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Why Isn’t Scientology More Open About Its Space Opera Beliefs? It’s the Best Part!

Martian invaders! Quick, put on your goggles!

Martian invaders! Quick, put on your goggles!

Claire Headley has been under the weather, so we’re replacing our “Up the Bridge” installment this week with something we hope will tide you over.

Back in October, we posted transcripts from a March 10, 1952 L. Ron Hubbard lecture that proved to be hugely popular with our readers. In that lecture, Hubbard described the origins of humanity on Earth, and it was quite a bit different from what he would say 15 years later when he came up with the notorious “OT III” material and its story about Xenu the galactic overlord (which South Park had so much fun with).

Today, we have another fun slice of Hubbard galactic history: audio portions of another lecture from 1952 in which the great scientist explains this solar system’s real political situation!

The lecture we’re hearing today was recorded on October 30, 1952, and its title is “Role of Earth.” We found a recording of two portions of it, and we think you’ll see why we thought it might be worth a listen.

At the beginning of the segment, Hubbard is talking about a young woman who was recovering memories of some kind of space communications switchboard from a previous life. That propels him into a discussion about the nature of our solar system.

The asteroid belt, he says, provides a convenient low-gravity platform for travel to other parts of the “gah-LAX-ee.” And we learn that to outsiders, our solar system is known as “Space Station 33.”

The place is apparently crowded with incoming waves of galactic travelers. The Fourth Invader Force has been here for millennia, but more recently a Fifth Invader Force has moved in, and there have been clashes between the two, with the Fourth Invader Force based on Mars and the Fifth Invader Force banished to Venus. (We think.) Meanwhile, the Earth is used as a prison planet, with installations in places like the Pyrenees and the Mountains of the Moon.

When a person dies on Earth, his thetan (Hubbard’s name for an eternal spirit) is transferred to Mars or Venus for a between-lives implant, erasing his memory of the life he just lived. This is why it takes therapy to recover your entire whole track of existence — that darned between-lives implant is preventing you from seeing your true nature. Or something like that.

In the second portion of the tape, Hubbard describes bodies being held in “pawn” while they are preserved for the use of a thetan. We think.

Hubbard then makes some very interesting claims, that the true nature of the galaxy is much more gruesome than science fiction has been able to portray, and then he tells a rambling story to illustrate it. We’ll let you tell us the upshot of all this.

We found it particularly interesting that Hubbard takes pains to point out that none of this is fiction. Or even very unusual, at least in the solar system he’s observed through his whole track of existence. Fascinating!

We just don’t understand why the Church of Scientology works so hard to keep this stuff under wraps, or why celebrities like Tom Cruise or John Travolta or Kirstie Alley don’t talk about what great space opera there is in L. Ron Hubbard’s lectures. This is the best stuff in Scientology, and it’s also its essence — Hubbard is telling his audience these things because he expects Scientologists to run into these histories as they recover their own galactic memories (at up to a thousand dollars an hour).

As Hubbard says, space is wild! And so is Scientology. But why is the church so shy about it?

 

—————–

OT PHENOMENA FOR YOU DOUBTERS

Last year, one of our most popular features was a weekly look at the “OT Phenomena” that appeared in copies of Advance! magazine in the 1970s. Advance! was — and still is — a publication aimed at whetting the appetites of Scientologists to get to the top end of “the Bridge,” where they reach the “Operating Thetan” levels of spiritual enlightenment and the superhuman abilities that come with them. Each month, the magazine features stories of the kind of extraordinary things “OTs” can do with the power of their minds.

Well, we couldn’t help thinking of those great Advance! items when we saw that one of our readers posted the following comment on a story from a few days ago, where it might not get the notice it deserves.

Please enjoy this anecdote from Paul Katz, you doubters. You just can’t argue with evidence like this!

To those LRH haters, OT ability deniers and especially those who know nothing of these things, yet want Mike, Marty and others to come to their senses and abandon worthless Scn Tech:

YOU ARE WHISTLING PAST THE GRAVEYARD. Yes, I mean you.

I have been waiting for an appropriate place to tell this story, and since Michael mentions Paul McElveen above, I will now.

Paul was a shipmate and my roommate on Excalibur in the early 70’s. I don’t remember what his job was at that time.

One payday we got in his stripped-down doorless Jeep and headed out to spend the precious $20 bill each of us had just been given. I was the passenger, my bill was in my right pants pocket.

Half way up the hill into town I realized my money was gone. I mentioned it to Paul.

He did an immediate uey and headed back towards the Excal. A minute or two later another uey and onto the shoulder.

There in the weeds was a $20 bill. I got out put in my pocket and got back in. He looked at me, smiled and said:

“That’s called knowin’ where it’s at.”

We never spoke of this. I was sure that all the OTs aboard could do that and other amazing things but LRH told them (in A History of Man, and an HCOB from the 60’s, for example) not to show off their abilities. So, OT ability is real. I saw it in action. (And I am truly sad if you didn’t attain OT in the c of s or if you didn’t feel scn worked for you.)

To you know-nothing whistlers: Whatsa matter? Mouth a little dry? Think I’m lying? Well say so, but sign your real name, and location, just as i am.

Paul Katz

Dunedin, FLA

Thanks, Paul. We’re sure many of our readers now have an entirely new attitude about spending several years and a couple of hundred thousand dollars if it means we’d achieve the superhuman ability to find lost twenties.

Somebody warm up the e-meter!

 

—————–

DISCONNECTION EVEN AFTER DEATH?

Another strong video testament from Karen de la Carriere about the death of her son, Alex Jentzsch.

J. Swift and Angry Gay Pope are doing a great job putting these things together.

 

—————–

Posted by Tony Ortega on April 2, 2013 at 07:00

 

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  • Patty Moher

    Ah space opera! Yes indeed. Reminds me of the time I was a red headed whore on planet FOS2521. An entertainment planet for space traveling businessmen. I was not just any red headed whore, I was the queen of the red headed whores and ran that planet with lots of theta until one of the implanters got a hold of me and put me in a large white box and zapped me with thoughts that I was a degraded being. Ah the good old days. Oh I just had a cog! This must be why I love to throw SP Parties! .

    • TonyOrtega

      I think this comment goes in the Comment Hall of Fame.

    • And it’s also why you keep a stash of dozens of red hair wigs in mixing bowls in your upper kitchen cabinets!

    • BuryTheNuts2

      Yet another keyboard……………….trashed by coffee!

      • Bradley Greenwood

        I have a “Seal Shield” keyboard… liquid-proof, goes in the dishwasher. No, this is not spam…but I have “mest” up a few keyboards over the years.

        • I’ve always put keyboards in the dishwasher to clean them up. Put some tape over the connector and use a less aggressive cycle. Works perfectly with never any failures.

          With a faulty hard drive that contains information you’re desperate to recover, put it in a Zip Lock bag, then into the freezer for a few hours. Whip it back into the computer before it thaws out and copy what you want onto another drive. I’m not sure why this works, but it does!

          Andrew

          • Poison Ivy

            Not so great when you’re on a laptop. I actually destroyed two of them over the years.

            • Missionary Kid

              If your computer isn’t running right, the problem may be that the electrons in the CPU have low blood sugar, so they aren’t running straight.

              To correct that, follow this procedure: Open up your computer, find the CPU, and place it so you have access from directly above. Next, take a can of Coke, shake it up well, invert it, and pop it open right over the CPU.

              When those electrons get that sugar and caffeine, they’ll run straight, and it’ll solve all your problems.

              This procedure works just as well on laptops as on desktops.

            • Missionary Kid

              Note: the procedure for computer repair was inspired by LRH, and endorsed by DM.

            • Ciru

              That’s squirrel computer tech. Just put it in a sauna for a day with some vitamins and it’ll sweat out the coffee toxins. It’ll only cost $10,000 too.

            • richelieu jr

              Depends who’s lap you’re on, my dear.

          • BuryTheNuts2

            You are handy to have around too!

          • richelieu jr

            Never tried the dishwasher but I’ve sued the freezer trick many times.. Only works about 60% of the time for me, but it’s still way better than buying that many new HDs!

        • BuryTheNuts2

          Thanks. I truly need one at home and at work. This is getting ridiculous!

          Walmart…here I come!

    • What I like about Scn auditing is that it provides pure wish-fullfilment, and even guilt-fulfillment. You are asked questions which implant suggestions about an infinite past of all the best things you can think of, and all the worst things you can think of. You are taught to run with these hypnotic suggestions in the form of auditing questions and not “Q&A” with them.

      You are given suggestions that you have done so many horrible things like “have you committed genocide?” (OH! We got a read on that!) that pretty soon all women become prostitutes and all men become planet-destroyers.

      The unfortunate thing is that memories make up a large part of a person’s self-identity – who they tell themselves they are. And so a Scientologist can be saddled with so much guilt from these auditing induced, guilt-fulfillment fantasies that they end up on “whole track amends projects” and begin working for L Ron Hubbard for free.

      If you really step back and think about it, to exploit the most powerful emotional vulnerabilities of human beings in order to enrich yourself, as L Ron Hubbard did, is actually quite fucking evil.

      May the Fat Fuck Rot in Hell for what he did to Scientologists.

      Alanzo

      • Patty Moher

        “(OH! We got a read on that!) that pretty soon all women become prostitutes and all men become planet-destroyers”.

        Wait! Wot? I’ll have you know Mr. Doom and Gloom, that I also destroyed plenty of planets, Christ, I wiped out several galaxies as I recall. And then there was this time I actually ran an Implant Station. Girls just want to have fun!

        • And I was an awesome prostitute.

          I used tractor beams and presser beams to make men come so hard their brains would explode.

          So HAH!

          • Bella Legosi

            so you are the inspiration for Little Boots comment, “Blow your mind 50ft out of itself!” What are you doing tonight, how much, and do you like gender confused girls from Portland? 🙂

            • BuryTheNuts2

              HA!

            • Poison Ivy

              “Blow your mind 50ft out of itself!” One of my new favorite COB quotes!

            • Bella Legosi

              Yep….mine too 🙂

            • Poison Ivy

              We must remember to use it in a sentence and make clay models of the concept on a daily basis.

            • Bella Legosi

              Ahead of you on the first part…..how the hell would you model that? lol god I wish I had photoshop skills!

            • Poison Ivy

              Calling all PhotoShop Artists! “Blow your mind 50ft out of itself!” – Go!

        • richelieu jr

          Saying ‘gender-confused’ and ‘from Portland’ in the same sentence is repetitive (I blame the weather..)

      • The wish-fulfillment phenomenon also explains the “natural clear” fiasco of the late 1970s. When it was suggested to PCs that they might allready be clear, the needle floated and this was interpreted as proof they were clear! The official clear tally went from 6000 to 20,000 in about a year and many of these people were obviously not clear. I could not buy the “cleared cannibal” explanation, and my belief in the state of clear was eroded.

      • MarionDee

        “Guilt fulfillment,” Alanzo, that is absolutely brilliant! My ex from the Rouchies gradually filled up with
        self-loathing because he had spent 26 precious years not dedicating himself to the cause, and believed that if if he hadn’t been part of the cure since birth, he must be the festering heart of the problem. Many people have enormous, free-floating guilt, of the woulda-coulda-shoulda type. (What I mean by that they feel they have failed because they aren’t perfect–and of course, we can
        all find infinite examples of our not being perfect.) The potential for mining guilt and imagining crimes in the gaLAXay according to LRH is infinite. It’s not just a trap and a syndrome, but an endless pit of self-reproach and misery which must, of course, be addressed with still more claptrap to heal you as you go up the bridge, and then more misery again.

        

I’m reminded of some of the satanic cult scandals of the late 70s and 1980s (Manhattan Beach in California, etc.) There was a long New Yorker piece about a supposed crime in Oregon in which a male authority figure was accused of abusing and sacrificing hundreds of children in satanic rituals. The accusations of some traumatized children (pressured by adults to “discover” repressed memories) were brought to him and he readily confessed to every awful detail. But there was a problem: no children, let alone hundreds of children, had disappeared from the area and no bodies had been found either. So the police went to their Satanist and made up some horrible tale, saying one of his torture victims had remembered it. The accused man readily confessed. They tried the same gambit; he confessed again. It turned out he was a man with deep wells of guilt who needed to confess–to something, anything, to find peace. Well, the case was thrown out and I assume the man went to a some kind of therapist. All I can say is, thank God he never joined Scientology.

      • Casabeca

        Do you spend every lifetime as the same gender? Just wondering if one could be guilty of prostitution and genocide? Yikes!

        • richelieu jr

          I personally was responsible for genocide BY prostitution… Boy was I sore! I was still walking funny three lifetimes later!

          • Casabeca

            You guys are so clever…I hope to make JV commenting team…a five year goal ;-). Thanks for answer!

          • q-bird

            est-ce vrai? pour vous?

            Monstrously delightful comment Rich!!! I was between sips of café au lait when I read this…
            fortunate that!

            Santé! ;-D

            • richelieu jr

              merci!
              et bah oui! bien sûr que c’est vrai!
              C’est certifié par le grand menteur rouquin lui-même,
              l’Amiral à la dentition douteuse…!
              à la votre!

            • q-bird

              LRH certi-lied?! Mais bien sûr!

