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Blogging Dianetics, Part 10: Killing the Grizzly

GrizzlyWelcome to our ongoing project, where we blog a 1950 first edition of Scientology’s bible, Dianetics, with the help of ex-Scientologist, Bay Area lawyer, blogger, and author Vance Woodward. Go here for the first post in the series.

[ALSO TODAY: Below, we have analysis of the Garcia federal fraud lawsuit from attorney Scott Pilutik, and our first SMERSH Madness match that features an online forum — ESMB!]

After that last chapter, with Hubbard’s exploration of perversion, it’s only natural that the next one, “Emotions and the Dynamics,” would prove to be something of a letdown. But there are some good passages here for us to explore.

At this point, things are really getting thick as we’re moving into second- and third-order make-believe, and Hubbard assumes that we’ve forgotten how earlier layers of this fantasy were formed. It was clear, for example, when he first introduced the idea of “Zones” of survival that they were arbitrary estimates of an organism’s relative health. And from that, he pulled some numbers out of the air to begin describing “tone levels” of emotion that go with them. Many pages later, those guesses have now become scientific-sounding, hard rules about how someone experiences life.

Of course, if you get to invent the conditions that plague a life, then you can just as easily invent the methods for how to cure them.

What’s always interesting, however, is when Hubbard interrupts his word salad for an actual description of events to explain what he means. And in this chapter, he provides a very interesting example. He’s talking about how a “clear” — who is unaberrated, and suffers from no engrams — can still suffer emotional trauma that can take him near death. Here’s how Hubbard starts the example…

A clear, inexperienced in hunting, determines to shoot a grizzly. He has a fine rifle. The grizzly appears to be easy game. The man is at [Tone Level] 3.9 or above. He feels good. He is going to get that grizzly as the grizzly has been threatening the man’s stock. High enthusiasm carries him to the lair. He waits. He finally sees the grizzly. There is a cliff above the man which he could not ordinarily climb. But to get a good shot before the grizzly vanishes, the man has to climb the cliff. Seeing he was in danger of losing the game brought the man down to 3.2.

The hunter continues to struggle in his quest. He wounds the animal, but it only angers the grizzly. He shoots again and misses, and soon the bear is upon him. Meanwhile, with each of these failures his emotional tone scale goes down and down as his survival potential also decreases.

His tone is 1.2. It drops to 0.9 with a smell in his nostrils of the bear. He knows the bear will kill him…He is at Tone 0.6, stark terror. The bear strikes him and knocks him from the cliff-side….Then the bear decides he is dead and walks away. Shaken, the man eventually comes around, his tone gradually rising up to 2.0…

This Hemingwayesque aside is rather entertaining, we’ll admit. But it’s also quite obvious that there’s nothing “real” about Hubbard’s numbers. Another science fiction writer could just as easily invent an opposite schematic, call it a Vitality Scale, and claim that it reached an all time high of 25.5 (or whatever) when the hunter is face to face with the bear. (Actually, we think Hemingway would like our version better.)

Vance, why is L. Ron Hubbard, who never struck us as the Big Hunter type, talking about shooting grizzlies?

VANCE: I think he just liked to expostulate and he happened to think of bears while he was doing it. I could be getting my folklore mixed up, but I believe the church presents a tale to parishioners that Hubbard wrote Dianetics over a few weeks in some cabin in the mountains of Oregon or Washington. Maybe the environment got him to thinking about what fun it would be to go shoot up a bear. And then maybe he realized that might not be fun. He might have felt, as he puts it, “analytical” fear about the idea. (Apparently, analytical fear is what Clears experience, not regular, shameful and unmanly fear that the rest of us experience.) Anyhow, gratuitously killing wild animals for “easy sport” never struck me as particularly clear in the first place; I never did reconcile that nugget. It made me wonder if clear and sane weren’t two different concepts. I’m now quite certain they are.

Something that only occurs to me now is the me-against-the-world theme of the chapter. It sounds like he’s saying that we’d be totally happy if it weren’t for these pesky “suppressors” that keep pushing down on us (e.g. bears that won’t cooperatively get shot and die). But it’s OK, because the “necessity level can rise … to a point which keys-out all engrams!” Phew! Get me some of this necessity-level stuff.

By the way, ever since reading Hubbard’s unauthorized biographies, I’ve suspected that many of the patient stories are about Hubbard himself. Examples from this chapter include the dentistry patient under the care of a nurse who was “blue-eyed blond and sexually aberrated” and the story of the guy who got committed and almost electroshocked or lobotomized until “the cavalry … arrived in the form of Dianetics and Cleared the patient and the wife.” Hubbard even wrote an entire novel about a guy who’s guileless wife had him committed and nearly lobotomized. Either way, it seems that this was a really big fear (analytical fear, that is) of Hubbard’s.

THE BUNKER: Well, that’s exactly where we were going next.

You’re right, there’s another example which is striking, because even though Hubbard says it happened to someone else, it strikes such a chord with what we now know about his biography (which wasn’t well known in 1950), we can’t help wondering if he isn’t talking about himself.

Here’s how the passage begins…

Let us make this an example: a man is under nitrous oxide (the most vicious anaesthetic ever invented as it is actually not anaesthetic but a hypnotic) undergoing exodontistry.

Well that certainly sounds familiar. Lawrence Wright, in his book Going Clear, places a lot of emphasis on something that happened to Hubbard on New Year’s Day, 1938.

“Hubbard had a revelation that would change his life — and eventually the lives of many others,” Wright says. “During a dental operation, he received a gas anasthetic…In those brief, hallucinatory moments, Hubbard believed that the secrets of existence were accidentally revealed to him…The intimation that he had briefly been given access to the divine mystery lingered for several days…In a fever, he dashed off a small book he titled Excalibur.”

As Wright explains, there are doubts that the book ever existed, but Hubbard claimed that some people who had dared to read the manuscript had immediately killed themselves.

Anyway, getting back to the example in this chapter, the unnamed dental patient, while he’s knocked out by the nitrous, absorbs several engrams because the dentist and his nurse can’t keep their traps shut. And because the dentist is angry with his assistant, the patient picks up that “valence” and will be angry at the next woman who restimulates his memory of the nurse. When he does meet such a woman, he divorces his wife to be with her…

Only now that he has married the pseudo-nurse the dental engram beings to key-in in earnest. Physically he gets ill: the two molars adjacent to where the wisdom teeth came out develop large cavities and begin to rot…His memory goes to pieces. His recall becomes worse. He begins to develop eye trouble and a strange conjunctivitis. Further (because the dentist leaned on his chest and stomach with a sharp elbow from time to time) he has chest and stomach pains….But most horrible: he believes that this pseudo-nurse will take care of him and he stops to some degree taking care of himself in any way…

This litany of ailments sounds remarkably like the symptoms that Hubbard complained of as he sought treatment during and after the war. He also sought psychiatric help, which he couldn’t get. But in his example, he says his unnamed patient is on the verge of having a lobotomy after a mental hospital gets its claws into him.

