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Jim Lynch, Scientology’s Shill, Dies at 59

Jim_LynchJust last week, news organizations around the country (and overseas) reported that Scientology’s propaganda magazine, Freedom, had placed an ad for a new writer.

Now we have some idea why the magazine is hiring.

We have learned that on July 19, Jim Lynch, Freedom‘s main correspondent, died in Boca Raton, Florida.

Lynch was known for aggressively questioning former church officials like Marty Rathbun and Mike Rinder in what bordered on harassment, and we had our own reasons for being interested in Lynch’s work, as a recent article at the Atlantic explains.

We heard from a friend of Jim’s who said Lynch had died of cancer, and that a funeral was held a week ago. He pointed to a one-line obituary in the Palm Beach Post. We then confirmed his identity with Avatar Crematory Service.

Jim was born on September 19, 1953, and graduated from the College of Holy Cross in Massachusetts. In the 1990s, he was a managing editor at the New York Post, an executive editor at the New York Daily News, and then had gone to work for American Media, which published supermarket tabloids like the Globe and Star. In 2006, he took a job as editor and publisher of a suburban daily in Illinois, the Naperville Sun, a job that lasted two years. In 2009, Michael Miner at the Chicago Reader wrote an interesting column on the (unsolicited) advice he was getting from an out-of-work Lynch about what the owners of the Chicago Sun-Times should be doing in the grips of the print newspaper apocalypse. (Lynch’s advice: bust the unions.)

A few months later, in February 2010, Miner was back with another column about Lynch, this time noting that he had moved to Boca Raton, Florida and was now writing for Scientology’s magazine, Freedom. Lynch had been hired to write a critical story about the St. Petersburg Times (now Tampa Bay Times), which had recently published a blockbuster investigation of Scientology.

Lynch told Miner that his story had taken only two weeks to report, and he didn’t want to give the impression that he had become the church’s gun-for-hire…

“I didn’t necessarily do this for the money. I’ve always had an interest in religion and this gave me a good way to examine a religion I never had a chance to examine.” However, Lynch also says that when he took the job he made it clear to the Scientologists he wouldn’t stand for any proselytizing, and as long as they understood that he didn’t care what they believed. “I told them, I said, ‘Look, I happen to be a Catholic. My wife’s Jewish. My views on religion are if people want to worship at Mayan temples, fine with me. You guys, albeit a nontraditional religion, are a religion under the auspices of the U.S. Constitution”….He doesn’t want to say what the Scientologists paid him. But he asks, “Just don’t make me look like a shill for Scientology.”

Since then, however, Lynch had appeared to work for Freedom full time, and specialized in popping up unexpectedly to confront Rathbun, Rinder, and Karen de la Carriere. His style seemed more about intimidation than reportage.

Lynch’s work was captured on video several times — after showing up to question Mike Rinder in a parking lot, for example. At the time, in 2011, Rinder was with Robert Almblad and Almblad’s girlfriend Susan Clickner, whom we have written about in the past. Rinder had been hired by Almblad to help him promote a company that made ice machines for hospitals, but the Almblads were then put under ferocious harassment by agents of Scientology. The message was clear: anyone who hires Rinder will have a hard time doing business. Lynch was clearly part of that operation, doing what he could to disrupt a business that was trying to bring bacteria-free ice to hospitals and save lives. In this video, Lynch can be seen attempting to question Almblad, Clickner, and Rinder as they get into their car…

 

 
Also in 2011, when Marty Rathbun made a trip to Los Angeles, Lynch was there to meet him at the airport, and got an earful from Marty’s wife, Monique…

 

 
Lynch shows up in yet another parking lot to interview the son of Luis Garcia. (Luis is now suing the church for fraud in federal court)…

 

 
In these videos, Lynch repeatedly asks questions about the counseling that former church official Marty Rathbun was doing at his then home in South Texas. Un-bylined stories then appeared in Freedom that seemed to rely on Lynch’s reporting, and other material that Lynch had gathered appeared on the anonymous attack websites that Scientology operates to smear its perceived enemies.

In January, Lynch showed up at the house of Karen de la Carriere, a former church member who has been very outspoken with her criticism of Scientology leader David Miscavige. She snapped a few photos of him after telling him to get off of her property.

 
Jim_Lynch

 
His final assignment, however, may have been your proprietor. In March, Lynch was sent around the country attempting to interview people who had worked with us, or members of our family. This was not an inexpensive operation. After Lynch showed up at the home of a person here in New York City, three days later we heard from a person in California who had chased Lynch off of their front porch.

Based on what Michael Miner wrote about Lynch attempting to turn things around for the Naperville Sun by bringing his big-city experience to the Chicago suburbs, we have a feeling we might have enjoyed sharing a newsroom with Jim back in the day. But right about that time — 2007 — the newspaper industry went into the toilet and has never recovered. It’s a shame that a formerly serious journalist like Jim Lynch had to turn to an employer like the Church of Scientology, which will continue to hire out-of-work reporters for its smear jobs. We already have some idea who is replacing Jim, and we hope to bring that to you in a future story.

 
——————–

Posted by Tony Ortega on July 29, 2013 at 09:30

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  • ReneeG

    And nothing of value was lost.

    • Leslie Stipe

      Amen!

    • USA MRIID

      Fingers cross that the next to unexpectedly fall face-first in to his linguini is Mike Rinder.

      • sugarplumfairy

        I do NOT agree..

  • InTheNameOfXenu

    Rest in peace Jim Lynch. It’s a shame that his swan song was to harrass people on behalf of a mafia-like cult.

    • TheHoleDoesNotExist

      This is the first time I’ve heard Tony speak much, or at all, about harrassment He receives, but have always imagined there had to be some. The fact that Lynch went after Tony’s family is just horrible.

      It was nice of Tony to try and insert a kind word over his grave. It matters not One bit to me that a sociopath is intelligent or skilled in such things as turning a newspaper around. Harrassing a grieving mother who lost her only son? Harrassing a journalist in this century in America?

      It is people like Jim Lynch in this world that makes me wish more funding for scientific brain research would be a top priority and we can help people like Lynch sooner rather than later. I have to smack myself and remember evil is a concept that science will delete in the near future and replace with medical facts and solutions. In the meantime, the laws need to change to start protecting Victims of people like Lynch and other criminal scientologists.

      Amen.

      • Unit G-Xenu’s Other Fist

        Tony is the most level headed of all of us 😉

        • Roger Larsson

          I have something about death.

          If it’s a crime to die so at least everyone goes out-ethics during a lifetime.

          Ron Hubbard died and his show with him. What? His show still goes on and he’s still not in a hole as a non-producer?

          Exceptions from the rule Ron Hubbard established exist.

    • KJP in Portland

      NO PEACE for these criminals. SP me you stupid cult. Come up to backwoods Oregon with your ‘investigators’ and be bounced out on your arses.

  • InTheNameOfXenu

    Rest in peace, Jim Lynch. It’s a shame that his final act was to harass people on behalf of a mafia-like cult.

  • Mighty Korgo of Teegeeack

    Thanks, once again for your research and reporting on the life of this man who shamed his profession.

    To any Scientologist reading this– Scientology can’t cure cancer. Scientology won’t lengthen your life. It will turn you into an aggressively obnoxious human being.

    • richelieu jr

      Is it impossible to shame the profession of shameless hack?

      And it’s more of a ‘vocation’, isn’t it?

    • USA MRIID

      To be fair, the insane shill was not himself a Scientology customer, there is no indication that he gave the crooks any money.

  • Robert Long

    Jim Lynch, R.I.P=Rot In Putrefaction

    • richelieu jr

      “This just in: Florida flies and graveworms can’t stop puking…”

  • Unit G-Xenu’s Other Fist

    It’s sad that a person died. But good riddance.

    • Peter

      We all die. What is sad about that? :)

      • Unit G-Xenu’s Other Fist

        It’s always sad when someone dies, especially from cancer. My aunt died from it earlier this year, leaving a husband and 3 young girls, 5, 9 and 13.

        Personally, I can’t wait to be worm food 😉

        • richelieu jr

          I am so sorry to hear of your loss.

          • Unit G-Xenu’s Other Fist

            Thanks rich, she was a wonderful woman. I would have gladly taken it from her if it meant she got to spend more time with her children and husband, all of us loved her dearly.

            And now I’m crying again

            • richelieu jr

              Sorry… A nasty disease that so often takes the best people in the worst way.

              And please DO wait to be worm food! As long a possible! There’s time enough for that, believe me!

            • Unit G-Xenu’s Other Fist

              Yeah, I know, I’m a little self-depreciating tonight. I need to fix my dose. It’s gotten out of whack lately. Thank you 😉

      • TheHoleDoesNotExist

        Not one Damn Thing if you’re a scientologist.

        • richelieu jr

          Well, unless they left everything to Scientology, that’s one revenue stream down the drain…

        • WildaBeast

          If auditing cured cancer, I would probably join up pre-emptively. In the last seven years, my grandfather died of it, then my grandmother had a mastectomy, then their youngest son (my uncle) got brain cancer and died.
          Actually, scratch that. I live in Canada. We have health care. Consequently, GETTING cancer is cheaper than being audited to AVOID cancer (even if it did work) and I am broke.
          I wonder if that’s part of the reason why Scientology never took off here with *quite* the fervor that it exhibited in its US heyday. When there’s a safety net, you don’t have the same desperation to convince yourself that there’s a “cure-all” waiting just inside the door for you personally (just swipe your card here, and sign away your life HERE…).

          • John P.

            You raise a very interesting idea: that outrageous health claims for a “religion” gain less traction in countries with a broad safety network for health services. It certainly makes intuitive sense.

            I did a quick look at the numbers (that’s what I do for a living) and the numbers for Scientology membership in Canada don’t look much different from the US (which just gives me another bit of evidence to lead me to believe that Canada really is part of the US, they’re just pretending :-). There are about 30 million Canadians, roughly 1/10 of the US population. The just-released religious numbers from the 2011 census show 1,745 Scientologists. Adjusting for population size, that would suggest there are about 17,500 Scientologists in the US (we have to estimate from multiple sources since the US census data doesn’t track small “religions”). That’s probably a little higher than the actual number of Scientologists in the US, but well within appropriate margins for error. A similar number holds true for the UK, where the NHS arguably does a better job than the provincial health systems in Canada: there are 2,500 Scientologists out of a population of 65 million or so.

            Interestingly, this does not lead me to conclude you’re wrong; it simply suggests to me that people get into Scientology for reasons other than the alleged “health benefits.” They may believe in the health message once they’re in, but it is probably not what attracts them in the first place.

            I would be interested if there are any studies done of highly coercive cults focused more on health benefits (“Breatharians”, etc) of membership in the US versus countries with single-payer health care, but I have neither the time nor any uniquely powerful research tools to track that down.

  • Observer

    Another close associate of Scientology dies prematurely of cancer. Hmmmm.

  • richelieu jr

    “Just don’t make me look like a shill for Scientology.”

    “Jim Lynch, Scientology’s Shill, Dies at 59”

    Thank you, Tony. Thank you so much.

    • ThetaBara

      Sad that he became that.

    • USA MRIID

      It makes one wonder what Jim thought he was doing, if not being a shill criminal working for an organized crime syndicate. Did the Republican actually think he was doing journalism? If so, he really was a dimwit.

      • Hubbard’s Boil

        Indeed. He took money from a criminal organization who paid him to lie, harass, and hurt others. With all due respect, rot in hell, Jim Lynch!

  • BosonStark

    The bells of Freedom Magazine will toll at half ding-dong.

    • richelieu jr

      GIven that he wasn’t a Scilon, I’m gonna say he was less Ding and more Dong.

  • NCSP

    It’s a terrible thing even when bad people die, because it cancels out any chance for them to change. He won’t be missed by most, but the person he could have become will be. RIP.

    • Gus_Cox

      Well stated.

  • 0tessa

    I’m sorry to say it, but the world is probably a better place without him.

  • subsilentio

    Would-be Scientology goons should consider, when hiring on for this cult, that it might very well be the last thing they do. Is this the legacy he wanted to leave behind?

    He died a scumbag with no honor or integrity. If there is a hell, he’s there.

    • Sidney18511

      I hate to hear of anyone’s death but I’ve got to say…..the cancer “gods” got one right this time.

    • TheHoleDoesNotExist

      Hell is here on earth, created, furnished by and the coals continually stoked by minions of scientology and other criminals. In the end, scientology consumes anyone who stays too long. Anyone.

    • richelieu jr

      No matter what anyone might think of our harsh words here, I cannot imagine that anyone but the most deluded Scion would possibly question your first sentence, subsilentio.

  • richelieu jr

    Doesn’t ‘Boca Raton’ mean “Rat’s Mouth?”

    Well, it’s the other orifice he wasn’t worth, but I’m sure this rat won’t stop puking until his mortal remains have shuffled off this… BLLLEEEAAAARRRRGH!!!!!

  • Unit G-Xenu’s Other Fist

    Why does it seem to be that an inordinate amount of Scientologists seem to get cancer I wonder? Could it have something to do with holding those cans? Electromagnetic fields are thought to cause some forms of cancer (in fact I’m convinced that I should switch every wireless device I have off, permanently)

    • Sidney18511

      i agree with you Unit, in fact on Artie Lerma has some info about this on his site.

    • TonyOrtega

      Lynch was not a Scientologist.

      • Unit G-Xenu’s Other Fist

        Of course, you are right Tony. That’s a derp on my part, sorry. He wrote for FreeDumb and was just their shill.

      • Sidney18511

        Mr. O, I got that impression by reading your piece. Do you think that there was any chance that he followed the “doctrines” or did any dabbling recently?

        • TonyOrtega

          No. He was just a gun for hire.

          • richelieu jr

            This just makes it so much worse for me.

      • Unit G-Xenu’s Other Fist

        Perhaps I should have asked, why does it seem that a lot of Scientologists, and those that work with, and near them, get cancer……?

        • richelieu jr

          It could be that Hubbard actively encouraged smoking and that the entire Scilon hierarchy
          apparently actually believed not only that it was unrelated to cancer but light actually cure it. Add that to a refusal to submit to check ups and real medical help over decades and…

          I’m gonna have to chalk it up to willful ignorance and regrettably stupid neglect…

        • Ciru

          A lot of people in every group get cancer. Scientologists don’t get treatment so more of them die.

      • Peter

        Amazing they didn’t get to him. But no matter what he did, glorying in anyone’s death demeans the one doing the glorying. I was saddened to see such vicious comments this morning on the blog, Tony.

        • richelieu jr

          Please do not let my comments reflect in any way on Tony and his reporting.

          I ma doubtless lowering myself, but I have a long way to go before i am harassing people in parking lots, hiding behind religious freedom whilst persecuting those who refuse to believe.

          • Peter

            I’m certainly not ascribing any of the comments to Tony. :)

            Making comparisons of yourself to Lynch misses the point. NO ONE ON THIS LIST knows how much this guy will be missed by friends and family. And, for all we know, he may have been desperate to have a job and the czerch may have offered him a lot of money in order to survive. But that makes no difference either. It’s all about who *we* are, not the other guy. The heavy judgement being posted here and just plain nasty comments about the dead just sit poorly with me. If I sink to the level of the other guy by celebrating his death, what then am I saying about myself?

            • richelieu jr

              Well, as I have said elsewhere, I find this to be an admirable and solid philosophy…

              One or two quibbles, even so;
              Criticizing the dead; even crudely is not ‘descending ‘ to his level (which in itself is a sort of judgement, be it ever so wrapped in good intentions)

              And whereas i truly appreciate your formulation there at the end, I can’t help but notice it still comes as a codicil to your criticism (implicit and otherwise) of those of us who are perhaps not so noble.

              Why are we less deserving of your reticence and bonhomie?

        • Peter

          Years ago, I noted that a lot of women in the czerch seem to get it. However, I also noted that many of them had been long time smokers. Back in 1950, Life magazine ran the first long article reporting on the results of two doctors who had deeply researched smoking as a cause of caner and early death. The cig companies whent berserk. One of those doctors, Dr. Daniel Horn, was our next door neighbour, himself a long time smoker. When he saw his results, he quit cold. Others, unfortunately, didn’t. When I was in the czerch, I was amazed at how many smoked. Hubbard’s example didn’t help.

          • Missionary Kid

            The Nazis, before WWII, noted the link between smoking and cancer. The problem was that much of their research was besmirched with the research done later in the concentration camps, so it was easy for the cigarette companies to discredit their results.

            Growing up in the 50s, it was noted that there was a notable shortness of breath from smoking. In spite of that, it was not unusual for professional football players to smoke at half-time, from what I’ve read.

    • TheHoleDoesNotExist

      No. It has much more to do with genetic codes. It is hard to really imagine what Full Force stress, 24 hours a day, is like, but that is the life of a scientologist, and it Does have an effect on your immune system and hormonal systems which sets a person up for Whatever lies lurking in your genes. For some, it is cancer, others heart conditions, etc.

      Scientologists in major cities will go to scientologist woo doctors, chiropractors, DO’s, as well as auditing and ethics (more stress and more financial debt adding to more stress). If they see an oncologist at all, it will be in Stage 3 or Stage 4 when it is much harder to recover and usually not. The reason a lot of OT’s have died from it is this 24/7 stress level and all of the above.

      • Unit G-Xenu’s Other Fist

        Stress is how I believe I developed diabetes THDNE

        • richelieu jr

          I certainly hope you are taking care of it.. Getting my MiL to take care of herself is a job I apparently don’t have the free hours for…

          • Unit G-Xenu’s Other Fist

            Well, 21 years I’ve had it by now, no major complications so far, except maybe an issue with a toe that I’m asking my doctor about this week, so I think I’ve looked after myself fairly well, thank you for the concern 😀

            • richelieu jr

              Very glad to hear it.

    • Missionary Kid

      The e-meter cans only put out direct current(DC), and in a very weak (300 microvolt) range. For a strong emf field to be generated, alternating current is needed (AC). That’s why transformers don’t work with DC. It is the rising and collapsing of the current that generates the strong emf.

      The paper that maintains that the current possibly blocks pain is, IMO, mistaken, because the medical devices are polarized (the current runs in one direction) from the pain site further up the limb, and they are also pulsed. The e-meter current runs up one arm and down the other. That would theoretically block pain in one arm, but not the other.

      The current mostly follows the surface, so it would be expected that higher rates of skin cancer would be expected.

      That’s my take on the e-meter cancer link, and I reserve the right to be wrong.

      • Unit G-Xenu’s Other Fist

        See my reply to John P, Missionary Kid 😉

        • Missionary Kid

          Can I interest you in the sarcasm font {}. I came up with it so that people like me, who are a little slow on the uptake, or who take stuff written too seriously and often don’t detect it. An example: the {church} of $cientology.

          Some people here use it, and others dislike it, so they don’t.

          BTW, wireless devices put out radio waves, which have a lot more EMF to them per amp than the e-meter because they are AC, but again, the output is very low and probably fairly safe. Even if they are a problem, the inverse square law (double the distance, and the power is one fourth). I should also point out that regular 60 cycle, or Hertz, house current puts out far more EMF. The frequency is far lower, which may be a factor in their effect.

          • Unit G-Xenu’s Other Fist

            I like that idea 😉 Hey listen I think I fried myself a bit here tonight guys. Apologies to all for any outbursts or stupid looking comments.

            I’m going to take a couple days off. I need to fix a couple things I think

            • Missionary Kid

              As the late, great basketball announcer for the L.A. Lakers put it, no harm, no foul. Relax and enjoy your break.

    • John P.

      The amount of current that flows through the “cans” is so minuscule that it has absolutely no effect on the body. It is a couple of millivolts of direct current, and it is electricity, not radio waves or magnetic fields, which is far less of an issue.

      My suspicion is that Scilons and those affiliated with the cult seem to keel over much younger than others because of a) smoking, common among cult members, especially staff; b) poor diet, from choices such as grabbing fast food on the way home every night or other “convenience” eating (probably some eating disorders, since many of the staff appear to be overweight, and eating is a much cheaper addiction than alcohol or drugs); and c) long-term effects on the immune system due to the stress they’re under to donate, to volunteer, to make money in their businesses to allow them to donate, etc.

      • Unit G-Xenu’s Other Fist

        Sarcasm doesn’t translate well over the Internet, which is what I was going for more than anything John 😛 looking at the comment, yes, it could have done with a smiley and more of a smart arse vibe to it for sure 😉

      • ze moo

        Twenty years of Cal-mag and vitamin overdoses can’t help either.

      • RMycroft

        A good night’s sleep is a major part of a healthy lifestyle, and some of those staff/Sea Org get worked to the bone.

