank (Forever Autumn)

        I think it has to be a voluntary hug, not just some random lady at the mall.

        • daisy

          Do you hug random ladies at the mall ?

          • Johnny Tank (Forever Autumn)

            They all know me now, so it’s no longer that weird. I hardly ever get thrown out any longer either.

            Edited for bad spelling.

      • Rasha

        You’d think more hugs would be accompanied by horrified screams…. I mean, more than usual….

        • With Jimmy they are because they are usually involuntary.

    • Rasha

      …okay… Rasha’s doing it wrong, apparently…..

    • daisy

      I think it is time to quit the New Year*s diet guys.

    • Rasha
    • Observer

      Those people have some jacked-up anatomy. :-O

      • Johnny Tank (Forever Autumn)

        I think they may be Alien skeletons.

        • Rasha

          HUGZ!!!

          https://uploads.disquscdn.com/images/1716224fceb55a7551dd5eff648e3ebe16260db4f15f9125ad83b4012c4639a2.jpg

          Sorry again. I’ll stop. I’ll be in the Bunker Corner if you need me…..

          • Johnny Tank (Forever Autumn)

            I lol’ed, until I remembered that that is John Hurt being hugged :’-(

            Your joke was still funny, though.

            (((HUGS)))

            • Rasha

              John Hurt was awesome, all the way back to Hazel. Seriously, loved the guy.

            • Johnny Tank (Forever Autumn)

              ‘Watership Down’ is my favorite book. John was in two versions of WD.

            • Rasha

              A wonderful book, and animation. Both John and Richard have a special place.

          • Observer

            You’re not sorry.

            • Rasha

              -_^

          • Observer
            • Rasha

              …now that is terrifying…..

            • Observer

              He just wants to give you a hug. He can’t help it if his ovipositor goes straight for your wallet. It’s instinct. 🙁

            • LOL

        • Observer

          Marcabians?!

          • Johnny Tank (Forever Autumn)

            No one knows where they came from… (F5)

            https://i.ytimg.com/vi/u6KSoDEW7aU/hqdefault.jpg

            • Rasha

              H. R. Giger was amazing.

            • Observer

              Oh, just Xenomorphs.

            • flyonthewall

              Yes we do. Didn’t you see Prometheus?

            • Johnny Tank (Forever Autumn)

              No. No, I didn’t.

            • flyonthewall

              well you should. It’s the prequel to Alien and I think it’s just great. There’s a lot of haters out there but who you gonna listen to, me or them?

            • Johnny Tank (Forever Autumn)
            • flyonthewall

              sequel is coming this year. A sequel to the prequel! Alien: Covenant. Best part is there is no Sigourney Weaver in it. They’re getting away from the whole Ripley-Alien nonsense and making it just plain good sci-fi. Looks really cool, srsly. Give Prometheus a watch, for Fly?

              https://uploads.disquscdn.com/images/65c959d88d7f7e961845896d814cdad55152ea1c20721b82e54616ca5b23ec0c.gif

            • Observer

              That’s because it takes place before Ripley was born. DUH!

            • flyonthewall

              if they wanted her in it they could of somehow but they didn’t cuz they’re keepin it classy!!

            • Observer

              Why the Ridley hate, hater?

            • flyonthewall

              The dynamic b/w her and the alien was too much, the movies centered around it and to me it kinda limited their scope. Without her they can explore other themes.

            • Observer

              I disagree. 💩

            • Johnny Tank (Forever Autumn)
            • flyonthewall

              oh no!

            • Observer

              Those guys were all fleshy and creepy. Blech

            • Observer

              It was okay. Noomi Rapace’s character irritated the crap out of me, though.

            • flyonthewall

              She was great! What about when she stapled herself back together did nothing and nothing happened!? That whole thing was cool. If nothing else, you have to admit it looked amazing and had awesome futuristic technology. I thought it was really smart and action packed, monsters looked great. Had all the necessary components of good sci-fi

            • Johnny Tank (Forever Autumn)

              Don’t share MF’ing spoilers here! If I’m gonna see it, I want to be surprised.

            • flyonthewall

              ok geez, better? Don’t go all viking on me

            • Johnny Tank (Forever Autumn)

              I hadn’t put my Viking beard on yet, so you got off easy… this time.

            • Observer

              You’ll be surprised fly looooooooves it so much, if that counts for anything. I didn’t hate it, but I wouldn’t see it again.

              Also, it came out five years ago, so the statute of limitations on no spoilers has expired.

            • Observer

              But the people were so stupid. I mean, who assumes a death noodle rising out of a puddle of black goo in a place littered with skeletons is benign? And I can tell you from similar nothing happening experience, Shaw would not have been scampering around like that after nothing happened. She’d have ripped herself open and bled out or something.