Thankfully, there’s a happy ending.

Only the cavalry, in this one case, arrived in the form of dianetics and cleared the patient and the wife and they are happy today. This is an actual engram and an actual case history.

That certainly does sound like Hubbard’s own actual case history, but we’ll have to take his word for it that dianetics saved the day.

VANCE: Indeed. How did you like Hubbard’s modification of the Golden Rule? “If you love your brother, keep your mouth shut when he is unconscious.”

I just realized that a nurse must have read Dianetics to me while I was unconscious and then repeated to herself several times the phrase, “Dianetics is worthless garble.” That, I suppose, would explain these irrational thoughts I’m having now.

THE BUNKER: You’re having an engram restimulated? Get on the cans, Vance.

Next week — Your Life as Sperm or Egg: L. Ron Hubbard’s Mad Genius

 
—————-

GARCIA LAWSUIT: THE HOOTERS PRECEDENT

HootersLogoYesterday, we posted the Church of Scientology’s response to the federal fraud lawsuit filed by Luis and Rocio Garcia. (Actually it was a response from three of the five church entities being sued, but you get the point.)

As we predicted, the church’s strategy is to convince federal judge James Whittemore that because the Garcias signed certain agreements as church members, they should be compelled to submit their fraud and refund claims to the church’s own internal arbitration scheme.

We are reminded, however, of a previous story we did on a similar case. Some smart attorney types pointed out to us that a very similar precedent has already rejected what Scientology wants done in this lawsuit.

That previous case involved another Clearwater, Florida corporation — Hooters restaurants, of all things.

Hooters made a similar argument when an employee sued for how she was treated. Hooters argued that she had signed contracts which required her to submit to Hooters internal arbitration.

But the court found that “arbitration” is all well and good — as long as it’s independent arbitration. In other words, Hooters couldn’t require an employee to arbitrate and select the arbitrators.

Well, that’s exactly what Scientology is attempting to do in this case. Scientology wants the court to force the Garcias into arbitration, but instead of then submitting their claim to third-party, independent arbitrators, it wants the Garcias to submit to a three-person panel of Scientologists to hear their complaints. In light of the Hooters case, what Scientology is asking for isn’t “arbitration” at all.

It will be interesting to see if the Hooters case is raised in this case.

We asked Manhattan attorney Scott Pilutik for his thoughts on the brief…

PILUTIK: What immediately stands out to me is how thick and chock-filled with law this motion is, which I take as a sign of how much this suit scares them. The law they cite is nonsense for the most part because it is all entirely premised on the notion that this dispute is religious in nature and can only be resolved by Scientology arbitration (which is akin to requiring a mugger and victim to privately settle as to the purse’s contents and monetary value).

But let’s look back at Garcias’ complaint, specifically paragraph 11, because their attorney did a great job anticipating exactly where Scientology would go:

“Rather, this case concerns something much more fundamental, that is, the rights of individuals to pursue claims through the civil judicial system for injuries and grievances sustained under conventions of civil justice applying legal principles of contract, fraud, misrepresentation and unfair and deceptive sales practices.”

In order to decide Scientology’s motion, the court must decide the nature of this dispute — is it civil as the Garcias contend or religious as Scientology hopes?

In 25 blustery pages, Scientology mostly dances around the substance of the Garcias’ claims, and even then only abstractedly, while repeatedly asserting its conclusion as fact that this is a religious dispute.

But putting aside the auditing services for the moment and focusing on only the biggest claim — fraud in regards to the Super Power donations — how can, say, deceiving statements made to city officials for the purpose of extracting more money from its parishioners possibly be deemed religious? Scientology is basically asking the court to completely ignore the Garcias’ allegations. After reading Scientology’s all-encompassing motion, the court might wonder what illicit conduct Scientology doesn’t deem itself legally exempt from.

 
—————-

SMERSH Madness: Sowing the Seeds of World Domination!

As we announced on March 1, we’re joining bracket fever with a tournament like no other. It’s up to you to decide who should be named the new SMERSH, the traditional nemesis of Scientology. Cast your vote for who’s doing more to propel the church down its long slide into oblivion!

Continuing in the first round, we have a fascinating matchup this morning…

ESMBVsJamie

The Ex-Scientologist Message Board was founded in 2007 by Michelle “Emma” Sterling, an Australian ex-church member, as a place for people who had spent time in Scientology to find each other and compare experiences. ESMB features many fascinating people from the church’s history who talk about the good and the bad they went through, and that inviting environment allows for some mind-blowing revelations.

Jamie DeWolf is the great-grandson of L. Ron Hubbard, and he’s not a fan of his ancestry. Gaining more and more attention for his spell-binding performance-art monologue about LRH, he’s gradually becoming a media darling, and that could be disastrous for the church. DeWolf doesn’t mince words. He’ll tell anyone who will listen that great-grandad was a con man.

 

An update on our tournament so far:

L. Ron Hubbard defeated Steve Cannane
Debbie Cook defeated John Sweeney
Nancy Many defeated Paul Thomas Anderson
Tobin & Childs defeated Rathbun & Rinder
Katie Holmes edged out David Edgar Love
Marc & Claire Headley defeated Luis Garcia

 

——————-

Posted by Tony Ortega on March 7, 2013 at 07:00

 

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  • Thank God for Scott Pilutik sorting through the Scientology trash in the Garcia case and saving us the trouble. More please,

    • Jgg2012

      It has nothing to do with religion. If the local Catholic Church solicited $500,000 for a charity, and used the money for something else, that is fraud.

  • Charlotte Sometimes

    As fond as I am of Jamie DeWolf, ESMB was the place where many of the Australian ex-Scientologists who set the ball rolling on exposing the cult (with the help of Senator Xenophon) met and set forth from. I consider the board (and Emma) a catalyst for most of the progress against the cult in Australian. Without ESMB, much of that may not have happened, IMO.

  • Observer

    I really wanted to vote for Jamie DeWolf, but right now he’s just not well-known enough to have much of an impact.

    I wish LRH had been eaten by a bear. That would have saved many people untold heartbreak. The further we get into Dianetics, the more obvious it becomes that behind all that swagger Ron was just a sick, scared little rabbit. I could almost have compassion for him–if he hadn’t made it his life’s work to take normal people and make them just as sick as he. (Pssst, Tony, there are a couple of typos: “lobotozimed” and “restimiluted”.)

    I hope the Garcia lawsuit turns out to be as entertaining is it looks. I remember reading about that Hooters lawsuit. I find it hilarious to envision the ruling in that suit being cited against oh-so-ecclesiastical Scientology.

    • EnthralledObserver

      Omg… I hadn’t even thought of how the ‘Hooters’ situation being compared alongside ‘Scientology’s’ issue and what enturbulation that might cause. Buuwahhahahaha! That’s just oh so awkward… I love it. Ecclesiastical my arse…

    • Trustmeonthis

      If only.
      The fact that the bear didn’t eat the guy shows that story was made up. No sensible bear would just wander off like that.