      • stillgrace

        I am in total agreement with your second paragraph. With regard to your first paragraph, I agree that the current is not strong enough to cause problems. I also humbly submit the fact that whenever current flows in a conductive medium, an electromagnetic wave always surrounds the path of the current. Laws of physics. Changes to the current are always preceded by the ramping up or down of the electromagnetic waves by changes to the capacitance and inductance of the circuit. Signal integrity 101.

        • John P.

          You are correct. Two points in my defense: a) I am a software guy by training, not a hardware guy. Physics frightens me. b) total EMI emitted by the current flowing through the skin, even though it is greater than zero, is orders of magnitude less than that emitted by a cellphone carried in a pocket or on the belt, even when not in active use. Those devices emit a couple tenths of a watt when in use, dramatically more than the RF generated by changes in the current from the cans. A good article about physiological effects of cell phone radiation, well above e-meter radiation, is here: http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Mobile_phone_radiation_and_health

          • stillgrace

            With electronic systems, the designer has to worry about two things: preventing the system from putting EMI in the air, and protecting the system from all the EMI that is always out there in the environment. EMI can cause problems in the big picture, but also in the very small picture, within the actual PCB, as fluxating electromagnetic waves surrounding one trace can cause current to flow on nearby quiet traces. It’s ironic that that fact (that can drive me crazy at times) is also the very basis for our electronic life as we know it. It’s the reality behind the electric motor, the idea that Tesla sold to Westinghouse so many years ago.

            • Bury_The_Nuts

              Man, I have darn near figured out your day job now Grace :)
              (of course silicon valley should have provided a HUGE clue long ago?). hehehe

            • L. Wrong Hubturd

              My good friend used to work for Recoton in the wireless department. They used to call working with FM, Fucking Magic because of exactly what you describe.

        • Missionary Kid

          While the changes in the current produce emf, IMO, the amount of emf produced by AC, in which the field is generated to a peak, collapses totally, and is generated to a negative peak and collapsed in each cycle, is far larger than the small fluctuations (because of changing resistance of the body) of the DC put out by the e-meter.

          John P. is right.

          • stillgrace

            Respectfully, so am I.

            • Missionary Kid

              You are right, but those small fluctuations produce emf that are orders of magnitude lower than the AC radio waves generated by the microwaves produced by wireless devices and cell phones, or even the house current running through unshielded power cords or Romex, or even the old knob and tube wiring running through the walls.

            • stillgrace

              Please let it be, MK, I was only pointing out that whenever there is current, there are inevitable electromagnetic fields. If you read my first post carefully, I agreed there was essentially no danger. We can talk about it later if you want, I have to return to my work. I have a technical article to finish, commissioned by an industry journal that is due tomorrow.

            • Missionary Kid

              I’ll agree. We, you, me, and John P. say that there is essentially no danger from the e-meter.

              I lost sight of the main point. Mea Culpa.

            • stillgrace

              No need for Latin, MK. LOL! You’ll cause an engram from my past! See ya later!

            • Missionary Kid

              *Laugh* I happen to hate Latin in general, because of 2 years of high school studying it, but specific phrases are useful. It’s better off dead.

              How Italian, a beautiful, simple language, could come from such an unnecessarily (IMO) complicated language, I don’t know.

            • Robert Eckert

              All early languages were complicated. Children’s minds have a frightening ability to absorb intricate grammatical structures by osmosis. Languages simplify when they get imposed on adults (who are too stupid to learn new languages the way toddlers do) or used in conjunction with a lot of hand-waving to communicate to people who speak something else. The Italian peninsula had been a linguistic farrago of Italic speakers (Oscan, Umbrian, Faliscan, and other Brand X relatives of Latin), Celtic speakers (the whole northern half was once called “Cisalpine Gaul”), Greek speakers (the heel and toe of the boat plus half of Sicily was “Magna Graecia”), now-dead branches of Indo-European (Messapian and Venetic) and totally alien languages (the Semitic speech of the Punics, and Sikelian and Etruscan of unknown affinities). By the time all of Italy was speaking “Latin” it wasn’t exactly Latin anymore.

            • Missionary Kid

              I found the grammar a PITA. Of course, English spelling and grammar aren’t exactly easy, but we don’t have to deal with all of the different forms of nouns and adjectives.

              We get into trouble when we try to impose Latin grammar rules on English (Never end a sentence with a preposition).

              English also has a rich history of integrating other languages into it. That’s why our spelling is so inconsistent.

      • Exterrier

        I have always wondered, especially as I watched more than a few OT7s stall, then sicken badly, and often die of cancer, whether being in a constant state of cognitive dissonance, and then constantly sec checked and drained of funds, would not lead the body to subconsciously begin the process of choosing not to continue living.
        The Rodale publishing empire, which became Prevention Magazine among other publications and books, began with Rodale’s book, “Happy People don’t get cancer”, in which he went through hospitals and interviewed patients and checked files, and found an awful lot of consistent correlation between certain diseases, and certain patterns in peoples family, emotional and social life. I had bought one at a thrift store the day I had attended a fairly young friend’s funeral. He had died of cancer, and the book described the kind of cancer that his particularly family history would have been linked to to a “T”. It was eery.
        It was shortly after that that I began noticing all the cancer in Scientology, and how it seemed to really center on the upper ot levels, particularly Seven. Inwardly, I decided I wouild never do those levels, and shortly after, I quietly departed from the whole mess.

        • Bury_The_Nuts

          GOOD!!!

      • Veritas

        The combination of smoking and chronic stress is a bad one. One can imagine a scientologist completely forgetting how to relax. Ever.

  • Brett Allen Hensel

    Kind of amusing to see RInder jump on the guy about his shoes. Is that some TR-0 resurfacing?

    • richelieu jr

      Thought the same thing!

      Pot and Kettle having it on there!

      (Plus: Extra! Extra! Kettle accuses Pot of smoking…. Pot!)

  • Mr. Fabulous

    And nothing of value was lost.

    • Peter

      To his family and friends, I imagine a lot was lost.

      • Mr. Fabulous

        Maybe so, but I’m not interested in saying something I don’t believe, just to be publicly politically correct. It’s sad when (almost) any human being dies, but in this case it’s tempered with the fact that this man took money from a criminally convicted cult, to lie for them, to harass for them, and to make people’s lives a misery for them. He was a good journalist by all accounts, so he should have known exactly what he was doing, who he was affecting, and what kind of abuse he was helping to facilitate. Did he give a crap about the families lives he helped to make a misery? No.

        Like I said, nothing of value was lost.

      • USA MRIID

        Highly unlikely that a man like that had any friends, or family that would claim him.

  • mirele

    “No man is an island, entire of itself; every man is a piece of the continent, a part of the main. If a clod be washed away by the sea, Europe is the less, as well as if a promontory were, as well as if a manor of thy friend’s or of thine own were: any man’s death diminishes me, because I am involved in mankind, and therefore never send to know for whom the bell tolls; it tolls for thee.” — John Donne, Devotions Upon Emergent Occasions, Meditation XVII.

    • richelieu jr

      But if that same clod continues to act like a clod selling his cloddish services to the highest bidder, leaving his dirty cloddishness upon one and all, the world is a dirtier place..

      Far be it from me to throw the first clod, but please sign me up for clods 7 through 12.

    • Peter

      Thanks, Mirele. Your point is well taken…at least by me. Reading all these gleeful posts on the list that someone has died makes me feel a bit ill. After beginning reading this morning, my mate begged off.

  • Sherbet

    There’s nothing much to say without being cold-hearted and coarse. This solves the mystery of where Jim Lynch had been recently. That’s all.

    • richelieu jr

      True. Not that I’ll let that stop me.

      These sort of greyish, salesman like eminences are the same that pushed paperwork to get more Jews on trains, then tried to keep it off their CVs…
      People are so judgemental, you know..

      • Sherbet

        Anyone who gets in bed with cos for money — it’s bad enough to be a believer, but to serve cos only for money and not philosophy — does not have my sympathy. I’m just saying the man is dead, the mystery is solved, and Freedumb will hire another obnoxious, pushy shill to churn out biased tripe and call it “journalism.” What’s left to say about Jim Lynch?

        • richelieu jr

          All true.

      • Sherbet

        richelieu — CVs? I need a translation.

        • Observer

          Curriculum vitae – résumés

          • Sherbet

            Thank you, Observer (and richelieu).

        • richelieu jr

          Oops! Sorry This is what you show to say what jobs you have had when you try and get a new one?

    • Observer

      That’s a sad commentary on a life: “There’s nothing nice to be said about him, so I won’t say anything at all.”

      • Sherbet

        I was at a funeral once, where there were 4 people, and I thought, How sad that this person didn’t touch the lives of more than 4 people in a positive way. What an awful way to live.

  • dvdoff

    Well, he’s Clear now, isn’t he?

    • richelieu jr

      Probably more of a cruddy, greenish grey, I’d imagine….
      On the plus side, he’ll be down to racing weight soon..

      Wonder if they’ll even let him into hell with those shoes on…

  • richelieu jr

    This guy was the worst sort of whore: Cheap, unscrupulous, untalented, and not even motivated by belief…

    He’s sleep with the Devil if Miscavige would pull his Vienna Sausage out of his wrinkled ass long enough for him to accept the 5 dollars and the Subway Sandwich Discount card (only 3 more and he gets another sub!)…

    • Captain Howdy

      As Johnny Rotten so infamously quipped when told of Elvis’ death “Good riddance to bad rubbish”.

      Jim Lynch..scientology shill..anti-unionist…toodle-loo ya goon.

  • Still_On_Your_Side

    I read this and the thing that hit me was that Lynch had to have been very ill and very desperate to have sunk so low. Medical bills and medical insurance are prohibitively expensive to start with, add the fact that Lynch was in his late 50s and that he had cancer, and the price must have been sky-high. Who knows, he might even not have had insurance. Would he have worked for a worm like Miscavige if he had lived in a country that guarantees healthcare for its citizens? These are not moot points. He went from being a recognized, respected journalist to being a bully and a mouthpiece for an organization that is famous for its bullying and harassment. Either he became a member of the church, or he needed the money. It sounds like he wasn’t a member. The deep shame of it is to Miscavige and company Lynch was expendable. Their only visible acknowledgment of his life and death is an ad to replace him.

    • TheHoleDoesNotExist

      No one Makes you be a bully. If he was working for Miscavige to help with medical expenses, that would be something. OSA and scientologists lurking here should remember that Never in scientology have staff members been covered by health insurance in America, while Hubbard and Miscavige only had to yell across the room to one of their servants to have a doctor come running to their bedside.

      That is the kind of people and organization you are supporting. I know very well that any of you lurking out there have personally seen or know about the thousands of scientologists who have died too young or are cruelly suffering physically and mentally, down to their last dime, and terrified. You can end this inhumane abuse now by walking out today. Stop supporting an abusive, criminal organization. Miscavige didn’t save Lynch. He won’t save you. Only you can save you and your family. Run!

      • Dean Fox

        “No one makes you a bully”, I’m not so sure. Jim’s confrontational, antagonistic and aggressive style is not that uncommon amongst front line “investigative reporters” usually though the target is someone we can generally agree is a scum bag, like a cowboy builder who’s ripped off dozen’s of people of their life’s savings for shoddy and not fit for purpose work and then gone bankrupt. Usually we cheer on the investigative reporter because it feels like some kind of justice.

        All Jim had to do was agree with the Church of Scientology’s perspective that the target was a scum bag “squirrel” out to destroy their religion and he could justify his actions, heck he likely believed the church of scientology and was just too blinkered; maybe he did have good reasons not to like medical bills and so on. (If you Americans had a proper National Health Service this may never have happened).

    • richelieu jr

      You know I once read of a poor mother who wasn’t even a prostitute.

      You know, he seems to have claimed to belong to religion that believes in sin and immortal soul. Some folks reflect on that towards the end.

      • ThetaBara

        I would far rather be paid to be a prostitute than to be a bully. And I hate being touched by people I don’t know.
        OTOH I’d probably make a good pro domme. 😉

      • cicely neville

        “I happen to be Catholic”… not so much. You cannot, cannot Behave as Lynch did and consider yourself a Christian; Catholic or any other flavor. j
        The toxicity cooked his brain too, and he never even joined…

    • RMycroft

      If so, it’s a shame that he had to go out on such a low note. I hope his possible replacements consider how this will look on their résumés.

    • KJP in Portland

      One down, Dwarfen Uber Fuhrer next?

    • Marie Claire Wolf

      That is what this criminal cult does though, it preys on the weak and exploits to its own advantage To Co$, people are things that can be defrauded, dehumanized and thrown to the wolves once every last dime of their has been squeezed

    • USA MRIID

      So an otherwise supposedly sane, law-abiding man adopted a violent, screaming criminal line of work as a result of his overwhelming medical bills?

      Some how I doubt the insane asshole was the original Breaking Bad role model.

  • SciWatcher

    Well, he did “pull it in,” didn’t he.

  • Mary_McConnell

    I knew they were replacing Jim! My OT powerz predicted he was out and being replaced.
    http://www.forum.exscn.net/showthread.php?32319-Now-it-s-in-the-Mainstream-Media-Leah-Remini-dumps-Scientology-NY-Post&p=828914&viewfull=1#post828914

    RIP, Jim. If you are ever able to find it.

  • Davka

    So based on what I’ve read thus far, mine will not be a popular comment, but I’m going to say it anyway: to revel in the loss of a life, even if in life that person did things you did not like, collectively cheapens us all, and denigrates the memory of a man who had a wife, and maybe kids, and hopefully for his sake, people who loved him at the end.

    Now I know there will be those who will say, what about the victims of the COS? What about Lisa? What about Jenna? And on and on. And of course, someone will make me into an apologist for behavior I in fact do not condone. Or OSA. None of that is true. I just wanted to say that we are all imperfect beings who have imperfect lives, and all of us have transgressed. The public flogging of a man who seems to have lost his way does none of us any good.

    Ok, done now.

    • Andrew Robertson

      In an article in the St Petersberg Times by Thomas C Tobin dated December 15, 1999 regarding the death of Lisa McPherson, David Miscavige is quoted as saying

      “At the time I don’t think it was really thought to be that significant an issue. She died. People die.”

      http://www.sptimes.com/News/121599/TampaBay/Scientology_leader_na.shtml

      His attitude towards the death of others is not one I share.

      Andrew

      • stillgrace

        DM’s quote is exceptionally evil, in light of the fact that he was the one who orchestrated Lisa’s death as her C/S. Soul-less evil human.

    • richelieu jr

      A perfectly moral and legitimate point of view.

      • SciWatcher

        Though not one I, personally, share. There are some people who make the world a worse place. While it is sad that there are such people, I won’t mourn their deaths or say anything kind about them simply because they were “human.”

        • richelieu jr

          Well, you’ve only to look around to know that I agree.

    • Unit G-Xenu’s Other Fist

      No, you make a good point. No one deserves to die of cancer, and I feel low now for my earlier comment.

      • Gerard Plourde

        I see his death as a tragedy. He must have possessed a desire to work for truth at one time. I hope that at the end he was humble enough to recognize his mistakes and get closure and peace.

        • DodoTheLaser

          My thoughts exactly. Amen.

    • TheHoleDoesNotExist

      People are not cheering his death here and this is typical bs. They are cheering the end of at least one more source of criminal, abusive activity from the scientology mafia like organization and you know it.
      So please, don’t come here and try to make us the horrible meanies. There are no enablers here, so, you know.

      • Unit G-Xenu’s Other Fist

        My medication is screwing with me a little tonight THDNE, and I have to say, while I don’t like speaking ill of anyone dead, I’m more on the side of not wishing death by cancer to anyone because of my aunt. On a Scientology mouthpiece, well, not as forgiving.

      • Sherbet

        TheHole, I love ya, lady, but, yes, people did post gleeful cheers about Lynch’s death. As for your second sentence, you are right on with your assessment of scientololgy as a “mafia like organization” with “criminal, abusive activity.”

        • Captain Howdy

          The world is chock a block full of assholes that would be better off dead, and you know that, Sherb.

          • Sherbet

            Did I cry when Bin Laden was killed? No.

            • Captain Howdy

              I did…he was a world class super villain..those are few and far between.

            • Sherbet

              Hmmm…OK, Howdy. You always keep me on my toes, which is why you’re important here in the Bunker.

            • DodoTheLaser

              I don’t believe you did, Mr. Sarcasmo.

      • Davka

        THNDE, I have tremendous respect for your comments, and appreciate your point of view, I get it. I responded the way I felt, as did you, as we all do. And if on this particular point if we disagree, I’m ok with that – I don’t think we are all a bunch of meanies, and I’m proud to be a mostly lurking Bunkerite.

      • Peter

        “Nothing has been lost”? Please reread from the top and note just how many cheerleaders chimed in.

    • Captain Howdy

      So if you heard that Ayman al-Zawahiri or Bashar al-Assad got blown up real good, you’d be sad?

      https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=HE3Q5xPtS3A

      • Davka

        Oh Cap’n, first I don’t think that Jim Lynch is an apples to apples comparison to those guys. Second, I’ve been on buses in Jerusalem and had to close windows to make sure the stones didn’t come through, and learned at an early age to look out for “suspicious objects” in the street, so not a big fan of people trying to blow me up. Would I mourn, no. Nor would I hold a party and dance on someone’s grave. Just not my way. And that’s as derailed as I’m going to get :)

        • Captain Howdy

          How about Kim Kardashian? ; )

          • Bury_The_Nuts

            Captain Howdy for the win……………………

            Sorry Davka….
            But that is like a Celebutard Godwin…

            • Davka

              Ok, point taken :)

          • Missionary Kid

            *Laughter* I wouldn’t be joyful at her death, but I do wish she would just go away.

            That family is the modern equivalent of the Gabors: famous for being famous.

            • Captain Howdy

              Dude! Eva Gabor was awesome in Green Acres, which was one of the most underrated, surrealist shows of all time. It’s worthy of Lynch or Bunuel.

            • Missionary Kid

              That is the one bright spot in the two sisters and mother’s history. They did appear in some movies in the 40s or 50s, but I have the feeling they were friends with someone in the business.

              Their real (especially Zsa Zsa) occupation was marrying wealthy men.

    • Sidney18511

      Davis….I understand what you are saying. But if Lynch himself, didn’t care about the “memory” he was leaving his own family, I can’t find it in my heart to care either.

    • Peter

      Bless you, Davka, for your humanity. You’re entirely correct, IMHO.

    • Exterrier

      I like to see people ride high horses…..makes em look good. But in this case, I think that the people on this blog, Tony included, have been fair all in all in their assessment of this man’s life and prior able career, and the bad situation he was in that made him choose to do bad and destructive things towards the end of his life. I don’t really see more than a little schadenfreude going on here. The comment that was made that it is a shame that the health care situation in this country would make someone desperate enough to smear and intimidate people with material he got from reading a supposedly confidential religious confessional file on their private lives, showed a great deal of compassion.
      So, contrary to you, I wish to congratulate Tony and the bloggers on their restraint and compassion. The clips posted above is all the evidence you need to view to see that Lynch was, for money, engaged in the business of trying to torment innocent people and destroy lives, and ruin this inventor’s chances of getting a very beneficial product out to the public. That is reprehensible and pathetic, and it is not about “flogging” him to point out that this is precisely how evil Scientology is, to make people like Lynch, and even Rinder and Rathbun and some others, so fearful and desperate that they behave like monsters, liars and intimidaters.
      It is the precise reason that this Bunker Blog exists to point out and emphasize such things, so it is in no way inappropriate to comment on the matter in this very specialized space on the internet. Your outrage is misplaced, and your podium is not on as high a ground as you might believe.

      • Davka

        I always thought equestrian jumpers looked really elegant, but I also knew I’d never be able to get up that high. Too much of a scaredy cat am I, though pontificator I may be.

        Everyone is free to speak their mind, E, I just happen to think that cancer sucks.

        • Bury_The_Nuts

          Yes Davka, it does suck. And no matter what the man did, no one, at least in my opinion “deserves” cancer.

          He did however, deserve to be mocked for those hideous shoes (Go Rinder!)

          His legacy is unfortunate because of the way he spent his last years.
          I hope his family finds peace.

    • http://lliira.dreamwidth.org/ Lliira

      I don’t see anyone reveling in the loss of a life. I may have missed some comments (this blog moves too fast, damn it), but I see people refusing to pretend this guy was a good guy when he was alive. That is entirely different from being glad he’s dead.

      As for the “all of us have transgressed” part, that is an argument without merit. Most people do not pull the bullshit that Scientologists do, or anywhere near. It’s an entirely different level, and to simply lump it in with the idea that everyone’s a sinner wipes out all ability to have any moral system of any kind.

  • Vistaril

    . . . You guys, [Scientology] albeit a nontraditional religion, are a religion under the auspices of the U.S. Constitution . . .