            • richelieu jr

              (and I won’t even tell you what ‘q’, (pronounced phonetically) means in French, my fine, feathered ami…)

            • q-bird

              laughing with you – Rich humor! Oh come now…
              S’il vous plaît, dites-moi. Mais Qui! I am terribly curious.
              My given surname bears an accent aigu – So c’est ca! Nous sommes cousins
              ​​éloignés – Je suis certaine. By birth I am Cajun… also known as coonass…
              from the word connasse!
              sacré bleu, sac en papier!! You know this word?! Egag!!!
              & Oh MON DIEU !
              Q : Can ‘cue’ possibly be any worse than this?
              A : Je ne pense pas!

              Richelieu The Rascal – you can tell me. It’s okay. Je n’ai pas peur, Cher – Oui, do tell.

              and don’t worry none too much about that goofy walk of yours – given the data, it is well deserved.

            • richelieu jr

              Very well, if you mus know… Q- “queue” means, “cock”…

            • q-bird

              ha! ok. I can live with this Monsieur Rich!

            • q-bird

              Got it Richelieu, Le Coq… Thanks! – good to know – not so bad – should I ever find myself in France however, I will be sure to not use my nickname!

        • OOkpik

          According to Hubbard, you would have changed genders many times. You could have been your dad’s mother or your granddaughter’s fiance or, or…

    • Missionary Kid

      So this is where you ended up! You were too expensive for me. I always had to settle for a blonde.

      • Roger Larsson

        A woman as Captain on the spaceship “Planet Earth” came to close to a sun in the past,and this sun pulled the spaceship in to its orbit and here we are in a suns orbit on a spaceship keeping the spirit up with stories.

    • Ah, but did collar and cuffs match?

    • FistOfXenu

      Hang on Patty, that was YOU? Damn, you were gorgeous! I couldn’t stay away from you. I guess you don’t remember me? I was the 9 foot tall guy that ran the satellite taxis on FOS2521. Remember? Our slogan was “Out of this world? We’ll get you home F-A-S-T!” I had 3 eyes – all purple – and 2, uh, well anyway, I had 2 and you always knew EXACTLY what to do with both of them, which is why I used to give the 80 megazat tips every time. I’d’ve given more but it would’ve shown up on tax returns. So I made sure you and your girls always had free taxi rides. I still think about you. Who’d’ve thought we’d meet again in this lifetime?

      • Patty Moher

        so happy to hear from you darlin’

        • richelieu jr

          I bet you say that yo all the three purple-eyed, 9ft tall taxi runners!

  • John P.

    I don’t have time to listen to the audio for the lecture, but I’m sure if I did, my blood would boil at the craziness and at the fact that people still eat this stuff up. And I won’t get into the bizarre phenomenon of somebody who claims knowledge of all sorts of scientific stuff who mispronounces “gah-LAX-ee.” That’s even more painful than “NOOK-you-ler” physics.

    The asteroid belt, he says, provides a convenient low-gravity field for travel to other parts of the “gah-LAX-ee.”

    While I’m not an astrophysicist, and while I don’t even play one on TV, I wanted to call attention to this particular sentence to illustrate just how much nuttiness Hubbard packs into every random synapse firing. Last time I checked, the mass of your average asteroid in the asteroid belt is pretty small. But it still has some mass and some gravitational pull. Therefore, while the gravitational effects of the asteroids at any point in the asteroid belt are not major compared to the gravitational pull of a nearby planet, they are in fact greater than zero. So it is scientifically inaccurate to say that the asteroid belt is a low-gravity zone.

    The other problem with the asteroid belt is the risk of collision with a space rock as you fly in your spaceship, accelerating to escape velocity to head out to some other star system. If you’re doing 25,000 miles per hour (slow by interstellar speeds, but equal to escape velocity from Earth) and you hit a rock the size of a potato, you’re going to turn a spaceship into a series of small metal fragments. And the probability of hitting something like that, while not particularly high, is still enough to worry about. So the asteroid belt is probably the last place you’d want to be. This should have been obvious to sci-fi writers of the time, as I believe Clarke, Heinlein, Asimov and others all wrote about the dangers of transiting the asteroid belt in their books which were contemporaries of Hubbard’s.

    • Bella Legosi

      This is off topic, but you mentioned a few days ago property taxes Co$ may be paying the City of Portland……I came across this nugget. Thought you would like to take a look. When you get to the page scroll down and click on Stevens Building and there is some info on the Sherlock as well…….http://www.butlerbrokers.qwestoffice.net/

      • Missionary Kid

        If you want to see the numbers on the Stevens building in Portland that Butler brokers made up to sell it for Co$, or whoever owns it, look at http://www.butlerbrokers.qwestoffice.net/Stevens%20Building%20For%20Sale%20Package.pdf

      • Roger Larsson

        There are contributers to civilizations welfare and there are criminals.We have to face the fact. LRH is a wanted criminal on other planets in other galaxies also.

        • Poison Ivy

          So is Target 2 sort of like the African Coast here on Teegeeack? (or the Barbary Coast in the 19th Century?) A haven for pirates and outlaws?

    • SciWatcher

      Unless you are trying to escape from Imperial Forces. Provided you don’t run into one of those pesky exogorths, aka space-slugs, the asteroid belt is a good way to go. They’d be crazy to follow you!

    • Dean Blair

      Well mr. smarty pants. Back then we had asteroid deflecting shields which prevented any damage to our great space ships that looked exactly like DC 9s only with rocket engines. The asteroids just bounced off the shields and we could go on our merry ways.

      • John P.

        I can find no description of the DC-8 space ships other than that they were exactly like the current DC-8 except “the DC8 had fans, propellers on it and the space plane didn’t.” Ignoring the fact that Hubbard, who claimed to have had a pilot’s license, couldn’t tell the difference between propellers and “fans” (jets) in this passage, we note that if the spaceships were identical to contemporary DC-8s except for this one difference, then if DC-8s have no deflector shields (they most assuredly don’t), then Xenu’s spaceships must also lack them. Any representation to the contrary is “squirrel tech” and it’s off to the RPF for you.

        • jensting

          My favourite alternative DC-8 story is this: Hubbard was talking about the late 1940s project (the bomber prototype XB-42) which was driven by (a pair of) propellers and for which the proposed passenger transport derivative was called – wait for it – DC-8.

          Ta-dah! It does look like nothing else (whereas the jet DC-8 is a bit bland).

          http://www.dc-8jet.com/0-dc8-skybus.htm

        • Poison Ivy

          Hubbard flew gliders in the ’30’s, not instrument guided modern aircraft. Big difference.

          • John P.

            Note I said Hubbard “claimed to have had a pilot’s license.” Even a complete wanna-be like Hubbard would presumably have known the difference between a prop and a jet.

            Incidentally, the gliders from Hubbard’s day were not only nothing like today’s jets, but they’re nothing like today’s gliders, which are pretty sophisticated. My new aviation lust object is not an upgrade jet but a Schempp-Hirth Quintus M glider, which is an amazing plane. The only problem is that I’d have to keep it way, way upstate in Elmira, which is another one of those little rural hamlets in upstate New York, right near the Canada region of New York and its quaint villages. Too much hassle to get up there on a busy weekend.

      • Was it a thetan energy shield?

    • The problem with the low-gravity zone isn’t that he’s alleging low gravity. Since the term is undefined, it’s entirely meaningless anyway. No, the problem here is that a “low-gravity field” is, a priori, a convenient place from which to launch your galactic travels. I flubbed onto a misunderstood plot point, and need it explained before I can become unstuck in Hubbard’s gibberish.

      You see, all I know about humans’ direct experience with interplanetary travel (in reality, not necessarily in fiction) is that the pronounced gravitational force of a relatively massive body, Jupiter for instance, is quite convenient for its slingshot effect. Think Mariner 10, Voyager 1 (not of V’Ger fame; that’s the fictional Voyager 6), Cassini, etc.

      • Ciru

        This is the least ridiculous part of the monologue for me. Taking off from an asteroid would be easier than from a planet because of its lower gravitational field.

        I liked the part where Earth was ignored by aliens because it was too big but Venus (almost exactly the same size) was used by one of the invader forces.

  • jensting

    a switchboard in the sky…

    I guess Hubbard just decided to neglect the segment of the customer base who needed something rooted, however slightly, in reality. Instead, he just went for the ones who keep coming back, even though the story is demonstrably laughable and changing every other month.
    This might be perceived as a weakness by those of us who like our stories to make sense, but it might be exactly what’s needed to keep a certain type of person (those who delight in believing things that makes others laugh) hooked.
    At the end of the day,I don’t think it’s about how reasonable the beliefs are, it’s probably more the group enforcing and the not-so-subtle encouragement of the side of people who likes being controlled which keeps one segment of the customers hooked (and repels the huge percentage of people who try one or two things and then leave permanently).

    • You know, Jens, a little while ago back in 1637, there would have been quite a few worthy Dutch citizens queuing at the doors of the Amsterdam Org demanding to buy ‘Dianetics’ so they could secure their eternity and achieve Super Poweringness.. But as there was not yet an Org in that fine city they all went off to speculate on tulip bulbs instead.

      Let me demonstrate my own remote viewing super-powers.

      I’m looking at John P’s bedside cabinet. Give me a moment, it’s 8,943.67 miles away approximately – wait the swirling mists are clearing. Ah, I thought as much, it’s a well thumbed copy of William Mackay’s classic ‘Extraordinary Popular Delusions and the Madness of Crowds’

      Interestingly there is an Org in Amsterdam now, though with no money to repair the lifts or pay the electricity bills I imagine all the staff have wandered off and have become tulip growers or cheese makers!

      Andrew

      • John P.

        Unsurprisingly, Andrew, you are absolutely right. As a remarkably perceptive observer of the human condition, you accurately predicted the contents of my library, though Popular Delusions and the Madness of Crowds is not in my bedside table, it’s enshrined prominently in the financial books section of my home library, one shelf above my Oxford English Dictionary and two bookcases to the left of my copy of the Kelmscott Chaucer.

        Mackay was mandatory reading for those of us who lived through the Tulipomania that took place in the last years of the second millennium — the “Internet bubble,” where now-worthless stocks were bid up to values greater than the most successful “bricks and mortar” companies in existence. As someone who has expertise in technology, I was front and center in shoveling piles of money into these very stocks. Naturally, we in Global Capitalism HQ are good at both buying long and selling short, so when the bubble burst (as these things inevitably do), we emerged unscathed, and indeed, even better than ever. I bought one waterfront estate with the bonuses reaped on the way up in the Internet bubble, and the other with the bonuses paid on the way down (with enough left over for a “starter yacht”). Thank you for being the catalyst for a walk down memory lane.

        Incidentally, no wonder the Amsterdam org is having such trouble paying its bills. If we apply the Dublin formula to the population of the Netherlands (16 million), where Dublin has about 50 public out of 7 million population per my comments here a week or two ago, we can reasonably estimate the active Scientology membership in the Netherlands at something less than 150 including staff.

  • 1subgenius

    Why Isn’t Scientology More Open About Its Space Opera Beliefs?
    Because nobody who isn’t brainwashed could possibly believe them.

    • Bella Legosi

      Just wait until Scientology starts to recruit from “Ancient Aliens” viewers or those who have read the Earth Chronicles =(

      • Ze Moo

        While many people can ‘suspend disbelief’ for watching TV, few live their lives according to ‘Star Wars’ or “The Predictions of Nostradamus’. There will always be people who believe in alien space invaders, Bigfoot and the Loch Ness monster. A decent education and critical thinking skills are sadly lacking in too many people. For the most part, belief in such things doesn’t cause you much trouble in life, until you get in the clutches of someone who can manipulate you into giving money or your labor to their ‘finding Atlantis’ cause. All of the ‘ancient Alien, Nostradamus, Edgar Cayce, Elvis is alive crap is just a sign of a second rate educational system.

        • Bella Legosi

          Well Jedi’s would beg to differ with you 😛 They now surpass public Scientologist. However, material like Ancient Aliens and Earth Chronicles to me are primers for something like Scientology. I have read all the Earth Chronicle books, but thankfully all that came out of the reading of those books was a better appreciation for megalithic builders.

          I agree that education and critical thinking are sadly not taught very well in most schools and if the educational system DID teach them……well let’s just say people would wake up and make Occupy look like “a little get together”.

        • The Loch Ness Monster isn’t real?

          • FistOfXenu

            There there George, of course it’s real. It’s descended from an alien that escaped from its volcano just after the H-bombs went off. The radiation made it genetically mutate and the result is Nessie.

          • Poison Ivy

            I did a TV show on the Loch Ness monster once. Had the full tour of the Loch, the village and its inhabitants & eye witnesses. Went out on the Loch in a boat, trawling for Nessie. Had a fully open mind, but alas, no monster showed up. Nessie has really brought money in tourism to the area, however! Did Hubbard ever address the Loch Ness mystery?

    • FistOfXenu

      Isn’t that connected to how the Ron and Dave Show don’t have a sense of humor and can’t stand it when people laugh at them and call them nutcases?

  • Great proof that Scientology is science fiction.

    Hubbard’s lectures are the best proof to refuting Hubbard’s claims.

    I’ve concluded we would need UFOs to land and vindicate Hubbard’s data.

    Until then, it’s made up bunk. .