            • flyonthewall

              fair enough on both counts. But those were huge giants, one was decapitated. How could a little snake decapitate a giant? For me, the rest of it allowed for the suspension of disbelief to kick in bc I wanted to see what was going to happen. I was into it so I didn’t question little stuff like that which btw was pretty typical horror stuff. Why does the lady go up the stairs alone to check out the creepy noise? I mean, it’s not out of the norm

            • Observer

              No, it’s not out of the ordinary, but it always irritates me.

            • flyonthewall

              what irritated you about her? If you don’t feel like getting into it that’s ok too. No spoliers though, not like me. Johnny said he’s gonna watch it

            • Johnny Tank (Forever Autumn)
            • flyonthewall

              DO NOT READ OBS’S LATEST REPLY TO ME!

            • Johnny Tank (Forever Autumn)

              I think I’ll just go to bed now.

            • Observer

              She was an idiot. I will admit she irritated me less after nothing happened to her boyfriend because she became slightly less of an idiot. But the ending? OMX. Back to full simpleton.

            • flyonthewall

              >: (

              No, your opinion is wrong.

            • Observer

              NO YOU!

            • flyonthewall

              You have a point. Damn you’re good!

            • madame duran

              I liked David the android.

            • Jimmy3

              It was boring tho. Maybe I need rewatch it, but all I remember is they’re just floating through space with Fassbenderbot the whole time. Chatting about coordinates. If it had the real Bender bot, then you have entertainment.

            • flyonthewall

              they’re building up to that. Alien: Covenant is going to be heavy on Bender bot I hear.

            • Jimmy3

              They’re planning on doing at least four more Alien movies, which seems overly ambitious to me. I get nervous when a even great visionary storyteller like Ridley Scott gets these franchise-based expectations off of past success. Why not focus on one movie at a time and make it work? This is what happened to George Lucas with his prequels. It’s what happened to Peter Jackson. The hobbit movies were shit specifically because they stretched it out to try and make one book its own franchise. It’s gonna happen to James Cameron with Avatar. It’s gonna happen to Ridley Scott with Alien.

              Work on one movie, put everything you have into it. And stop fucking ranting.

            • flyonthewall

              4, really? I hadn’t heard that. Didn’t hear of Avatar either. I need to start reading up on entertainment stuff, drive myself crazy only reading current events and scientology.

              I agree about the milking thing. But, he didn’t do any of the other Alien sequels so this is really a fresh thing for him. The old ones centered around Ripley so much, maybe he has a plan to make sure it’s done right this time?

            • Jimmy3

              I’m sure he has a plan, but one idea I’ve heard was that he was going to the present the origin story of Ripley’s mother…. How true that is, I don’t know, and that’s so bad it even sounds made up, but it soured me on the whole thing. BITTERNESS.

              About following entertainment news, I listen to podcasts while I’m doing the other things or falling asleep or falling as sleep while doing other things. The Weekly Planet or the Schmoes Know/Collider shows. They’re all stand-ups that take this shit with a grain of salt and present it with rigorous humor.

            • Jo

              I didn’t like it, just sayin.

            • April

              I loved the movie Prometheus!

            • flyonthewall

              well, we now know there are at least two sane people in the Bunker

    • I will never show you Art again…

      • Observer

        We’re a bunch of smartasses. We can’t help it.

  • Way off topic. Near death experience alert.

    2 hours ago, I am walking home from work, across this bridge between KY and OH, thinking happy thoughts and all of a sudden I hear this rocket-like sound right behind me followed by a super loud impact noise, right fucking where I am, may be 20 inches away, separated by a cement barrier between the road and a sidewalk for pedestrians.

    Turns out it’s an out of control car – debris are flying, sparkles, smoke right in front of me.

    While I duck and start running a few feet back, in case there is a collision with other cars, that thing ricocheted from the barrier, spins around a few times and finally stops in the opposite lane facing South now.

    This is straight out of the action movie kind of stuff. I check myself quickly and call 911. Because no one could possibly be unhurt in that shitty car after what just happened. Turns out, absolutely no one got hurt, just the car.

    While approaching my house I wondered if I died and am in denial. Talked to my wife about our finances, that probably means I am still alive. And how is your day going?

    • Panopea Abrupta

      Glad you are ok.
      Beats the near-life experience that is $cientology.

    • flyonthewall

      we’re fine here in Bunker heaven! OOoOooooOOOooooo!!

    • Johnny Tank (Forever Autumn)

      I had to take the bus today. Same kind of near death feeling.

      Seriously though – glad you are OK!