      • FistOfXenu

        Not all bears like to eat after sex? Or he’d already eaten after the 1st 2 times?

        • Observer

          As we used to say in my 70s youth, what a BURN!! Of course, the guy in the story would have to be Hubbard.

    • Johan

      Yes, L Ron does sometimes seem like a damaged soul trying to cure himself….if only he cared even a little bit about others he might have noticed the havoc he wreaked….

  • EnthralledObserver

    I could barely decide this one, and I only in the end went with Jamie because I’ve watched and enjoyed his work, and with the Hubbard ancestry he’s a little hard to ignore when you stumble across him. As I’m not an ex Scieno I don’t frequent that forum board much, but that’s the only reason. It’s probably doing a fantastic job, it’s just I’m more familiar with Jamie, therefore he is more visible, and doing more damage in my opinion.
    With a specific precedent the Garcia’s can launch off I think they might be alright… I’m still crossing my toes, fingers, legs that the judge is the reasonable and logical sort with BALLS. So, legal eagles… what happens next in their case, what am I waiting for now?
    Dianetics is getting boring… thank goodness Tony and Vance are doing the reading and summarising for me, I’d never have gotten this far on my own. It just really highlights the messed up mindframe and misunderstoods one had of the world and how it and people ‘work’ for anyone to have believed and revered any of this garbage!

    • And Chuck Beattie keeps saying that somebody needs to plow through the “red volumes” to get a real understanding of how the mind-fuck is put together. That might be an important piece of research, but it would certainly be beyond my patience.

    • Unex Skcus

      I went with Jamie DeWolf as well, for much the same reason. Plus, I feel that those that expose LRH & Co$ to people who are unfamiliar with such rubbish, do more damage in the long run, by denying Co$ it’s ‘fresh meat’.

  • MarionDee

    I couldn’t read any of that bear text without hearing it through Stephen Colbert, going head to head with those “giant, marauding, godless killing machines” in the ThreatDown. Or maybe he will soon have a Wag of the Finger to LRH for not writing a scene in which the Scientologist is the victor.

  • Patty Moher

    ESMB is the place to go when you finally come to enough of your senses and want to know the truth. I am so proud of Emma and what she’s accomplished.

    • BuryTheNuts2

      ESMB got my vote. That is one heck of a community. Emma did good!

      • Captain Howdy

        Agreed.

        • I adore both Jamie and Emma! But IF I have to choose, which I do ….I’ll pickin’ ESMB as SO many people have been helped, educated, and just had a place to meet and share stories. My guess is Jamie would agree with this. He’s a card and has done fabulous work exposing the Con, too. 🙂

    • OTVIIIisGrrr8!

      We in RTC have designated ESMB a Psych-Infested den of SP criminal Joking & Degrading. As such, it poses a serious threat to the Church of Scientology and for this reason is continually monitored by OSA.

      An investigation revealed that Big Pharma bankrolls the nine actual members of ESMB. You heard it right: There are only nine members of ESMB who use multiple sockpuppets to create the appearance that there are many people posting there.

      The nine members of ESMB report to the twelve British bankers who control SMERSH and Interpol.

      “Emma” is one of the British bankers. Her real name is Lady Gladys Swendon Smoot, the heiress of the Smoot railroad fortune, a fortune that has funded intrigue against Scientology for decades.

      Tony Ortega is also one of the British bankers. His real name is Archduke Sylvester de Medici of the Psych Medici family that has ruled Europe and international banking for hundreds of years.

      Freedom Magazine will soon release a hard-hitting report on SMERSH, Interpol, and the British bankers, but first we in RTC must raise money to purchase Framistans for all 55,980 Ideal Orgs. As Framistans always need a backup Framistan, each Ideal Org will need two Framistans.

      • BuryTheNuts2

        There “were” only nine members of ESMB. Michael Chan taught us how to clone them!
        ESMB now has 55,500,009 members and 43,412 of them are named EMMA!
        We at the bunker are currently working on the Tony Ortega clones.
        They are growing exponentially in petri dishes as we speak!

        By the middle of March there will be Millions of him!

        • FistOfXenu

          While you’re doing that BTN, how about a few more of some other people like Jenna Miscavige and Katie Holmes and Lawrence Wright and Nancy Many and David Love? Oh and we need more Jon Atacks. Just think of what he’d write if he had more time. And how about some more Paulette Coopers? And another Tory or 4? You know this could become a new list of its own.

          • BuryTheNuts2

            Imma need a cool tailored white lab coat, a clipboard and a whole lot more petri dishes….but I am on it.

  • mook
    • Observer

      I’d expect nothing less from one of The Most Ethical People On the Planet!

    • Captain Howdy

      It wa$ clearly the greate$t good for the grea$t number of dynamic$

    • FistOfXenu

      So THAT’S what “wank” means.

    • grundoon

      Breaking news … in September 2012. http://www.guardian.co.uk/books/2012/sep/03/rj-ellory-secret-amazon-reviews (RJ Ellory ranks among “the dung beetles of literature” for his sockpuppetry, said one Guardian reader.)

  • BosonStark

    So, does the bear = wog? Bear hunting would be one of those situations where this tone level business and mind technique would fail. However for a guy anyway, it’s probably more likely than undergoing a coat hanger abortion.

    I’ve had close encounters, about 30 feet away, with bears in the wild twice and just walked away as stealthily as I could which worked fine. I don’t remember my tone level but the bear wasn’t too excited so I was lucky. Mountain lions scared me more because on a few occasions I noticed one standing there watching me.

    It’s odd that Hubbard didn’t use examples of something he was more familiar with, such as sailing, and maybe throwing in a tale about an encounter with a whale — a whale of a tale or a tail of a whale.

    • Captain Howdy

      Hubbard deciding the right tone level for being mauled by a bear is fabulous.

      • Are_sics

        Another summary of his then new project: “you’ll be mauled and you’ll like it!”

        • stillgrace

          “Don’t worry! We can get your credit card limit increased!”
          (Actually spoken to me, before I ran for my life after my free personality test.)

          • Spoken to me many times. Why didn’t I run?

            • BuryTheNuts2

              Please tell me you finally did!

      • FistOfXenu

        Wasn’t that great? As idiotic as the tone scale is when you look at it abstractly, when you see it applied to a specific example like that, it just gives me a lulz fit. Really Ron, down to 1.2? Not 1.1 or 1.0? And are you sure he didn’t go straight from 3.2 to 0.6? And what number are you at when you shit yourself and hunker down against a tree? But at least bearshit makes a change from the usual horseshit.

        • PreferToBeAnon2

          He would have made a great Russian gymnast judge.

          • FistOfXenu

            I remember those days! Yeah maybe, right up til when he stops a performer in the middle of his routine and tells him, “I’ve found your ruin but $cientology can take care of that for you. Do you have your credit card?”