    The US Constituion specifically exludes the ability for the state to define what is and what isn’t a religion. While the IRS abdicated its responsibility to protect the public purse, the only reason Scientology is considered a religion is because Scientology says it is. In effect, Scientology, along with its willing and unwitting schills, has debased the notion of religion entirely. Logically speaking, if Scientology is a religion then so too is the Mafia. Fortunately, most the US public sees through the ruse and, as per L Ron Hubbard scripture, because there is a significant lack of agreement there can be no reality on the concept of Scientology as a religion.

    • Observer

      Thank you! I get sick of hearing Lientology claim that the government declared it a religion. It did no such thing!

      • Unit G-Xenu’s Other Fist

        Nope. They did not. The tax man did, and that is not the government.

        EDIT: Did you get my memo about the Dead Space Cootie shoop Obs? 😀

        • Bury_The_Nuts

          They (IRS) are a federal agency under the Department of Treasury.

          • Unit G-Xenu’s Other Fist

            But a federal agency is not the government at large. They do need to explain why, however, they granted a cult tax exempt status.

            • Bury_The_Nuts

              It only takes one branch of the Federal Government to do the damage. The IRS granted them legitimacy at a Federal level. Letting them keep their ill gotten gains was the cherry on top.
              Until the DOJ steps in and calls bullshit on this criminal organization………..They are a “religion”.

              Now we all KNOW they are not. And this pisses me off to no end that the Government put themselves in the position they are now in….you know the one I am talking about…
              The one where they are fucking afraid of Scientology. GRRRRRRRRRRRRRRRRRRRRRR.

            • Unit G-Xenu’s Other Fist

              No I totally agree with you on that one. They have tax exempt status here as well, and Senator Nick Xenophon is the only person in power here that has ever publicly questioned why (but I would hope most of you guys know this?) and I’ll be voting for him again this year in our Federal Election.

              What would happen, I wonder, to all of that ill-gotten loot, if they were declared a criminal enterprise and shuttered tomorrow?

            • i-Betty

              Yes, we’re all huge fans of The Xenophon here :)

            • AnyOldName1

              Yep. The IRS set them up to be a religion and DoJ is allowing it to continue. There is nothing that says the FBI or the IRS can’t investigate a religion – they are just afraid.

            • Interested

              Again … WHY? What have the cult got against them…. Hey those out who know tell us please?

        • Observer

          I did, but I’m going to have to pass. Having played all three games in the series so far I know how relevant it is, but any shoop referring to it is going to be too esoteric for most people. Shooping is time-consuming, and while a good part of my reason for doing it is the lulz, the major part is to deliver a visual message to the lurking clam-aid drinkers. They can skip over the text posts without reading, but it’s much harder to unsee an image.

          btw, Howdy, if you can get your hands on a PS2 or Xbox 360, the Dead Space games are right up your alley.

          • Unit G-Xenu’s Other Fist

            Fair enough in that case :-)

          • ThetaBara

            That’s brilliant, Obs! Excellent strategy!

        • Peter

          Actually, the tax man, under the Constitution, had no say whatsoever in the matter, nor did they “declare” the czerch as a religion. They, too, had to follow along. And since when weren’t they the government? LOL

    • richelieu jr

      What an idea that the IRS should be in the business of validating religious belief!

      This just in: IRS declares LImo not to exist, but validates Transubstantiation and The Doctrine of Papal Infallibility… We’re still waiting on the next IRS DIrector to declare the next Pope, rule on access to Mecca and decide whether or not Safeway’s butchers adhere to Kosher standards…

      • SciWatcher

        Hahahaha!

      • Unit G-Xenu’s Other Fist

        You are fucking hilarious dude 😀

      • Exterrier

        I’ll watch for the blue smoke over the IRS building.

      • Peter

        You entirely miss the point. No area of the government may declare anything a religion or not a religion. Today, you could claim The Church of Tony Ortega as a religion, incorporate it as such, point to all the “members” here…and the gubmint would not have ANY say in the matter.

        That said, the fact that all the negotiations were and still are “secret” is another matter. Why do you think the czerch pays out so much money on condition that the payee keep his or her mouth shut?

        • richelieu jr

          You might want to reread my post before declaring I am missing the point there, Peter.

          • Captain Howdy

            Peter is an indie.

            • richelieu jr

              Really Cap’n?
              Pinch me, I’d never have guessed.

            • cicely neville

              Is that avatar a hook, Cap’n? Do we need to warn you about ticking crocodiles?

      • USA MRIID

        Bacon is the Body of Christ.

        Seriously.

    • Gerard Plourde

      If we accept that religion means a belief system and that a belief system can be dedicated to the pursuit of evil, I will accept that Scientology is a religion related to the religion of materialism, which worships power and greed.

      • Vistaril

        If we accept that religion is a “belief system” then, logically speaking, neo-liberalism and socialism, for example, are also religions.

        • Gerard Plourde

          They could be, if held as a core principle of a person’s life. Under my definition atheism qualifies as a religious belief, since it relies on acceptance of a premise that is empirically unprovable (the existence or non-existence of a deity) and results in a course of conduct based on that belief.

          • Captain Howdy

            For me, atheism is a lack of belief in the supernatural, which is something that is unprovable, so far.

            • Gerard Plourde

              Exactly. The existence of the supernatural is empirically unprovable. But it is equally true that a negative (in this case, the non-existence of the supernatural) is equally unprovable.

            • Couch_Incident

              I’ve always thought that the burden of proof was on those who assert the existence of something.

            • Bury_The_Nuts

              It is in my bubble!

            • Gerard Plourde

              It is but that coin does have two sides. Only agnostics are in the position of having nothing to prove.

            • Couch_Incident

              So, if I assert that Captain Howdy is god, do you have anything to prove if you disagree? I think it’s an arbitrary statement that imposes no obligations on you as a disbeliever.

              Of course, if you are intellectually honest, you should be willing to look at proof offered of Captain Howdy’s divine nature (and given that we don’t have an infinite amount of time, you might reasonably rely on those you trust to weigh in on him being god first), but until then, you are perfectly reasonable to be an atheist when it comes to Captain Howdy as god.

              On the other hand, I think we can all agree that BTN is a goddess!

            • Bury_The_Nuts

              ~~~blushes~~~

            • Gerard Plourde

              Unfair – You would tempt me into continuing exercising my logic circuits just when I have to go meet a potential client. I concede that BTN is a goddess.

              Additional proof of how interesting, intelligent and diverse the visitors to this site are.

            • cicely neville

              You had better concede!

            • Captain Howdy

              I’m not god..but I am Demonio Profeta to my friends.

            • Peter

              One may have or be of a divine nature without taking the next step of stating he is God.

            • Peter

              The burden of proof also applies to those who deny the existence of something. LOL

            • http://lliira.dreamwidth.org/ Lliira

              There is a pink unicorn flying outside my window. She is playing the bagpipes.

              Prove I’m wrong.

            • Robert Eckert

              Wrong.

            • Captain Howdy

              The burden of proof rests on he who asserts, not he who denies.

              The onus is on those who believe in the supernatural.

            • Peter

              That is simply your belief, Cap’n. If you deny the supernatural, using the others inability to prove it does not make your argument rational.

            • Captain Howdy

              Tell that to Randi.

            • Peter

              Why bother? He makes his money from what he does and I’ve already seen one example of his corruption. Good enough for me.

            • Missionary Kid

              So, what was that example? I’m interested.

            • Once_Born

              Me too

            • Bury_The_Nuts

              Seems to me that using the others inability to prove it is exactly what makes it rational.

            • Peter

              Nope. Either you can formulate the evidence yourself to disprove it (which in this particular case also cannot be done) or simply state your negative belief (opinion).

              If you love someone, for instance, I defy you to rationally prove it.

              I’ve personally seen and experienced so many things which do not lend themselves to the concept of Newtonian proof that I had to finally realize that not everything lends itself to that system. Try quantum physics, for instance, where light can be both a wave and a particle at the same time. Or an atom can be in two places at the same time. Totally boggles the mind, m’dear. But utterly fascinating stuff.

            • Bury_The_Nuts

              There are lots of things in our universe that do not lend themselves to the concept of “Newtonian proof”….Including “parts, or I should say gaps” in Quantum Theory at this particular point in time.
              And yes, it is fascinating stuff…(I have sort of heard of it).
              But I think bringing quantum physics into this is a diversion Peter.
              Let’s not mix science and religion as I find it highly insulting to parallel them for comparison.

              I cannot prove a negative. Nobody can.
              But if you say something is real, you darn well should be able to offer proof.
              Other wise it is just more ridiculous and dangerous woo woo.

            • Isaac Clarke

              I think heaven is made out of entangled photons. {}

            • Bury_The_Nuts

              Prove it! lol

            • Isaac Clarke

              Since the photons are entangled, they would disappear upon observation… no can do:)

            • Bury_The_Nuts

              Then you FLUNK!

            • Once_Born

              I think this is the serious point behind the Internet silliness that is the Church of the Flying Spaghetti Monster (seek for his blessing by googling his name).

              If you claim that you can aquire real knowledge from subjective experience which cannot, by its nature be empirically tested (e.g. the tech works, god listens to prayer &c.) you have to admit that claims for the existence of the FSM are equally valid.

              Bertrand Russell got their first, though – see Russell’s Teapot http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Russell%27s_teapot

            • L. Wrong Hubturd

              Fan of Asimov and Stanley?

            • Peter

              Fwiw, I’m not a believer in “religion” as it is currently practiced on the planet. I *am* however, quite interested in spirituality, often confused and conflicted with religion. If something is real to me, it’s generally because I have directly experienced it. I really don’t care if you or anyone else call it “woo woo”. What I have observed is not always what others have observed. I’m not judging their observations nor do I pay a lot of attention to what is *not* real for others. There are many statements made on the blog, often followed by “right on” or similar from quite a few others, with which I totally disagree. I generally just ignore the subject and pass on.

              As far as the “tech” is concerned, many here denigrate it and worse. My wins and gains from the tech with which they don’t agree are still my wins and gains. Being told repeatedly that none of the tech ever worked just makes me laugh. The organization could never have lasted at all had not so many people (not just a “few) not had significant results over the years.

              The czerch in its highly adulterated form today, and with which I pretty much totally disagree, is not the organization it was back in the 60s and 70s. Nor is the “tech”. And the vast number of individuals, well trained and caring, who made *that* tech work so very well, have either left on their own or have been summarily dismissed and denigrated by Miscavige in his insane lust for money, power and personal dominance over others. His utter destruction of the highly effective mission system doomed the czerch from that day forward.

              I observed those wins and gains myself. I am still in touch with many outside the czerch who agree with what I’ve stated here. And, if you bothered to read Rinder’s blog from time to time, as I do, there are some quite marvelous individual stories there of people getting similar wins and gains today, using that “old” tech which you despise. Even Geir, on this blog, testified to sensational wins. No one argued with or put him down for it. He would have ignored it, I think, had they done so. He knows what he KNOWS.

              You and many others have extremely strong negative opinions of much of what exists in the czerch, especially since the 80s. I would agree with you on virtually all of it. However, I also have seen a lot of opinions doing their best to throw the baby out with the bathwater, belittling *everything* having to do with the entire history of the organization. With that I do not agree. And since I was in for a long time and observed rather “magical” things coming from superb auditing long before a lot of the folks on this blog were even born, I look askance at a lot of such “opinions”.

              You do not have a lock on what is “real”. And as you are not in a position to define that for me, I do not accept your definition of “woo woo”, a meaningless derogatory term itself. I have personally observed incredible things occurring which seemed to defy accepted logic. What is “scientific” today becomes totally outmoded tomorrow, pretty much the history of science. The world of quanta is rapidly changing the game and trying to keep up with it is an exciting adventure in itself.

              Hubbard said, very often misstated on this blog as “what is true for you is true for you”, “What is true for you is what you yourself have observed.” I still find that a valuable datum. Maybe he got that from someone else. I don’t really care. I still find it valuable. And what is often so virulently stated on this blog is often quite wrong and illogical. Yet many instantly chime in in support of it. So be it.

              I value Tony greatly for his great integrity, his investigative skills and especially his stability where the subject material is concerned. HIs comments are always judicious and informative. He provides the blog, but rarely comments other than to correct something, answer a question or provide new information. He is the epitome of investigative journalism. In truth, I don’t know what he agrees or disagrees with regarding most of the comment on the blog. That, too, is priceless.

            • Bury_The_Nuts

              Good Lord Peter..You are awesome at subterfuge and bullshit.

              Honestly, I like you and will continue this discourse..but not tonight (wine, ya know)
              Tomorrow. I will be lucid…re-read this and we can continue.

              Now, with that said…Offer me proof?
              You are right..I have no lock on what is real…But refute it???
              yeah,,,..I am waiting Peter.

            • DodoTheLaser

              Thank you for your input here, Peter!

              Of course people get wins in Scientology, esp on lower levels (when they are not being regged to death, or being told not to take their meds). Otherwise, the con of scientology wouldn’t last as long as it did.

              I believe, we are at the point when the amount of disaffected “Clears” and “OT’s” (regardless of their wins) is sufficient enough for scientology to implode and join the ashes of its cremated founder.

              Sorry, if I sound too harsh, it’s a loaded subject.
              I hope you understand, it’s nothing personal.

              Please keep posting – your voice counts.

              Your friendly SP – Dodo, who once was a Class V Auditor with many, many of WDAH
              (WDAH = Well Done Auditing Hours stat).

            • grundoon

              I accept that many people have found something of value in Scientology. But anything of genuine value can only persist in Scientology as bait or as camouflage, or as short-lived out-KSW destined to be hammered out of existence byScientologists in positions of authority.

            • Peter

              As I’ve stated before, scn does not provide wins or gains. Only the individual can do that. And everything of which I speak in a positive manner was available over 30 years ago. Virtually nothing of that is left in the “official” czerch. The indies, however, ARE providing the same opportunities, though many here simply discount everything. I would agree fully that the current czerch is about as corrupt as one could possibly imagine. I would not suggest to anything otherwise.

            • Captain Howdy

              Peter, all I can say is god speed in your mental disillusionment…Distemper Fi!..Kool-Aid-Rah!

            • Robert Eckert

              Yes it does. When someone tells you there are invisible giraffes on the moon, it is completely rational to disbelieve that, if there is no proof and not even anything that might slightly tend to be evidence in favor.

            • Peter

              You use the word “disbelieve”. Of course you can disbelieve, just as the Cap’s disbelieves. You may claim rationality for anything you think. But there is no proof in the Newtonian sense. (I take words very seriously.)

            • Robert Eckert

              There is no “Newtonian” sense of the word “proof” (I take such things seriously as well).

            • Peter

              As you wish.

            • Veritas

              But if there were any proof, it would not be religious.

            • richelieu jr

              Extreme claims demand extreme proof.

            • Peter

              The reverse is also true.

            • Captain Howdy

              Nein. “semper necessitas probandi incumbit ei qui agit’

          • Peter

            Bravo! I’ve said the same thing many times over the years. One can neither prove the existence or non existence of a “creator”.

            • Mark

              Sorry; couldn’t resist interjecting this:

          • stanrogers

            That better describes agnosticism or apatheism; there are also atheists (antitheists) who hold the position that the existence of a god, gods or any higher collective/composite entity is demonstrably false, and not merely unknowable or unnecessary. Atheism is a bit of an umbrella term; some are indeed “religious” in their beliefs.

            • Veritas

              Yes, but it is not demonstrably false. It is a belief without evidence.

          • Veritas

            Good point.

        • Peter

          However, they have never declared themselves as such.

        • richelieu jr

          I am beginning to see how some people gulped down the flavouraid here…

      • http://lliira.dreamwidth.org/ Lliira

        I would say that a religion has to be a belief system whose underpinnings are in the supernatural.

        I do think Scientology is a religion, absolutely. It says “this is how you must live and this is what happens when you die.” “Religion” is not a positive descriptor — it’s a neutral one. Scientology is a terrible religion. I don’t think any religions should have tax exempt status.

      • USA MRIID

        Scientology is not a belief system any more than victims who fall for other bunko crimes are. Are Roswell flying saucer believers a religion? No. They’re not.

        • cicely neville

          Could we all please get past that volkswaggon-sized red herring about what’s a religion?

          It is only a religion because lrh sold it as such. People follow it ‘religiously’, but you can follow anything in that way – from Marxism to raw foodism. Ayn Rand, anyone? Lyndon LaRouche?

          Let me throw in another aspect here; a genuine religion is not based on ‘belief in the supernatural’ but an experience of what Jung called ‘the numinous’. Human beings have these experiences all the time. They may or may not be supernatural; no one can know. We can’t measure them any more than we can measure love.

          There is not a damn thing in lroon’s con that is numinous, or allows for it – and experiencing anything in that ballpark ( a transcendent sense of love or beauty which changes one’s world view, for instance) would get you sec-checked, RPF’d , SP’d AND turned into a newt ; burned at the stake if they could get away with it.

          I am going to stick my neck out here and say that whatever wins or gains a practitioner may have had, they are not numinous experiences. Lrh did not know what those were, or he would have been a very different person.

          • Dmitri

            The numinous experience doesn’t need religion. But the religious experience often includes the numinous. These experiences are, of course, most likely not supernatural. However, the extensive doctrinal instructions written over the last few millenia about managing these experiences no doubt, by default, labels them as such.

    • KJP in Portland

      A M E N

      • KJP in Portland

        The government needs to SACK their tax-exempt status.

    • cicely neville

      Thank you!, Vistaril!

    • Once_Born

      I *really* don’t understand this.

      Does it mean that, if I incorporated the Church of the Flying Spaghetti monster in the US and then opened churches which took a fixed donation for a sacramental sample of his noodly appendages (i.e. opened a chain of spaghetti shops) I would not be subject to public health inspections… or tax..?

      If not, why not?

      • ThetaBara

        If you could convince the IRS that it was a religion you would not be subject to tax; however you cannot escape the health department. Or the fire marshall – there are stories of the fire marshall being called over locked doors during regging at events!

    • Interested

      You say most people but you would be surprised just how many people I have spoken to who still say
      ” but scientology cures sickness. the church helps so many people.” and no, they are not members of the cult. And they are not fools. I have told them to read TOny’ blog.

  • Gerard Plourde

    I understand that investigative journalism sometimes requires that a reporter get pushy with a potential source. My concern with Mr. Lynch’s probing lies more with whether he ever asked himself if the questions he asked had any basis in fact or were merely to trigger a reaction that could then be used to smear. There is a difference – true reporters like Tony are committed to a search for truth. I’m saddened that Mr. Lynch’s path seems to have diverged from that quest.

    • richelieu jr

      I happen to have a journalism degree that i have never used (doubtless to betterment of the entire profession!), and even I recoil at the thought of how perfectly this sort of thing plays into the nasty reputation of journalists today… Shoveling untruth and harassing people for unseen forces for money… I just can’t bring myself to accept it was ever thus.

      • Gerard Plourde

        My wife also has a journalism degree. The profession, like all professions, contains heros and villains. My own, law, is a prime example of this truth.

  • SFFrog

    I guess Ron needed someone to smear some alien psychs over on Target 2.

  • Bed Man Okc

    If only there were some kind of therapy type you could preform on your body and mind to help rid yourself of negative particles.

    • Unit G-Xenu’s Other Fist

      Yeah. Not touching that with a 10 foot pole.

      • richelieu jr

        How about with some 6 inch cans?

        • Unit G-Xenu’s Other Fist

          LOL! 😀

        • Unit G-Xenu’s Other Fist

          I don’t want cancer, thanks 😉 in my mind there is now a link between auditing and cancer.

          EDIT: and that is as close as I ever want to get to the cans, TYVM 😛

    • grundoon
  • sugarplumfairy

    A one-line obit in the Palm Beach Post.. Tony, it sounds like you, the enemy, honored and respected him more than those magnificent thetans he spent the last years of his life serving.. how truly sad..

    • Sidney18511

      {Maybe the COS had a nice, respectful memorial service for their bulldog, or donkey as Karen would say}
      Whatdayathink?

    • Peter

      Spot on. Tony’s ethical nature shines through once more.

    • Gerard Plourde

      The cult has no respect for anyone beyond their usefulness as tools to further its goal of raking in money and perpetuating DM’s lifestyle.

  • KNMF

    That poor guy Lynch was the poster-boy for used and abused. I remember a video of Andreas from OCB talking with Lynch, years ago. Lynch didn’t seem completely hopeless at that point. But all self respect drained away. What a waste. Scientology had him behaving like a moron to the very end. I hope the Murmans and Allenders. et al are paying attention.

    • Sherbet

      I think Murman is too far gone, really. He seems to have mental issues that go way beyond slavery to the cos.

      • RMycroft

        Without bothering to search, I’m sure that they have him on the “Illegal PC” carrot and stick.

        • Sherbet

          Did someone once say he used to be a boxer, and his brain has been battered as a result?