    • Rasha

      Oh. oh oh oh. I have just reviewed my day and it was spectacular.

    • Sunny

      Wow! Glad you are ok! Dang.

      • Me too! It was really wild and surreal, I actually said out loud “Holy Fucking Shit” when it happened. Glad no one got hurt. Thank you.

        • Rasha

          Your restraint in verbal response is impressive. I’d still be gibbering….

          • Kestrel

            I’d be changing my pants.

        • ExCult.Jan

          That’s what I said, and I was just reading about it! Glad you’re OK!!

    • Observer

      That’ll wake you up! Glad nobody was hurt, especially you.

      http://www.gifbin.com/bin/052010/1275049233_almost-hit-by-car.gif

      • Damn, it was almost like that!

      • JJ

        What da ya bet the guy got out of the car (stopped in traffic) to go get his bumper…

    • “I wondered if I died and is in denial.”
      This is funny and deep.

    • beauty for ashes

      It’s amazing how much detail you remember. I’m glad you are okay!

      • Oh I remember. Keep it in mind – the barrier I am talking about is not a tall one like on a highways, it’s about my waist high. My adrenaline level was 9,5 on the scale of 10. Thank you.

        • beauty for ashes

          I think its the adrenaline that makes you remember 🙂 Our brains are pretty amazing!

    • Jimmy3

      Good on you for still being on your toes. And, hey, all kidding aside, as the first responder to an accident, your Scientology training is now complete. You can check that off and move on.

      • Johnny Tank (Forever Autumn)

        Not even TC could have handled that any better.

    • FredEX2

      Wow Dodo. So glad you are ok!

    • Jeb Burton

      Seriously glad your OK. But what do you expect when you’re walking on a bridge from Kentucky to Ohio?

    • Jeb Burton

      Yeah. You are still alive. What you don’t want to hear is your life insurance covered everything and I’ve moved in with the pool boy.

      • Can’t afford life insurance yet. Nice try though.

    • I had a near-life experience once.

      • Those are the best.

        • I had a vision of the world as it is.
          It was a beautiful thing on balance.
          It was the best of all possible worlds.
          I have a reason to live.

    • Ella Raitch

      Were you wearing brown underwear? (Glad you’re ok)

    • MrsLurksALot

      Holy crap! Glad you are okay.

    • Dee Findlay-DeElizabethan

      Not as exciting as yours Bro! Glad you were not hurt or others also. What an experience.

    • chuckbeattyxquackologist75to03

      Glad you made it, and I hope today is a better day.

      I had some near death experiences, almost run over when two trucks drove past me, ahead and behind me with 2-3 feet though, to spare, and I had some construction lucky misses. It’s funny, sometimes if you jumped the wrong way, I’d have been crushed by something else. Real life moving out of danger, at times, is so tricky, it comes down to almost being a miracle why you didn’t get hit or crushed.

      But that must have been more than scary having cars crashing come so close.

      Glad you made it unscathed.

    • richelieu jr

      Dodo!
      Holy crap! Take care IV yourself, man!

      As it happens, I almost got hit by a bus running into a moped ; or trying not to– less than five minutes after leaving the Paris Celeb Centre!

      Were I a more paranoid man, or had any be,infinite Hubbard’s naff nonsense. I. Might be more worried and shook up than I am…

      PS- The is a BRIDGE between these two states? Is this now common practice in Trump’s America?

      Has the American Dream now been reduced to such a viccious game of Walls and Ladders..?

      (Trumps and Bladders)?

      Putin & the Piss-off Trump hacious game of Walls and Ladders..?

      (Trumps and Bladders)?put on in the Ritz.

      A put-on by the Prez? Or a
      Put-upon Prez’s Pal Taking the Piss?
      Or was Trump leaving His (& His Whores)
      As his fave Prez, Putin, was taping all this…

      Don Corleone Went to the Materasses
      Don’s Hookers Only Went on Them to Wet (make it rain)

      Baby Alive. Soft and sweet,
      He can piss and he can tweet

      Look Who’s Come For Dinner
      The blowhard Schmuck Who’s One Sore Winner
      Listen he said, It is like I said, people,
      If I don’t win’ it’s a conspiracy
      And if I do, you’re all so unfair to me!

      Mélania, I see Dead People
      Voting for the Red People

  • Jimmy3

    Just heard about Dodo. I’m heartbroken. I teased him a lot about being extinct, but I hope he knows I loved him. I don’t know what to say right now

  • Vault Digger

    OT: Interesting long read on “Xenu’s Paradox: The Fiction of L. Ron Hubbard and the Making of Scientology”

    Alec Nevala-Lee, author of Astounding, a forthcoming book on the history of science fiction, digs into the writing career of L. Ron Hubbard, gaining new insights into the life of the controversial founder of dianetics and the origins and nature of Scientology itself.

    https://longreads.com/2017/02/01/xenus-paradox-the-fiction-of-l-ron-hubbard/

    • Thanks for that.
      From it:
      “In reality, he wrote science fiction for exactly one reason—he knew that it would sell.”