  • mirele

    I voted for Jamie DeWolf, for the future and because I think as he becomes more known, he will be more accessible to younger people. (Now get offa my lawn, you kids!) I love ESMB, but it can be very off-putting to someone who has absolutely no experience with Scientology.

  • Captain Howdy

    All I saw was “Killing the Grizzly” and i fell off the bed.

    Commander McBragg strikes again. Statistically you have a better chance going up against a great white than a grizzly and if you are going to try to shoot a grizzly you better have the equivalent of a buffalo gun (45-70 and up) and if you don’t you might as well use your gun to blow your brains out because the grizzly is going to eat them anyway, grizzlies luv brains.

    “Anyhow, gratuitously killing wild animals for “easy sport” never struck me as particularly clear in the first place; I never did reconcile that nugget. It made me wonder if clear and sane weren’t two different concepts. I’m now quite certain they are.”

    Vance, I love you man

    “Of course, if you get to invent the conditions that plague a life, then you can just as easily invent the methods for how to cure them.”

    Tony, this sums up the LRH mindf**k maze more succinctly than anything i’ve ever read.

    And I’m glad to see Esq. Pilutik agrees with my legal analysis from yesterday..lol

    • BuryTheNuts2

      Man.On.Fire.

    • The Lewis & Clark expedition had heard of grizzlies from some of the natives before, and when they first saw some extra-large bear prints, some of the men determined to track the beast. The men returned a few hours later, the captain’s log records laconically, “their curiosity about this animal completely satisfied.”

      • Captain Howdy

        The Grizzly/Kodiak/Brown Bear is only surpassed by the Polar Bear, Elephant and Homo Sap in it’s destructive potential for land animals

        • Johan

          Don’t leave out Hippo’s!

    • RMycroft

      Isn’t there a joke about the difference between brown bear and grizzly bear poop? The grizzly bear scat has bear bells in it.

      • stillgrace

        LOL! I’ve heard that before! No grizzlies reported in the lower states, thankfully. Plenty of brown bears, though. Bells will attract the mountain lions, too. The answer for that is to always have a dog with you. Mountain lions are stealth attackers. They prefer surprise. Dogs remove that threat. And cats (even the big ones) really are afraid of dogs. My cousin has a great story of his Jack Russell frightening away a large mountain lion.

        • PreferToBeAnon2

          It seems that domestic kitties have a higher tone level than us mere human meat bodies: http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=HcTSnLV4QZo

          • stillgrace

            That was great! Kitty hubris goes a long way!

        • Ze Moo

          There are grizzlies in the northern Rocky Mountain states, Canada and Alaska. Most bear attacks are the result of someone coming between mama bear and baby bear, or young bears that cant find food very well, they rarely hunt humans. Mountain lions are extinct in the east so I don’t know much about them, but taking a dog into the woods is always fun for you and the dog.

          • “Mountain lions are extinct in the east”

            There was that one from the Dakotas a year or two back, who for whatever reason made his way to Connecticut and wound up getting hit by a car and killed not far west of New Haven.

          • Captain Howdy

            Ha Ha , that photo says ..pure love

          • Snippy_X

            Smartest and goofiest breed on the planet 🙂

    • FistOfXenu

      “All I saw was “Killing the Grizzly” and i fell off the bed” This. But sorry Ron, you sure can spin a yarn but all you got is a monkey. Spank him! You and Jack Parsons, spank him!

      No wonder he wanted that wall paper in his office.

      I 2nd you on that quote “Of course, if you get to invent the conditions that plague a life, then you can just as easily invent the methods for how to cure them.” My quote of the week.

      So Captain, you thinking of becoming a lawyer now? 😛

    • Your best hope is that the grizzly is actually a person in a fursuit eating a turkey leg.

  • If Scientology can enforce internal arbitration only for refunds, a civil matter, what next couldn’t they enforce? For instance, anyone coming on their property could be required to sign a waiver that if they slip and fall on the premises, get sick in their restaurant, have a fender bender in their parking garage, only scientology internal arbitration determines the amount of a settlement, if any.

    It seems ludicrous.

    • LongNeckGoose

      Could that Mormon guy who was accused of statutory rape for marrying underage girls get out of it by insisting that the case should go to “internal arbitration” or does civil law still apply?

      • Captain Howdy

        If you want to consider the state of a supreme court that decides that corporations are people to and that all religious matters should be resolved internally, than the the answer is ‘yes’

      • Ze Moo

        There is a huge difference between civil and criminal court cases. In criminal matters you have to have the police and district attorneys and judges committed to finding the truth and keeping everyone honest. Politics some time derail criminal prosecutions, but an informed citizenry do tend to keep things honest. A judge or sheriff or DA facing reelection usually do the right thing. Chiefs of police and appointed judges (usually federal judges) don’t have to face elections and have more leeway to game the system.

    • FistOfXenu

      Ron said it back in the 60s. “Somebody some day will say ‘this is illegal’. By then be sure the orgs say what is legal or not”. I think that’s how it goes. That’s a goal they put a lot of years and money and work to reach. They have enough hold on lawmakers and judges and even cops it’s like a pocket full of get out of jail free cards. And you can see that they keep fighting to use that angle every time they get in trouble with the law. And it works more than it should. And until we take that away we can’t get too excited when they have a little legal setback here and there because they can just pull out a card and turn one of their crimes into another internal ethics procedure.

      • Observer

        They lost a big one when they lost Gerald Feffer. Here’s hoping Lee Baca is removed from office in disgrace very soon …

      • Poison Ivy

        “And it works more than it should. And until we take that away we can’t get too excited when they have a little legal setback here and there because they can just pull out a card and turn one of their crimes into another internal ethics procedure.”

        Well said. It is endlessly frustrating.

  • Cymboli Starsong

    I wonder what this lawsuit will mean to the Garcia’s tax liability should they win. More than likely the Garcia’s itemized these donations as charity on their tax returns. If the $cilons are forced to return the Garcia’s donation, do they have to refile the returns for the years effected or do they just need to pay tax on the refund as income?

    • sugarplumfairy

      Co$ brought up the same thing in their 25-page response.. And i hope their bringing it up backfires on them big time, by opening up the IRS agreement they made to provide refunds..the court needs to look at the Catch-22 refund protocol co$ has set up..

    • Captain Howdy

      Excellent question.

    • Ze Moo

      If any settlement effects a past tax return, you file an amended tax return for that year. Given the amount of money at stake and the deduction limits on charitable giving, I doubt the Garcias will be paying much. No matter how that works out, you always pay the costs first, that includes the IRS. You always have to feed the bear first.

      • BuryTheNuts2

        I like how you snuck that bear reference in there.

        That was a “Hemingwayesque aside”!

        • sugarplumfairy

          I think Tony might have been Hemingway somewhere along his whole track..

          • BuryTheNuts2

            Astute assessment. I think you are right!