          • Captain Howdy

            yea, supposedly he was a boxer before CofS.

            • Sherbet

              He seems to be, by appearance and affect, brain damaged. I don’t know if the cult made him what he is today, but they couldn’t have helped his condition.

            • RMycroft

              So he had his brains battered, and then fried by Scientology.

    • Unit G-Xenu’s Other Fist

      Fucking OSA trolls you mean?

    • KNMF

      Correction; The video I mentioned did not feature AH and Lynch, but some other poor scientology dummy named Joel Phillips who will likely also die stupid. Phillips runs the freedomwatch hate site. It is sad when anybody dies after decades of wasted, misplaced energy and wrongheadedness. correction made.

      carry on

  • Couch_Incident

    Ignominious end to a career.

  • Bradley Greenwood

    Often times, a death is welcomed; this is one such case.

    • Unit G-Xenu’s Other Fist

      Well said Bradley 😉 and makes me feel like less of a dick. So thank you for that 😀

      In fact, having though thought more about it, and having had a family member die from it, there are certain people that don’t deserve it at all. Others, it would be a fitting end. My aunt was 35 when she died. He was 59. She didn’t deserve it. I’m actually going to say this. He did.

      Only the good die young, no?

      • Missionary Kid

        I must be evil at 68 and still alive, and my dad REALLY evil when he died at 90. 😉

        My mother lasted to 86 and her mother to 95. I picked the right parents to live a long time.

  • John P.

    Let’s look at Jim Lynch’s career again for a second:

    In the 1990s, he was a managing editor at the New York Post, an executive editor at the New York Daily News, and then had gone to work for American Media, which published supermarket tabloids like the Globe and Star. In 2006, he took a job as editor and publisher of a suburban daily in Illinois, the Naperville Sun, a job that lasted two years.

    That is not a bad resume for a newspaper guy. While I find the Post objectionable, and could care less about celebrity gossip a la American Media (whose flagship title is the National Enquirer, by the way), they are big titles for a reason: they are good at what they do. I had a friend who worked at the Star as a managing editor under legendary celebrity rag editor Bonnie Fuller, and they worked hard getting it right (though yes, they occasionally did get sued). Even the Naperville Sun is a reasonably solid outfit, since it’s owned by the Chicago Sun-Times. And Lynch didn’t have menial jobs there — managing editor, executive editor, editor & publisher, in order, are all signs of a reasonably healthy career with steady promotions.

    It is difficult to understand how Jim Lynch fell so low so fast with a solid looking resume, even in the tornado of death that is currently engulfing print media. Lots of people leaving the business have ended up on their feet doing something else that they can be proud of, including my friend who worked at the Star, among others. I wouldn’t want to speculate on what may have happened in his life, but that incredible bottom just keeps nagging at me.

    Also, in watching the Rinder confrontation, you’d never know that the guy wasn’t a longtime Scientologist from the give and take there. Apparently, long-time proximity to the cult may turn people into complete assholes, giving them the worst of the personality aspects, even if they don’t believe in exorcism of dead space cooties.

    • Bury_The_Nuts

      Now John, you would not suggest that the evil cult may have had some blackmail material on Jim that they threatened and used to keep him employed as a paid slave, now would you?

      • John P.

        That was not what I was thinking. If blackmail were involved, I highly would doubt that would have been used to recruit him. I suspect he stayed mostly because he got paid pretty well for the amount of work he did — he apparently did only a couple of projects for the cult annually. I think he was one of Miscavige’s inner circle, like Danny Sherman, Jeff Pomerantz and a couple of the “wog experts” who the cult paid handsomely, like PI’s Marrick & Arnold.

        I was wondering whether there might have been some tragic circumstance in his private life that caused him to more-or-less blow a fuse and settle for a gig that is substantially poorer in reputation than working at a PR firm, doing freelance writing, or any of the more typical paths that ex-newspaper people end up following. I am emphatically not speculating that any of the following applied in Lynch’s case, but the kind of thing that always crosses my mind when people’s careers blow up massively include drinking/drug problems, marriage breakdowns, family member health problems, mental health issues such as depression, a desperate attempt to recover from financial irresponsibility such as a gambling problem, etc.

        • Gerard Plourde

          Elsewhere in this thread the question of his cancer and the resultant medical costs were mentioned. If his struggle with the disease was protracted, it could explain a lot about his choice – the need for a well-paying job with not many hours (although the travel schedule on short notice would have been a drawback).

    • http://lliira.dreamwidth.org/ Lliira

      I would guess they offered him a LOT of money. And if he knew he was at the end of his life, and wanted to leave plenty for his family, that may have been too big a temptation to pass up. Then, when he started taking their money, he may have started believing what they said, since he had such a big stake in doing so. It’s a common enough pattern.

    • grundoon

      “Also, in watching the Rinder confrontation, you’d never know that the guy wasn’t a longtime Scientologist from the give and take there.”

      The Chruch probably put him through some lower level courses and lots of TRs to prep him to go up against Rinder and Rathbun and Karen#1. He wouldn’t have to believe in thetans or call himself a Scientologist to do the drills.

  • Sidney18511

    Maybe lynch wasn’t a sclion, but he sure did a PERFECT imitation of one.

  • Studious Judious

    Regardless of what Jim Lynch did (shill for Scientology) or did not do (investigate both sides of the story) I would like to express my condolences to his family. May he RIP.

  • Gordon Freeman

    He must now stand in judgement before God for the path he followed and the people he served and the way he treated people.

    • dagobarbz

      Or get his soul weighed by Osiris. Or party in Valhalla. Or dally with 42 virgins. Or wind up at the Martian Implant Station for reassignment to Teegeeack. It’s all the same thing.

      • USA MRIID

        The irony is that Jim was not a Scientology customer, the asshole did not think he was infested with invisible murdered space alien fragments that need to be scraped off. He “fled teegeeack,” as they saying goes, without being covered in Body Thetans.

    • http://lliira.dreamwidth.org/ Lliira

      Meh. What happens to people after death, whether it’s nothing or the Elysian Fields or whatever, it doesn’t mean a damn thing to life on earth. And Jesus himself said that the sheep would do good on this planet by helping people while never thinking a bit about him, and that those are the people who would do his work.

    • USA MRIID

      Um… No. Have any evidence for this “god” thing of yours? Right. You don’t. Sadly these criminals get to die without being punished here on Earth, pretending that these scumbag assholes will some how get punished “after they’re dead” is why these assholes are allowed to escape punishment.

  • KJP in Portland

    So much for Blowingtology medicine, eh buddy? What is the average life expectancy for its adherents, about 50? Hurry up! Catch the galactic train to Xenu, you suckers!

  • Ted Slowik

    I was managing editor of The Naperville Sun in 2007-2008 when Jim was publisher. We hadn’t stayed in touch, and I was unaware of his recent work, so I have nothing to say about Scientology. I knew Jim as a good boss, an old-school newspaper man, who was fair and would listen to people. I think he sincerely wanted to understand varying points of view on issues. During page-one meetings, I admired his ability to stop a circular discussion about a complex topic and say, “What’s the headline?” He was good at getting to the point and cutting through all the extraneous stuff. R.I.P. Jim, prayers to your family.

    • Bury_The_Nuts

      Nice to have someone who knew him prior to drop by and offer that.
      Thanks.

    • John P.

      Thanks for contributing your (well-informed) perspective, Ted. That confirms what the thumbnail resume Tony wrote suggests: here was a guy with reasonably successful career, who completely went off the rails with a stunningly bad career choice when the current newspaper industry shit-storm hit. One can only wonder what the thought process was that caused Jim to make this choice, when surely other, less sleazy, choices were most probably available for him.

      • Sherbet

        Nicely put, John.

      • Marie Claire Wolf

        Maybe the money offered matched his needs, when they need to Co$ pays handsomely. It still was a particularly bad place to end career and life in.

      • ThetaBara

        My industry went off the rails. it was scary. People were scrambling. So I have a little sympathy.

        Who knows what they told him at first. Later, he was probably just stuck there. Who’s going to hire you off Freedom Mag?

        • John P.

          My industry has been coming off the rails for the last five years, almost as bad as newspapers, and probably as bad as what you’ve been living through. I frequently get calls and e-mails from former colleagues, (in some cases, people senior to me) who are inquiring about a job, any job, just to try to get back in the game. While I’ve been miserable with all the extra (often nonsensical) projects dumped in my lap by the managing general partners, I serve with a smile where I would have pushed back when times were good.

          Of course, the fact that the managing partners pay themselves a continually higher slice of revenue every year as a bonus and it comes at the expense of the bonus pool for mid- to higher-level guys like me, doesn’t make having a job in these tough times very pleasant. I have been stuck with the same friggin’ used Gulfstream 500 for four whole years and don’t know when I’m going to be able to upgrade. Times are tough all over.

          So I do indeed have sympathy for Lynch’s originally getting caught in the maelstrom of a dying business. But it’s still odd that a guy with a solid resume made a spectacularly awful career choice that he would never be able to recover from in future employment had he lived. The choice he made is baffling based on the known facts, and it probably was a kind of hell he lived in before he died, thinking many times a day “after all I have done, making a living has come to this.”

          • ThetaBara

            I agree. Well-put, as ever.

            The compassion I have for him comes from that sort of place.

            FWIW: your posts sometimes really remind me of Bryce Lynch (no relation, heh) of Max Headroom. Who Bryce might have grown into. 😉

            • http://lliira.dreamwidth.org/ Lliira

              There’s nothing wrong with being a pornographer, though. See: Tristan Taornimo.

            • ThetaBara

              Of course there isn’t! See also: Annie Sprinkle, Carol Queen et al before her. I never said there was anything wrong with it.
              What I was saying was that once you go into that field, you’re branded with it forever, and it does create challenges to getting work in more mainstream areas. Tristan became a minor celeb, and has traded on that, but she is still known as the buttsecks girl.

            • http://lliira.dreamwidth.org/ Lliira

              Hollywood locks pornographers out for the wrong reasons, though. (Though there are still some pornographers who should be locked off the planet, but I’d put even more Hollywood people on that ship.) Locking Scientologists out is more like… I dunno, locking Holocaust deniers out of the academy in history.

          • OTVIIIisGrrr8!

            JP, we in RTC share your pain. COB’s Gulfstream G280 is five years old and is getting long in the tooth. COB was so embarrassed at Cannes what with other world leaders and celebs having brand new jets. Thankfully, the big jewel heist went off perfectly and so a little bird tells us that COB will very soon have a shiny new G650 in the hangar.

            COB was climbing out of Nova Scotia after gassing up on his way back home from Cannes when his plane suffered a bird strike. It was a Canadian goose vectored in by the Psychs. The plane had to make an emergency landing. COB had to endure the humiliation of spending the night in a rundown wog hotel used by wog aircrews until a replacement private jet was flown out the next morning.

            As for people dying, well, when Lisa McPherson died COB said, “I didn’t think it was unusual, people die all the time.”

            The only speed bump here is that Jim Lynch could have gotten our Freedom hit piece on Leah Remini out faster. Now we have to hire and groove in a new wog writer. Danny Sherman might even need to pinch hit on the Leah hit piece.

            Jim Lynch died. People die all the time. It doesn’t mean anything to we in the Church of Scientology. So long as we survive that is all that matters. http://otviiiisgrrr8.com/2013/07/27/the-church-of-scientology-and-our-policy-on-lying/

            • John P.

              Nice job on the jewel heist. They’re now saying it’s $163 million instead of the original estimate of $50 million, though one suspects that a lot of the diamond dealers looted their own stands in the wake of the heist to double-dip on the insurance coverage, so I am suspicious that your guys got away with anything like $163 million.

              Did you net enough to offset the 47.5% haircut you took on the IAS funds you had on deposit in Cyprus, in the wake of the EU decision announced today?

            • Bury_The_Nuts

              “so I am suspicious that your guys got away with anything like $163 million.”

              Scientology Stats John!?

            • OTVIIIisGrrr8!

              We’re still counting the haul. COB has to calculate in the 25% fee demanded by OT Grant Cardone to move all of this ice. We in RTC are putting the hooks to Grant to come down to a more reasonable 2.5% but Grant is pushing back and acting like this is a darned used car deal. The nerve of that guy! The Church made him what he is and now he does this to COB!

              The Cyprus haircut was huge and that is why we in the Church had to pull of this “Caper in Cannes” as we are calling it. We put our best man Admiral Cruise on the job and he delivered as always:

              http://i1284.photobucket.com/albums/a563/OTVIIIisGrrr8/Mission-ImpossibleH-V-240403-13_zps6eebd5f0.jpg

            • Bury_The_Nuts

              That must be why the “biggest, baddest OT VIII” doesn’t want his peeps to mention anything about Scientology on his facebook page.
              What a crybaby cracker!

              Edit: Cardone, I mean (for those who missed his whining)

            • John P.

              Cardone must be pretty lame as a fence to offer to take only 25% of the gross. Most fences take at least 50% of the realized retail price for stolen goods when dealing with professional thieves on high-priced goods like uncut diamonds, and up to 90% when dealing with meth addicts trying to move stolen car stereos.

              You’re already getting a cut-rate deal with Cardone; perhaps you ought to figure out why… might he be trying to suck you in because he cut a deal with the FBI to rat you out? You might think about hauling him in for a couple months of “grab yer ankles” sec checks at Trementina Base just to make sure.

            • OTVIIIisGrrr8!

              It’s not that Grant is a lame fence. What Grant is telling us is that 25% reflects the “COB Discount”.

              On the other hand, COB’s “Ideal Price” for anything is free, or better yet have Church parishioners pay for something 200X over with COB pocketing the difference.

              Whereupon it becomes evident that COB is being exceedingly generous by offering Grant 2.5% — and this without even hanging threat of an SP Declare over Grant’s head.

            • OTVIIIisGrrr8!

              BTW, the Church had the right to do this job. It is no different than Operation Snow White wherein we took government files containing incorrect data on the Church and replaced them files containing correct data.

            • DodoTheLaser

              Of course. That’s why FBI kindly offered their help to sort it all out at the time.
              Their version of Data Evaluating was slightly different from the other one though.
              Hence, Mary Sue went to prison and L Ron went to hiding. What a flap that was!

            • DodoTheLaser

              Reposting this for the truth:

              The excerpt bellow is from the funniest and most terrifying book I’ve ever read.
              Pretty educational too. And scary. But still very funny. Strongly recommend it:

              You Might Be a Zombie and Other Bad News: Shocking but Utterly True Facts
              http://www.amazon.com/You-Might-Zombie-Other-News/dp/0452296390/ref=sr_1_1?ie=UTF8&s=books&qid=1290471063&sr=8-1

              (Fair use, cracked dot com guys. Thanks muchly.)

              From the chapter titled:

              FIVE CONSPIRACIES THAT NEARLY BROUGHT DOWN THE U.S. GOVERNMENT

              OPERATION SNOW WHITE

              “Sometimes during the 1970’s, the Church of Scientology decided its
              religion wasn’t getting the respect it deserved. Instead of converting
              to a slightly less silly set of beliefs, it did what any reasonable
              alien-god-fearing American would: declared a covert war on the U.S.
              government.

              The goal was basically to destroy every single sensitive document
              that made the religion look bad, in hopes that it would help in their
              prolonged war to become an officially recognized (as in tax-exempt
              religion). The incredible scope of the plot came to light when two men
              were arrested trying to enter the U.S. Courthouse in Washington with
              fake IRS credentials. One of the men was sent to jail where he refused
              to talk, while the other, Michael J. Meisner, gave a fake name and
              disappeared.

              According to Time, a year later Meisner “turned himself in,
              identified himself…and said he had just escaped from two month of
              “house arrest” by cult members.” He went on to describe how the church
              had planted employees in the IRS and Justice Department “for the express
              purpose of stealing documents concerning investigations of
              Scientology.” He also said they’d broken into the IRS and planted a bug
              in a conference room, and stolen mind-boggling amounts of sensitive
              information. After humoring what they must have assumed was just a
              crazier-than-average Scientologist, the FBI obtained search warrants,
              just in case, and conducted a raid on Scientology offices that confirmed
              every word of Meisner’s account.

              Scientology’s crack commandos had wiretapped and burglarized
              various agencies and stolen hundreds of documents, mainly from the IRS.
              In the end, 136 organizations, agencies, and foreign embassies were
              infiltrated. According to the Phoenix New Times, Operation Snow White
              was the largest infiltration of the U.S. government in history. Ever. Of
              the many thousand hostile governments and criminal organizations that
              have wanted to get their hands on sensitive U.S. intelligence, the
              people who actually managed to pull it off also believe that Battlefield
              Earth is a documentary.

              It’s impossible to say if the church was able to use information
              pilfered from the IRS toward its intended goal. But it’s certainly
              strange that it didn’t seem to hurt: In 1993 the IRS, the very
              organization it had freaking wiretapped less than fifteen years before,
              gave the Church of Scientology exactly what it was after, granting it
              recognition as an official religion. Toppling the U.S. government may
              not have been the stated goal, but of all the conspiracies on this list,
              Scientologists probably walked away from the ordeal with the most
              reason to believe that, should it ever become necessary, Washington,
              D.C., was as easy to take down as Grenada.”

            • Interested

              What actually happened when ” little snappy slappy” and I think either the warrior or Rinder walked into the IRS director’s office. It would be interesting to know what threats were used. What dirt he was told was going public for them to walk out ” having won the war” a good question to ask both Marty and Mike don’t you think?

            • OTVIIIisGrrr8!

              Re: the FBI Data Evaluators, yes, those fellows were brutal and had never done TR’s in their lives. The way they just barged in swinging axes!

              What wogs!

            • DodoTheLaser

              I know. So rude. And right in the middle of Washington D.C.!
              Almost as Russians on Thursdays at 2 pm.

              [IMG]http://i39.tinypic.com/2qx7y86.jpg[/IMG]

              Moscow Raid.

            • Interested

              Ho ho. By the way I looooove diamonds. If you can appropriate one or two i might be your friend for a billion years. Only really big ones please.

            • OTVIIIisGrrr8!

              ; -)

              Look for a small package in your left shoe.

            • Interested

              Ohhhh I looked so hard (said with a childish whine) but there was nothing…. I’ll keep looking I promis.

            • Gus_Cox

              “It was a Canadian goose vectored in by the Psychs.”

              Jeezus fucking Christ, you owe me a new keyboard, I spewed a whole mouthful of beer all over mine, laughing when I read that!

          • Eivol Ekdal

            If it is the advertising business then I know what you are going through. My bro worked in TV and he has been renovating houses for the last 4 years!

        • richelieu jr

          I also have suffered from hard times in my industry, even taking a part time teaching position at a film school to even the ups and downs of the film industry. There is not as much ‘free money’ around as there was even 5 years ago…

          That said I hope I would have serious considered jobs in the food service, homemaking or even sex service industry before becoming a thug and spreader of poison, turning every thing my profession stood for in horrible derision with every professional act I took.

          If he was writing some exposé of Scientology’s horrible acts of harasssment, blackmail, Black PR, and slanderous fake journalism, I will gladly take it all back and sing his praises.

          Otherwise I put it in the

          ‘I built a bridge, but do they call me Lynch the Bridge Builder?

          No they do not!

          I published the Naperville Sun through troubled times,

          but do they call me Lynch the Great Publisher?

          No they do not!
          But you f””k one sheep!”
          file.

          • i-Betty

            Richelieu jr, I love you :)

        • Interested

          Exactly. But is he to be pitied? Surely he did not have to actually bug people like he did. If he was not a scientologist who had been brain washed then why not walk away if you realise what you are doing is not journalism but harassment and you are losing your integrity. Unless they had something on him!

          • ThetaBara

            Which they very well might have. What he did was reprehensible, no doubt about it. I’m just saying that some things are a lot easier to get into than to get out of. Which seems to be the case with everything connected to scientoology!

            ETA: scientoology: the science of becoming a complete tool!

      • Zana

        Poor guy didn’t even have the right shoes to wear with his suit. He must have been desperate to make money. As you said, “Wrong career choice.” There was a time I was that panicked to make money…even then, I wouldn’t have been a shill for Scientology.

    • Marie Claire Wolf

      Good of you to give him some credit.

    • Peter

      An excellent epitaph, Ted. Thanks for posting this.

    • ThetaBara

      Thank you for coming here and sharing your perspective.

    • richelieu jr

      Very interesting and à propos, Ted. Thanks.

      Sad to wonder what forces can make a man accept such acts…

    • Dean Fox

      The church of scientology has a knack of bringing out the worst in people.

      • DodoTheLaser

        ^^^So true.

    • Veritas

      Thanks for the post, Ted.

    • USA MRIID

      Well apparently money turned him in to a screaming asshole working for organized crime.