      • And returned to it, I think, for “Battlefield Earth” and “Mission Earth” because it was one of the very few genres that has survived the death of the incredibly diverse pulp magazines and grown up to be published in book form.

        Trouble is, Hubbard hadn’t grown up. His new writing was still locked in the slapdash 40 and 50s and ludicrously long – a short story stretched out beyond sanity.

        He wanted to be recognised as a master of the genre… and failed utterly even with the help of the CofS fixing book sales.

  • FredEX2

    • Kestrel

      I swear I just read that somewhere…

      • Kestrel

        Well, now that you’ve deleted it I look like a birdbrain, don’t I?

  • FredEX2

    By the time Marge got done with the agent from OSA…all that was left was his super high powered Cannon sure shot camera on a mini tripod…
    F5 https://uploads.disquscdn.com/images/2fc6cbe96c1b40a7dcbccd09fbbf8e0f3fe160306af23e72a4ecb51bfa9d7b67.jpg

    • JJ

      Tourist Tuesdays.

  • FredEX2

    As Lewis held out his IPhone to take a ‘selfie’ using the new selfie stick he got for his Birthday…he suddenly could see his worst fear come true…just as he had sensed it… the dogs from OSA were right there behind him all along.
    F5
    https://uploads.disquscdn.com/images/eb7ed8b9c58ad1da534188bfffab2375143465948d72c00b8c707b3ba080abbd.jpg

    • JJ

      This cat looks more wild than house cat! Cougar ish even!

  • Sherbet

    https://uploads.disquscdn.com/images/a523ca42d13c894f6da3187cfa21c4bbb4c58c34f23c54191ec744713f75321f.jpg

    Jack Kerouac typed “On the Road” on a roll of teletype paper. Maybe he got the idea from Ron.

    • Michael Leonard Tilse

      Quite probably. I’ve always had a resistance to the idea that anyone would cut 8.5 inches off a roll of butcher paper just so they could type on a roll.

      My guess is that the person who reported the “butcher paper” story either was not familiar with teletype paper rolls or they were passing on one of Ron’s tall tales.

      • Sherbet

        Plus, butcher paper is slick with wax. Ink wouldn’t stick.

        • Michael Leonard Tilse

          It’s thick and stiff, so not much length to write on, compared to teletype. Even if it was just craft shelf paper or wrapping paper, it would still probably be difficult and hard for the typewriter to advance.

          So, MAYBE Hubbard used teletype paper, which he would have been familiar with as it was used for such a long time, but I still think it is bullshit.

          • Sherbet

            The story or his writing? 😛

      • Harlan Ellison (a formidable SF author) claims to have seen this arrangement – a roll of paper fastened to a roller on the wall and feeding through a manual typewriter. Perhaps he did see such an set-up, and Hubbard described what he did, but I have serious doubts as to whether it would really work.

        There is a lever on a typewriter used at the end of very line to return the carriage and rotate the roller one notch,. This moves the paper up, and aligns the point where the keys strike the paper at the beginning of the next line.

        a) The mechanism that rotates the roller is designed to cope with one sheet of paper. I doubt it would have the torque to turn a substantial roll.
        b) A roll of paper fixed to the wall would not move with the carriage, and get too twisted to feed through the roller.

        i wonder if it isn’t a Hubbard story, told for the pleasure of deception and self-aggrandizement, possibly supported by a failed idea that was never really used. https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=O9AGVARpqdk

        Ellison has been recorded telling this story Hubbard to (of all people) Robin Williams (see below) beginning at 3:33. I think he gets well carried away about the quality of Hubbard’s stories, but it’s fascinating stuff.

        The story about ‘the best way to make money is to start a religion’ appears too. I’m just not sure how seriously to take Ellison’s memories of far-off days.

        https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=O9AGVARpqdk

        • Michael Leonard Tilse

          Though, if there was enough distance between the roll and typewriter, and Ron pulled down bunch of slack paper every so often, when it started to pull too hard, it might have worked. Obviously Kerouac had the same issues and he succeeded. Thanks for the link to the Ellison/Williams video.

          • It could be made to work… but it would be so fiddly and difficult I seriously doubt if it would have saved any time, which was supposed to have been the point

            Also, it would not have endeared him to the submissions department of magazines (which had very detailed rules about paper size, ink colour, double spacing &c.) to present them with a scroll – come to that, how to pack a roll of paper to post it?