    • Poison Ivy

      They did land, Chuck. And all Hubbard’s data was verified with written, tape recorded, filmed and photgraphic evidence. All of it. But as I learned yesterday, not only did the cat eat his original research, Hubster just coincidentally happened to store all the evidence of UFO landings and vindication of his Space Opera tales on Hiroshima, right at ground zero where the bomb hit. Such bad luck!

  • Bella Legosi

    Hey Paul……finding money is NOTHING NEW for those in Scientology…….what magick…….I once prayed to Jesus for a Christmas Edition of a Barbie Doll and you know what? I got it! Was it Santa (my parents) or did the power of prayer send me that toy??????

    • Bella Legosi

      hahahahaha one down vote…….oh stroke my enthetic, sociopathic, SP Ego some more……come on I dare ya! 😀

      • Sherbet

        Don’t you love it?? I scratch my head sometimes, thinking, “How the heck did I offend someone with that post??”

        • I bet it was someone who got the Malibu barbie but wanted the princess barbie.

          • Bella Legosi

            They prolly got a Ken doll and that really really created one hell of a Christmas Engram for them.

        • Bella Legosi

          😀 I am hoping this was a for real down vote instead of a fat finger mistake! Where is Captain?? He is totally missing out!

          • BuryTheNuts2

            Yeah, where is Capt. I always worry about him when he is on a bender damn it.

            • Bella Legosi

              If his benders are anything like mine he will need at least a gallon of water upon waking up and 10 hours of silent restful sleep.

        • I have been trying to figure out the pattern of downvotes on this page. I can’t do it. Someone has it in for MidwestMom, I think, but beyond that, I’m without a clue.

  • Bella Legosi

    I am halfway thru the audio and thank you Tony…….I think I have slapped myself in the forehead 3 times now followed by shudders and shaking of the head. H. P. Lovecraft was sooooooo much better at SciFy then this tool.

  • It’s interesting that even as far back as 1952 L Ron Hubbard was unable to separate fact from fantasy.

    And is Paul Katz merely a deluded fool, so desperate to believe that super powers really exist or was he suffering from a mental disorder. It’s hard to tell.

    There should be a compulsory ‘Creative Writing Rundown’ before Scientologists are allowed to share their ‘Success Stories’ with anyone – curing lumpy goldfish, destroying alien weather stations in Phoenix, turning back time to avoid being run over by a speeding truck, finding lost $20 notes and so many more fabrications just to attest to a level so they can start the next one. It’s so pathetic that adults choose to make themselves the subject of derision by such immature fantasy writing.

    Andrew

    • BuryTheNuts2

      Don’t forget the OT Postman who straightened the corner of the magazine he threw willy nilly on someones porch because he is just neat like that!

      • Observer

        Or the exteriorized identifier of patio furniture colors! Well, except for the green.

        • BuryTheNuts2

          And wasn’t that in the dark?

          • Observer

            Yes, that was the excuse given for not seeing the green. Lame!

            • BuryTheNuts2

              OT fail!

            • Midwest Mom

              Bury, I just exteriorized to your house. That’s a cute palm tree in your front yard! P.S. Water your plants! 🙂

            • I just used remote viewing to check your guttering BTN. And though I’d be the last person to criticize the maintenance of your house, cleaning out the palm leaves before the next torrential downpour might stop the lawn being flooded and sadly drowning the squirrel colony.

              We need squirrels, red, grey and even polka dot.

              Andrew

            • BuryTheNuts2

              Holy crap! You and Mom are REAL Operating Thetans!
              I am in AWE of your SUPERPOWERZ.

              That palm tree is awfully cute.

            • Sherbet

              I’m glad Mom and Andrew are exteriorizing chez vous, Bury. I walk around my house without a bathrobe sometimes.

            • BuryTheNuts2

              TMI,…TMI !!!

            • I know Sherbet. I’ve remotely viewed you. And you’re very comely. Cute tattoo and discreetly placed!

              Now let me check on Miss Plum. Oh, she’s at work looking all serious in her starched white uniform. “Drink this. It will make you feel better.” she’s saying and sure enough her patient is perking up and will soon be out of the Intensive Care Unit. One way or another.

              Andrew

              “Officer! There’s a peeping tom in that house over there looking through my windows.”

              “I can’t see him.”

              Of course you can’t. You’re not using these binoculars!”

              – MAD Magazine, a long time ago

            • Sherbet

              Oh, gosh, I was sitting in my green lawn chairs and thought I was invisible.

              (Love the Mad joke!)

            • Missionary Kid

              That’s a variation on the old story.

              Police are called to a little old lady’s house, because she’s complaining about a neighbor exposing himself to her. The officer looks out the window through the neighbor’s window and says, “I can’t see anything.”

              The little old lady says, “Well, you’re not standing on this stool.”

            • Captain Howdy

              You know of the MAD Magazine on Middle Earthiness Island?

            • sugarplumfairy

              I’m sooo glad I was working when you checked on me.. Usually I’m hiding in the linen room, reading Tony’s blog on my phone..

            • Midwest Mom

              When I’m fully clothed, I walk around without a bathrobe a lot – even while walking the dog, grocery shopping, going to my kids’ school and sports functions, and even attending Mass at church!

              Shocked? I’m full of surprises! 🙂

            • Sherbet

              That’s why Andrew isn’t peeping at you.

            • Midwest Mom

              Don’t think that he didn’t try, Sherb. The Zombies scared him off.

            • I did try but those awful shambling Zombies spotted me and advanced menacingly. Fortunately they are slow moving and I escaped in time. I just caught a fleeting glimpse of Midwest Mom and just enough time to admire the frilly lace edgings on her dressing gown.

              But I will try again and perhaps I’ll have better luck next time. I hate Zombies spoiling my remote viewing pleasure.

              Andrew

            • Poison Ivy

              Speaking of Zombies, since they are so slow and easy to kill by ten year old boys and teenaged girls (in The Walking Dead), why is it that they overran the planet – army, navy, airforce, national guard et all – in record time? Just a few Mishones with swords could’ve wiped out whole armies of them.

            • grundoon

              (Hubbard’s bad SF didn’t hold our attention for very long)

            • Midwest Mom

              Andrew, was that the gown which is full length or the shorter one that shows my ankles?

            • The pink one that complements your eyes and gives a tantalizing glimpse of your shapely ankles.

              Andrew

            • FistOfXenu

              May we ask for 15 min advance notice before the next time? A bit of preparation before exteriorizing is sometimes necessary. 😉

            • grundoon

              (…sounds of thetan putting on astral raincoat…)

            • Sherbet

              We’ll have a secret signal in the sky, like the Bat Signal only battier.

            • Poison Ivy

              Perhaps they can exteriorize at my place late at night – I need someone to keep the deer off the lawn.

            • Sherbet

              How do you know they’re not exteriorizing out there, and the deer are just metaphors?

              (Post script: Every time I indulge in one of these really silly threads I remember that anything lrh said was far sillier than the idea of MidwestMom and Andrew clearing the planet of deer, starting with PI’s lawn.)

            • Poison Ivy

              Tragically, despite the many great and witty minds on this blog, the snark we produce here cannot even begin to compete with either LRH’s tall tales or the “true stories” of ADVANCE! magazine.

            • I’m hurt that you believe L Ron Hubbard had a sillier imagination than me.

              Andrew

            • Sherbet

              Aw, Andrew, don’t feel bad. You can start your own church.

            • DeElizabethan

              I think they also came to my house while South. Got the tree and the jammed up gutters. I’ve been trying to use the OT powerz for the nasty gutter job, to no avail, will have to settle for the ladder and my hands. Maybe MWMom and Andrew could send over some powerz to help me out? I’ll wait!

            • Midwest Mom

              Unfortunately, my supah powahs aren’t the type which can perform manual labor. Try using your feminine wiles, Dee! (Wink-Wink!)

            • Sherbet

              Let us know if you find a $20 bill in there.

            • BuryTheNuts2

              I am going to settle for sending Mr. nuts straight up and verticle on the ladder….all the way to those jammed gutters.
              I will however get the hose out and water the poor thirsty shrubs.

              Mom, has only been back a day and I am already scolded!

            • Poison Ivy

              So glad Mom is back. My giggle quotient is met for the day!

            • grundoon

              And none too soon!

            • grundoon

              MM!!!! Welcome back!!!! We missed you!!!

            • Midwest Mom

              Thank you! 🙂

      • RMycroft

        The werewolf cure was good.

    • Mighty Korgo of Teegeeack

      I vote deluded fool.

    • Sherbet

      “Sure, there are wars, misery, and poverty, but my goldfish is no longer all lumpy-looking! Praise the tech!”

    • Poison Ivy

      They make for great stories, great fiction even some great movies. Hubbard failed to mention to his followers that all humans are imbued with this wonderful, super OT-powerful ability known as “imagination.” That’s where the “whole track” really lies.

  • whingeybingey

    I was particularly impressed by one Big Being in Los Angeles who was under the impression that Australian Aboriginals boiled missionaries in pots. Rofl!! Is there no end to the OTness?? And what was more, this person was egging them on to do it, unbodily. Don’t you all wish you could do that?

    • Missionary Kid

      Maybe he got New Guinea and Australia confused. 🙂 Ha!!! So much for $cientology ethnology studies.
      It just goes to show how much $cientology makes up about the world. That image was probably taken from some potboiler (pun intended) Hollywood silent movie, or, at best, a Bing Crosby/Bob Hope movie.

      Come to think of it, isn’t $cientology just another form of a cargo cult that has everyone waiting to receive the benefits of some alien tech?

      • whingeybingey

        Lol, probably! I was so considerate at the time – not to “invalidate” her “case” – it did cause me serious doubts though, which is why people being audited are NOT supposed to discuss these things with each other. She just had a big mouth, which was fortunate for me really. It truly did make me question. It was still years before I left though.

        • Missionary Kid

          Isn’t it amazing how we put things together in a more complete picture years later, when we’ve left something. As one person put it, you only “hear” things when you’re ready to hear them.

          • Bella Legosi

            Heres another way…..you can hear everything and anything (as long as you are not deaf), but to LISTEN is to actually give thought to what you ‘hear’

            • Missionary Kid

              Well put.

              From Nilsson’s The Point, the Rockman says, “You see what you want to see, you hear what you want to hear.”

          • whingeybingey

            Sad but true, Missionary Kid. I wonder if she’s still in?

  • Can you imagine what Star Wars must have done to his ego…. here’s a simple western in Space story that made billions… must have made him feel really inadequate, lulz.

    Which brings me on to a question of the old timers who knew him and I don’t think I’ve seen seen discussed before. Star Trek. Did he ever watch it or mention it? Given his friendship with other Sci Fi authors did he ever come into contact with Roddenberry? I have visions of him grumbling that the character of Kirk was based on him, or one of his past (future surely, ed) lives. Are there any episodes that parallel one of his “tracks of existence’ stories? I just can’t imagine him not knowing or watching a few episodes without making pithy comments.

    • Missionary Kid

      Star Wars was, IMHO, an homage to the movie serials of the 30s through the 40s, but much better told. I doubt he ever met Roddenberry, since he was on the lam for a lot of that period. Roddenberry dealt in ideas that often expanded people’s views, even if the stories were corny at times.

      LRH’s sole purpose was to make money by bonding people to him.

      His friendships were with sf authors working in a much earlier era. The youngest was probably Harlan Ellison.

  • SFFrog

    If they embraced the space opera publicly they might have to admit that while they are a floor wax, they aren’t actually a dessert topping.

    • BuryTheNuts2

      Blaspheme!

    • sugarplumfairy

      Which reminds me.. Chevy Chase would make a great clam..

      • SFFrog

        I’m OT… and you’re not.

    • mirele

      DO NOT TAUNT HAPPY FUN CULT!

  • Bradley Greenwood

    The audio of this glorified snake-oil salesman, is the product of a man, and too much “galaxitive”. In other words, he’s full of shit. How do independents still buy this, now that the truth has been clearly laid-out for them?

  • Truthiwant

    I am now going to reveal to you how to obtain OT abilities without having to enter
    the doors of a Scientology Organization or even read a book by L. Ron Hubbard.

    But firstly, before I reveal this stunning information, I am really happy for you,
    Mr. Katz, that you retrieved your $20 bill. Heck, that was a weeks wage and
    over 100 hours of hard work.

    My story starts with my Grandfather, who himself had OT abilities when he was a boy back
    in about 1910 growing up in Scotland (sorry, Mr. Hubbard, you weren’t the only
    one to have such remarkable abilities) and my Grandfather passed on these
    abilities to me when I was a small boy in the early 1960’s.

    And this is what my Grandfather said to me (Please don’t read on if you are faint hearted
    or haven’t been through the Wall of Fire)

    He said to me……

    “If you want to find money, then keep your eyes on the ground.”

    It’s totally brilliant OT technology and it really works. In fact since my
    Grandfather told me this secret, I have found dozens of coins all over the
    place. In the old days it used to be threepenny bits and shillings but more
    recently I have found fifty pence pieces or one pound coins. I have even found
    five pound and ten pound notes on the ground, just lying there waiting for an
    OT like me to come along with my eyes always trained on the ground and pick
    them up.