  • Proud to be an SP

    It is sad for anyone to die of cancer, and sad that this journalist stooped so low in his last years. I truly hope he had health insurance and was not depending on touch assists. But it also shows how evil the cult is, that it turned this man into such a hostile shill and a loser. I think he must have been involved, tried out the courses etc. Just being around the mind control, the violence, the “you pulled it in” mentality, the constant sec-checking, seems to have transformed him into an evil OSA Marty Rathbun enforcer type.

  • Sherbet

    Tony, got another post for us? We’re stalled on this one. :-)

    • Bury_The_Nuts

      Jim Lynch is leaving the bunker with cognitive dissonance!
      Somebody bake some fucking cookies!

      • Sherbet

        I’ll take cookies for any occasion.

  • LaLa104

    Kinda blown away that my 14 year old Elmo Kitty died the same day as this HEDEBIL …. I have no compassion for someone that caused strive for people because he was a “SHILL” for a cult.

    On an unrelated note; CDAN (Crazy Days & Nights) has a post about Leah Remini and C0$. Interesting that Enty comments that Leah is writing a book and he mentioned that TO was writing his book.

    http://www.crazydaysandnights.net/2013/07/leah-remini-and-scientology.html

    • LaLa104

      Bwaaaahahahaha.. On the link I posted above there is an ad from Scientology. “The Truth About Scientology”.. scientology.org… Found it amusing..

    • Captain Howdy

      Sympathies for your kitty : (

      • LaLa104

        Thank You CH…. Heartbroken but I was blessed with him for 14 years wonderful years.

    • Anandamide

      Glad to see I am not the only one who likes a dose of gossip with their righteous indignation, though I do miss the old Enty. New Enty is so mean-spirited. It was actually his posts on scientology that got me reading CDAN!

      • LaLa104

        The new Enty is a frustrated old queen for sure! No offense meant to queen’s…

        • April Walsh

          I think the new Enty is a woman. The tone of the photo posts is just so female. Not a good writer, either way. I much prefer Michael K of D-listed. He does snide queen right!

          • LaLa104

            After I get my daily dose of TO, I always head over to Michael K.. and yes, he does snide queen so well.. I have snorted out loud by his writing many a time.

          • http://lliira.dreamwidth.org/ Lliira

            Men can be every bit as snide and write at least as poorly as women. See: LRH.

            Michael K is absolutely brilliant, one of the best writers on the web, one of the best humor writers I’ve ever read, period. I don’t know if it’s all that fair to compare anyone else’s writing to his.

            • April Walsh

              Well, Old Enty and New Enty are both rather incomprehensible writers even when not compared to Michael K. I have to read a blind 3-100 times before understanding what it says.

              I’m not slamming my own sex. It’s just that the commentary on the “random photos” posts, particularly the fixation on what the women they’re wearing, seem closer to what a woman would say than a man, gay or not. Just my opinion.

            • http://lliira.dreamwidth.org/ Lliira

              Honestly, I never liked CDN much. But I see men criticize what women are wearing all the bloody time too. Plus, look at how many fashion designers are men. I don’t think it’s a tell as to gender.

            • V4Vacation

              What do you guys mean re an “old” and “new” Enty? I’ve read the blog from time to time… are you suggesting an actual writer change or just a tone change? And starting when? I haven’t noticed any change, but then again I’m not a regular reader… 😉

          • LaLa104

            Speaking of D-listed.. Here’s Michael K’s post on the Leah announcement.. Gotta love a snide queen.. Gawd, I love his writing. Worth the shits and giggles….

            http://dlisted.com/2013/07/29/leah-remini-isnt-going-to-stop-talking-about-scientology/

            • April Walsh

              Just reading that and grinning madly. “Sharpie hair.” Oh, MK!

            • LaLa104

              Oh the Lulz……

              I bet Tommy Girl farted out a black cloud of rage when he found out that Leah used the word “sacrosanct”……

  • John P.

    Totally off topic but fun to contemplate:

    Cyprus announced today in a final deal with the various EU lender nations, a tax of 47.5% of deposits over 100,000 Euros in bank accounts held there. While this will mostly affect Russians who were stashing massive amounts of cash there, it will affect many other nationalities as well.

    It is fun to wonder if any cult funds might have been affected. While it’s not likely, since there are other more traditional offshore destinations for funds from the US, it is kind of amusing to think the cult might have lost a bundle and will now start a revised version of the “Bulgravia” campaign to take over Cyprus and create an “Ideal Island.” Let’s watch the Sunday Funnies especially carefully over the next couple weeks for a hint!

    • Gerard Plourde

      I find it conceivable that the cult could have been enticed to have deposits in Cyprus, especially from Europe or the now-defected Israeli mission (Tel-Aviv?).

      • John P.

        True. And that could be very well be presumed to be true for foreign subsidiaries of a more traditionally run organization, particularly a for-profit company. But keep in mind two points:

        a) the cult is tax exempt so they do not have the sizable tax burden from repatriating cash that affects commercial enterprises (look at the recent Congressional hearings grilling Apple CEO Tim Cook and others on why they keep tens of billions of dollars overseas and rolling up profits through tax havens such as Bern Switzerland or Ireland instead of paying US taxes on it). Thus, there’s no cost to the cult to roll up international profits in the same vehicle as domestic profits, and they’re thus less likely to have established a presence in more recently evolved offshore havens like Cyprus — they’re probably using the same destinations as Hubbard stashed all his cash in.

        b) Miscavige takes his cut off the top; orgs are required to send a massive percentage (in some cases, 85% according to TheHoleDoesNotExist) of money off the top to RTC/Int Management, leaving the local entities mere scraps to pay the staff and keep the org maintained. That would argue that there is precious little profit to park offshore, even if there were tax reasons to do so.

      • http://www.tingleff.org/jensting/muslinger/ Jens TINGLEFF

        Moneys from France were traced to (I believe) Luxembourg and Denmark by investigating French magistrate Georges Fenech (soon to be mayor of Lyon, we hope :) ). This was in the 1990s so teh requests were just turned down. A non-French European (from Luxembourg, I think) bank account was attempted to be used (“Sea Org Reserves”) in a proposed tax payment in France.
        But this shows that moving money between European countries is certainly part of the way the criminal organisation known as the “church” of $cientology used to roll. Maybe it changed its ways, but I wouldn’t, ahemm, bank on it.

        • Whoknew

          Wow. Would there be an in-depth article about this in English somewhere?

          • http://www.tingleff.org/jensting/muslinger/ Jens TINGLEFF

            Don’t think so. Still waiting for a publishing company to wake up and smell the coffee and give an English writing journalist a way to get that book written.

            • Whoknew

              Thanks for the reply. That is such a major story. Hope it works out to be published, and the other to be translated.

    • ze moo

      If the CO$ ever had money in Cypriot banks, they took it out long ago. It will be interesting to see how angry the russian depositors get. Lroons current goons like conservative countries like Switzerland and the Caymans. I do wonder where Davey stashes his emergency cash and who guards it?

      • John P.

        Part of the problem with Cyprus is that they planned this levy in secret and sprung it on the public over the weekend, including shutting down ATMs so people couldn’t get at the assets frozen, even enough cash to pay rent, etc. This was an unprecedented action — the government confiscating depositor assets to save the banks — and one that we in Global Capitalism HQ think will live on for centuries as one of the worst governmental decisions of all time.

        But nobody, not even people as smart as we at Global Capitalism HQ, had any inkling this was coming, so nobody had time to move their money out before the boom came crashing down (not that we would have had any cash in such a place; we’re 95%-98% fully invested in the markets at all times; we don’t have to keep that much cash for redemptions since our investors love us with all their greedy little hearts, and our fiduciary duty to our investors mean we keep the cash in too-big-to-fail local banks).

        Since the cult is utterly primitive in their financial thinking, it’s unlikely that they were any more able than anyone else to spot the Cyprus problem and get any (hypothetical) money out ahead of it.

        • MissCandle

          The deposits that were “taxed” represented “uninsured” deposits, which is a lesson to all of us in U.S. banks, imo. Keep your holdings in U.S. banks within the insurance limits.

        • ze moo

          Cyprus has talked about ‘taxing’ deposits for the last 6 months and state of Cypriot banks has been known for the last 2 years. I don’t know how the banks keep depositors from taking their money out in the last 6 months. The writing has been on the wall for some time.

          The clamdom is often penny wise and pound foolish. Spends millions on rehab and then omits to provide toilet paper to the facility. Any one who loses Miscaviges ‘retirement fund’ is going to ‘scohb’ and then inhabit a shallow grave. The cult can afford the best financial advice and can keep any thing they do secret. Few defectors have worked the financial headquarters and given us wogs a glimpse of the clampires cash flow.

          I suspect that most of the money is flowing between the various CO$ corporate entities in a check kiting scheme.

        • Robert Eckert

          “But nobody, not even people as smart as we at Global Capitalism HQ, had any inkling this was coming” You need to hire me at Global Capitalism HQ then, because I could have told you this last year.

          • John P.

            We certainly saw the Cyprus mess coming. Anybody with a subscription to the FT or the Economist knew that, almost as long ago as we did. What we didn’t honestly believe was that they would confiscate assets. That is the sort of thing that you would expect from some low-grade pissant third-world dictatorship. North Korea, I’m thinking of you and your 2009 currency “revaluation”… It is emphatically not a solution you would expect the EU to dream up and then actually to implement. I would have assessed the idea of a European confiscation of assets as far less likely there than it would be in the US, and it is extraordinarily unlikely here.

            I am sure a few people responsible for the plan got a big chuckle over the fact that the Russians took the brunt of the hit, especially given how the Russians have been trying to hold Europe hostage on oil and gas for a few years. But the blowback of looting the ill-gotten gains of a number of Putin’s personal buddies will be impossible to predict (either the form or the timing) but it will happen.

            Europeans tend to be far more cautious than the US on a lot of things, because they seem to have have a substantially greater fear of the law of unintended consequences than we do (which may or may not make them smarter than we are). It is for that reason that we rejected the scenario of a deposit-based rescue out of hand. I can’t (but some economic historians might) recall the last time a government tried to fix financial problems by appropriating deposits in this manner, but I will be utterly confident to bet that it did not end well, to say the least.

            The Europeans may have been emboldened by the fact that the Cyprus air force consists of 18 lightly armed helicopters and one light cargo aircraft, so it is unlikely to be darkening the skies over major European capitals demanding their money back any time soon. And it is unlikely that the Russians will try to send in the troops to invade Europe to get Putin’s friends’ money back, though they are indeed hopping mad.

            But over time, as the austerity-driven recession grinds on, larger, more central European countries could easily become afraid that a deposit confiscation will be pushed on them. It is conceivable (unlikely today but increasingly likely as time goes on) that WW III could start in a decade or so if the Germans demand a deposit confiscation from the French or the Italians, should the overall EU economy continue to struggle under debt loads and austerity, particularly if the EU fractured and countries were able to pursue monetary policy outside the current restrictive EU limits. We would have expected the Europeans to have thought long hard about this particular issue as they debated what to do about Cyprus.

            • Robert Eckert

              One of these weekends all deposits in Greek banks will suddenly be denominated “drachmas” again, and the exchange rate of the drachma to the euro will be far less than 1:1. They put that off last year, at the cost of locking in a continuing continent-wide contraction, but I do not think they will be able to put it off indefinitely.

            • DodoTheLaser

              I can see how some Russians may get adversely affected by this whole Cyprus thing.
              May be, a little. I definitely wouldn’t worry about Putin and his friends though, they can easily have entire Cyprus with all their banks for breakfast, I’m pretty sure.
              From my observations – people with a lot of money, pay very close attention to their $.
              Just my opinion, of course. I was wrong before. Thank you for yours, I learn from you.

            • Phil McKraken

              “From my observations – people with a lot of money, pay very close attention to their $.”

              Mine too. That’s usually a big part of how they got a lot in the first place.

      • SciWatcher

        He probably stashes it at one of those underground vaults where all LRon’s works are supposed to be protected against nuclear holocaust.

      • Interested

        The Swiss have a unilateral agreement with all EU counties to give details of accounts that transfer funds, to the country the funds are going to. Basically numbered accounts are useless now. As for Americans it is even sticter.

  • Jefferson Hawkins

    A sad story. But don’t expect a glowing obituary in Freedom Magazine. Scientology uses and discards people, and when they die, they are ignored and erased. Veteran Sea Org Members, when they get old or ill, are simply shunted off to some low-rent fleabag senior center or offloaded to their families. Sea Org members who die are simply erased from history and forgotten. The death of Mary Sue Hubbard was never mentioned by the Church. Annie Broeker’s death was not only ignored but hidden from her family.

    Scientologists need to realize this: The Church of Scientology does not care about you. They will use you and when you are used up, they will discard you and erase you. If you are a Sea Org member, they will not take care of you in your old age. If you get seriously ill, they will scatter like cockroaches, refuse you any service or aid because you are “PTS.” If you die, your death will go unremarked and you will simply be erased from their history.

    And if you are a desperate reporter doing their sleazy dirty work, you will just be replaced with another desperate reporter. They don’t care. They really don’t care.

    Get out while you can.

    • Studious Judious

      Didn’t it take outside media pressure for the church to hold a service for Alexander Jentzsch. My heart aches for Karen.

      • J. Swift

        Studious Judious, Karen and I had a friend go to the Evans’ home with a letter asking for Alexander’s body. Karen wanted to handle her son’s final disposition. The Evans’ said no and that there would be no service. They then told our friend to get off their property and leave. The Church had no plans to do anything when Alexander died

        We rented the yacht “Spirit” to hold a service for Alexander and made announcements. Due to the enormous coverage of Alexander’s tragic death at age 27, the Church eventually announced a service at CCI. The Church even pulled Alexander’s father Heber Jentzsch out of the SP Hole to make an appearance to show how much it cared.

        *****
        Regarding Jim Lynch, when he came here a few months after Alexander died he came to see me. He wanted to know what I thought about Marty auditing people.

        I was outraged: The Church had killed Karen’s son through callous indifference when he had a very high fever for several days in a row and here they were harassing her again.

        I replied by asking Jim Lynch why he didn’t do real some journalism, specifically a story on why the Church would not allow Karen to see her dead son’s body or why David Miscavige beat his fellow Church members.

        Jim said there was no story here and started walking to the black car seen in the photo I took with my phone. There was an armed PI in the car who was the driver. I asked the PI why he was so scared that he needed to carry a gun when he came to harass people in their own neighborhood.

        I have never understood why the Church has to hire all of those PI’s who carry weapons. This is more Miscavige paranoia.

        Jim Lynch was part of David Miscavige’s completely failed, imbecilic, and at times laughable “Machine of Terror” that broke its teeth on Anonymous.

        The Church of Scientology is now, ignominiously, Jim Lynch’s legacy.

        Mother’s don’t let your children grow up to become Freedom Magazine reporters.

        It is a sad ending.

        • Studious Judious

          Thank you for the reply J. Swift, and I enjoy the videos that you are producing with Karen and AGP.

    • Veritas

      A scientologist with cancer is an embarrassment to the cult, and it is relief to them when the victim dies. The sooner the better. No regard for human life in this cult.

      • ThetaBara

        Exactly. “They pulled it in.”

    • Brett Allen Hensel

      I think the best anyone could hope for is a “he dropped his body” line somewhere towards the end of Freedom.

    • dbloch7986

      “Veteran Sea Org Members, when they get old or ill, are simply shunted off to some low-rent fleabag senior center or offloaded to their families.”

      That’s only IF they have a family. Most of them do not. Most of them die, unnoticed in a tiny room…alone. With no one to stand by them. Those are the ones treated with dignity. Some are simply shoved into the nearest hospital and left to die. Their bodies go unclaimed.

      Scientology is a shitty organization. People in prison get treated better when they die.

      Indeed they are erased. Especially if any illness is involved.

      • Ms. B. Haven

        “That’s only IF they have a family.”

        Some people just don’t have any family when they die. That is sad, but it’s just the way that it is in some situations. What is truly sad is that the reason many scientologists have no family when they die is because of the disconnection ‘scriptures’ that have been so prominent as of late. There is no reason for disconnection other than a way for scientology to create an illusion of fear so that they can hold on to their members, milk them for all they are worth and then toss them aside when they have nothing left to give.

      • John Andra

        There bodies go unclaimed. Really, has this happened?

    • Douglas D. Douglas

      Perhaps this is because of the Scientology belief that you simply drop this body and go get another.

      Have there been ANY recorded instances of ANYONE coming back? The cult still awaits the return of the Master, LRH (whose new body should be 27 now). But since they believe we are all immortal thetans, has anyone come back to resume their labors with all their faculties and (more importantly) Scientology “skills” intact?

      (Or is it possible that they do come back, and decide to avoid the CoS this time around???)

      • cicely neville

        Well, wouldn’t you? (avoid it!)

      • http://lliira.dreamwidth.org/ Lliira

        I’m surprised Davey hasn’t found some red-headed baby from a Scientologist family and claimed the poor kid was LRH.

        • shasha40

          Give him time, he’s almost that desperate .

        • Robert Eckert

          The problem with child puppet-emperors is that a rival shogun can seize control of the puppet and oust the reigning shogun.

        • John Andra

          My feeling is that if they do come back, and I am sure they do not, they probably have completely forgotten about Scientology–so unless they were recruited into it somehow the subject world be completely foreign to them. Most of the people in the world still have never heard of Scientology, and even of the ones that have, very few have bothered to find out much about it.

    • Karen de la Carriere

      He
      visited my home to harrass me to interview me as a “journalist” 3x.

      I subsequently declared him a Donkey.

      http://www.forum.exscn.net/showthread.php?32078-New-*ELITE*-CLUB-exclusive-to-100-members-only-DONKEYS-of-the-*Church*&p=813792&viewfull=1#post813792

      This
      is a cover story DM’s cult use so that if police arrive quickly, the
      pretended journalist can lie to the police that he was not stalking or
      harrassing but “writing” journalistically. It gives them a bit of
      slack.I did publicly declare him a DONKEY for being duped by the criminal entity and prostituting his writing skills.
      He wasn’t doing the writing. No evidence of any product or writing from the harassment tours. He was on their payroll to intimidate. He
      called up at least 3 others in the LA area ~~ all of us had been to see
      Marty…so he had a prepared list of who to harrass.
      However, he has passed and I hope he fares well on future trails without being deceived and conned. RIP Jim Lynch.

    • InTheNameOfXenu

      Scientology discards people when no longer useful, because that trait is part of Hubbard’s personality. Indie Scientologists are blind to this. Hubbard only cared about himself. He lusted for power, money, and the dominion over others. Didn’t he say in his affirmations, ‘All men are my slaves’?

    • ahkang

      Truly.

  • Sidney18511

    Well, Mr. Lynch, I guess when MONEY talks your own values walk. Theses videos are what you will be remembered for, you choose to be a victim of Scientology. Too bad, so sad.

  • baddog5623

    I think his Theaten just attached it self to the wart on my ass.

    • USA MRIID

      Please post that to YouTube.

  • HeatherGraceful

    A sad end.

  • ThetaBara

    In other, more positive news, Leah Remini has finally made a statement to the press!

    “We stand united, my family and I, and I think that says a lot about who we are, and what we’re about,” the former King of Queens star, 43, told PEOPLE on Saturday at the 15th annual DesignCare event in Malibu.

    Remini, who tangled with the church, added, “I believe that people should be able to question things. I believe that people should value family, and value friendships, and hold those things sacrosanct. That for me, that’s what I’m about. It wouldn’t matter what it was, simply because no one is going to tell me how I need to think, no one is going to tell me who I can, and cannot, talk to.”

    The actress – who was defended by the niece of David Miscavige, the most powerful man in Scientology – explained, “It doesn’t matter, it could be anything. I thought about the family being broken up for some other cause, and I’m not about to shut up.”

    GO, LEAH!

    http://www.celebitchy.com/312806/leah_remini_on_leaving_cos_no_one_is_going_to_tell_me_how_i_need_to_think/

    • Missionary Kid

      Thank you, ThetaBara

    • ze moo

      When the Washington Post covers it, it is news. Leah Remini is going have a 1/4 ton of Kristie Alley after her.

      http://www.washingtonpost.com/blogs/reliable-source/wp/2013/07/29/quoted-leah-remini-on-leaving-scientology/

      • Missionary Kid

        A short article, but it’s one more stone on the future grave of $cientology. At least they’re treating her seriously.

        • ThetaBara

          Super short, but their edit of her quote is sharp and to the point. Says it all, really.

          The Celebitchy writer went on to say that, to most people, this statement would be a “well, duh!” sort of thing but in this context, it is huge.
          Their coverage of all things scilon is really fantastic for a gossip site. And the commenters are mostly twigged to the cult and its scams, and are educating one another. Pretty cool.