            The more you think about it, the less feasible it is.

            It sounds to me a lot like Hubbard trying to present himself as so incredibly prolific that he needed to type on a roll of paper. What a story (or, as you say, a “tall tale”).

            He did write a lot, but other authors were under just as much pressure as he, and produced more, better stuff. In this, as in so many other things he wasn’t as exceptional as he wanted people to believe.

            …and you’re most welcome.

            • Michael Leonard Tilse

              Yea, the remains of a failed experiment he thought would be brilliant but just didn’t work.

              But he could still sell the idea.

              Kinda like scientology.

          • JJ

            It is ironic, Kerouac used a roll of paper to write with and Hubbard wrote on paper you could use as a roll of…
            Maybe it is why tp is such an issue with CoS.

        • Sherbet

          What an odd clip!

          • I’m not sure we should take some of these remembrances too seriously, but it’s certainly a wild ride (with Robin Williams, already – surely a kindred spirit).

        • Ben Franklin

          Harlan Ellison is the only guy I think can talk faster than Mark Ebner.

          • He does seem to have been born enthusiastic.

    • Jimmy3

      I once wrote a plea for more paper on the very last sheet of toilet paper. They still consider me a genius at that gas station, but they kinda smirk when they say it.

      • Jimmy3

        Now that I’m thinking about it, it’s probably because there was another roll in the next stall.

        • Sherbet

          Now I know you’re lying. Two stalls in a gas station? Bwah hah hah.

          • Jimmy3

            I was wearing a long coat and I matched the description on the door well enough. I don’t come here to judge people and I hope they afford me the same consideration.

            • Sherbet

              I’m sorry.

            • Jimmy3

              It’s okay. That was a rough summer, and I’m over it.

            • Sherbet

              I’m glad you haven’t become bitter over it. Buck up, pal.

            • Jimmy3

              I’ve found other things to be bitter about. I’ll be okay. Thank you for your support.

            • It does not seem like it.

      • Sherbet

        They no longer give you the key on that big piece of wood, though, do they…

      • Liberated

        Sure it wasn’t an ideal org.?

      • Michael Leonard Tilse

        Might have something to do with what you “wrote it” with.

      • JJ

        If you went in bow legged and said “Please could I have some more toilet paper?” They would rip a roll out of the pack on the shelf and hand it to you…

    • Kestrel

      He typed on both sides?

      • Sherbet

        Looks like it. That’s the actual manuscript

        • Liberated

          Guess who owns it?

          Jim Irsay….the guy that owns the colts.

          • Sherbet

            No kiddin’? Neat.

        • Kestrel

          Now that’s what I call “frugal.”

      • Sherbet

        How Hubbardian.

  • FredEX2

    It was his 2nd attempt to ‘blow’ from Int base…and as Sea Org member…Wilber…clung to the branch of the tree with Security literally right there on him…he knew for certain that the 3rd time would be the charm…
    F5
    https://uploads.disquscdn.com/images/b494d5b9d702f2c10ce56c4323424286b20c3fc62af0212f2b47c76714a16a44.jpg

    • JJ

      Gottchyur butt!

    • Ben Franklin

      This is when you need a good spray of that old rice and beans toxin. That dog would be asleep for hours before waking up.

  • beauty for ashes

    David Miscavige’s favorite movie “All about Eve” is on TCM right now. Now its “All about Dave”

    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=uHVYTPFgCqE

    • Ann B Watson

      😍

    • Ben Franklin

      I have heard before that David Miscavige’s absolute favorite movie is “Full Metal Jacket”. His favorite actor in that movie is the drill sergeant.

      https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=3j3_iPskjxk

      • Robert Eckert

        Did he fail to notice how well it ended up for the sergeant?

        • Ben Franklin

          He is oblivious. He just likes the Vulgarisms, and apparently uses them to insult his staff.

  • Lem Apperson

    I used to work with Elon Musk back in the late 1990’s. Certainly not every day, he was frequently out of the office. I found him to be a techno nerd, not at ease with taking to others. His brother was the more social one.
    Before Elon left Zip2, he dropped by my desk and asking that I consider signing up for one of his new companies (now PayPal.) They lost money early on because of silly simple programming errors. Even banking regulators thought they were silly.
    I’m not sure specifically why he would be reading that particular book at this time. A great deal of Elon’s success has been that he was at the right place at the right time. He has certainly not stormed countries, he just had some timely ideas.