    Isn’t it brilliant? You can all do it as well, without even having to pay for an introduction
    course at the Church of Scientology!

    • sugarplumfairy

      By keeping my eyes on the ground, I once found a whole box full of nickels and dimes.. Of course, it was sitting in the lap of a homeless man in front of the Lincoln Square theatre at 62nd and broadway.. but, hey…

    • Observer

      I can vouch for your method. I once found a $20 bill (which I had not lost) in the street in front of the store in the tiny town I where I grew up, using my innate wog ground-observing skills. IMO that’s far better than Paul’s experience, because he only broke even while I came out ahead.

      • Oh no! You’ve restimulated an engram. I must have been about 10, which was a fair while ago, walking up Victoria Avenue in Wanganui with my mother. With my nascent OT Powers I spotted a ten shilling note in the gutter which was a significant amount then. I picked it up and gave it to her and asked what she was going to spend it on. She looked at me sternly and said “Andrew, we’re going to the police station to hand it in. You don’t take what isn’t yours!”

        That was an early lesson in ethics in the real sense of the word. She wouldn’t have made a good registrar.

        Andrew

      • PreferToBeAnon2

        Yep…engrams being restimulated here too. When I was a teen and living on
        the east coast of Florida, I discovered a bale of weed on the beach.
        Then, it was common for that to wash up on the shore as ganja-filled
        speed boats coming from the islands would jettison it as soon as a Coast Guard boat was
        spotted. Of course, it was soaked in saltwater and smelled
        horrible–and, for those who want to know, it gets more pungent when
        attempting to dry it in the oven. I’m not sure if it was a past-life
        thetan of Kirstie Allie that made my mother walk in as it was draped in
        bunches all over her kitchen, but I acknowledge that supa powa was demonstrated that day.

        • Observer

          Wow … my SP (suppressive person) SPs (super powers) are *on* today! I’m restimulating people all over the place without even trying!

      • Poison Ivy

        Like Midwest Mom, I use my OT abilities for finding money with wardrobe items, but they generally work best with the pockets of coats and jackets I haven’t worn for over a year. Sometimes my OT abilities extend to the miraculous feat of finding stale candy as well.

        • Observer

          My pocket OT powers only extend to finding used Kleenex. Sad, really.

          • Midwest Mom

            Aww. That is so sad, not to mention totally unfair! Here’s a tissue to dab your eyes . (It’s a new tissue – I swear! 🙂

        • Douglas D. Douglas

          Mmmmm. Stale candy.

    • Midwest Mom

      I have supah powas which help me find money every time I do laundry. Whenever I check my children’s pockets before placing their jackets, pants or shorts into the washing machine, I find crumpled bills and loose change! This is not an isolated incident – it happens every time I do laundry!

      Now, if only my supah powahs could help me find socks, which disappear without their mates somewhere in the laundry process, on the same day they mysteriously disappear!

      • John P.

        What you are seeing is Scientology “hosiery tech” in action. Socks have thetans just like people do. When the heat of the dryer restimulates them, they drop the “wool body” and are able to teleport to another planet (“Target Fuzzy”) where they circle endlessly waiting for an opportunity to be reincarnated. The reincarnation process on Earth is a bit slow since we only have two feet; Teegeeack is a prison planet for socks just as it is for humans. Most sock thetans end up reincarnated frequently on planets like Mizar 5, where the octopus-like inhabitants have at least 300 tentacles apiece, all looking for comfort and warmth in the harsh winters, winters even harsher than the Upper Peninsula. Given that Mizar 5 (where “people got to shout to stay alive” as the saying goes) is in the Marcabian Confederacy, they have fedoras, business suits, telephones and Nike running shoes.

        Congratulations… you are now an ST III (Sock Thetan 3) and have “power over hosiery.” You may now put this comment back in the locked briefcase and pay the registrar $73,000 as you exit.

        • Midwest Mom
          • FistOfXenu

            Tricky Dicky! Now that’s an engram I never wanted restimulated. But at least we socked it to him in the end.

        • Poison Ivy

          Hilarious MWM & JP both! My “sock thetans” have a terrible habit of going to Mizar 5, especially in winter. They go directly there from the dryer. Using the same transporter technology so popular in Star Trek.

          • Midwest Mom

            I like how on Lost in Space the mom puts dirty clothes in the washing/ drying machine and they come out clean, dry and neatly folded in a matter of seconds!

            • Poison Ivy

              Doesn’t that happen in your house, Mom? 🙂 But seriously, I loved Lost in Space. Billy Mumy and the Robot (both of them!) were my first crushes as a little kid (even though I was watching reruns on VHF TV.) I built my own robot out of cardboard and slinkies.

            • Midwest Mom

              He was a cutie, wasn’t he? Guess what? I just did a quick Google search on him and he is now 59!

            • Poison Ivy

              Well, we’re all going in one direction, and that is OLDER.

            • Midwest Mom

              What?? That is crazy talk, P.I.!

            • Poison Ivy

              Well honey, we ain’t gettin’ any younger! (Is Billy Mumy just as cute as ever?)

            • Midwest Mom

              I’m not sure how recent the photos are, but if you Google him you’ll see how well space kids age.

            • Poison Ivy

              Actually, he looks just a little bit like MrPoisonIvy (in his teen years, anyway.) He aged pretty well, I think. All that zero-gravity prevents jowls.

        • Casabeca

          Awesome!

        • Sokramor

          I’m sure one of my cats must me Operating ST IV or more. He not only manages to find our socks, no matter how well we hide them – he also eats them. Poor sock thetans, that must be a helluva engram to be cat dinner.

      • Truthiwant

        OT phenomenom has no limits! I think I’ve found one of your socks, Midwest Mom. Having read John P’s scientific paper on disappearing hosiery, I now realize that this sock that does not belong to me and just “appeared” one day out of the washing machine, must infact be one of yours. Can you confirm?

        • Midwest Mom

          It looks a lot like one of my eldest son’s socks. 🙂

        • Bella Legosi

          Everyone knows there are gnomes who steal socks from dryers! How else can you explain mysterious appearance of socks that don’t belong to you? Silly you think it’s the Hubbard Craft muahahahahahah 😛 j/k

          • Poison Ivy

            Time travelers. That’s how I always explained it to LittlePoisonIvy.

      • FLUNK_101

        I asked a serious question yesterday about JoJo Zawawi. I felt I needed to know. I am “FB friends” with some clams that are still “in,” and I’ve heard that JoJo is some kind of Scientology Internet Policewoman.
        Midwest Mom responded, “Why don’t you ask your other socks, Bob!”
        I’m trying to get some people out of Scientology, in case you didn’t realize that. Just thought you’d like to know.

        • Midwest Mom

          Dear Sir,

          No need to misquote me. I actually wrote, “Why don’t you ask your other sock, Bob? 🙂

          See the difference? Your version gives an incorrect spin to my actual statement. Sometimes people misquote others to make them appear in a negative light, but I suspect that you would not intentionally do that, would you? Unintentional misquotes can happen without any ill intent, especially if one is in a hurry or preoccupied with other things. I choose to presume that this is the case with your above statement.

          I extend my best wishes to you in helping others out of Scientology. 🙂

          • FLUNK_101

            I did not misquote you to make you “appear in a negative light.” OK? So don’t start with that.
            I may have left out the “smiley face,” but I don’t see how a smiley face justifies making a sarcastic remark when it was inappropriate to do so.

            • Midwest Mom

              I’m perplexed as to why you are so angry. The anger that you are directing toward me is both startling and inappropriate and it doesn’t accomplish anything positive, now does it? Why not focus your attention on something else, particularly the friends that you want to help?

            • FLUNK_101

              I know you’re probably a nice lady and everything, even if were not on the same wavelength.

              But you haven’t even been around, and your first day back, you take a pot shot at Flunk? Just for fun?

              We all make mistakes, Midwest Mom. It’s OK.

              I am a little angry, but it’s not just because of you. I am looking forward to having a harmonious relationship with you in the future, if that’s still possible.

              Best wishes to you and those you love,

              Flunk

            • Sherbet

              Mom, I call ’em like I see ’em, and I do have to agree with Flunk that yesterday you did seem to shoot him a zinger right out of the gate (and innocent bystander Bob got some of the flak), and I was a teeny bit surprised. Still love ya and all. Hugs hugs and all that.

            • FLUNK_101

              Thank you Sherbert. I appreciate it.

            • Midwest Mom

              Sherb, to be honest, I find it odd that a grown man uses so many different online personas to post on an internet site, and then uses those personas as though they are different people, even on the same threads.

              He has used more fake personas than you are probably aware, Sherb and it’s completely unnecessary. It is also misleading and I find it to be quite sad that he feels the need to hide behind so many different identities.

              He is a grown man who acts like he is a victim all too often, yet he has posted some pretty vulgar and vicious things to people. It’s time for him to pick one avatar/persona and use only one. That’s not asking him to do anything that others already do.

              I didn’t hear any denials that he was Bob, or vice versa. If someone accused me of being someone else, I would correct them nicely right away, no matter how ridiculous or humorous the guess would be. Perhaps this gentleman would like to come clean about all of his fake personas?

              I truly hope he is able to get the necessary help and support that he needs from his family and friends. He is obviously hurting a great deal and can hopefully get the help he needs through therapy, etc. to get on the path to a positive present and future.

              You are a sweetheart, Sherb!

            • sugarplumfairy

              =D

              o.m.g. it is good to have you back..

            • Midwest Mom

              I luv ya, spf!

            • DeElizabethan

              Mom, you have an amazing heart that just keeps giving. <3

            • Midwest Mom

              Big hugs to you, Dee! You are like sunshine! I missed you a lot! 🙂

            • DeElizabethan

              Mutual, sunshine and missing. Nice!

            • Sherbet

              I understand what you’re saying, and, like all of us, you have to say what you feel. Scientology brings out some strong emotions, and the cos is worthy of derision and condemnation. The Flunks and the Bobs and maybe even the Martys will make the progress they need to make…or maybe they never will. This blog is a welcoming place where those people can try out their anti-scientology baby steps. Yet I understand it’s hard to feel warm and welcoming when somebody is irritating you for one reason or another.

            • Midwest Mom

              Amen, sista!!

            • FLUNK_101

              Thanks Sherbet, but please don’t put me in the same category as a “Bob” or a “Marty.”
              Because of the way I’ve talked about some of my experiences in Scientology, some people think I’m still “in.” This is not the case. I am blessed with an exceptional memory. I remember very well what it’s like to be a Scientologist, and I have thought long and hard about those experiences.

          • grundoon

            F1 switches pseudonyms every so often, as do some other contributors such as Bitter Defrocked Apostate, but I haven’t seen him engage in sockpuppetry (pretending to be different people joining in an argument or conversation). F1 has been out for many years (but can’t quite leave it behind), while Bob is still in but lurching toward the exit. AFAICT, Bob isn’t F1 and hasn’t posted under other names here.

            • Midwest Mom

              Do B.M. and Peter come to mind?

            • FLUNK_101

              I feel genuinely sorry for you, MM.
              I have only been using one avatar, for a while it was only Flunk. But then people accused me being Zion, so I went back to that, to own it, so to speak.
              But I’m sick of Z. It’s a bit provocative, and I don’t want anyone to take that name the wrong way … I prefer Flunk. But I’m not hiding anything but my real name, of course. Otherwise, I wouldn’t want to be associated with Scientology in any way.
              Grundoon was right that I don’t engage in sock puppetry. He wrong when he said I haven’t yet left Scientology behind. I look back on my auditing experience from the viewpoint of cognitive science. Some may misinterpret that, but I don’t want to get into that know.
              It is very sad to me the way you characterize me as some kind of damaged soul.
              You refuse to acknowledge that this can be a hostile blog. It’s been a learning experience for me on many levels.
              Take care,
              Flunk

          • An extra sock wandered into his sentence from Mizar 5.

        • John P.

          A Google search, which you have presumably already done, shows that Jojo Zawawi did send e-mail to people in connection with someone’s SP declaration “suggesting” that they delete the SP from their Facebook friends list. I was unable to turn up other documented instances of this. It might be most prudent to assume that there is no rigorously organized “OSA Facebook Police” but that they simply send out e-mails telling people that it’s a good idea to disconnect from someone who was declared, and suggesting that all recipients pass that along to other culties in good standing. Sort of like a chain letter. Here’s the one documented link of JoJo Zawawi’s one instance of furthering disconnection, which we all know doesn’t really exist 😉 http://leavingscientology.wordpress.com/2009/10/28/scientologists-fail-to-get-the-memo-about-disconnection/

          • FLUNK_101

            Wow. Thanks very much, this is informative.

        • grundoon

          Sherry Katz, 2009: “JoJo Zawawi … sent around the following to three friends of mine… Dear ____, Sherry Katz has resigned from our Church. She is committing suppressive acts and attacking the Church and making effort to pull people off the Bridge. I have personally verified this with OSA Int. I recommend that you delete your Facebook friend connection with her. xoxox JoJo

          Mary Jo Leavitt & her son Greg (2009): “Jojo joined the fray by recently writing to all of the Facebook friends of Greg urging them to disconnect from Greg because he did not comply with ORDERS TO DISCONNECT FROM HIS MOTHER.”