      • ThetaBara

        Hey, Ze. I’m curious: would you fat-shame me, if we disagreed about something?
        Because this line of attack is getting a bit stale. We can do better.
        I have no respect whatsoever for Kirstie as a person. However I have too much respect for myself and other women to attack her for being female and fat. There is PLENTY to legitimately criticize! She’s NASTY. Hell, she’s ungroomed most of the time! That’s fair! But being fat and female, ehh, that is the hand that Xenu dealt her.
        I’m just sayin’ :-)

        • richelieu jr

          She does publicly try and make a living off of selling products meant to control that,a s well as starring in a show called ‘Fat Actress’.

          It’s not the same as just insulting random people in the street. I don’t personally engage in those attacks (partly because I haven’t seen the fatter part of her life, perhaps?), but it seems a bit harsh to criticize someone for criticizing her for public profile and reputation. Can we call Rosanne Barr a loudmouth?

          • ThetaBara

            You can absolutely call Roseanne a loudmouth; when you call her a “fat loudmouth” is when I will bristle.
            I know, Kirstie ought to be able to audit the fat off – but you and I both KNOW she can’t.
            And “fat” is the go-to insult for women. You guys can call her that if you want, but just know that other “fat chicks” are listening and it cat get to be kind of a drag.
            I’m not even all that fat, actually. But it still makes me cringe,
            Again, I’m just sayin’. Now you know another perspective. Do as you wish.

            • http://lliira.dreamwidth.org/ Lliira

              know that other “fat chicks” are listening and it cat get to be kind of a drag

              Or women who think they are fat or fear being fat…

              I don’t care about hurting Kirstie Alley’s feelings. She’s not here and won’t see anything anyone says anyway. It’s the splash damage that matters.

            • http://frankdisalleisadummy.wordpress.com/ Get Chutney Love

              Krispy Allie should be criticized for her attitude, which for her would still be easier to change, instead of her body weight. Fat-shaming hurts a lot of good women whose only sin isn’t looking like a model out of Vogue magazine.

            • Anonymookme

              I disagree. “Slut” is the go-to insult for women.

              The fact is, she IS fat. She shills for a weight loss product and then, most likely, sends a percentage of her profit to the cult.

              She’s rude and she’s mean. She has made $$$ off of being fat. That $$$ she has made off of being fat has most likely found it’s way to the cult via her “auditing” or whatever silly Sciloontology products she has chosen to blow her $$$ on.

            • http://lliira.dreamwidth.org/ Lliira

              There are tons of go-to insults for women. “Bitch” is another. None of them are okay.

              That she’s rude and mean are what are bad about her. That she’s fat (sometimes, and sometimes not, just like nearly everyone who diets) is a non-issue.

            • AnyOldName1

              “And “fat” is the go-to insult for women.”

              It’s used as a slur against a woman. It’s what “mean girls” do – call another girl/woman fat. I cringe every time someone calls a woman/girl fat. I am not nor have I ever been close to being overweight (actually the opposite) and yet that attempt at a “put down” has been hurled at me – “fat anorexic” was my fav! (Neither was true :) )

              As far as I am concerned she looks like a slob – her clothes are often dirty or stained, make-up is usually a mess, clothes don’t fit her, and most of the time her hair looks in need of a good shampooing, combing wouldn’t be enough. There are a number of large women who look good (Oprah, Adele, etc.). I have no empathy for slobs.

            • ThetaBara

              Thank you, this is exactly what I meant. She looks terrible most of the time, for all those reasons (plus she often seems to be scowling). Fat is the least of it.
              True, if she spent less time dancing with the cans and more time at the gym, she’d look different. But that is also an unrealistic and unfair standard, and not what I’m here to support.

        • ze moo

          After Krusties diet empire got into trouble, I find making fat jokes ok. I am a few pounds over ‘ideal’ weight myself so making fun of Krustie seems natural. Her sex is no matter of derision, her gung-ho style of upholding CO$ disconnection while avoiding direct name calling is very ‘thetanesque’. Her most abhorrent trait is her nasty mouth and abject promotion of NarCONon.

          • ThetaBara

            Right, we can legit attack her for her mean-girling and public support of disconnection (and even her constantly messy hair and unpleasant expressions) so why go for the low-hanging fruit?
            This shit was all over the place the other day – I’m not blaming you. But it is “low tone” compared to much of the conversation here.
            We can do BETTER. Calling people fat doesn’t really advance the conversation, and it is personally hurtful to many who might otherwise support us.
            I am all about the STRATEGY. It might be legit (and fun for some) to hassle Kirsty about her weight, but does it advance our freakin’ agenda?

        • Observer

          I agree with you in principle, and you won’t catch me making fun of Kirstie for it, BUT imo it’s valid to bring her up her weight for two reasons:

          1. The entirely bogus Hubbard-based “weight loss” products she is misrepresenting as effective (why haven’t they worked for her then?), and

          2. Her OT status in Scientology, the cult she so vigorously defends, which should have given her the power to maintain her desired weight by postulate alone.

          In my opinion the failure of LRH’s “tech” to give her mastery over such a basic issue as the weight of her meat sack–much like TC and his off-center teeth–is proof that Scientology’s promises are utterly worthless. Both TC And KA have pursued wog remedies as well as Scientology “cures”, and still their problems remain.

        • Veritas

          I agree. We’re better than that.

        • stanrogers

          It’s not about calling out baldy, it’s about calling out a bald guy selling a hair tonic. If he’s selling shoes, it’s not an issue.

        • John P.

          I am certainly not one to engage in fat-shaming of the average person. I struggled with weight for many years, and managed after a lot of work to achieve and sustain a very significant weight loss about a decade ago. I’m not quite half the man I used to be, but am getting reasonably close.

          As a result, I have a lot of compassion for those who are overweight. Yes, it’s true that they ate every bite themselves and nobody forced food down their throats. But on the other hand, everyone is born with the ability to drink a little bit then stop, or smoke a moderate amount of pot and then call it a day. After overdoing it a few times, addicts lose that ability, and what was once a matter of exercising a little will power turns into something very different. I believe pathological overeating is a behavioral addiction like gambling, kleptomania, hair-pulling, cutting, etc.

          Kirstie made a conscious choice, on many occasions, to make her struggles with weight a highly visible part of her persona, for the express purpose of building her audience and getting more work. At first, I think her efforts were also a way of fat-shaming herself, by becoming the spokesman for at least one diet chain, perhaps with the unconscious hope that a desire to avoid public failure would spur her to success. As time went on and she suffered multiple public failures, I think she retreated into the cynical “Fat Actress” persona to try and deal with the emotional wreckage of failure.

          So despite my own personal history, I don’t see a contradiction or hypocrisy in my own fat-shaming attitude towards Kirstie. What works is a lot of quiet, unglamorous hard work over a long period of time. The kind of quick fix and magic potions that she is promising won’t work reliably well for her or for anybody else. She has made herself into an exception to the rule, because of hypocrisy and denial, rather than for being fat. I would feel the same contempt for a televangelist preaching abstinence later caught with hookers (Jimmy Swaggart, Ted Haggard, etc.).

          And, of course, Kirstie has exposed herself even further to contempt and derision by basing her latest weight loss scam on the healthy living ideas of L. Ron Hubbard, a paragon of health and fitness for so many years. That is most deserved of all.

          • http://lliira.dreamwidth.org/ Lliira

            You are one of the 3% of people who are able to keep weight off in the long term. 97% of people cannot do it. We don’t have any actual, reliable way to make fat people into thin people, and most people who try to lose weight end up gaining substantially in the long term.

          • shasha40

            Ditto what you said. Thanks . I’m a female and it’s not about what she looks like , but more proof the tech is BS . Scientology’s not the answer for any woes, Kirstie does put herself out there like that .

          • Robert Eckert

            Overeating is an even more difficult addiction than alcohol or nicotine or heroin. It may be hard to determine “I am just not going to drink”, but it is impossible to just not eat. An alcoholic who tried to have just one glass of wine every day would never make it.

        • Douglas D. Douglas

          There are two women in my life that I love dearly who daily struggle with weight and body-image issues. I never was one to make an issue of it (I was a fat kid, but not THAT fat). It’s cheap, it’s easy, but if it is on point or genuinely funny (better-be-worth-it funny) I don’t mind. I won’t do it myself.

        • Missionary Kid

          The real ugliness in Krusty is her viciousness and intolerance for anyone she perceives to diverge with her in her opinion of $cientology.

          Her weight is an easy target, but I’ll try to refrain from it. Both of those characteristics are within her power to change.

        • sugarplumfairy

          Kirstie is fair game.. For goodness sake, she’s making money selling diet food and can’t control her own intake.. She’s been helped time and again with her weight issues and she continues to blow it.. God gave her a perfectly good body and she’s done nothing but abuse it..

          Ze moo isn’t fat shaming.. He’s not attacking her for being female and fat.. He’s attacking her for being an asshole who acts like she knows more than everybody else about weight contol and healthy living when she is clueless.. She will, however, continue making money off of the lesser beings, like a good little scientologist..

      • Gordon Freeman

        Why would 1/8th of Kirstie Alley go after Leah?

    • April Walsh

      The People Mag article comment section seems to have a few CoS operatives.

      http://www.people.com/people/article/0,,20721105,00.html

      They’re calling the article “odd” and saying she seems “off,” then agreeing with each other on how odd and off things are. Oh, OSA. Why can’t you learn to talk like people?

      • ThetaBara

        Thanks for the heads-up. Let’s go counter them!

        • April Walsh

          They’re also swarming Radar Online’s piece, but with lots of downvoting and the stand-by (at least that I’ve noticed this week) of “all religions are cults. catholics, mormons, muslims, blah. blah.” I can’t help thinking this is a tactic because I’ve seen too much of it and I think it’s to either get people off discussing COS to argue about religion instead or to get religious people to think “hey, i shouldn’t read this. all the people commenting here think i’m a cultist, too” getting them out of the discussion.

          • Veritas

            I believe a significant proportion of the “all religions are cults” posters are actual atheists looking for a chance to proselytize. The reason I suspect this is that usually, when I’ve tried to engage them, they actually can hold an intelligent conversation.

            • Robert Eckert

              Both types occur, the OSA deflectors and the Angry Atheists. The OSA deflectors do not seem to be as active as they once were.

            • Bury_The_Nuts

              Where the fuck is Louanne?
              I have interacted with S_ST.Claire a lot lately…

              But where the hell is Louanne????

            • Robert Eckert

              I asked St. Clair about Louanne and whether she’s OK, but didn’t get a response. Maybe it didn’t help that I referred to her as “Louanne the Creepy Eyeball lady”?

            • Bury_The_Nuts

              I think Louanne is in Cali. St. Claire is a florida clam…will follow him closer and try to find out more

            • Robert Eckert

              You would think that their counter-entheta people would be in frequent touch no matter where they’re physically based. Bunkerites are from at least four continents but we see each other every day, right?

            • noseinabk

              Hoping for kindness towards St.Claire. He may be looking and lurking for the truth.

            • ThetaBara

              Good, treat him gently! We can always use another ex!

            • sugarplumfairy

              Hey.. Things are tight.. She’s probably running things at INT base while Dave’s in Clearwater.. Somebody has to hose down the holees..

            • sugarplumfairy

              maybe she’s the temporary replacement for Lynch.. =)

            • ThetaBara

              I hope she’s not in the RPF, obnoxious though she is.

              S_StClaire was being accused of being a sock for Kirstie Alley somewhere recently. I had to laugh – usually the sock is the more rabid one!

            • April Walsh

              Possibly. But I can’t help thinking it will only leave religious people feeling as if they shouldn’t be a part of the discussion or have room to talk about COS as a cult.

            • Missionary Kid

              The one thing I think is fairly effective is to tell the atheists that they are sounding like $cientologists when they change the topic to the “all religions” argument. I then point them to some of the Tony Ortega blogs.

            • Veritas

              That is excellent advice!! I’ll try that next time I get drawn in to a debate with them.

            • Missionary Kid

              I stumbled on it when I started to go round and round with someone on another site, then, when I pointed it out to them that they were using a $cion tactic to deflect attention away from the Co$, they quickly changed their tune. I also mentioned that I was an atheist and that my attitude was “whatever floats your boat,” but that Co$ is involved with forced abortions, disconnection, fair game, and other nasty business.

            • Veritas

              I’ve been looking for a good solution to that situation for a while. Thanks!

            • cicely neville

              Good job MK!

    • Exterrier

      Excellent news flash, and a nice counterpoint to all this hand wringing and self criticism over nasty Jim Lynch’s passing.

      It brings us back to the real point of this blog, and the real issue at hand.

      The real issue is the integrity of mind and morals that one must make not to stayed hooked up with the church and watch yourself become a monster, or a simple hollow zombie or slave. Leah made the hard choice of choosing integrity over compliance and convenience, and has suffered some personal pain due to that, with much more to come…. If he were alive I can guarantee you that Jim Lynch, the tabloid man, would be on her doorstep, and the doorsteps of past associates, and friends, attempting to smear and intimidate this woman and her family. That is PRECISELY what he would be up to, pulled off of the Ortega smear project by DM to “handle” the Remini family.
      So cheers for Leah and family, and no tears for Lynch except for the tragedy of watching someone sink so low, and choose to abandon integrity for money.

      • ThetaBara

        Well put, Exterrier. Thank you. The tragedy, to me, is that another life was lost to the scilon bullshitness machine. And that is a tragedy. Can you imagine if he’d broken free and joined us? What stories he could have told then!

      • shasha40

        The stars are aligning ! Tick..Tock Tiny d .

  • Stephanie

    What do they say…be careful who you associate with… give it a whole new meaning now doesn’t it? If I were a Scientology lawyer – I would really take a look at who you are protecting. God has a way of dealing with protecting criminals. It is crimes against humanity really!

    I find it very interesting that Jim Lynch “took himself out”!!

    Jim Lynch was connected to the one of the most viscous SP’s on the planet – the Church of Scientology!

    Not only did he “contribute to the motion” but was paid with our trusted, hard earned dollars.

    David Miscavige has done nothing to earn a salary and all the perks he enjoys whilst hiding behind a religious cloak – so maybe he will be next on the line up of “wierd things that happen to Scientologist’s and their shills”!

    If I were working for the Church of Scientology – I would take a good, hard look at exactly who you are working for.

    When this Scientological bubble breaks and the World really finds out WHAT Scientology is and what it is NOT – a Church – it will go down in History in the US, anyway, along the likes of the Nazi’s and their concentration camps! Crimes against Humanity right in front of our noses!! And our government help protect them with the “religious cloak”.

    Extortion
    Fraud
    Bribery
    Money Laundering
    Human Trafficking
    Deception

    These ^ could be just a few of the crimes the church of Scientology will be found guilty of. I don’t think there will be many left in to even punish. How do you punish the victim of mind control, anyway. The Nazi’s finally got caught and persecuted but it took some time. For the Church of Scientology ~ I think most of them will be gone … one way or another!

    When the Church of Scientology finally goes down (and that will be soon) It will be a snarled up ball of confusion for the AG of the United States to unravel so the assets can be sold off and the victims compensated!

  • sizzle8

    PTS to Miscavige?

  • aquaclara

    Tony, you’ve written a fair and factual accounting of Jim Lynch’s life, far more than the brief obituary posted in The Palm Beach Post. Jim fell off the rails when he took a job with Scientology. Yet, there is not a single note from the Church of Scientology about his passing in their press releases or on the website.

    It is utterly ironic that the last man Jim Lynch was believed to be investigating is the one to write the only accounting of Lynch’s life.

    This is a tribute to you, Tony. Since I don’t think they cover this kind of sticky situation in journalism school, you just wrote the chapter on class.

    • Sherbet

      Tony did manage a bit of snark. Lynch said: “Just don’t make me look like a shill for Scientology.”

      And look at Tony’s title for his post. Cold, Tony, cold. (But I’m smiling.)

      • Veritas

        It’s only fair, in return for the harassment.

        • Sherbet

          And because nobody made him “look like a shill.” Lynch was a shill in the sense that he was an accomplice for hire.

    • richelieu jr

      Why would the CoS want to be publicy associated with a guy like that? They’ve got their reputation to think of.

      (snark parentheses or whatever, I dunno how to make them)

      • Missionary Kid

        On the keyboard, { and } are done by using shift + [ and ] respectively.

        • Casabeca

          We were trained early on to convert, and some habits never die ;-).

        • ThetaBara

          European keyboards don’t necessarily map for stuff like that, FWIW.
          Can be fun when traveling!

          • Missionary Kid

            I hadn’t thought of that. There are umlauts and other markings to modify a letter. Good point.

      • stanrogers

        On a French keyboard, it should be Option + ( and Option + ) on a Mac, or AltGr + ( and AltGr + ) on Windows/Linux. Which is probably why most French programmers set their machines to US layout (the {} characters are used all of the time; accents much less often).

        • richelieu jr

          Thanks. Having other keyboard problems as well (my Mac is on its last legs, I fear..) Thanks!

    • DodoTheLaser

      “It is utterly ironic that the last man Jim Lynch was believed to be
      investigating is the one to write the only accounting of Lynch’s life.”
      ^^^ QFT

  • http://www.angrygaypope.com/ Angry Gay Pope

    Ding dong Jim Lynch is dead! Could cult lawyer Elliot Abelson be next? Let’s hope so!

    • SP ‘Onage

      Haha! I’m shocked you didn’t mention, Moxen. Love your Moxen site!

    • USA MRIID

      Dude, Abelson was dead way back when already, back when he attended the Brian Keith Justice release hearing in L.A. At least the asshole smelled like he’d been dead for years, any way. I mean seriously, “Walking Dead.”

  • Thetapotata

    Apparently being a puppet and having DM’s hand up your ass to move your mouth can be FATAL.

    • USA MRIID

      That’s not DM’s hand up Jim’s ass.

  • Mark

    Mr. Lynch should have remembered “He that toucheth pitch shall be defiled therewith; and he that hath fellowship with a proud man shall be like unto him.” (Ecclesiasticus 13:1), rather than prostituting his undoubted journalistic talents in ‘fellowship’ with the likes of Miscavige.

    But then again: “De mortuis nihil nisi bonum”.

    • dbloch7986

      It’s a superstitious sentiment, even though it’s often portrayed as a noble one. It’s unfortunate the man could not leave behind a more positive legacy. He will be remembered for years to come by thousands of people as a Scientology shill who made a living on lies and harassment.

      At least he leaves behind noteworthy footprints, despite the negativity. Most people that die at the hands of Scientology, die alone and their memory fades forever into obscurity. The only thing that I hope for when it comes time to meet my maker is that I will be positively missed by those I have left behind.

      Older Scientologists take note: when you die in Scientology you get a one line obituary and become a non-person. It’s unfortunate. Scientology does not memorialize the deceased. Instead they erase them from existence in a false belief that, “They’ll be back.”

      • Mark

        Superstitious?! I’ll have you know “De mortuis…” was coined by Chilon the Spartan, one of the Seven Sages of Greece, young fellow-me-lad!

        “Don’t libel a dead man until you know all the facts about him” is rather closer to what Chilon originally meant, than any mediaeval-Thomas-Aquinas-scholastic twaddle about not saying too much about a corpse, in case a ghost comes to get you.

        As an ageing pagan, I thought it apt to leaven the somewhat sanctimonius Ecclesiasticus with a bit of rational Attic salt.

        I shall now return to my barrel, grumbling…

        • http://lliira.dreamwidth.org/ Lliira

          The ancient Greeks were massively superstitious. Oracles, witches, wars caused by gods…

          • Mark

            Some Greeks more than others – Chilon less so than most, I’d guess. Human beings as a species are massively supersitious; how else account for $cientology?

            • http://lliira.dreamwidth.org/ Lliira

              Very true. And imo superstition plus money is a recipe for the most terrible, hardest to stamp out vileness humanity does.

        • Douglas D. Douglas

          Perhaps we can all agree on Shakespeare: “The evil that men do lives after them; The good is oft interred with their bones”

          • Mark

            Ah, the Bard! Thank-you, Douglas: just so!

        • dbloch7986

          I agree with Freud– “We assume a special attitude towards the dead, something almost like admiration for one who has accomplished a very difficult feat. We suspend criticism of him, overlooking whatever wrongs he may have done, and issue the command, De mortuis nil nisi bene: we act as if we were justified in singing his praises at the funeral oration, and inscribe only what is to his advantage on the tombstone. This consideration for the dead, which he really no longer needs, is more important to us than the truth, and, to most of us, certainly, it is more important than consideration for the living.”

          • Mark

            Now where’s my copy of Freud Was A Fraud by Friedrich Fried got to…?

  • dbloch7986

    Another Scientologist that died young from untreated cancer. So sad.

    • Veritas

      Yes indeed. Another one. I’d be interested to learn the details of his cancer diagnosis and treatment or lack thereof. It seems odd that he would be working up to the very end, and he looked pretty good in that recent photo.