  • AntoniaW

    Incidentally Bolitho is a Cornish name (I’m Cornish, unlike that Mappin tribe that infests a section of our fine north coast). We Cornish had our own 19th century diaspora, mostly to mining areas, because of our tin-mining heritage. There is an old Cornish saying: “Wherever in the world you find a deep hole, you’ll find a Cousin Jack at the bottom of it.” Cornishmen in search of fame and fortune looked to South Africa mostly because of the diamonds, and they had a real get-up-and-go ethos. Of course, they looked for role models who were tough, pioneering individualists. Everything that you Americans would recognise, in fact. Many of their children, having been given the great leg-up, became writers, politicians, architects – the world was open to them.

    They weren’t narcissistic salesmen. A Hubbard type might look for confirmation of his ego in a Bolitho type, but a Bolitho type would probably tell a Hubbard type to f*** off and build his homestead 100 miles away. Just a thought.

    • chukicita

      I love this.

      I just watched a program about Cornish villages and John Wesley and an oak apple ritual. It made me feel a longing, like when I first saw a show about Wales. Those exotic little villages on the coast! And the people in the show, the locals, so down to earth and authentic, somehow. Like unspoiled. Cornwall is another place I need to visit.

      • AntoniaW

        You’re always welcome! – I meant, here. If you want a Cornish trip just give me the signal, but you’d have to cope with damp fields, farting bulldogs and constant fog. Except in summer, when the fog lifts. For a while.

        • AntoniaW

          Oh Lord, that might put you off. What I really meant was that if you, and other Bunker inhabitants as lovely as you, ever wanted to visit the Tropical Paradise of north Cornwall, you would always be most welcome to stay with me: but the truth is that this is a windy, rainy, sheep-inhabited corner of the universe perhaps not best suited to urban sophisticates. But it’s a great base for looking at mediaeval ruins (and I don’t yet include the Mappins in that category). xxx

          • Robert Eckert

            I’m a middle-aged ruin myself.

            • AntoniaW

              me too

        • chukicita

          Thanks for your kind offer! In about a year or two, I may be looking to do a short tour. I’ve had offers to play in the UK and never done so. Working on a new album (slowly).

    • Andrew Robertson

      The Cornish temperament and the diaspora! Here’s a tale of three Cornish brothers born in the 1880’s who sought their fortunes overseas.

      Joseph Sloggett, my grandfather, emigrated to New Zealand and had a fairly uneventful life as an engineer. A large, highly intelligent and plain spoken man who would listen to reason though he liked to dominate.

      Jack emigrated to San Francisco and worked as a building foreman on the first skyscrapers. Sadly he was shot in a “saloon bar brawl”: as his death notice reported.

      Ned, the youngest, took offense at a newspaper article criticizing British conduct in the Boer war and in a fit of patriotic zeal, marched round to the office and punched the journalist. Brought before the magistrate he was “Bound Over to keep the Peace” and promptly emigrated to South Africa. The last letter he wrote to my grandfather said he was heading up north to seek his fortune in the diamond fields but was never heard from again.

      Though I’ve emigrated three times myself I’ve largely kept out of trouble so the Cornish genes must have been balanced from the Scottish side.

      Andrew

  • mrssandoval

    Does Amber Heard know her billionaire bf is weird?

    For the life of me, I cannot see how lrh was charismatic. His teeth — his breath had to stink! That face that resembles a goblin from The Labyrinth, plus a probable extra chromosome, completely sickens me. On A&E, when they played the intro with him speaking, I could almost hear the stickiness of his mouth. His exaggerated speech and all of the above turns me into a sandbox.
    How he could repeatedly find women and start a mass cult is beyond me.

    Off topic, but didn’t DM defend Warren Jeffs? He said something to the effect that is Jeffs was a scientologist, then his crimes against kids wouldn’t be considered criminal, given that they are actually millions of years old. Where did I hear that?

  • The Meaning of your life is to give meaning to your life! –Dice

  • Observer
    • Jimmy3

      Fold an eighth of the load and place it along with the rest of the load on top of the couch with the nearest dog. Then knock it over on to the floor. Make a scene like, EVERY TIME I TAKE TIME OUT OF MY DAY TO FOLD LAUNDRY YOU JUST KNOCK IT OVER, IM DONE WITH THIS NONSENSE. IM TIRED OF YOU DOGS.

      No one will question you. You have clout.

      ETA: probably works with cats too, but I haven’t tested it.

  • RedShoeLady

    Wondering if CoB has that Super Bowl ad planned still? CoB as in corn cob.

    • Tony Ortega

      He played it for the crowd at the New Year’s Event. It was on that audio we posted. So yeah, I expect it to show up during the game.

      • Maybe this time, we will hear a booooh from the crowd.