          Joy
          Graysen, 2011:
          “Apparently JoJo Zawawi, a covert OSA operative, contacted all of my Scn FB “friends” and told them to unfriend me.”

          • FLUNK_101

            Thanks Grundoon!

          • FLUNK_101

            Thanks Grundoon!

    • richelieu jr

      Something tell me that when you’re on SeaOrg’s save waves, every spare penny on the street jumps out at you. You could probably spot a twenty from the moon, no OT powers required…

  • Kevin Tighe

    Enough already with making fun of Scientology and all this alien stuff. I mean even ET was a Scientologist.

    • BuryTheNuts2

      Kevin….Please, please, please tell me you are going to stick around here!
      I have a great VIP parking space all picked out for your spaceship. It is right next to the Van Allen Belt so it is nice and warm.
      I will even provide appetizers and mimosa’s.
      And the short term contract is only for a million years.

      • Kevin Tighe

        Will I still be able to phone home?

        • BuryTheNuts2

          I have a special I-phone space station 33 unit designed just for you!

          • Kevin Tighe

            I appreciate the offer but unfortunately I’m already with Sprint. If you break their contract they immediately disconnect from you and hit you with a brutal freeloader’s bill.

            • ParticleMom

              No worries Kevin. I moonlight as a switchboard operator. I’ll make sure that when you iPhone-home that the signal has a cloaking shield.

            • Kevin Tighe

              Moonlighting? Obviously you’re a Scientology staff member. 😛

  • Observer

    Thanks, Paul, but it’s a whole lot cheaper to lose buckets full of $20 bills than go OT to be able to find them. Plus I get to retain my critical thinking skills, not have KRs written on me or have to write them on others, not fear disconnection from my friends and family and, best of all, I am not endlessly hounded for $$ to support tiny tyrant Davey Miscavige’s extravagant lifestyle (indeed, I find myself wondering why he isn’t out there exercising his OT $20-locating OT skills instead of bankrupting his flock). I instead contribute–willingly, not regged–to two organizations of my choice that are actually feeding, clothing, educating and making able people who weren’t born with the advantages we have in this country. But thanks for the laugh

    LRH – dimming bulbs since 1950.

  • Bella Legosi

    So Alexander lived with the president of CCHR and allowed Alexander to take methadone? Obviously, Alexander was just being “tolerated” and NOT CARED FOR. If you are the head of CCHR and trying to fight, “Nazi psychiatry” why allow a synthetic form of heroin, developed by the Nazi’s, into your home? Here’s another point: taking methadone while you have ANY respiratory conditions will cause severe breathing issues, because methadone depresses the respiratory system, and laying in a sleeping position only exacerbates those issues. God damn now I am truly enturbulated, because this death should have NEVER happened. Had these “freedom loving, planet clearing do-gooders” actually been HUMAN with real EMOTIONS they would have checked on Alexander multiple times instead of leaving him alone in a room to die.

    I actually had a few tears listening to Karen. My whole heart goes out to her. There can be nothing worse then what she had went thru as a parent.

  • sugarplumfairy

    Karen de la Carriere.. Warrior Queen..”its the church of hatred…church of vengeance.. church of snitching..”

    • Poison Ivy

      Strong words, powerful words.

  • Sherbet

    It’s one thing to believe lrh’s laughable stories, but it’s another thing to actually pay thousands of dollars to be part of the confraternity of believers. That’s the sad part.

    • FistOfXenu

      It’s not often I disagree with you Sherbet, but I’d’ve said the sad part is not just believing the horseshit or paying thousands and thousands of bucks to belong to the beknighted, but then cutting each others’ throats for imaginary ethics violations (KNs) and letting each other die just to stay out of trouble with Dracula’s Midget. President of the “Citizens’ Commission on HUMAN RIGHTS”?? HOW ABOUT THE RIGHT NOT TO BE NEGLECTED TO DEATH, YOU STUPID BASTARD? You presided over his needless death. WHAT ARE YOUR CRIMES? WANT ME TO HELP YOU WITH THAT?

      I’m sorry everybody. I thought I was finished being enraged over Alexander’s killing. I not. I’m fucking just not.

      • Midwest Mom

        It’s heartbreaking that so many people’s lives have been destroyed. Every person whom we have heard about who has died because of Hubbard’s cult needs to be remembered and they also need us to stand up for them, even if we need to express it in anger. Shouting for justice is a good thing, Fist. I’m glad that you don’t forget that!

        • Sherbet

          Thanks, Mom. You’re right.

      • Sherbet

        You’re absolutely right, Fist. Looking at just the surface of the bogus church, my statement stands because not everyone digs deeper to where the real horrors are. That’s why many people think it’s just a goofy bunch of silly people. You put the focus on what these goofy people are capable of, and how it’s really church doctrine to inflict abuses on its parishioners. Thanks for clarifying and pointing out the pure evil that is scientology, where I didn’t.

        • DeElizabethan

          You too are absolutely right as is Fist. We can’t forget who wrote all the books and policies that these people follow to the letter.

        • FistOfXenu

          Apologies Sherbet. That came out wrong. I know you know about all this. That smug “president” is just 1 more thing to get me riled about the whole situation and it turned into a not so good day for me. Sorry!

          • q-bird

            hello there Fist ~ real quick. I have been catching up on the last 3 days of news & I had just hit the up arrow on your post up there & then you popped in, just now … serendipity.

            I would like to tell you, I feel exactly this way too often times, many times in fact, I have felt this way, while lurking / reading upon this blog. What you said here – “I thought I was finished being enraged {} I’m not. I’m fucking just not.” I get it… howling sorrow, then supreme anger. yep, with you there friend.

            I am grateful you said it for me — I’m glad that you put the words down here FistOfXemu-like thunder crashes down.

            I am hoping for you a more uplifting day today.

            Cheers FOX – please do keep on saying the things you say here –

            a little anger management perhaps & she’s good to go; she’ll do.

            <3 Q

  • BosonStark

    Glad Paul Katz is proud to be nutz. What if the driver stole the bill and planted it in the weeds? Even if that isn’t the case, money stuck in weeds would show up a lot better then let’s say, a contact lens. Let’s see you find a damn contact lens lost somewhere in a field?

    BosonStark
    Railroad tracks, Venus

    • Sherbet

      “Whatsa matter? Mouth a little dry?”

      I’m shaking my head at the challenge Paul gives us, as if he’d just produced the Holy Grail with Documentation. He really, really believes his weak little anecdote is the tipping point to convince the “haters and OT ability deniers.”

      • RMycroft

        Who says he second bill was his? I doubt he recorded the serial numbers.

        • Sherbet

          O, ye, of little faith…

          These yahoos spent thousands to learn how to clear the planet. They didn’t know it meant searching the weeds, looking for valuables. And, anyway, if Paul was such an OT smartypants, how could he lose the $20 to begin with?

          • EnthralledObserver

            Yep, I did wonder the same thing… or if not Paul, then why didn’t his friend notice the moment it happened? Because the ethical (not) SOB was planning to go back and get it for himself later! That’s Scientologists for you, the most ethical people on the planet.

            • Sherbet

              Yes, what I should have said was, Paul the driver, the OT, should have said, “Hey, dude, your $20 bucks is about to fly out of your pocket.”

            • Poison Ivy

              Exactly Sherbert! He should’ve stopped the car the minute it was gone.

          • Guest

            I think Paul was saying that he wasn’t OT yet, but his ride was?

        • The hard part is believing they both had 20$

          • SP ‘Onage

            LOL LOL LOL

          • Poison Ivy

            Ha ha!

    • q-bird

      “a skillion years ago & so forth…” “Implant games of some sort…” “the truth be told, it’s not science fiction…”

      • grundoon

        Science fiction has higher standards.

  • BosonStark

    Did Hubtard actually pronounce “chimerical” sha-merical? LOL.

    I thought he was going to say, “It isn’t fiction and it certainly isn’t science,” but he wasn’t quite ready to tell any part of the truth. How brainwashed “and so forth” do you have to be to believe this ludicrous rambling crap?

    • TonyOrtega

      And did you catch the way he said “rococo”?

    • Artoo45

      Don’t make it sound science fictiony . . .

  • aquaclara

    I am in tears after watching Angry Gay Pope’s second video with Karen -give me a moment to finish mopping up…
    I hope this encourages some people inside to speak up and share what they know.
    Karen, sending you warmest hugs for your unforgivable loss and for continuing to fight for him and for others.
    You have a beautiful voice with much to say.

  • EnthralledObserver

    My brother, when about 14 years old (I was about 12), once found some money on the side of the road. He came home waving a fifty dollar note about in my face. I was marginally jealous, but wow, good on him. He then said he was going back to where he found it to look for more. I thought there was no way he’d find more, so I let him go off on his own. Well, he bloody well came back with another 50 dollar note. He said again he was going looking for more. Again I let him go alone, there was no way there would be more there this time. And again he came back with another note (a 20 this time). The next time he said he was going back I went with him, but as I arrived he pulled the last 10 dollar note from the long grass, and despite looking for ages we never found any more. (Dammit!) So anyway, either he was really a reborn OT, or just really fricken lucky… I’m going with lucky, the arse. (He never shared any with me). The moral – it isn’t that hard to find cash on the side of the road.
    Harder, of course, is making glass bounce on tiles. I watched my hubby do this. He dropped a drinking glass accidentally and despite trying failed to catch it before it hit the tiles, but we both watched in amazement as it landed on it’s bottom edge and bounced quite high in the air. Too stunned to react quickly enough my hubby again failed to catch it before it hit the tiles again, where it (I shit you not) bounced AGAIN, not quite so high and as he expected this outcome even less my hubby didn’t even try to catch it, just both of us watched incredibly dumbfounded as it headed back to the tiles and this time, finally, smashed to smithereens. See, OT powers aren’t that hard to attain… it’s what you do with them that counts. (i.e. don’t just watch the glass fall, get ready to bloody well catch it just in case it bounces!) :p

    Oh, and my hubby played golf once – just once – and on his second hole hit a hole in one. Witnesses and all. Needless to say he is a retired golfer now. OT powerz… bite me!

  • q-bird

    Martian, “Oh boy, what do we have here?”

    “A good gag…”

    “THE THETAN JUST DOESN’T KNOW WHAT’S GOING ON…”

    “Leave Mars strictly alone!”

    okay Ron – gotcha fine there then…

  • danlocke

    To which post was the Katz/McElveen story a comment? I don’t think I have met. Paul Katz, but was friends with McElveen some years later. I’d like to say hello.

    • Sherbet

      He’ll get in touch with you, because he’s knowin’ where you’re at.

    • The captain bill installment

      • danlocke

        thanks Michael!

      • danlocke

        I found the comment thread and read with great interest. “Runningbear” was Arthur Runningbear and I remember those stories. There is an Arthur Runningbear that shows up in Google search.

  • My favorite OT Success story from early 1970s Advance was about someone who claimed they detected ancient machinery in mountains near Phoenix AZ that kept the weather clear for an ancient space port. This person claimed to dismantle it with his mind “And the desert has been blooming since.”

    Once while perusing the Red Volumes I came across and HCOB called “Where Are You Buried?” This was supposed to be a follow-up to Have You Lived Before This Life where people locate gravesites, genealogy records, etc., that validate their past life recalls. Funny how nothing came of it, because if people could routinely recall being non-famous people in the past whose existence could be proven (and if it was in the USA or Europe in the past 200 years or so in many cases you could), would be pretty compelling evidence that past lives were real.

  • Ivan Mapother

    After listening to Ron’s ramblings, I can see why Tom Cruise was attracted to make Oblivion and All You Need is Kill. I predict that these two sci-fi epics will out-gross Battlefield Earth by one skillion dollars. This lecture may also explain Will Smith’s need to make After Earth.

    • Poison Ivy

      Well, I think $$ and career maintenance was the motivation for both Smith and Cruise in making those movies, not Scientology. I have my doubts about how deep Will Smith is into Scientology (though Jada is another story completely.) Post apocalyptic sci-fi films have been around a long time – and Mel Gibson (“Mad Max”) is a Catholic.

  • I am very disappointed that science fiction writers won’t get a little backbone and start wrighting REAL science fiction. Well we still have the Enquirer thanks goodness, oh and rons stuff.

    • Ze Moo

      Your not looking for real working authors. Read David Brin, James Hogan, Larry Niven and many others. Lron was a 3rd rate author in every genre he used. I enjoy the ‘alien space baby took me to the mothership and I met Elvis’ tabloids. I know that companies that market Chia Pets and kitchen magicians will still be around.

      • Missionary Kid

        Good science fiction to me isn’t about the tech so much as how it impacts the users or how they use it. It’s about people.

        • Ze Moo

          That is what all good fiction is about.

          • Missionary Kid

            Agreed, but I would add that good science fiction takes us into the realm of the future or alternate worlds where the effects of technology are envisioned or extrapolated.

            • Ze Moo

              One of sci-fis earliest writers, EE Doc Smith wrote what are considered now 2nd rate novels like the Lensman series. The characters were all archtypes of heroism and the tech was rather ray gun goofy. But he did invent a command and control structure that was used in the late 30’s early 40’s to make the combat information center on US navy ships. This CIC helped manage battles and helped win the Pacific war. Star Trek forecast cell phones and ipads. A lot of technology gets dreamed up and used in stories before anyone actually tries to build it. Read John Brunners “Stand on Zanzibar’ for an excellent forecast of today’s culture.