      • WhereIsSHE

        Lots of people of all (or no) religion die young from cancer.

        Two of our best friends died from cancer mid-life, seemingly out of nowhere.

        One–who was Jewish– had GBM, i.e. Glioblastoma Multiforme, an extrememly aggressive form of brain cancer. He was an avid mountain biker, tennis player, ski buff…with a PhD in psychology/ran a very busy brain injury center, where he was admired and adored by all, from patients and their families to the entire staff. The tumor had already firmly entrenched itself before he showed any signs or symptoms. He went through numerous operations…was in all kinds of trials… finally got the cyber knife surgery, etc. etc, etc.. and died less than a year and a half after the diagnosis.

        Another– who was Episcopalian–had pancreatic cancer. He was healthy as ever last Easter, 2012, and was gone before Christmas, 2012. It has metastasized to his brain and liver and bones before he showed any symptoms.

        Neither religion counsels it’s members to avoid or replace proper medical care with religious doctrine (or “tech”).
        Both of our friends had lifelong access to the very best healthcare, looked the picture of health until their fatal diagnoses were delivered, and neither –despite plenty of funds to afford the very best of care–could be helped.

        I certainly don’t know the statistics, but I would hazard a guess that the female Scientology population is at greater risk of death by cancer insofar as they eventually succumb to treatable and curable disease, mainly the risk of breast cancer which can be treated/cured by lumpectomy/mastectomy and radiation and/or chemotherapy treatments, and, perhaps more importantly, which can be detected early via routine breast examination and mammogram (or ultrasound and/or MRI, depending on the nature of the breast cancer and the patient’s anatomy/family history/gene-carrying status).

        As for Lynch–
        If you read the linked material in Tony’s article, you will see his history was not related, in any way, to Scientology until just the last few years of his life.

        Having said all of that… I won’t be shocked if he was more than just a shill for Scientology, but I think it’s pretty clear he was a casualty of the war of attrition within journalism, and that he was on a self-demoting career path for a long time before he ever “sold his soul” to Miscavage/his minions.
        Also…
        Who knows what dirt OSA may have dug up on Lynch to keep him so rabid.
        I’d place my bet on a skeleton –or two– or ten— in his closet.

        • John P.

          I am sorry to hear of the deaths of your two friends. We are getting to be of that age where people we love and respect are taken with little rhyme or reason. More than ever, when things like this happen, we are reminded that life is often capricious and arbitrary, and is in many ways manifestly unfair.

          I hope that you, who are subject to the stresses of the life of a member of the Federation of Ruthless Courtroom Predators (FRCP), are able to deal well with the strains of that life so that you don’t become susceptible to illnesses that bring people down at an early age.

          • WhereIsSHE

            Thank you, JP, from the top to the bottom of my heart.
            We are getting to that age, aren’t we.
            I prefer the wisdom gained to the insecurities of youth (plus, I am a smarter, leaner, better athlete and a far more open-minded and less-judgmental person every year that goes by).
            In fact, I was terribly judgmental about Scientologists, in general, only a year or so ago… and thanks to this site, in particular, I have gained a depth of respect for so many bright and brave former members.
            However, … yes.. it is true. We are getting to that age where permanent loss has, at times, replaced temporary setbacks.

            The Unbearable Lightness of Being, JP.

        • Veritas

          What I found intriguing was the timing of events. The article states that he was travelling around the country digging up dirt on Tony in March 2013. And he was dead 4 months later. Perhaps he was diagnosed much earlier, and knew he had cancer, but chose not to have treatment.

      • Sunny Sands

        Some people go fast because they die of the treatment itself. That’s harsh, but the drugs are powerful and I’ve known 2 people that’s happened to.

    • USA MRIID

      Jim was not a Scientology customer. He just worked from the crime syndicate.

      • dbloch7986

        The fact that he died young of cancer is evidence enough for me that he was a practicing Scientologist. There’s no way someone could work for Freedom and not be one. He would have submitted to sec checks and complied to “policy” set by the cult.

        Even more so, the fact that it would be beneficial to make him look “impartial” to outsiders leaves me to believe that his distance from the cult was all an act.

        • TonyOrtega

          Derek, the PIs (Dave Lubow, before him Eugene Ingram), and “reporters” (Jim Lynch), and most attorneys (except for the Moxon types) are NOT Scientologists. They are hired guns.

        • sugarplumfairy

          He was a hired gun, but I bet you’re right about the sec checks.. I remember reading somewhere that co$ made the PIs go through sec checks?

  • Room 101

    Frankly my dear, I don’t give a damn.

  • SP ‘Onage

    The only thing I feel sorry about is the people he has harassed for the cult and the next shill reporter they hire.

    This guy has been tailing and harassing Tony and his family since the Village Voice days.

    Here’s an example of some of the crap he did to Tony. I hope in Tony’s up coming book he tells us the whole story about how he’s been “Fair Gamed” by the cult.

    Jim’s e-mail he wrote to The Atlantic Wire trying to find dirt on Tony.

    Hi Foster:

    I’m a reporter writing a profile of ex- Village Voice editor Tony Ortega for

    Freedom Magazine which is sponsored by the Church of Scientology.

    My understanding is that you used to work/blog for the Voice.

    My questions are simple:

    1) Do you know any reasons for Ortega’s obsessive interest in and incessant

    blogging about Scientology while he was at the Voice and now as an

    independent?

    2) Is it true that Ortega was fired by VVM due to his blogging about

    Scientology to the detriment of his editorial duties? This was intimated in

    various NY media reports but, to my knowledge, never confirmed.

    3) In what kind of regard did VV staffers hold Ortega?

    That’s it….and if there is anyone else you might think it worth my while

    to talk to, please let me know.

    Any answers/insights regarding any or all of the above three questions will

    be considered on or off the record according to your wishes.

    Thanks in advance.

    Best,

    James

  • Douglas D. Douglas

    300 comments already? Where does the day go?

    I don’t have time to wade through BOTH of today’s comment threads (another 250 there), so if this is old news, jut skip over it. But the weeklies have all hit at the supermarket, and Leah Remini is in a few of them. People has her on the front cover, along the side. The article inside is dynamite! Here are a few images. I LOVE the sidebar about diminutive David Miscavige…

    • ThetaBara

      See below. 😉
      Although my post has turned into a debate about whether or not fat-shaming Kirstie Alley is a good idea. So, have at!

      • Douglas D. Douglas

        Kirstie dishes it out, so it’s fair game. I won’t do it, but it’s not that distasteful to me, considering Kirstie’s own predilections.

        • http://lliira.dreamwidth.org/ Lliira

          She’s not going to see it, though. Certainly she will not see comments here. And it hurts some people who do see it, and adds to the cultural idea that if a woman is fat or otherwise strays from a certain standard of attractiveness, it is a moral failing on her part.

          Plus there are so many other things to talk about regarding Alley that are more on-point. She’s an ignorant, obnoxious, self-absorbed, deluded Scientologist who seems to enjoy shooting herself in the foot.

          • ze moo

            Kirstie Ally’s least attractive feature is her personality.

      • shasha40

        Yes, yes it is …

        • ThetaBara

          How so?
          How does stooping to their level forward our (theoretically shared) agenda?
          I’m honestly curious.

          • shasha40

            It doesn’t ,I hadn’t read your post below before I said that. It’s not about what she looks like but the oxymoronic way she touts Scientologys many cures for everything including things that haven’t worked for her. I respect you and your feelings and as you said she has multiple things to critique. None of that helps the cause but does make us feel a little better at times. I apologize for any hurt I may have caused you. Truce ?

            • ThetaBara

              No need for a truce – I’m just putting it out there that I think we can do (and be) better than them. :-) Thanks for your reply.

            • shasha40

              Works for me ! You’re welcome and thanks for putting it out there. Good food for thought.

    • Douglas D. Douglas

      Here is In Touch and that doyenne of checkout-rags, the National Enquirer. Note that the Enquirer piece also has an article on the closure of the Will and Jada Smith supported “academy,” with full disclosure that it was a Scientology school…

      • Sidney18511

        There is nothing that makes me happier then seeing all scientologys bullshit spread throughout the media for everyone to see.

  • USA MRIID

    “Lynch’s advice: bust the unions”

    He was a right wing shitting Republican asshole, just like all Republicans are.

    • Douglas D. Douglas

      Ahem.

      • USA MRIID

        LOL! I know. :) I’m just trolling here.

    • Sidney18511

      there is not much difference between RWNJs and Scientologests. In fact in many cases they are one and the same.

      • India Crep

        Low information voters are the same as dimwitted crooks that work for Scientology and think they’re going to some how get rich. Stupid fucks.

    • Bury_The_Nuts

      Um, er….Really?

  • USA MRIID

    “We already have some idea who is replacing Jim…”

    Oh please please please let it be Glenn Beck!!!11

  • Truthiwant

    It’s sad that Jim Lynch has left us.

    This guy, with his mafia style glasses and his henchman, Mr.T, has done so much to show off the pure morality of Scientology.

    I just hope that Mr. Miscavige can find another journalist as able as Jim Lynch to bring to the world the spirituality of this religion.

    This guy managed to write articles about all sorts of people without getting a word out of them. Almost everyone refused to speak to him but he was still able to publish a hate story of the worst kind.

    Pure genius.

    PLEASE, Dave, hire somebody with that same and wonderful talent as the deceased Jim Lynch.

  • Mark Ebner

    I applied for the job, just to let them know I was interested.

    • SP ‘Onage

      How funny! Imagine the sec checks that reporter has to go through.

    • dbloch7986

      Where do I apply?

    • Sherbet

      If you get an interview, it means somebody wasn’t doing his homework.

    • USA MRIID

      Mark, if you get hired by these fucking loons, please do me a favor and write an article for Freedumb all about how it has recently been discovered that Lisa McPherson committed suicide. That would be awesome.

    • CharlieWaters

      Mark,
      Poster John P is wondering if John Connolly may be a candidate for this job. This is the John Connolly who Marty Rathbun exposed at his site on 2/15/11. Also, would this be the same John Connolly that had articles in SPY Magazine on Danny Casolaro and Wackenhut?

  • Captain Howdy
    • Sherbet

      Well, get off them, Howdy, because I have no idea what you’re trying to say here.

      • Captain Howdy

        Sherbert, If you saw “Heavenly Creatures” — the best film Peter Jackson ever did — you would understand the similarities between the folie et deux world the girls live in and that of scientologists. Plus it’s got clay modeling as well as Kate Winslet and “Rose” from Two and a Half Men.

        • Sherbet

          I didn’t. I did see the clay. This one was lost on me, although you and I are often in sync. Sorry. I owe you one.

          • Captain Howdy

            You need to watch Heavenly Creatures ASAP. It’s wonderful and it’s based on a true story.

            http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Anne_Perry

            • Sherbet

              I know that story! I saw it reenacted on one of those crime documentaries. OK, I’ll add the movie to my Netflix list.

    • CharlieWaters

      I refreshed by browser and I see you changed your avatar to the BOC symbol. I must say, “well done!”

  • Douglas D. Douglas

    I have to head back out, but I did want to leave a final thought for now. (Again,. if this has already been widely discussed, just skip over this!)

    Jim Lynch’s career seemed to be a reverse-success story. He went from mainstream media, to supermarket tabloid, to small town papers, and ended up as a pseudo-journalist “shill” for the CoS. So, in a way, he is a perfect “face” for Scientology, which tends to take vulnerable people at a low point in their life and then makes it even worse, somehow.

    • shasha40

      That jumped right out at me ! Accurate description of just what COS will do for your career and what Vultures they are .

    • SP ‘Onage

      That’s true, but there’s a thing called the internet, he knew what he was getting into.

  • Simon

    But I don’t understand. I thought that, as a Scientologist, all he had to do was postulate the cancer gone.

    • Simon

      Just to clarify – I’m not making light of his death. My comment was to highlight the insanity of the COS and the drivel they brainwash their followers with.

      • Robert Eckert

        No need to apologize. Your quote “all he had to do was postulate the cancer gone” should take the South Park caption “THIS IS WHAT SCIENTOLOGISTS ACTUALLY BELIEVE” and sadly, it is why so many of them have died prematurely.

        • Tory Christman

          So many also have died prematurely due to 2 things, per Dr Denk (L Ron Hubbard’s Doctor), and my own observation:
          1) Dr Denk: “ALL of the Scientologists who have come through the Shaw Health Center and tried to handle Cancer ‘naturally’….are D E A D. Some who used some medical, some natural–some lived, some died. Those ARE OUR Statistics”.
          2) My own observation ( as well as many other OT 7 and 8’s) is that MANY people seem to die way too young, especially from OT 5-OT8. Why? Well, medical science now has proven what you envision re your body *can* effect it. OT 5’s on up are envisioning being not only covered with dead space aliens/beings….but they can be effected by them from as far away as 1,000 feet, hundreds of miles, as far away as other planets. Imagine thinking *that* 24/7. Yes, way too many of those peeps have committed suicide, too. Hubbard himself died fighting this very trap he built. Peace and love to ALL :) Tory/Magoo
          PS: To ANY possible future reporters, PLEASE look at what happened to Jim and consider dearly if working for this sleazeball organization is worth it. It is not….I promise you.

          • phronsie

            Hey, I sent you a message on FB; feel free to ignore b/c, while I’m a stranger to you, I just wanted to check out if you were doing okay. And here you are! :)

            • Tory Christman

              Thanks, phronsie! I’m sorry, I didn’t get your message on FB. But as you said: “Here you are!” Thankfully we all get around on the Net :)

            • phronsie

              Bet it went to your other folder; good old Facebook! :)

          • Spackle Motion

            Spending untold hours with a small electrical current going through your body may also have an impact, although no one has tested that (from what I’ve read).

            • tetloj

              Then there’s possible exposure to asbestos on the Fleawinds

            • sister wendy

              this is so not talked about often enough. I see articles every once in awhile about it- no one seems to care about floating on the sea trapped with asbestos…

          • sister wendy

            Dear Tory- thank you so much for saying that about the OT levels and cancer ! I know the mind-body connection is doing something not right with visualizing those BT’s. In a way, it makes reminds me of how you can “identify” parts of yourself- and then you are rejecting those pieces of yourself, by calling them alien body thetans and trying to get rid of them. It reminds me of a person trying to split themselves up. Unhealthy, I think, any way you look at it.

        • Robert Eckert

          Debbie Downer honors me! There was a piece in the New York Daily News about “The TomKat Project” (I am sorry that there is no way I can make NYC anytime soon) noting that they use a sign “THIS IS VERBATIM DIALOGUE” whenever they are totally not making up what you cannot believe anybody would say:

          http://www.nydailynews.com/entertainment/music-arts/cruise-missile-tomkat-project-strikes-fringe-fest-article-1.1402485

    • Sherbet

      He wasn’t a scientologist, as Tony noted somewhere below.

    • USA MRIID

      Jim was not a Scientology customer, he was a criminal working for the Scientology crime syndicate.

      • Eddie Vroom

        But he spent a lot of time on their properties, right?..

  • dbloch7986

    Hey! Debbie downer is back.

    • SP ‘Onage

      Yep! This story must be hitting a nerve.

      • ze moo

        After 2 or 3 weeks you’d think the story would be played out, but Leah Remini actually addressed the issue and brought it back to the front of the gossip/tabloid sites. Real newspapers are now covering it. Leah’s escape story has legs again. The dwarfenfürher must be very angry, now the CO$ will have to produce another video and make everyone watch it again.

        The beatings will continue until morale improves.

    • April Walsh

      Well, there’s crazy downvoting at the radar piece on Leah, too. and even on the most innocuous comments. I’m finding it sort of hilarious.

  • mook

    Tony, is this true that you’re co authoring Leah Reminis’s memoirs? If so, then yippee! Kind of side eying CDAN for leaking this info though…
    http://www.crazydaysandnights.net/2013/07/leah-remini-and-scientology.html

    • N. Graham

      Is this anywhere else?

      • Minion Gayle

        The new Enty is wildly, um, creative (and mean, even for my tastes.) Not the most reliable of sources.

    • Sherbet

      Remini has a book’s worth of things to say? Chapters 1-27: I was in scientology and believed in it, and I was in a TV show, too. Oh, and I had a child. Chapter 28: DM is nuts, and I left scientology.

      As for Tony co-authoring, that seems to be a bit of fiction pulled out of thin air. There are only two books I’m eager to read: Tony’s and Katie Holmes’s. I think the latter may be a long time in coming, but it ought to be as deliciously rich as a Dove Bar.

      • Spackle Motion

        If we are to only gauge Remini by what her sister says, then I don’t think she’s done enough unraveling to write a book. From what I can tell, she’s still in the LRH = Good and DM = Bad camp.

        If she writes a book that resembles Rathbun’s drivel then she will lose many fans she recently gained.

        • Sherbet

          I’ve been saying the same thing, Spackle. If at least some of Remini’s family make some sort of indie pit stop, I wouldn’t be surprised.

    • TonyOrtega

      News to me.

    • Minion Gayle

      LMAO! I was just going to ask the same thing (from the same source.) Although, since Tony couldn’t even get a comment out of her as to whether or not she’d left the Church, i kind of figured she wasn’t his secret inside source.

    • media_lush

      …. either way it’s planted a seed of horror in Tiny Fist’s feeble brain that is likely to have made him double his Xanaz scrip immediatley…. Tommy Girl is probably starting to get genuinely worried by now, too

  • Eddie Vroom

    I know this has been brought up before, but doesn’t there seem to be a higher than average incidence of cancer amongst the Scientology lifers? If I were buying one of their properties, I’d want to inspect that thing like a former meth house.

    Say, you don’t suppose?..

    • Missionary Kid

      Naah. It’s the stress from dealing with a Loony Tunes {religion} that takes all your money, tells you that your eternity depends on it, and then keeps asking for more, and more, and more.

    • Spackle Motion

      Lynch wasn’t a Scientologist.

      But, yes, I’ve seen references to a perceived high prevalence of cancer among long-term Scientologists.

    • sister wendy

      well- there are probably more than a few reasons, but the most obvious we’ve talked about before is that quite often, those of us in Sci-bot land didn’t get normal screening done- either due to no insurance and/or the inference that if you have a disease, you are somehow not as good/clear/able/OT as you “should” be- If you are supposed to be at cause over your body and what you get, then you wouldn’t have cancer, right? 😉 Also- they do spend time (at least the ones I’ve known) rejecting a lot of medical and alternative options while they try for the auditing cure. Many of them seem to avoid anything but auditing and vitamins- and their cancer is also caught in a late stage. Personally I think that there is something psychotic about auditing BT’s and that the body also maybe turns on itself in a certain way… I know people who’ve done all their levels and NOT gotten cancer, but there are a good deal who do…

  • John P.

    I wonder if Jim Lynch’s replacement is John Connolly. He sounds like enough of a sleazebag to pretty much drop easily into Mr. Lynch’s somewhat unfashionable shoes. Marty Rathbun exposed Connolly a couple years ago here: http://markrathbun.wordpress.com/2011/02/15/journalists-beware-of-scientology-inc-spy/

    • CharlieWaters

      Is this the same John Connolly that wrote pieces for SPY Magazine on Danny Casolaro and Wackenhut?

      • John P.

        I don’t know. Perhaps someone else might. I just saw a post earlier today by Mark Ebner, who (IIRC) also worked at Spy; might he know?

        • CharlieWaters

          Just asked him. I’ll let you know if he gets back to me.

          If this IS the same John Connolly, he’s quite the personality. I believe there was even a character loosely based on him (ex NYPD cop turned investigative reporter/writer) on an episode of Law and Order. The character on that episode was something of a muck-raking schmuck, if I remember correctly.

          • Gerard Plourde

            Truly ironic if true given the great work by Mark Ebner in the same magazine.

        • CharlieWaters

          Yeah, same guy.

    • q-bird

      one dies but then another rises to take his place – {great}

  • SP ‘Onage

    I might have missed it, but has it been confirmed by a known reputable source, that Lynch actually died because of cancer? Jessica Feshbach supposedly had cancer too and that turned out to be a lie.

    In the photo Karen took of him in March (4 months ago) he doesn’t look like he was suffering from cancer.

    The one-line obituary was definitely cult controlled even in his death. Didn’t Jim have any family?

    • Sidney18511

      Good question. I lost my dad to kidney cancer 7yrs ago and that is one evil, evil disease. It eats you away from the inside, takes away your energy and leaves you a shell of your former self, nothing but a husk. Lynch didn’t even look sick in the most recent videos released by Karen.

      • Isaac Clarke

        Yes, it’s a mystery. Typically the decline takes longer than that.

      • Spackle Motion

        It could have been pancreatic cancer, which is very swift in claiming victims.