          • Captain Howdy

            No, Hemingway was a crazy ass macho douche

            Tony was obviously Dorthy Parker in a past life

            • BuryTheNuts2

              No, that was me!

            • Captain Howdy

              OK, he was Mark Twain

            • sugarplumfairy

              lol.. “you can’t teach an old dogma new tricks..”

            • FistOfXenu

              No but it can get run over by its karma.

            • sugarplumfairy

              Can’t happen soon enough for co$’ dogma..

            • BuryTheNuts2

              Lol, that is my signature line on ocmb.

        • Captain Howdy

          You can never have too many bear references.

          • RMycroft

            Seven long years of it…

            • Captain Howdy

              I hear ya bro.

        • Ze Moo

          Yes.

          A famous scientologist (you can name them later) decides to go bear hunting. They get a nice rifle and hunting clothes and go to Alaska to hunt Grizzly. One the first days hunt they walk around very quietly and eventually come upon a grizzly bear. They raise their rifle and ‘bang’ let loose. The bear falls down and the mighty hunter walks up to the bear. The bear suddenly springs up and knocks the rifle out of the hunters hands and breaks it and knocks the hunter down.

          Standing over the hunter the bear says ( I like anthropomorphic bears, whether they cause engrams or not) “I don’t like people trying to kill me, I’ll give you a choice.” “I either claw and chew the living crap out of you, or I have sex with you.” “What do you want?”

          The hunter thinks about it a minute and says “You better have sex with me, I don’t want to be chewed up”. Well, the bear has his way with the hunter and eventually goes away.

          The hunter is really angry and returns to the hunting lodge and buys another rifle and goes out hunting again. They come up to the same bear and shoot. The hunter walks up the bear and suddenly the bear jumps up, breaks the hunters rifle and knocks the hunter down. As it is the same horny bear, the hunter gets the same choice. Not wanting to be eaten, the hunter gets raped by the bear again.

          The hunter is really mad at this point and goes back to the lodge and buys another rifle and goes hunting again. After spying the bear again, the hunter fires again and the bear goes down. This time the hunter sneaks up to where the bear fell, and again the bear takes the rifle away from the hunter and breaks it and knocks the hunter down. The bear looks down on the cowering hunter and says ‘ You aren’t here for the hunting are you?”

          • BuryTheNuts2

            Baaahaaahaaa…loves!

          • After reading this I feel I have to give you the benefit of my recent experience…..

          • Poison Ivy

            Hilarious.

          • Missionary Kid

            A greenhorn, new to Alaska, is in a bar and asks a sourdough what it takes to become a sourdough like him.

            The sourdough says, you have to kill a bear, have sex with one of the dance hall girls, and drink a quart of booze.

            Later, the greenhorn stumbles in the bar in horrible shape, drunk and all cut up, and says, “O.K., where’s the dance hall girl I have to kill?”

      • Feed the bear a turkey leg, no doubt.

  • BosonStark

    I think Jamie is great — I just read read a long interview with him here:

    http://www.bohemian.com/BohoBlog/archives/2013/03/06/extended-play-jamie-dewolf-interview

    However, “Emma”/ESMB is much bigger force, and Xenu only knows what Hubbard would have done about all their “nattering,” as Hubbard (or Marty) would say. For clams to have a place to go is important, whether in the cult and beginning to have doubts or out of the cult and picking up pieces of their shattered life, or just coping with the realization they were in a trap.

    For some, telling their stories on ESMB is a springboard for writing a book or at least knowing they are not alone at all in this experience. It’s also an invaluable archive of an individual clam’s experiences, including encounters with Hubbard, his family, Miscavige and other key figures. There is breaking news too. Members have a finger on the pulse of what’s going on, since many ex-members have friends or family still in the cult. The first whiff of who is out, who is in, who has died, what’s happening, who has spoken out, is often on ESMB.

    Jamie is someone the public can relate to and appreciate though — a real thorn in their myth making.

    • Poison Ivy

      Exactly. Jamie is a wonderful source of entertainment-inspiration for the wogs out there to learn about Hubbard, but ESMB has probably saved a lot of lives, not to mention souls. And the sharing of information from the exes adds up to an ever-expanding and compelling picture of the “church” behind the curtain.

    • Trustmeonthis

      Really enjoyed that. Thanks for the link!

  • Missy Wog

    ESMB all the way! And I encourage all of you watchers to join me over there..the group is awesome and very happy to have our never in point of view post also! Everyone is so kind and helpful <3 I just appreciate those folks soooo much!

    • Well, it’s not the Underground Bunker (but then… what is?), however it does seem to be an enturbulatingly entheta bunch of suppressive persons, who sure do know how to restimulate an engram!

  • BosonStark

    At least with Hooters, you know what they worship — good food, especially milk. No billion year contracts for waitresses either.

    • Captain Howdy

      Exactly, breasts trump “enlightenment” anytime, anyplace throughout history.

      • FistOfXenu

        … and bear hunting.

      • Missionary Kid

        Only among babies. There’s other societies and times where the breast hasn’t taken on the American adult male obsession with breasts. 😉

        • Captain Howdy

          MK , breasts rule America and America rules the world.

          • FistOfXenu

            Oh boy. Think I’ll go for a stroll, pick up a slice and maybe check out a hardware store.

          • Trustmeonthis

            They are a very popular obsession, it is true. However having dated both men and women, I can tell you that different people are into different things. There’s only a boob hegemony in magazines like Maxim. IRL, it’s all over the map.

        • FistOfXenu

          Tsk, there’s always somebody around that gets his fun out of putting down a good obsession. But MK, I object to your unfair stereotype! I was obsessed AFTER I was a baby and BEFORE I was an adult.

          • Missionary Kid

            Like the rest your peers: teenage American boys. The same doesn’t happen in other societies. We assume that because we do something or think in a particular way that the rest of the world does too. That’s hubris.

            • FistOfXenu

              I didn’t assume anything. Maybe you did? But I think really you’re confusing me with “somebody”. Read it again, I even emphasized the important words. I described my teenage obsession. A lot of my friends were into legs or ankles or butts. Not me. Then I grew out of it. One day I had a major “cognition” when I looked up and saw that a girl’s face could be so much more interesting to look at than her blouse. Women have such great faces! You watch their eyes and faces when they think nobody’s looking and it’s beautiful. Wish I could paint. Or write poetry. Or something.

            • BuryTheNuts2

              I think you just did write poetry!
              And we women thank you for it.

            • FistOfXenu

              The poetry is in the faces. I just observe it.

            • hogarthian

              ok, now I’m reaching for a bucket 😉

            • FistOfXenu

              Sorry hogarthian. I’m a cranky sentimental old man of few talents. If you think you’re reaching for a bucket now, be glad I don’t still have the letter I wrote to that girl complete with some crappy rhyme about how her face was beautiful like .. oh, hell no! It’s embarassing just remembering I wrote it. I’m not telling you people. I was 16 and green as the grass and she pretended she thought it was sweet and then she had the kindness to “accidentally” burn it. It was a different time in those days and it was okay to be corny. But it doesn’t belong here does it?
              Anyway, sorry.