              Personally, I am more of ‘Galaxy Quest’ type of reader.

              https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=9b4s5CfPD4Y

            • Missionary Kid

              It’s been at least decades since I reread “Stand…” It was well written in a different writing style, as I remember it, where a whole series of seemingly unrelated stories were unified at the end. I can remember finishing it the first time and saying, WOW!

              I’ve read science fiction from the era of Hugo Gernsback, (as you know, the Hugo Award was named after him) who wrote a story in 1911 called Ralph 124C41+. LRH was a writer in the style of the workaday pulp writers of the ’30s and early ’40s, where the standards were much lower. By the time that Heinlein, Asimov, Clarke, and Dick were on the rise, he was more or less out of the genre, writing his “religion.”

              Brin, Niven, and that group were dealing with ideas that the Hub could possibly talk about, but couldn’t conceive of on his own or write intelligently about. He was stuck in the 30s, trying to graft tech from the 50s on his stuff. I think he was a hack.

              Galaxy Quest was just fun, check your brain at the door, fun. Star Wars was a throwback to the movie serials of the 30s and 40s, but it was well done, aside from the space ships operating as if they were in an atmosphere with internal gravity.

            • Star Wars isn’t sci fi: it’s fantasy in space with lightsabers and blasters instead of swords and bows. It’s even a long time ago and far far away. Fairy tale, not sci fi.

              I like well-told stories, no matter what genre they’re in. What I hate is dreck, and that’s what LRH produced.

            • Missionary Kid

              VERY WELL put. I tend to agree with you about Star Wars. It was Space Opera, but much better told. There have been entire PHD papers written on the different classifications.

              The general public considered it science fiction, but within the community of Fantasy and Science Fiction (I don’t know if you can remember that magazine) it would be in the category of fantasy, like Heinlein’s Glory Road. My biggest agreement with you is the term dreck for LRH’s writing.

          • Missionary Kid

            That’s also why some of the better sf writing stands up, even though we’ve surpassed the technology envisioned.

      • Just kidding up above. The only thing i have read of rons was half a dianetics book and the things posted on this site and others like it.

    • Artoo45

      Nobody’s guts could take it . . .

  • Ze Moo

    Reading about Lrons ‘cosmology’ is an adventure in mental manipulation. A glib storyteller spouts things that are impossible to believe, but must be believed if the ‘infallibility’ of Lron is to be maintained.

    The asteroid belt has low gravity. Duh…Low gravity compared to Earth? Jupiter? In space all things are relative. In Lrons philosophy, any thing that brings me money or followers is the desired end. An end like Alexander Jentzsch got, ignored and unwanted by those around him, while the only people who cared about him were kept away. You don’t have to go to space to make your blood boil, just read exscientologykids or xenu.net stories.

    The humor and ridiculous nature of Lrons stories is outweighed by the manipulation and destruction of lives that result. How can thinking caring people not see the end result and run away? The real end result of OT powers is the ability to loose yourself and your soul.

  • Ho Tai

    Paul Katz thinks his tale shows OT powerz? When I was in college some of us got liquored up one night and took a jeep out to the boondocks. We spent a couple of hours zooming around. Then someone realized his wallet was missing. We drove around some more and ACTUALLY FOUND HIS WALLET IN THE DARK! We had never heard of $cn at that point, so I assume one of us was a natural-born OT. I just wish the $$ I spent on $cn later in life had provided equal or greater abilities.

  • Anony mad

    In regards to the LRH audio: I know there are a lot of ex-scientologists in the forum and I mean no disrespect to them as ‘ex-scientologists’, but you have to have a bit of a compromised mental capacity to listen to anyone tell such a story and give it any credence whatsoever. I’ve followed this Scilon thing for a long time now, I’ve read the books and even gone to some protests. For some reason, it’s become a personal obsession to see this ‘church’ fall. One thing I hear over and over again is that these are smart people that just got sucked into something at a difficult time in their lives. And I can understand that…up until I hear audio like this.

    Personally, I don’t see any difference between believing in what scientologists choose to believe and those that believe in talking snakes, 900 year old people, magic underwear, etc. Within any ‘religion’, it is inevitable that you will find some crazy belief. Why? Because it’s simply not enough to ask people to be moral, good and respectful. Anyone can do that or be that. No, to be a religion, you have to convince people to believe something beyond reason, because once you do that, they’ll believe anything and sacrifice anything to maintain that belief, even if it comes at the loss of their family, their money and yes, their sanity.

    It’s a difficult thing to admit you were wrong and I applaud all of those here that gathered the courage (in the face of incredible consequences), to stand up and call “bullshit” on this alleged church. Though not an ex-member, I share the frustration with everyone. How does this stuff persist? Where is our government that seems hell-bent on sticking their noses into every other aspect of our lives?

    The last couple years have been stunning. It’s clear the end is near for the organized part of this religion. It may not come soon enough for most of us, but it is coming. How do I know? God told me.

    • Artoo45

      I know what you mean about these tall tales. How could anyone listen to this and not just go WTF? It’s always different for each follower, why they want to believe. But on the other side of the leader/follower dynamic, religion is ultimately about power and control of populace, and once a person gets a taste of worship, that’s it, they’re done. I’ve watched it happen right before my eyes with people in the New Age industry when I was still a magical thinker. But no matter how much I wanted to believe, I would still laugh at Scientology, Unarius and other loopy sci-fi cults . . . cause I was crazy, but not that crazy.

    • Douglas D. Douglas

      There is actually a big difference between Scientology belief and the belief of most religious people. Religion accepts the idea that there is a supernatural that must be accepted by faith. Some find this absurd– that is their privilege. For me, I do not believe that faith includes believing something that cannot possibly be true– just that one can accept the possibility that something may be true.

      Scientology, on the other hand, makes the specific claim that their system is based on verifiable, tested and demonstrable fact. They proudly claim that they are not practicing a faith-based system of belief, rather, they are employing a tested and proven technology. While individual Scientologists may indeed require faith to accept the more outlandish of the statements made by L. Ron Hubbard, the CoS itself would reject the very notion.

      • I kind of disagree. Sure Hubbard and the rest may claim that this is scientific. But that’s just words. Notice how no one ever asks for evidence of Hubbard’s claims or research. Notice how they accept Hubbard’s pronouncements as absolute truth, entirely reliable and completely accurate. This is what faith looks like. This is what religious faith looks like. It is very much like talking snakes. All the talk of science is just window dressing.

        • Douglas D. Douglas

          Actually, in Scientology the religion part is the window dressing.

      • Anony mad

        There is no difference. Yes, scientology claims their system is based on verifiable, tested, demonstrable facts – and then they provide none. This is faith. Don’t drink their Koolaid. You will find more religious people are inclined to try and impress you with miracles, history and other ‘proof’ than simply proclaim it’s “Faith”. Faith itself, is essentially the belief in something based on no supporting evidence. Most people find that a tough rock to stand upon. Scientologists, just like other religions, seem to have no problem building ‘churches’ on it.

        • Douglas D. Douglas

          As I said, there are individual Scientologists who accept LRH’s ramblings by faith. But the CoS itself would reject that on the basis of their assertion that it is all reliable tech. Whether or not they have the facts to back it up is neither here nor there. The difference is that people of faith acknowledge that their beliefs are based on faith. Scientologists are denied that fig leaf.

      • Poison Ivy

        “For me, I do not believe that faith includes believing something that cannot possibly be true– just that one can accept the possibility that something may be true….Scientology, on the other hand, makes the specific claim that their system is based on verifiable, tested and demonstrable fact. They proudly claim that they are not practicing a faith-based system of belief, rather, they are employing a tested and proven technology.”

        Well said Douglas. The thing that first made me maddest about Scientology is its practitioners’ insistence that all this is scientifically proven fact. And LRH’s demand that every thought fart of his addled brain was never to be challenged as less than accurate. Of course, there are Christians who believe the Bible is 100% literal (despite all its inherent contradictions); Muslims who take the Koran as 100% percent applicable today as it was in Mohammed’s time, etc. etc. For all these extremist views, they forget that “faith” means just that – something you can’t prove but you believe anyway.

      • Ms. B. Haven

        Speaking as one who has sipped the Kool-Aid and survived, here is my experience in brief. One does some introductory services and has some ‘wins’ with that. Moving on a little further, there are more ‘wins’ and one can be feeling pretty good about scientology. If that is the case, one is inclined to want more. There is always the whispering in the background of incredible gains to be had and new abilities one can achieve. However, being new to the subject one can’t really be in a position to look deeply. If one does try to look deeply, that is discouraged as being a ‘hidden standard’. So what happens, is one develops the attitude that there are these fantastic things awaiting just over the horizon. The pot of gold at the end of the rainbow. When one hears the outlandish stuff that Hubbard put forth, it is outrageous, but there is always the slight possibility that perhaps some of this stuff is plausible. Of course it is all bullshit but at that point who cares? One is in deep enough where they just don’t care. After awhile though, one’s discarded common sense returns and this stuff just doesn’t add up. It isn’t worthwhile to try and make it add up any more because after all this time one does still not have any of the abilities claimed and one’s wallet is very empty.

        If one’s senses don’t return, one ends up like Mr. Katz in the example Tony posted today. Sure he found his $20 after some wasted time and a couple of u-turns. A real OT wouldn’t have had to bother with all of that. A real OT would have ‘known’ when the $20 went missing in the first place. Hell, a REAL OT would ‘know’ that they are taking it in the ass by working for $20 per week.

        Since so much time has passed since this event, I’m sure that Mr. Katz has really developed some out of this world OT abilities. A wee test. I have $1000 in my pocket that is his for the taking if he can tell me which pocket it is in. Since these purported abilities transcend matter, energy, space and time; I’m sure that he will have no problem letting me know which pocket the $1000 is in. As Jason Beghe said, “show me one mother-fucking OT”. Oh, ya, that’s a ‘hidden standard’. Sorry.

    • Here is the big difference I see in the stories (not talking about the practices here, just the stories):

      Almost every other religion has good stories at its foundation. Interesting stories that can be talked and thought about deeply even if one does not believe the stories are real. They might not all be meaningful to us today, but enough are to make them a worthwhile study, and to be able to glean something from them.

      Scientology is just total crap. If you don’t believe the stories are true, they are absolutely meaningless on every level. Scientology stories are both dull and nasty. They teach nothing and they aren’t even entertaining in their own right.

      • John P.

        You did a great job of summing it up in a nutshell, and is a way of drawing a distinction that is right on:

        If you don’t believe the stories are true, they are absolutely meaningless on every level. Scientology stories are both dull and nasty. They teach nothing and they aren’t even entertaining in their own right.

        Stories from many religions speak to people universally, whether you’re a member of that religion or not. They’re timeless. You’re right. Listening to Hubbard bloviate about Marcabians, DC-8’s, hydrogen bombs, freight trains on Venus, and all the rest, says absolutely nothing about human nature or timeless themes of the struggles to make it in the world. It’s all about Hubbard trying to sound smarter than everyone in the room (and doing a crappy job of that, to boot!).

  • Ms. B. Haven

    “To you know-nothing whistlers: Whatsa matter? Mouth a little dry? Think I’m lying? Well say so, but sign your real name, and location, just as i am.”

    Well, Paul, my mouth is a little dry, as in dry heaves. No I don’t think you’re lying, but I do think you are delusional. (I recently realized that I lost my car keys. I then went right to where I lost them. I am not a ‘big being’ with incredible OT abilities “whistling past the graveyard”. I just ‘knew’ where the keys would be and I found them. PS Since the keys were for a Prius, that would have been 500 smackers to replace them, not a ‘precious $20’ for a weeks wages.)

    Wouldn’t it be nice to be able to sign one’s real name and location without fear of being harassed endlessly and entering a nightmare a world of a Stasi-like ‘religion’ rather than being able to engage in a civil discussion of beliefs and practices?

    • Ze Moo

      Why do people stop looking for lost things after they’ve found them? This story is almost as credible as the ‘cognating me a prime parking space’ story.

    • FistOfXenu

      @ Paul: Sign my real name and location? Why Paul? Even if you’re not OT enough to find me, don’t you believe there are real OTs in $cientarCONon that can do it? Hell, I’m right here.

      Fuckwit.

      • Bella Legosi

        If I was drinking anything while I read that it really would be all over my monitor! Fuckin classic and goddamn good call!

  • Breaking news! New York City Councilman Dan Halloran, lately of the Bunker’s story about Scilon infiltration of NYC schools, has been arrested this morning by the FBI in an election rigging and corruption scheme. It looks like someone needs a dose of Criminon.

    http://www.nbcnewyork.com/news/local/Malcolm-Smith-Arrest-State-Legislator-New-York-Corruption-Arrest-FBI-Scheme-201017461.html

    • Or at the very least a massive touch assist.

      • Ze Moo

        He’ll get that when he’s prom queen in cell block ‘d’.

    • BuryTheNuts2

      That is what he gets for pissing off Zeus’ relatives!

    • Poison Ivy

      Shock and awe. No doubt he’s been studying political strategy using the “tech” of the Most Ethical People on the Planet.