        • Isaac Clarke

          Which, in the worst case scenario (stage IV disease left untreated) on average will take about 5 months- but typically the patients are sick (unable to work), which prompts the diagnosis. If treated, the outcomes are better, and some may survive for years.

          • Gerard Plourde

            It is a scary form. Most people don’t last long after diagnosis. Steve Jobs was an exception in that the form he had was very slow in developing and more treatable but he couldn’t beat it either.

            • Bury_The_Nuts

              He may have been likely to beat the form he had if he had not engaged in BS quackery.
              He had the procedure (whipple) that could have saved him had he followed advice of the mainstream medical community. He chose woo woo.
              Apples (the fruit) do not cure everything!

            • Gerard Plourde

              He did go in for the unconventional stuff, didn’t he? Sometimes we humans can be too smart for our own good.

            • Bury_The_Nuts

              Yeah, I was just about to edit my comment…to clarify I was being kinda unforgiving today..but yeah.
              He could have contributed for the next 20-30 years.
              So I am a bit pissed he ended up being such a donkey!

              Of course…I can be a raging jackass myself….
              sighs…

            • Gerard Plourde

              Can’t we all.

            • Bury_The_Nuts

              Prolly! lol!

            • sister wendy

              careful- some of it works. Depends on what, where, who, how long, etc. I cured myself from breast cancer (no, not by auditing or well wishes;) There is a lot of alternative stuff that DOES work and in my experience the US is very limited in viewing what works and what doesn’t. That being said, there is a lot of stuff that doesn’t work, and pancreatic cancer is a different kettle of fish than a reproductive cancer.

        • Sandy

          Both my aunt & father in law – 3 months from diagnosis to death. Both with the best possible care.

          • Bury_The_Nuts

            I have an acquaintance that lasted less than five weeks from diagnosis to death.
            Pancreatic cancer is a nasty mutha!

        • SP ‘Onage

          Patrick Swayze was diagnosed with pancreatic cancer in March of 2008 and lost his fight September 14, 2009. He really looked bad, poor guy. I guess it depends on the individual.

          • http://frankdisalleisadummy.wordpress.com/ Get Chutney Love

            And that was a long time for pancreatic cancer, most people with it don’t last even a whole year after the initial diagnosis.

    • Garry Scarff

      It wasn’t confirmed by independent sources that Jessica wasn’t treated for cancer.. only that SHE denied it. Jessica & her husband, Tommy, had a track record for dishonesty & deception when they were in the Sea Org. I heard from reliable sources that Jessica had lymphoma, something she had been previously treated for. It’s also known that Tommy & Jessica took a “medical leave” from the Sea Org before they routed out. Hmm.. wonder what the medical reason was?

      • SP ‘Onage

        Yea, you’re right, I remember reading about her fight with Lymphoma, but it was rumoured she relapsed and that’s why she left which pretty much seems to be a lie. Didn’t Tony do a story on it? I can’t remember?

        • Bury_The_Nuts

          The thing is…If she did not relapse and used her history for a sympathetic shore story…Shit, that makes it even worse.

          • Xenuvius

            Ah yes, but always consider the source…(please pardon the double entendre, but things get so boring….it’s always research research, research…)

            -Elron

            • L. Wrong Hubturd

              I’ve been waiting for someone to do this. It’s like the Jesus actor answering Bill Maher’s questions in character during Religulous. Love it!

      • TonyOrtega

        Your reliable sources blow, Garry. She wasn’t sick. (At least not this time.) It was a shore story.

      • Phil McKraken

        “… wasn’t confirmed by independent sources that Jessica wasn’t treated for cancer …”

        Oh noes! A double-wasn’t! Your standards for evidence are somewhat … askew. While we’re at it, I’ve been unable to confirm that the guy next door, who didn’t return my hedge clippers, doesn’t fellate goats.

    • John P.

      Recall that the reason the Feshach’s circulated that “shore story” was as a condition of being allowed to route out — it would have embarrassed the cult if people “in” learned that they were merely disaffected and had exited, particularly given the prominence of their position and proximity to Scientology “royalty.”

      Irrespective of the cause, Jim Lynch died way too young. There’s no need for a “shore story” for the cult to spread to members to spare themselves bad PR. Oh, and he wasn’t a Scientologist, just a thoroughly ensnared “wog.” So they would care even less about the real reason for his demise.

      • SP ‘Onage

        You know, JP. They lie so much I question and doubt everything when it comes to them. Maybe I am getting too cynical?

        • John P.

          Skepticism is essential, but cynicism tends to be as blinding as gullibility. We in Global Capitalism HQ work very hard to understand the difference, and to make sure we don’t cross the line into dangerous territory. We accept that company management teams stopping by to tell us about the company will stretch the truth and will occasionally lie outright. We are always skeptical of what they tell us. If we were cynical, we would never invest in anything and thus would never make our clients enough money to earn our exorbitant performance fees. If we’re properly skeptical, we verify what people tell us, assess their credibility, and we may invest in them even though we know they’re stretching the truth. Mostly, it works, though sometimes it blows up spectacularly.

          • SP ‘Onage

            Pearls of wisdom. Thank you! 😉

          • http://frankdisalleisadummy.wordpress.com/ Get Chutney Love

            “Skepticism is a good watchdog, as long as you know when to take him off of the leash.”

            Rex Stout

      • Gerard Plourde

        “Irrespective of the cause, Jim Lynch died way too young.”

        That was my thought too. He’s about a month younger than me.

  • Garry Scarff

    Jim’s wife, Sammy, posted a photo of her & Jim last month.. he looked frail from the other photos of him on her FB page. Jim left behind a young son who had his Bar Mitzvah last month.

    • Bury_The_Nuts

      Awwww. Poor kid.

  • SandiCorrena

    Entertainment Tonight showing preview of Leah speaking about CO$

    • SP ‘Onage

      Thanks! :)

  • DodoTheLaser

    This reminds of TV show – “Breaking Bad”, where the cancer stricken chemistry teacher turns into a meth manufacturer, in order to afford the treatment. Ironic and sad.

    R.I.P. Jim Lynch.

    • Gerard Plourde

      What an incredibly powerful and disturbing series. My son introduced me to it this summer while he’s on hiatus between high school and college.

      • Xenuvius

        Arguably the best drama on TV…Breaking Bad and Mad Men are the only two series we receive here on Mars. We’re looking forward to Jim helping us with some research…

        -Elron

        • Bury_The_Nuts

          ASSHOLE!

          Sorry, i don’t use the brackets!

  • Captain Howdy

    This is for Jim..and I mean it.

    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=xUA-DcW1lFc

    • Bury_The_Nuts

      I truly love you Captain.
      Pure and simple love.

      This is so beautiful.

      • Captain Howdy

        That song makes me cry every time.

        • Bury_The_Nuts

          Hugs capt….

        • Bury_The_Nuts

          U ain’t supposed to cry over us humans 😉

          • Captain Howdy

            Saddest song ever

            Holocaust by Big Star

            Your eyes are almost dead
            Can’t get out of bed
            And you can’t sleep

            You’re sitting down to dress
            And you’re a mess
            You look in the mirror

            You look in your eyes
            Say you realize

            Everybody goes
            Leaving those who fall behind
            Everybody goes
            As far as they can,
            They don’t just care.

            They stood on the stairs
            Laughing at your errors
            Your mother’s dead
            She said, “Don’t be afraid.”

            Your mother’s dead
            You’re on your own
            She’s in her bed

            Everybody goes
            Leaving those who fall behind
            Everybody goes
            As far as they can
            They don’t just care
            You’re a wasted face
            You’re a sad-eyed lie
            You’re a holocaust.

            https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=vsQ977u8Wuk

          • Captain Howdy

            I try not to but you all make it real hard.

        • Sherbet

          Captain Softy.

    • SP ‘Onage

      The story goes that the song was written by Rokusuke Ei when his heart was literally broken by a Japanese actress, Meiko Nakamura.

    • noseinabk

      Well shit!
      Never expected that Cap would be be the one to make me cry.

  • L. Wrong Hubturd

    Just saw this on CNN and was wondering if there might be another part featuring Narconon. Hoping so since this one says part 1.

    http://www.cnn.com/2013/07/29/health/rehab-racket-siu-cir-part-one/index.html?hpt=hp_inthenews

    • Spackle Motion

      Narconon does not receive public funds (Medicaid, Medicare) so it is not likely it is a part of this sting. But it may be a part of a larger story about rehab fraud.

      • L. Wrong Hubturd

        I see that now, but damn, that title really sucked me in.

  • media_lush

    this has just popped up…. Cruise having to get further and further from hollywood to get positive PR…. anyway, I can’t seem to leave my comment due to some Captcha glitch….. I would be delighted if someone could get my feelings known on the site http://www.vsail.info/2013/07/29/video-tom-cruise-helms-and-grinds-on-the-emirates-team-new-zealand-ac72/

    feel free to use my exact words if you want “however, there isn’t any doubt it is the best publicity the America’s Cup could get”

    dudes, he’s a toxic scientologist spearheading the the biggest fail in media history!

    FTR you get to hear Connors voice for the first time…. obviously subservient to his ‘dad’ IMO

    • Dmitri

      Watching that video, one just can’t help but get the impression that Tom and Connor aren’t the sharpest knives in the drawer. But the sailboat is very cool.

    • media_lush

      also discovered a new Tommy Girl site…. I think this is how he keeps up to date with what’s happening to “his” daughter…. naturally you can’t leave comments …. http://www.tomcruiseforever.com

      • media_lush

        confirmation that’s it’s clam

        • tetloj

          And with one line they defeat the PR purpose if the site.

      • DodoTheLaser

        Is that for real? “Tom Cruise Forever” Whoa… Really?!

        He looks like a pretty nazi man in those B&W header photos.

        Is this a joke/prank of some sorts? Looks kind of legit. Just wow..

        • media_lush

          whole site is a lovebomb…. I’ve mentioned elsewhere that it’s strange that it appears in google alerts all of a sudden… I get a feeling that his PR people are doing all they can to increase his Q rating [good luck with that] …. I think I read yesterday that the NZ org is having issues as well or something…. as for America’s Cup associating with him….. bad mistake… the people behind it are pretty much the Illuminati of wealth and keeping your name out of trash PR, I doubt they’ll be happy Cruise’s people have latched on.

          • DodoTheLaser

            Ok. Thanks. Let’s keep an eye on this thing.

    • Dmitri

      The captcha won’t letcha posta, I tried 6 times

      • media_lush

        makes you wonder if everything posted was negative and they conveniently ‘turned it off’

        • Dmitri

          You can see what I tried to post below…the one about dull knives in the drawer:)

    • noseinabk

      I tried also. Got the same Catcha msg.

      • media_lush

        it’s on Daily Mail now…. [I can’t post there because of the bollocks on my head… buggered if I’m going to change just for them] http://www.dailymail.co.uk/tvshowbiz/article-2381057/Tom-son-Connor-turns-racing-high-tech-catamaran-San-Francisco-Bay-Americas-Cup.html#ixzz2aUvHsqS4

        • DodoTheLaser

          If not for them, change them for us/me.

          I get the point, but the hairy balls are overrated
          even on TC’s forehead. I’ve been begging you for years :)
          I’ve changed my avy (for now), see?

          • media_lush

            hairy balls are NEVER overrated!

            I’ve suffered a lot for these balls…. in early days of Facebook I had [I’m pretty sure] Ronbots complain and had my account suspended for this very avatar…. I’ve had dealings since then that have been just as antagonistic that have only stiffened my resolve [so to speak]. I’m open to a kindler gentler nutsack shoop but until I see one I like the balls stay!

            • DodoTheLaser

              Copy that.:)

        • noseinabk

          I am good to go and signed up . What do you want to post?

          • media_lush

            the other site said this:

            “There mustn’t be many famous Hollywood actors that can get you a greater return from a media and publicity stunt and the kiwi America’s Cup challenger got probably one of the most famous of them, Tom Cruise, to grind and helm after their victory with Luna Rossa. One wonders though who and how much paid Cruise for his visit to the Emirates Team New Zealand base in San Francisco and subsequent ride on the boat. However, there isn’t any doubt it is the best publicity the America’s Cup could get.

            ….which led me to try and make this comment:

            “however, there isn’t any doubt it is the best publicity the America’s Cup could get”

            dudes, he’s a toxic scientologist spearheading the the biggest fail in media history!

            so, …. a way round that might be something like: “Journalists are already saying “there isn’t any doubt it is the best publicity the America’s Cup could get”… and then add the kicker….

  • Dmitri

    Off topic, but a rare William S. Burroughs book about Scientology recently came up for sale. It is a presentation copy of his book “Naked Scientology” with a personal inscription to Allen Ginsberg. “For Allen / Love / William S. Burroughs,” and signed “Allen Ginsberg aug 30, 1979.”

    Quote from the book: “Scientologists are not prepared to accept intelligent and sometimes critical evaluation. They demand unquestioning acceptance.”

    • Bury_The_Nuts

      Interesting!

  • SP ‘Onage

    Leah, coming up next on ET. She says, she feels compelled to help people who can’t help themselves. Go Leah!

  • Ted Slowik

    I dedicate this original song, Dear Editor, to my old boss and friend, Jim Lynch R.I.P. http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=4iDDsJwL07g&feature=youtu.be

    • Dmitri

      Very cool of you to do this, Ted. Compassion like that doesn’t exist in the place he was drawn in to. But it does exist in your remembrance of him.

      • Ted Slowik

        Thanks Dmitri. He was a good husband and father. He happened to be the guy doing the job he was hired to do. If not him, they would’ve hired someone else.

        • DodoTheLaser

          It’s really good to know he was a good husband and father. I mean it.

          Too bad he choose to work for clearly evil entity.
          Perhaps he didn’t know what he is getting into.

          Hopefully, others will educate themselves.
          Internet is still here.

        • sugarplumfairy

          I’m sorry you lost your friend.. I love that you honor him.. I’m reeeeally sorry his young son lost his dad..
          But that doesn’t excuse his choice of work.. He should have found something more honorable..

          • Dmitri

            The point has been raised that maybe he didn’t have health insurance, and needed money to have his cancer treated.

            • DodoTheLaser

              Hard to blame him, if that was the case.

              But it’s hard to treat cancer with cancer, allegorically speaking.

            • Dmitri

              One can only imagine the desperation of needing anti-cancer drugs that cost thousands of dollars, and not having insurance. I would be a jerk too, if I thought it might save my life, or prolong my time with my kids. Maybe not, but I can see that angle.

            • DodoTheLaser

              Understood. Cancer is a complicated issue though, that is still being researched.

              On top of somewhat obvious contributors like smoking and radiation, there are also
              inner conflicts/stress/cognitive dissonance, that may play the key role in triggering the body going into such an extent of confusion where it attacks it’s own cells and starts reproducing uncontrollably in all the wrong places/body parts.

              Either way, I wish it to no one.

            • Dmitri

              Even though I am an athiest, I pray for cancer patients.

            • DodoTheLaser

              Same here. Before the good doctors/scientists/philosophers come up with the real answer/solution – hoping there is plenty of opium available for cancer victims to go
              in peace, pain free, with the smile.

            • sugarplumfairy

              So, needing healthcare justifies intimidating people?

            • Bob

              He died the way many clams are dying these days. Comes from being lied to and coming down with cognitive disonnance that causes continual stress and then the cancer shows up. The plague of the damned.

          • DodoTheLaser

            Whoever down voted SPF’s post – do you homework, please.

    • DodoTheLaser

      Thank you, Ted. Can you post the lyrics here too, please?

      • Ted Slowik

        You bet:

        Dear editor tell me some good news for a change

        The world is driving me crazy and that seems so very strange

        Why does there have to be so much sad news everywhere?

        I’m going to break free and get right out of here

        Dear editor I’m feeling pretty blue again

        My fantasy lover just ran off with my imaginary friend

        And they don’t know what’s happening

        Sometimes I wish I was them

        How do you wipe the slate clean?

        And start all over again

        Dear editor tell me some good news for a change

        The world is driving me crazy and that seems so very strange

        Why does there have to be so much sad news everywhere?

        I’m going to break free and get right out of here

        • DodoTheLaser

          Thank you, Ted.

  • SandiCorrena

    What if we start tweeting #MISSING SCIENTOLOGIST with their names and last date seen?

  • DodoTheLaser

    Vader – When the Sun Drowns in Dark

    http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=nvBhxmuNHj8

    “Where the sun drowns in dark,
    The left hand path engulfs.”

  • Simon

    Off-topic but I’m new to posting here and want to say thanks to Tony for all the work he’s doing. I check this site every day for new LOLs. Whilst many of the stories are heartbreaking and tragic, the funny ones crack me up. What Tony and people like him are doing is invaluable. Hubbard could never have foreseen the internet (you’d think a superhuman like him would’ve had psychic abilities, not to mention the ability not to die) which has opened the eyes of so many people formerly trapped in the Sciloon prison.

    • ThetaBara

      Shush! Hubbard did not “die!” He dropped his meat body!

  • Simon

    By the way, has Karen Pouw commented on Leah Remini yet? I’m waiting for her now customary and legendary “she’s a bitter apostate”.

    • Robert Eckert

      Karin told us that the {Church} of Scientology would have no comment because “we respect the privacy of our parishioners”. You can’t make this stuff up!

  • Colliric

    You missed the “OT8 Convention at LAX” video, he appears in that too…

  • donnafiore

    they better not try this with me!

  • Tina Brown

    Karma!

  • Spiderpope

    Sad to say i don’t think he’ll be missed.

  • Dave Roland

    Why don’t the people who are being harassed by Lynch simply take out a protection order? If he shows up again then you snap his photo and call the police.

    Dave

    • Tony Ortega

      Not sure you can get a protection order against a dead man.

  • FOTF2012

    Isn’t it odd that from among all these Clears and OTs who have died (i.e., dropped their bodies and gone exterior) that there is not one credible case of any of these exteriorized super-beings manifesting themselves to the living through visible acts, communications, etc.

    So maybe Lynch was not actually a Scientologist. That means he is doomed to be swept into the in-between lives and from there to either the Mars or the Venus implant station. Once entrapped there, he will be programmed to forget his most recent Earth life and will otherwise be made malleable through mental implants and so on. Then, back to Earth most likely, to be born again.

    But an OT would not have suffered that fate — he/she/it could be exterior with full perceptics and could presumably communicate in any number of ways. “Hey!” the dead OT might write in clouds in the sky, “the weather is fine out here; all the invader force keys in the implant stations are actually long dead. I’ll leave you notes up here in the blue every day! ML and ARC, a Thetan.”

    Further, if you were an OT VIII, you would not even need to come back. Heck, if you were quasi-god Ron, you would not even need to do fundraisers. You (Ron) — being at cause over MEST, life and thought both subjectively and objectively — could simply postulate a pot of gold into existence whenever you needed money. The hell with fundraisers. And you could blow the minds of everyone by simply postulating ideal orgs into existence. One day, vacant lot. Next day, 50,000 sq. ft. building that doesn’t even need to be hooked to the grid — it somehow generates its own energy.

    Scientology has its own convenient rationalizations for why it cannot subject the world to actual proof — overwhelming, restimulative, out-gradient, out-exchange, unethical, etc. Bollocks. That same Scientology is quite happy to overwhelm people with crush reging, restimulate them through volcanoes on book cover art and any number of other practices, push people way out gradient through ridiculous stats pushes, create massive out-exchanges ($1,000 for a t-shirt — wow!, not to mention books, e-meters, etc.), and of course any true meaning of ethics is something truly incomprehensible in the Scientology world view.

    So why can’t Scientology demo any Clear or OT objectively? Because they don’t exist. Why can’t dead (out-of-body, exterior) OTs communicate to us? There’s no OTs exist. Not one has been realized. None proven. Just anecdotal information that can be explained in many other ways much more plausibly.

    But for Mr. Lynch, I wonder — would true believers in Scientology really be fine with their magazine editor being manhandled in an implant station? Wouldn’t they want to usher him past the in-between lives madness and get him back in a Scientology baby body? Oh, wait — Scientology does not encourage babies or growth of family, and may enforce abortion for its top ranks.

    Stupid.

    Stupid evolutionarily: those persons with the traits to be the truest believers and most dedicated servants, you weed out of the gene pool instead of encouraging them to have kids?

    Stupid sociologically: pretty much every other religion on Earth has grown via reproduction. Not Scientology! It focuses on the growth vector some (but not all) religions promote — conversion! In its arrogance of belief that it will clear the Earth (convert 100% of the population), Scientology thus squanders its true growth potential through reproduction.

    Well, as Mr. Gump once said that his momma said, “Stupid is as stupid does.”

    And back to Mr. Lynch. He has not moved on to an implant station. He will not be back. He is now born into that land from whence no one returns — to poorly paraphrase Shakespeare, who had a quadrillion times more wisdom than Hubbard.