            • hogarthian

              awwwwwwww! Bless ya, a little confessional (you’re not holding a couple of cans of any kind are you?). ‘man of few talents’?….. oh, I don’t know, you entertain the life out of me! I think you’re ‘Fantastic Mr. FoX’.
              p.s. She was clearly a bitch.

            • BuryTheNuts2

              And an arsonist!

            • hogarthian

              lololololoooooool!

            • FistOfXenu

              hogarthian, BTN, I don’t think she was a bitch or an arsonist. I think really she just wanted to save me the embarassment if somebody else saw it. After all we went steady for a while. Really. It was bad. A Vogon with his first crush bad. I still remember a couple of phrases and I want to bang my head to make it stop. She was doing me a favor burning it. Less of a favor when she dumped me for my pal.

            • BuryTheNuts2

              Awwwwhhhh!

            • FistOfXenu

              It was OK really. I think I dodged a bullet there. 😉

            • ParticleMom

              I kept all the corny love letters and poems written to me. 🙂

            • ParticleMom

              Right after my post, my husband walked in with Lawrence Wright’s book for me. Corny poems from teenage boyfriends are great, but surprising your wife with a Scientology exposé? True love!

            • Missionary Kid

              If you’ll accept my apology, I’ll be happy. I missed the part about growing out of it.

            • FistOfXenu

              Don’t think twice about it MK. I wasn’t offended. I get lost in who said what all the time. And that’s even without Disqus screwing things up for me. And I wasn’t as obvious as I could’ve been. And it was funny in its own way so that can’t be bad. 🙂

            • hogarthian

              Start a religion that worships women. I’ll join.

        • BuryTheNuts2

          Are you from Saturn or something?

          • Missionary Kid

            Nah, Mars, but I’ve spent enough time in other cultures to realize we have a boob fetish. I share it, but it it’s far from universal on Earth.

  • sharon brown

    Thanks for narrowing $ci’s reponse for us Mr Plunkit , you have definitely given me hope ! I would Love for the Hooters case to be brought up at trial, but am wondering if they will just refund the money prior to any trial , like they did earlier this year in Ga. *sigh *

  • richelieu jr

    Is anybody else struck by the similarities between Hubbard’s Laughing Gas Ha-Ha It’s So Not Funny Excalibur D.D.S. vision and Phil K. Dick’s vision of the Black Cage whilst sick with flu at home and getting cold medicine delivered?

    Both of them felt divinely inspired, as if the scales had fallen from their eyes (Who knew eyes were scaly?)..

    Both of them had visions/inspirations that continued for days, after the initial experience and after all residual drug effects should normally have disappeared..

    Both of them wrote furiously about it for years afterwards…

    Of course, one went on to write some of the most amazing mind-bending Literature ever written,surpassing even the genre of SciFi and becoming, as Le Guinn said, a sort of home-grown Borges, inspiring and enlightening thousands whilst at the same time entertaining them, and the other- Well, he bent reality out of shape and became a sort of home-grown Borg, assimilating thousands (which he counted ass millions) and destroying countless lives and livelihoods in the process, a sort of snaggle-toothed swami, a Captain Horatio blowing his own horn and serving as his own Gilligan as he skippered (and scampered and skuppered) the tiniest fleet since the Scrubbing Bubbles circled the drain for the last time…

    Seriously, though- There are real similarities. Is it due to the nature of pulp Sci-Fi writing, cranking (perhaps literally CRANK-ing, sniff) out schlock for pennies a word? The drugs? They were certainly both apranoid and given to writing exquisitely detailed explanations for the universe and everything in it, Hbbard quite publicly with his Dianetics nonsense, and Dick in a far more erudite manner, ssecretly bashig out thousands upon thousands of pages of his ‘Exegesis’ secretly at night, seemingly for an audience which consisted only of himself.

    • Henry James once had a profound epiphany while on nitrous, and struggled to write it down before it faded. The next morning, unable to recall what he had written, he squinted to make out his own poor handwriting and deciphered it as: “The ineffable smell of petroleum prevails throughout the room, throughout the universe.”

      • richelieu jr

        Then there was the writer who awoke in the middle of the night, reached blindly for his notebook which he aways kept on the bedside table in case an idea struck, and scribbled blindly an idea which had come to him as blinding flash of inspiration…
        Come the morn, he could hardly wait to grab the notebook and see what he had found so incredible during the night. It said:
        Boy meets girl.

        • Captain Howdy

          That was Alice Cooper, right ?

      • LongNeckGoose

        Or Paul McCartney’s great marijuana revelation: “There’s a funny smell in the room.”

        • 10oriocookies

          I dont like cocaine, I just like the smell of it.

      • Captain Howdy

        Off topic, but have you ever heard the Oscar Wilde quote about Henry James ? It’s pisser, look it up.

        • Poison Ivy

          “Mr. Henry James writes fiction as if it were a painful duty.”

          • Captain Howdy

            No PI it’s ” Bostonians are the most boring of Americans and the most boring of Bostonians is Henry James” to paraphrase

            • A review of Portrait of a Lady: “It is a very Jamesian book, which is to say: nothing happens. I mean: nothing, at all. And it takes so long not to happen. Finally, something seems to be about to happen, so the book ends abruptly.”

            • sugarplumfairy

              Haha.. Just like the movie Blair Witch..

            • PreferToBeAnon2

              There is something about realizing the remote possibility of noting a comparison between Henry James and the Blair Witch film on an anti-scientology blog that makes me giddy.

            • sugarplumfairy

              They should have named it Portrait of a Blair–oops, Bear– Witch..

            • BuryTheNuts2

              Snort!

            • FistOfXenu

              Don’t you mean Bear Witch? Nothing happened there either, it’s just a fairy story so people would think the Hub is this macho guy that knows about the woods and wild animals.

    • RMycroft
    • FistOfXenu

      Well we know the Hub was knocking back the pinks and grays to do his research. Wonder if anybody’s tried to sort his word diarrhea into 2 piles – make that puddles? One for when he wasn’t stoned on something and one for when he was. Bet most of his policies and tech was written from “on high”

    • Captain Howdy

      I’m staring a new video franchise named ” People On Drugs and or Insane Believe In Anything”, do you want to be a co-producer ?

      • Missionary Kid

        Of the drugs or the video franchise? 😉

      • PreferToBeAnon2

        Yeah, those films are in “the cans.” badumpump

      • richelieu jr

        Count me in!

        I made a show once called ‘Info or Intox’ (True News or Misinformaton/Propaganda) where the contestants had to watch news reports some of which were real on crazy subjects and some which were totally made up… `
        It was fun making the fake ones but it never caught on, really. I couldn’t even get anyone interested in an American version…

        • FistOfXenu

          The show already exists. Faux News. The contestants are the whole audience.