  • “That’s called knowin’ where it’s at.” If he already knew the money was gone, and where it was lying, why did he wait till his ‘friend’ realised he’d lost the money before turning round to look for it? Hmmm??

  • Midwest Mom

    Next, on Scientology’s “OSA Sock Attack Theater”: The President of the United States.

    Join us as we watch the Church of Scientology’s “Office of Slimey Antics” attempt to annihilate The President of the United States and all who support his Brain Initiative.

    http://www.whitehouse.gov/the-press-office/2013/04/02/fact-sheet-brain-initiative

    *”Brain” is an acronym for “Research through Advancing Innovative Neurotechnologies”

    • John P.

      Here’s the strategy:

      The BRAIN Initiative will accelerate the development and application of new technologies that will enable researchers to produce dynamic pictures of the brain that show how individual brain cells and complex neural circuits interact at the speed of thought.

      I can just imagine your average Kool-Aid drinking Scientology public reading this and sitting back with a knowing smirk telling his wife, “Hey, Gladys! The wogs are going to pay billions to duplicate the ‘tech’ we already have in the e-meter!”

      • Midwest Mom

        I’m curious as to how Davey and his minions will twist this up for the Sci members. I guess it’s going to be chalked up to another governmental conspiracy theory!

        • Poison Ivy

          Well, wouldn’t Scientology reject this anyway, because the brain is just an incidental organ of the “meat body” (or the “protoplasm body” as Hubbard described it in 1952) ? Who cares how it works. We already have this research anyway – it’s in the belly of Hubbard’s cat.

  • Artoo45

    Yes, it’s more shameless self promotion, but you weren’t the first to be inspired by Space Station 33 . . . http://vimeo.com/1227000

  • Bruce

    I found a quarter in a parking lot the other day. Since I spent nothing on Sci, my profit is approaching infinity.

  • Guest

    Hi Tony,

    Was that tidbit about OT Phenomena sent to you directly or did you get that off the internet somewhere? If it came off the internet, would you mind linking?

    • TonyOrtega

      As I said, it was a comment posted on one of our recent stories. I think it was the story about Captain Bill Robertson.

    • grundoon
      • John P.

        It looks to me like Paul is trying to “strike a decisive blow” against suppression as part of his “A-E” steps to get back into the cult’s good graces. Note that his comment went up last night, several days after everyone else moved on from the post of three days ago. That’s why none of us saw it…

        • DeElizabethan

          Unless you’re down for notifications, which I am, usually after commenting. But then I’m weird and have weird times to play and weird ways. 🙂 Retired night owl!

          One time I got a very old late one and the guy was really off the wall and nasty bad, so I flagged it for whoever.

        • dbloch7986

          When I read that comment it almost sounds like sarcasm. Was it a joke, maybe? I mean seriously, you can’t really think that’s proof of OT powers?

          My head hurts thinking about it.

    • dbloch7986

      By the, sorry about this comment. I tried to delete it, but then disqus decided i only meant to remove my name from it. After posting it I realized that you said where the quoted bit came from, Tony.

      Reading comprehension fail!

  • dbloch7986

    Let me just say that medication has taken me a lot further in healing the trauma that Scientology inflicted on me, but it’s ironic to think if I had not been exposed to Scientology at all I might not have needed medication in the first place. So parking spots, goldfish and lost cash aside, I think that we’re all better off without Scientology.

    • Bob

      Darren, you certainly got the short end of the stick being born into a Clamatology family, that’s for sure. I have seen both sides of the coin. So I don’t have the same point of view. And If it didn’t exist Tony Ortega would be writing about ObamaCare or gun control or some other boring subject and none of us would ever have met.

      • dbloch7986

        Hey Bob,

        I’m Derek. 😉 Darren is my dad.

        Speaking to your point, it doesn’t matter what would have been if Scientology didn’t exist. The fact is it does. My point is that no one needs Scientology and everyone is better off without it.

        Of course you feel differently because you still practice it, so that could have gone without saying.

        • Bob

          Sorry Derek, stupid error on my part. Yes my point of view is different but not because I still practice it so much. More Because I have seen people benefit from some of it. Of course I have seen numerous people be abused by others who seemed to like being cruel and selfish and use Scientology as a license to f–k people over. But if you are a Bot then you can do nasty things to others and not have a second thought. Part of why I no longer subscribe to the church of Hubbology.

          • dbloch7986

            Bob,

            I’ve never seen anyone who truly has truly benefit from Scientology except in their own heads as a result of cognitive dissonance and confirmation bias.

            Unless you consider not visiting a doctor for 20 years and being out hundreds of thousands of dollars and in poor health, benefits.

            But hey if you can back track to find a lost $20, I guess Scientology taught you one thing: how to scrounge for every penny. Certainly makes up for the $450,000 you spent to learn how to retrace your steps.

            • Bob

              Hey, I am not going to argue with you on that account. We both have seen what forms our opinions good or bad. And I can’t argue with you regarding the countless bots that have spent the bulk of their earnings on what turns out to be a dead end or road to perdition. I consider that my journey including going down a certain path that ended up worse than nowhere is part of my lesson in this life but I got through it and there are parts of Scn that for me are still valuable. Would I ever recommend someone going into a church, mission or field group? Never.

            • Bella Legosi

              AA and NA help people too, but you don’t see those organizations commit such atrocious crimes like Co$. I am sure there are “tools” LRH gave out that actually help. You need something that works to keep people coming back for more. But come on let’s be honest, what does work in Scientology is elementary at best and in no way comes near to validating what Co$ has done in the past and what they continue to do now. I am sure there are 4 people in OK who would disagree that even the baby steps of Scientology doesn’t work.

            • Poison Ivy

              AA and NA are free. And they aren’t “organized” as in top-down hierarchy.

            • Bella Legosi

              I swear if someone asks me what my crimes are cuz of that comment I am going to puke and wish killer bees on them. Don’t screw with Eskimo Wizards damn it. We will harpoon you and use you to beat a baby seal so we can have warm booties!(><)

            • Bob

              I was honest. I see many people who are leading productive happy lives and benefited as far they are concerned from what they got. Do I think that ultimately they will benefit. Time will tell. If these people were truly willing to see what the church has done would they be so happy with their benefits. I don’t think so.
              I am not happy about how I was BSed. Having benefits does not balance the crimes. But most of the crimes came from the top and are then perpetrated by a smaller group of zealots, some Seamorgue and some regular public bots. And their karma will come a callin. For now the benefits are what keep people drinking the kool aid. And of course the massive propaganda campaigns and continuous attempts to suppress the truth.

            • Bella Legosi

              I am sorry Bob if I am coming off a bit of a bitch. But you are talking to someone who witnessed Scilon tech being used on psychiatric patients in a Foster Home setting by either a public Scilon or Indie. When you see a Pub or Indie hover over someone who is completely schizophrenic say, “Apply the Tech! KSW! If it isn’t working —— YOU ARE NOT TRYING HARD ENOUGH! THE TECH WORKS ONLY IF YOU APPLY IT!” you come out of that experience with a harsh view of anyone who says a little of Scientology helps. Not to mention I was yelled at and called “Suppressive” when I told the boss in question, “Sorry, not interested in any religion that charges money for information.” And this person’s karma? Living out of state on a nice retirement cuz she was paid $12,000 a month to take care of mentally ill people.

            • sugarplumfairy

              Aaaagggghhhh!!! That is soooo frkng disturbing!! Keep talking, Bella.. maybe one day he’ll hear you..

            • Bella Legosi

              Well we could get into how this person bought theater sound system, big screens, a new car, and other creature comforts that she got written off on her taxes (after income she made $100,000/yr) that were supposed to be the benefit of the clients; except that all of those items listed above were used ONCE by the clients then went directly to the persons locked bedroom. How about that none of the clients could drink the milk the owner bought, because it was too expensive for “those people to drink and if they want milk so bad they can buy it themselves!” Except 3 out of 5 clients were restricted to the AFH property unless accompanied. Or being yelled at because I bought these clients pizza (I mean how could I spend my money on such things?). Oh my favorite bit that I haven’t already disclosed. How about coming into work to cook for 5 people and every dish and pan in the house is dirty and I am being told that it is my job to wash them AND make sure these guys get food and meds in in less then 2 hours; then when I leave CLEAN dishes on the counter I get called lazy and sloppy because I left pans staked neatly the counter?

              Or how about a supposed Scientologist applying Tech to patients currently under the care of psychiatrists, under the influence of major medications, introducing them to concepts like KSW, and when the Tech just doesn’t work……..it is all their fault? Do you know how heartbreaking it is to try to tell these guys that what was going on was wrong and something must be said or done and have those people look at you with absolute fear, because they know if they did speak out about the nuttiness of it all they would be placed into another home? Because I wanted to report this woman and not ONE client would back me up because they felt dealing with this crazy was better then the alternative.

            • Bob

              Bella, I appreciate your sharing what amounts to horror stories. I have witnessed some pretty disgusting acts of stupidity and cruelty but nothing like that. I did not understand the part regarding your boss and his comment on “any religion that charges money…….”. But I get the sense that it was more callous and mean treatment.
              Regardless you witnessed some extremely stupid and cruel acts in the name of Scientology. But I have witnessed tremendous acts of kindness, patience and care by others who grasped the use of it properly. I don’t ignore all the crimes and punishment neither do I dismiss the good works of good people.
              Bad people can take anything and turn it to S–t. The church is now at a stage where it is not just harboring bad people it is creating them.

            • Bella Legosi

              I was the one who said, ” Sorry,I don’t believe in any religion that charges its members money for information.” to my boss. This was after she saw me looking at a copy of Dianetics and gave me a wide glass eyed look and told me that book would change my life and that LRH was one of the “most intelligent geniuses ever!”

              And thank you for not jumping my shit by the way! I don’t mean to jump yours. I commend you getting out of that whole scene and at least speaking out about it here. But, it is very hard for me not to speak up when I see anyone attempt to defend the LRH way of life. Keep in mind that my story is the first experience I had with any Scientologist. Of course there are good people out there who do good things, who happen to be in Scientology. Just like there are good Muslims, Jews, Catholics, Hindus, Buddhists, ect. Usually it is the semi-secular who lead balanced and productive lives. Reading HCPL (or whatever the acronym is for the policy letters) you don’t get to be a “Sunday Scientologist” “You are either in or you are out.” All that I have read in regards to how LRon set up his religion reads like fundamentalist Christian or Islam. Words to be taken literally and policy’s to be followed ruthlessly without any regard to the flock itself, the outside world, and even the law itself. My point I have been trying to make is that what does work in Scientology is nothing new, L Ron wasn’t the first to come across how to communicate effectively to others, and a lot of low level scientology is more like cognitive psychology (which is why I believe L Ron had such a hate on for psychs). This stuff was out there before L Ron and is still out there today, with the exception that those ideals, ways of thinking or what ever you want to call it, is not attached to such a shady organization and costs way less in monetary terms and emotional ones.

              But……”It takes many good deeds to build a reputation, and only one bad one to lose it.” Ben Franklin.

            • Bob

              Thanks for clarifying. Now it makes sense. And a dick by any color is a dick. And I guess why I did have so much trouble when I was in Scn was I never totally believed everything Hubbard said. Plus I was around him and he was very human as far as I was concerned. Of course I never said what I felt to anyone in the church. And in fact my business was not with clams so I had friends and associates that were in the real world.
              And from my perspective there are many clams I know who don’t take everything Hubbard says as gospel. But they are very careful who they talk to. I think part of my issue is I managed to avoid a lot of the dicks. That does not mean I did not run into them but probably my percentages were lower than others.
              The Franklin quote is so true. And I stand by my prior statement.
              The church is now at a stage where it is not just harboring bad people it is creating them.

            • Bella Legosi

              I was using, “let’s be honest” more as a turn of phrase. I was not implying you were lying by the way =)

            • Bob

              Yes, I did not think that. But often when I post I end of clarifying what I was saying because I was not completely clear in my statements.

      • Do you actually consider ObamaCare and gun control “boring” subjects? Let me guess, you’re going to pull out “I was joking/being sarcastic” about this too. You’re still a Scientologist, Bob, and holy crap it shows.

        • Bob

          No actually. I was just being lazy which is a flaw and gets me in trouble when I post. And your label for me is partially suitable. Both gun control and ObamaCare have quite a bit of importance to me. So you have a right to lambast me if you like. I should done my research and used subjects like the mating habits of the dodo bird or something equally inoffensive.

    • aquaclara

      and in the meantime, thank you for sharing those hard-won talents, Derek. Without your help, I would never have found my cell phone this morning. It must have been you…right? You were able to make it ring, and without that, well, it would have remained lost forever on the seat of my car. Just so glad you were able to guess the number, and everything.

      Now where did I put my Kindle? It’s got PI’s book on there, and Marc Headley’s and Luke’s.

      Heh – Found it! Thanks! This OT sh–t is pretty awesome. Now where is my anon mask?….hmmm.

      • dbloch7986

        Ha! It wasn’t me that called you, but I’d be glad to!

        • aquaclara

          I’m giving you all the credit, my friend!!

          • Thanks, and check the glove compartment for the anon mask.

            • aquaclara

              aaah – thanks! The big OT WIN write-up is all yours, now. No points off for grammar or spelling mistakes. ++ points for excessive adjectry-ness.