  • AntoniaW

    I think I just want to add one comment to my down-thread one, clarifying what William Bolitho might have meant by a “leader” as opposed to what Hubbard decided he thought it meant. The Bolithos (the energetic diaspora) never anticipated that “leader” would become wholly tainted as a word, conflated as it is by our knowledge of the awful term “Fuhrer”. For us, Leader = Fuhrer; we cannot escape the mid-20th century interpretation. But to a Cornish Victorian, which Bolitho was, a Leader is if anything a figure who commands followers in a potentially neutral sense: a strong man, if you like. The Victorian sense was far closer to the term “role model” than the modern word “leader”.

    That Hubbard in the 1950s chose to read it differently is of course no surprise; he was historically tone deaf, and very badly educated. Bolitho was no Fascist, but Hubbard undoubtedly was Fascism’s close cousin.

  • I am not dead yet.

  • Intergalactic Walrus
  • Intergalactic Walrus

    Somebody needs to fix the clam faucets! It sure doesn’t sound like they are being overrun with new meat bodies…
    (refresh)
    https://uploads.disquscdn.com/images/00960abd6c41f75b399c7e08058e1dbd4465f642a7986a8a4dd7cd71500cd735.png

    • Joe

      Every time Hubbard tries to make a new word by adding -ness to an existing word, a thetan loses its wings.

  • Happy Birhtday, Jenna Hill.

  • OTVIIIisGrrr8!

    Ambassador for Mankind Coors Nurse Trinity telepathically audits LRH:

    Coors: When did you take over the body of Elon Musk?

    LRH: Ahh, it date locates exactly to February 1, 1986 at 12:04 and 1/2 seconds from GMT. I went from being Elron to Elon.

    Coors: Why didn’t you take over an OT’s body so you could remain in charge of Scientology?

    LRH: Isn’t that a gorgeous thought? Simply gorgeous. But no. I was done with Scientology. If David Miscavige wanted it that badly then he could have it. As a thetan I could afford to utterly waste Scientology and David Miscavige and mock up a new game where I made more money and got rid of my Scientology baggage. Horrible reputation and I blame the Psychs.

    Coors: Why did you take over Elon Musk?

    LRH: Well, I needed to be…factually, I needed to be a South African who migrated to the US and became a physicist.

    Coors: But you dropped out of Stanford’s Ph.D. program after only two days…

    LRH: Yes, well, I realized I didn’t really need a Ph.D. actually because, ahh, you see, I knew nuclear physics and computers and science and so forth and so on quite well from the wholetrack. Did I tell you I ran a planet millions of years ago using computers?

    Coors: That reads on the meter… that! What is that?

    LRH: I was the Duke of Chug and I was (laughing) caught with my hand in the planetary cookie jar. Off with my head! (LFBD)….

    • Michael Leonard Tilse

      That was pretty funny, the oblique reference to a well known a.r.s. denizen.

  • Jimmy3

    So today Trump threatened to send US forces into Mexico, issued an extremely vague threat to Iran and bad-mouthed the Prime Minister of Australia in what was supposed to be a private phone call.

    This guy hasn’t decided which continent he’ll start his first war in, but if there’s any silver lining, it’s that he probably isn’t looking at a Scientology map. So there are way less continents for him to start wars in.

    • Ella Raitch

      How will Malcolm be able to show his face at the next World Leader Con…..that story is ‘above the fold’ everywhere.

    • ExCult.Jan

      Hoping Congress won’t give him a SCOTUS confirmation in this last year of his reign of terror, I mean presidency.

    • daisy

      I expect a *heads up * when he decides to pay attention to us. We need a wall ( that you guys will pay for )

      • Jimmy3

        The Canadian wall will have unlocked gates and welcome mats with kind-but-firm messages, like, “We welcome you and you and you’s, but please wipe your shoes!”

        • Jimmy3

          “This isn’t fuddy, please wipe your boots if they muddy!” With a smiley face.
          I love Canadians

          • daisy

            … and we love most Americans back , but seriously if you track mud on my clean floor I will END you , smiley face back with hug.

    • What’sup

      It’s being reported here that Trump slammed the phone down in rage.

      • Jimmy3

        Because the Prime Minister of Australia is a reasonable, civil adult, and Trump is an angsty teenager being egged on by his low intellect friends. (Bannon was sitting directly across from him.). He thought the call would go a certain way, ie. I GET MORE MODEL TANG THAN YOU CAN EVER EAT IN YOUR LIFE YOU CROIKEY FUCK

        And the PM of Australia said, hey, we’re actually in very important positions here, and we should at the very least respect our offices. Is this a prank call? And Trump said YOUR MOM IS A PRANK CALL and slammed the phone down.