        • hogarthian

          That’s because the number of people who can tell the difference between news and misinformation are getting lower with every generation. It scares the shit out of me. I have many failings as a mother, but one thing I have ALWAYS done is forcibly bring to the attention of my children every single bit of crazy that I see, and discuss it with them. It’s important.

          • richelieu jr

            Well this, of course, was exactly what I was hoping to point out with my show- Using the media to call attention to its own failings and potential for misuse…
            My hope was that the spectators would watch the show and then not be able to help themselves for (over)analyzing the rest of the reports the saw on TV- Who made this?
            Why?
            What is it trying to do?
            What idea is it trying to sell you?
            What was cut out?
            What was left in?
            Where do these talking heads come from?
            Who are these ‘experts’?
            Who pays them?
            What does ‘The Centre for American Democracy Mean?
            Or ‘Citizens for a Better Tomorrow’?

            A bit like Colbert does nos, though much ess funny and accompished, I fear…

    • hogarthian

      There’s a fine line isn’t there, between genius and madness? This may upset people, but I have always felt, strongly, that most fabulously talented people are ‘on the spectrum’ somewhere, not the full shilling, sandwich short of a picnic… whatever you want to call it. And that’s a good thing, until they put their ‘talents’ to bad use. There is also a huge difference (or a very small one?), whatever some may say, between those of us who are inclined to believe the shit that comes from the heads of those ‘talented’ people. I’m just relieved, for those that are compelled to believe, or have a ‘faith’, that CHUBBS wasn’t born 4000 years ago in a small town somewhere in Palestine.

  • stillgrace

    Holy Crap. I actually felt my heart jump when I came face-to-face with the opening photo of the grizzly bear!! Major FEAR button; As a Sierra backpacker, I never forgot to put bells on my shoelaces!
    Way to wake someone up, Tony! I guess I can skip my coffee this morning.

    • FistOfXenu

      Yeah, I used bells when I walked until I met an experienced guy who asked how did I know they weren’t dinner bells for the bears? He said he preferred to call a cadence when he walked (being a former jarhead and all) or sometimes sing. I went for singing after that. I know bears don’t get what a dinner bell is but still …

      • stillgrace

        Some of my friends preferred pebbles in a can tied to their pack. Yet another use for cans!

        • FistOfXenu

          I avoided cans. Too much extra weight. But that would’ve been worth doing if only I’d thought of it or somebody’d mentioned it.

          • BuryTheNuts2

            “I avoided cans.”

            ^^^always the correct answer for this blog!

            • FistOfXenu

              What can I say? I get things right sometimes.

              But it stimulates the mischievous part of my brain. How much fun would it be to conceal some kind of little electronic noisemaker in somebody’s e-meter cans? I don’t know, a buzzer, a tinkly bell, just something. Or a rogue circuit that randomly makes a peeping sound. Or something that picks up needle movement and randomly makes a whining sound.

      • Which reminds of a joke about bear preparedness: “Pepper can help to repel bears. Others have used little bells. It is also good to learn the difference between the traces left by brown bears and grizzly bears. Grizzly bears leave larger paw-prints, and their droppings are distinctive because they smell like pepper and have little bells in them.”

        • Trustmeonthis

          Bahaha, you beat me to it!

  • sketto

    Love Jamie! Tough call. Gotta go with the Exes, though. Powerful stuff.

  • 0tessa

    The Scientology scriptures aren’t but the Revelations of Ronnie Hubbard in the end.
    Many other religious revelations have occured as a result of drugs, nearly starvation and/or a psychiatric condition (schizophrenia e.g.). Also the Hubbard ones fall into that category.

  • stillgrace

    Vance: “It made me wonder if clear and sane weren’t two different concepts. I’m now quite certain they are.” I’ve believed that ever since I “met” George “Electronic Incident” Baille, an outstanding example of OTVIII!!!

  • The arguments of Scientology are quite far fetching. They essentially claim that anything that has to do with Scientology and money, is not subject of any civil court jurisdiction. What if somebody bought a seminar aboard of the Free Winds and was unable to attend. Does this set payment for the Freewinds adventure (including room and meals) is also a donation of religious nature, not subject of a refund? Does this person need to go to Scientology arbitration if she is refused a refund? And what happens if Scientology arbitration denies this person a refund, arguing that it was a donation? Surely this person can take the matter to a civil court.

    • Poison Ivy

      And we all know on what side the Scientology panel will rule in arbitration. Geez.

    • 0tessa

      All money paid to $cientology is called donation, no matter for what purpose it is paid.
      Needless to say that alle money paid to this firm is lost of course and that it serves a criminal organization.

  • PreferToBeAnon2

    Ok Freudians, need your help here. According to the article about Hubbard at the Explorer’s Club: “What held the room was his joshing reply to a club joke, ‘a persistent rumor’ about a swimming brown bear that was said to have climbed into his boat with amorous results.” In addition, Wiki notes about an expedition, “Hubbard’s recharting of an especially treacherous Inside Passage, and his ethnological study of indigenous Aleuts and Haidas” and tell of how “along the way, he not only roped a Kodiak Bear, but braved seventy-mile-an-hour winds and commensurate seas off the Aleutian Islands.” Also, Captain, is that a bear suit the chicken-leg-eating-lady is wearing?

    Ok, he has a shtick with bears. First, he hunts, ropes, and has sex with them. He puts a female dressed as one on the cover of his magazine. Is a bear just a bear or is it a cigar?

    • BuryTheNuts2

      God I was so hoping someone was going to “go there” and that it wasn’t going to be me.
      Thank you!

    • Missionary Kid

      LRH is simply unbearable. Sorry, couldn’t resist.

      • FistOfXenu

        Don’t make an ursa of yourself.

      • PreferToBeAnon2

        I knew that one was coming!

        • BuryTheNuts2

          And it bears repeating!

    • Poison Ivy

      “Also, Captain, is that a bear suit the chicken-leg-eating-lady is wearing?” LOL!

      Obsessions with bears – the only thing LRH and Stephen Colbert have in common!

  • Captain Howdy

    For the sake of stupidity i would just like to point out there is a deference between the comment count and the viewer count.

    I understand why people don’t comment, it’s scary

    The bottom line is, please comment, it’s important

    And I will have your back

    • Espiando

      Well, sometimes I read a story and don’t comment because I don’t feel I have anything relevant to contribute, or someone’s already beat me to the point. Better to stay silent than be a ditto.

      • DeElizabethan

        Ditto that!
        Couldn’t help myself hehehe and thanks Captain for your back!