            • My needle floateth.

        • I think it might have been me. I was working a shift at the Mars Implant Station when your lost phone came over the Big Board right about the same time as an OT parking place snafu. I was afraid I’d goof the floof but came up with a brilliant solution which I’ll be writing up as a super-win.

          • aquaclara

            it’s been a busy day at the Mars Implant Station.

            • Beats the day shift at the Venus Implant Station though. Space Station 33 is getting too busy with all these enturbulated thetans from North Korea. Took us eight weeks just to restrain Kim Jong Il, much less process him. We might have to imprison in the same mountain as Xenu.

            • PreferToBeAnon2

              Have the Venus Implant Station workers unionized yet?

            • No, the last time they were allowed to organize they tried to erect a toll station on the Bridge.

            • Poison Ivy

              I thought Scientology itself was the toll station on the Bridge?

          • dbloch7986

            Only men go to Mars. Women go to the Jupiter implant station. Or have you not also heard that lecture?

            • Missed it.

            • grundoon

              First I’ve heard of the Jupiter implant station. Tell more!

    • Missionary Kid

      $cientology is toxic, and no amount of purification rituals will get it out of your system. In fact, they just stick things in further.

      Thank goodness, you’re healing.

    • Glad that the meds are working for you Derek.

  • 1subgenius

    Was the guy who lost the $20 an OT too?
    Just askin’.

  • Espiando

    I was once walking back to my car after an Anon protest against the Scis and I found not twenty, but sixty dollars on the sidewalk. Apparently my thetan rewarded me for going against Scientology.

  • LongNeckGoose

    It seems strange to me that they tried to keep the OTIII “Xenu” stuff a huge secret, but they will let you buy a set of the “Scientology: Milestone One” lectures. It is the same silly space opera stuff, and for me it was the proverbial “last straw that broke the camel’s back.” I’m in favor of helping people to give up drugs, to look up the definitions of words, or to look people in the eye when you talk to theme even if you’re shy. It’s not OK to make up grandiose lies and convince gullible people to believe them in order to get every penny of their money and every hour of their lives. The audiences who heard this stuff at the time didn’t know a thing about conditions on Venus or Mars. Now we do. “Reality is that which, when you stop believing in it, doesn’t go away.” — Philip K. Dick

    • Poison Ivy

      We taught LittlePoisonIvy how to look people in the eye when she was a shy elementary school student. We said, “Look people in the eye, honey, it’s impolite not to. It hurts their feelings” Amazingly, it worked. And it was free.

      • wannabeclear

        Well, clearly, if it was free you were doing it wrong. Sheesh.

  • N. Graham, who can’t log into Discus right now, wanted me to communicate that the OT9 document he posted a couple of weeks ago (he found it in a coat pocket of an old jacket that apparently Pat Broeker had given to the Salvation Army) was missing much of the important data and that HAS BEEN RECOVERED!! Not to give anything away but, the portion that is found has to do with SUPERPOWERS!! And I don’t mean just ordinary OT 6 things like $20 dollar bill spotting and parking space. No, the super powers provided with this OT step make super-strength look like super-ventriloquism. Stay posted-OT 9 is coming!!!

    • N. Graham

      I am still trying to de-enterbulate it so it can be read without catching diphtheria or TC dyslexia.

      • wannabeclear

        Catching Diphtheria! That’s a great name for a band!

        • Midwest Mom

          I brought my cow bell! 🙂

  • PreferToBeAnon2
    • 1subgenius

      Hoping Xander and chianons are on it.

  • sizzle8

    I realize this is a “forest for the trees” issue, but my OCD has to chime in.
    It’s not correct to say, “When a person dies on Earth, his thetan (Hubbard’s name for an eternal spirit) is transferred to Mars…”
    In Scientology, a person doesn’t HAVE a thetan – he IS the thetan.

    • FistOfXenu

      Meanwhile in real life “thetan” is just this made up word created by that master of horseshit shoveling, LiarRon Humptydumpty.

    • TonyOrtega

      Yes, I am well aware of that fact. But instead of torturing the English language by writing something utterly stupid like “when a person’s meat body dies on earth, he — as a thetan — then transfers to Mars” it’s more fun to write it in a way that makes sense to rational human beings, and then watch Scientologists pitch a fit.

  • FistOfXenu

    After listening to this I’m thinking LRH made it up as he went along and didn’t always think about how the horseshit he told in the moment fit into the bigger picture, in the beginning at least. Or maybe I’m missing something.

    As far as Paul Katz is concerned, if that had been posted yesterday I would’ve thought it was April Fools’ joke post. As it is, it’s just a post about a fool.

    • wannabeclear

      Of course he was making that shit up as he went along. That’s what the man did. And amazingly he got lots of people to believe it. That part still astounds me.

      • Missionary Kid

        Boy, are you clear!!!

  • F_Randy_Hullabaloo

    I could listen to that space opera shit all day.

  • FistOfXenu

    I just realized MIDWEST MOM IS BACK! 3 cheers and welcome back MWM!

    It’s been a long Lent and I’m sorry I wasn’t here to welcome you yesterday but it looks like my efforts wasn’t really be needed then. So consider this a a continuation. The Bunker’s partying this week for having you back. 🙂

    • Midwest Mom

      Thank you! There’s still some delicious caek left; plenty for everyone to enjoy!! Howdy is supposed to be handling the tunes but he is off flirting with some of the new girls in the bunker.

      How about Blitzkrieg Bop?
      http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=VN84heYya1I

  • 0tessa

    The space opera (Marcabian civilization, Xenu, implant stations on Mars and Venus, whatever else) is actually really believed to be true by a number of Scientologists. Amazing, but true. Others consider it to be part of the Scientology mythology, like the Greek and the Roman. It is not made known to new Scientologists, because it would be ‘out gradient’ and they would run away of course. By the time you get to these tapes, you are supposed to have had some auditing, and you would have had some (mocked up) past lives incidents to run.
    The only one who really knew that he was making it all up, was of course LRon.
    This childish science fiction stories are the weakest link of Scientology. But if you buy this, then you will probably also buy the body thetans. An OT8 is someone who buys literally anything if he believes it will bring him to a higher state of OT.
    But, like Jesse Prince said: there is not one single OT in Scientology, nor one single body thetan.

    • grundoon

      Marty Rathbun asked his readers (indie Scientologists) what they actually believe about their whole track, the implant stations, between-lives area, etc.) About 25% “noted there are implant stations awaiting us after death,” while 65% “noted there are no such obstacles as implant stations.” http://markrathbun.wordpress.com/2012/12/09/between-lives-survey/

  • Poison Ivy

    I am so impressed (on a professional level) by Angry Gay Pope’s video series. Karen is an outstanding spokesperson. You feel her pain in every word. There is nothing false about what she is doing – she is reaching out to the world to help right the assaults against basic human decency perpetrated by Scientology – not just on “Wogs”, but on its own members. Its own believers. Stunning stuff. I don’t know if Angry Gay Pope or Karen drop in here much but if you do, Kudos. Your work has amazing power.

  • Douglas D. Douglas

    Has anyone sat down and compiled a complete timeline of all the stories and incidents that LRH stated about planet Earth? By my reckoning, the “Fourth Invader Force” should have been dealing with engrams and thetans and so on from the mess left several millennia earlier by Xenu.

    Also, LRH mentions that the Fifth Force arrived 8,200 years ago (I believe I heard that). He also went on to say that one of them accompanied a member of the Habsburgs on a little tour, during which an assassination occurred. Am I confused, or is LRH suggesting that the Habsburg dynasty extended back over 8,000 years?

    • John P.

      I believe the bit about “accompanied a member of the Habsburgs on a little tour, during which an assassination occurred” was talking about the assassination of Archduke Franz Ferdinand, which precipitated World War I. So he’s not making an obviously outlandish claim that the Habsburg dynasty stretched back in time by 8,000 years. He is making the utterly reasonable and completely believable claim that an alien battle group was involved in starting one of the bloodiest conflicts in history.

      • Douglas D. Douglas

        Ah. Clarity. It’s beautiful.

      • wannabeclear

        Well, now it all makes sense. Thanks for clarifying the outlandish claim from the…outlandish claim.

    • grundoon

      I’ll get right on that, as soon as I finish my complete timeline of Batman and the Justice League (oddly, although clearly depicted, the sources seem inconsistent at one or two points).

  • Douglas D. Douglas

    It’s really not all that hard to blow people’s minds in the way described. Years ago my college roommate burst into our room in a frenzy, babbling about having just made a date to meet a certain girl for lunch, and proceeded to wash up and change his clothes. As he headed out the door, he asked me how he looked. I told him he looked good enough for a lunch date with the girl in question. He turned to me, thunderstruck, and asked me how I knew he was meeting her for lunch. I thought he was kidding, until I realized he genuinely didn’t know how I knew that. If I had been a devious person, I could have told him that I had amazing mind powers. Instead, I reminded him that he had told me that when he first burst into the room…

    • Missionary Kid

      You had the chance to become another LRH, and you blew it. Thank goodness. 🙂

  • InTheNameOfXenu

    Paul,

    Couldn’t it have been the simple fact that you’re $20 bill fell out of your pocket and landed on that patch of weeds? You’re friend saw what happened, but was going to keep that twenty for himself. After you realized the money was gone, he felt guilty and turned back to where it fell. Whala, OT powers.

    There are truly gifted psychics out there, but none were created in Scientology. If any psychic ability like remote-viewing occurred it was due to the techniques that Hubbard ripped off from Crowley and others.

    Sincerely,

    InTheNameOfXenu
    Hollywood, CA

  • Sherbet

    I just realized lrh is the Forrest Gump of the universe. You name the planet, asteroid, civilization, or historical era, and, by golly, lrh was there in person.

    • Missionary Kid

      Zelig.

  • Truthiwant

    I have a very underwhelming OT story.

    I have been completely out of Scientology for about a year now.

    About a month ago, I had a visit from two OT VIIIs (I believe that the power of OTs is
    even greater when they are together). They said that they had visited me
    several times but that I was never at home.

    Well, anyway, I told them exactly what I thought about Scientology. All one of them
    could reply was that there must be a case error. I told him that he was right
    but the real case error was Scientology itself. I told him that Scientology was
    a brain washing cult.

    However, this is not the point to the story. The point is about underwhelming OT
    ability.

    These two OT VIIIs visited me when I was out. I would have thought that a couple of OT
    VIIIs would have known when somebody was at home or when they were out. No?

    It reminds me of that joke about “a bus full of clairvoyants that crashed and killed all
    of the people on board.”

    • Missionary Kid

      I laughed when I saw a sign that said, “Psychic Convention” and had an arrow pointing one direction.
      If they were truly psychic, they’d know where it was.

  • wannabeclear

    In response to Paul Katz’s convincing proof that OT Powerz iz for Realz Y’all, allow me to share a story.

    Once when I was about 12, my best friend and I were tooling through the mall in our home town. My mom had given me $20 to go shopping, which was A LOT of money for me. And as we were strolling through the mall, I looked in my pocket and realized it was gone. So, we turned around and backtracked and there on the ground in the middle of the mall I found a $20 dollar bill, just sitting there waiting for me. I must have been a $cientology prodigy at age 12 and had never taken a single course or been audited even once. I just used my Sooper Dooper OT Powerzzzzz.

    Or…

    I was lucky enough to find the money on the ground where I’d dropped it, before anyone else picked it up.

    I’ll go with Occam’s Razor before L. Ron Hubbard. Thanks ever so kindly.

  • claybonnyman

    Seriously, as someone who has long despised Scientology but never had anything to do with it (other than laughing and pointing from the sidelines), I cannot for the life of me understand how anyone who reads Hubbard’s constantly changing science-fiction fantasy can conclude anything other than that he was either a wacko, a liar or (probably) both.

    But he’s so busy making it all up as he goes along (as his oldest son once explained) that he can’t even keep his own fairy tales straight.

    So if anyone would indulge me, I’d love to hear about how people overcome the presumed cognitive dissonance they experience when hearing this stuff. (And I do recognize that some – many? – “public” Scientologists may not have heard all the goony-tune tales of the “guh-LAK-see” spun by Hubbard.

    Much obliged.

    • Schockenawd

      What Clay said. … When LRH told his audience stupid things like “the Martian operation is fascinating,” did he really not expect that within a relatively few years we would know what is on Mars, and it doesn’t include an invader force operation? And how can anyone listening to him now think anything other than that the guy was an imaginative fruitcake?

      • Sure. I don’t think he was very imaginative. His stories suck.

    • Artoo45

      You can actually hear him making it up as he goes along, he clearly loved the sound of his own voice. What a ham . . .

  • Missionary Kid

    Gawker reports that John Travolta’s insurance company paid out $84,500 in claims against demand letters for sexual assault. http://gawker.com/5993260/document-shows-john-travolta-paid-at-least-84000-last-year-over-sexual-assault-claims

  • Missionary Kid
  • TonyOrtega

    We noted that in the afternoon story.

  • They just have a past that they can’t accept that is why they don’t put much attention or more open regarding on their space opera. Still, it’s their decision after all and we may not be able to do anything with it.

  • anoni81b4u

    Remember when the underground bunker got 400 comments on a good day … 🙂
    GREAT BLOG Mr. Ortega !