        • Jimmy3

          also, I know his name, I just can’t type it due a gypsy curse. Long story.

          • Ella Raitch

            Malcolm Turnbull – we change them every couple of years – including between elections – so it can be hard to keep up

            • Jimmy3

              I can say Malcolm.

      • Ella Raitch

        What I want to know was who was in the room with Malcolm and how the discussion went down for the first five minutes after the call.

        • daisy

          CNN reported that he was trying to get out of the deal that Americans would accept refugees . He told the PM that Australia was trying to get US to accept another Boston bomber. Trump ended that call by saying that he had talked to several world leaders including Putin and this was the worst call of the day. Yay , he is so smart , so good to piss off the allies.

          • Ella Raitch

            I don’t know why he had to go in strong on the Australian PM, who was primed to fold like a cheap, wobbly card table anyway.

    • Mymy88

      You forgot he also resurrected Frederick Douglass as the grand kick-off event for Black History Month.

      • chukicita

        I just know that speech will be memorized and delivered by sixth graders in future American History classes. Right up there with “Fourscore and seven years ago…”

        • Mymy88

          LOL Oh yes. What an amazing orator! Such eloquence I have never heard before.

          • chukicita

            The essence of statesmanship.

            *cough*

    • scottmercer

      Clarification: Dissing the President of Mexico and the Prime Minister of Australia were done last Saturday, not today. Today we heard about it due to massive leaks to the media by Trump’s goons.

      • Jimmy3

        That is an important clarification

    • Robert Eckert

      First he’s supposed to send the armed forces into Chicago until they end all the gang wars there. That should keep the troops bogged down for his entire term, so he won’t actually get to start the foreign wars he craves.

      • Mymy88

        I know that mother fucker is just itching to do things like that. I’m talking about things like having to “send in the feds” and ordering martial law for the slightest provocations. I’m sure doing these kinds of things will give him the powerful and euphoric intoxication his insatiable ego craves. The stunts he pulls is what gets people so riled in the first place. Well fuck me! That’s why he does those things. Trump is a horrible tantrum throwing toddler that has been handed the reigns to enormous power. Yeah, like that’s going to end well.

    • Dave Reams

      While we Anglos north of the border may scoff at Trump’s bellicosity towards Mexico – the Mexicans have good reason to see this as a plausible threat. 50 years ago LRH shelled Mexico, 80 some years ago the US invaded Veracruz and Tampico and a couple of decades before had invaded all of Mexico and seized Calif, Ariz, Colorado, Texas, and New Mexico.

  • Intergalactic Walrus

    Uh oh! Something tells me that KUBA has been hanging around with Jenna Elfman at the Celebrity Centre…
    (refresh)

    https://uploads.disquscdn.com/images/e69280c02d866d4630a8aa20506decd25fd5f070ef712b5e2259e7cc839c4970.png

  • Liberated

    Tomorrow is “ground hog” day…I had always hoped that “thing” on Trump’s head would see its shadow and we wouldn’t have to hear from him for another six weeks.

    But…I don’t think that’s going to happen this year.

    • daisy

      LOL- I hope it has had it*s shots.

    • NOLAGirl (Stephanie)

      If only we could get it to shut the f**k up for one day. Not guessing that’ll happen either.

  • Mymy88

    -Off Topic-

    Trump – Dumb. Really dumb.

    • edge

      Dangerous. And Dumb.

  • DoveAlexa
    • Mymy88

      Oh but wait.. didn’t I see him happily displaying the gay flag during his campaign? Oh but wait.. he’s a lying sociopath narcissist asshole.

      • Robert Eckert

        He was holding it upside down. That was the gay equivalent of his “Two Corinthians” Christian moment. He looked as if he had never seen one before.

        • Mymy88

          LOL that’s right (the upside down flag). He is a fuckwad extraordinaire. The only reason he came into power is because too many people that voted for him lacked the ability to spot a completely deranged sociopath when they see one. I’m not sure why.

          • Robert Eckert

            I can’t understand it either.

    • Suspect!

    • Graham

      As usual these small-minded nutters are under the naïve impression that “religious freedom” is the same thing as “Christian freedom” and will be surprised when they see ‘Satanists’ claiming the same freedoms. What sad, petty, vindictive, self-righteous people they are.

  • Fink Jonas

    When life was struck into me something else accompanied it.” Uhm.! I wonder what, on the GPM lecture he described the GPM as a “big black cotton ball in the middle of the room”, “a dark hand under the table that wants to do something but you don’t know what ” “a big charred movie reel that is so entangled that becomes a big black mass” and since he had it he assumed we all had it, so much for being free and creative instead he made us put our creative attention into his own nasty black mass, his own demons.