    • Sandy

      Howdy – I don’t always feel like I have anything new to contribute …

      • Sandy

        I read and agree – ya know …

  • Scott’s analysis is right on point. The issue is whether the funds solicited were used for a purpose other than the one intended by the donor. This is called a restricted gift. The CO$ is bound by its role as a fiduciary to use the funds for the purpose for which they were intended or if that cannot happen to contact the donor to request allowance to divert the contribution to another purpose. If the donor does not agree they are obliged to return the money, There is no religious exception to the obligation of a fiduciary to act responsibly with respect to the the money it administers. And as Scott pointed out any arbitration (if called for in the agreement) must be conducted by an arguably neutral third party (if I have a dispute with my broker regarding a stock transaction, for example, I am usually contractually bound to arbitrate the matter. But the arbitrator is not an employee of the brokerage house.).

    • Johan

      What is your view on Judge Schaefer’s ruling? (Hoverson couldn’t sue to get his ‘donation’ for services not received back)

  • “[H]ow can, say, deceiving statements made to city officials for the purpose of extracting more money from its parishioners possibly be deemed religious?”

    This isn’t just any religion. It’s Scientology. Lying is a religious ritual. Ergo, this is still a religious dispute. This argument from Scientology makes perfect sense … in Belgravia.

  • Johan

    On the Garcias’ case: they should have submitted a copy of the letter that Robert Berrington received – stating he needs to fill in a form that he can’t get since his not allowed in the building – to show the judge that the “arbitration” really isn’t relevant.

    • BuryTheNuts2

      I agree, that letter is a perfect example. I would like the IRS to be carpet bombed with that letter!

    • 10oriocookies

      good point

  • Snippy_X

    This is simple. Miscavige is Jim Bakker’s evil twin. He will get 5 years for “bilking billions” from his followers.

    From Wikipedia: Jim Bakker/Scandals

    PTL’s fund raising activities between 1984–1987 underwent scrutiny by The Charlotte Observer
    newspaper, eventually leading to criminal charges against Jim Bakker. From 1984 to 1987, Bakker and his PTL associates sold $1,000 “lifetime memberships,” which entitled buyers to a three-night stay annually at a
    luxury hotel at Heritage USA. According to the prosecution at Bakker’s later fraud trial, tens of thousands of memberships had been sold, but only one 500-room hotel was ever completed. Bakker “sold” more “exclusive partnerships” than could be accommodated, while raising more than twice the money needed to build
    the actual hotel. …

    Bakker, … allegedly kept two sets of books to conceal the accounting irregularities. Reporters from The Charlotte Observer, led by Charles Shepard, investigated and published a series of articles regarding the PTL organization’s finances.

    Following a 16-month Federal grand jury probe, Bakker was indicted in 1988 on eight counts of mail fraud, 15 counts of wire fraud and one count of conspiracy. In 1989, after a five-week trial which began on August 28 in Charlotte, the jury found him guilty on all 24 counts, and Judge Robert Potter sentenced him to 45 years in federal prison and a $500,000 fine. [He served 5 years.]

    Then he will not admit he is wrong.

    Then he will get goofy in the head and start asking “Where’s Shelly?”

    http://www.nationalenquirer.com/celebrity/dead-wife-still-alive-jim-bakkers-sad-last-days

  • Baker

    IMO, the arbitration defense is a powerful one. As Garcia was not in the Sea Org and was not living under the same conditions that Debbie Cook alleged, it would be difficult for him to claim duress. The arbitration clause that Garcia signed covers all disputes relating to “Scientology services and activities.” Hard to argue that getting regged for money to erect a giant cross on a Scientology building is not a Scientology activity.

    Interestingly, there is one way in which this defense could backfire on CoS. If the Court is persuaded that Hooters is relevant here, then it will have to determine whether CoS’s arbitration system is, as the court found in Hooters, a “sham system” with “warped rules.” There is no factual record on which the Court can make that determination at this stage. So there would have to be discovery on the issue of CoS’s internal dispute resolution system, including whether the system is subject to interference by upper management. It also could include discovery concerning how the system worked in past disputes.

    So oddly, the CoS may have put forward a good defense with unanticipated and unwelcome consequences, namely discovery.

    • Johan

      This angle is worrying as the Judge (like Jude Schaefer) may well decide that when discovery is required he won’t go there because of the religious aspect. I’ve noticed how they tried hard to rope in all possible claims and organizations to be covered by this same defense. I have no idea how the cases they reference relate to their argument, but I don’t think the court is doing its job if they allow the ‘blanket ‘ defense. I do not agree that the agreements signed covers the donations for the Superpower building. Clearly, if the Garcias knew their donations were going to be used for ‘any activity’, they would not have given it. They did not agree to this when they signed agreements that were timed to co-incide with courses and auditing.

  • PreferToBeAnon2

    Someone had an interesting thought over at Marty’s: postal fraud. They send out tons of mailers for fundraising and it is done with a government permit number. If the Garcias succeed and they received a flyer for SuperPowerz, that would be a Federal offense. Hey, they took down mafia mobsters with income tax!

    • PreferToBeAnon2

      And I’ll say it before BTN says it–Someone needs to go postal on them!

      • BuryTheNuts2

        Damn it….I wanted that one!

  • DeElizabethan

    ESMB has been and is a wonderful help and tool for ex’s.
    Jamie is ridiculing and educating the public so they won’t go there. That is more my goal so he gets my vote.

  • Jaime is a good egg who is adored here in the Bay Area.. He is also a gifted performer who comes up with a range of compelling materials for his shows. He’s nobody’s fool. From my perspective, the “church” suffers the greatest damage from these legacy offspring. They can scream “bitter apostate” all they want. An articulate adult who was raised in or around this organization has cred. Period.

    • Espiando

      But Jamie wasn’t raised in and/or around Scientology. After all, his grandfather Nibs left in 1959 and even changed his name to get the stench of being Lafayette Ronald Hubbard Junior off of him. Jamie’s doing damage and he’s a wonderful performer, and I don’t want to insult what he’s doing. But I’d be more impressed if it was Arthur or Suzette, both of whom received a mammoth dose of childhood mindfuck aboard the Apollo and had to witness their beloved older brother die, speaking out.

  • Osa is spanish for bear …coincidence ?…i think not 😉

    • Espiando

      It’s actually Spanish for female bear, which, of course, creates comparisons with Sarah Palin. OSA is practically the only thing on Earth where a comparison with Sarah Palin makes Palin look good.

  • Roger Larsson

    Scientology is more armed robbery in metropolitan areas than a hunting trip.

    Scientologists standing in front of Hubbard’s rifle have to pick between scientology and future lives in the mud.

    Criminals’ purpose is to have an environment afraid to speak out.

    Operating Environments are a horror to criminals.
    Operating Thetans are controlled by fears.
    OEs are not afraid of crime syndicate.
    OEs fool around with Grizzlies’ as LRH and DM before they swallow them whole.

  • DodoTheLaser

    It’s definitely ESMB. Jamie is a rock star though. Love, respect and gratitude.

  • Artoo45

    Jamie’s going to be in town for a poetry slam on Sunday. I am so there. I missed the vote. Bad wog.

  • Kaarli Makela

    Any Mom would take into account the bear’s “necessity level” … perhaps protecting her bear babies!?!