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—————- In anticipation of her biggest day in court yet, Laura DeCrescenzo and her attorneys hit the Church of Scientology with 928 pages of new filings —————- Details from 18,000 pages of evidence show how Scientology manipulated a child to keep her working under slave-like conditions —————- A key document describing DeCrescenzo’s unwillingness to have her coerced abortion is missing from the evidence Scientology was ordered to produce By Tony Ortega Wednesday afternoon, Laura DeCrescenzo filed explosive new information in her four-year legal odyssey against the Church of Scientology, submitting 928 pages of new declarations and exhibits in anticipation of a crucial October 23 hearing in her lawsuit against the church which alleges abuse, including allegations that she was forced to have an abortion at only 17 years of age. Key to the new filings is information gleaned from thousands of pages of previously secret files that the church fought mightily to keep under wraps. But on Monday, the U.

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Herb Richardson, Please Don’t Sue Us

Herb Richardson, helluva guy

Herb Richardson, helluva guy

We want to thank Professor David Touretzky of Carnegie Mellon University, who sent us down this rabbit hole a few days ago.

He pointed us to a news item that has grabbed considerable attention in the academic world, although Gawker thinks it can’t be any more boring.

Here’s the thumbnail: An academic librarian at McMaster University in Ontario named David Askey is being sued for millions because in 2010, when he was still a tenured associate professor at Kansas State University, he wrote a blog post criticizing the quality of books put out by an academic publisher, Edwin Mellen Press.

Who cares, Gawker asks. Well, we think you might care after you hear more about Edwin Mellen Press, about the odd way Scientology is involved, and about a guy named Herbert Richardson.

A note about the care we’re taking in this blog post: Herb has proved to be a somewhat litigious person, and we really can’t take any chances. So any time we can find something positive! to say about Herb, we’re going to grab it.

For example, we were thrilled to learn that Herb was once the subject of a book that championed his cause after he was removed from his job at the University of Toronto in 1994. Why was he sacked? No doubt because he was simply too awesome. In fact, the title of the book about him seems to suggest that’s the case… The Envy of Excellence: Administrative Mobbing of High Achieving Professors. (Two other professors were also profiled.)

So it was envy of Herb’s excellence that motivated the pointy-headed bastards over at U of Toronto’s St. Michael’s College to give him the boot. Well, thank goodness Herb received some recognition in Envy of Excellence, which was written by Kenneth Westhues and was published by Edwin Mellen Press. Which Herb owns.

Hey, why not? After all, who else is going to stick up for you besides yourself, right? In fact, Herb also published another version of Westhues’s book that contained only Herb’s part of the original story, calling it Academic Mobbing at the University of Toronto. (You can get a copy for yourself for only $119.95 at Edwin Mellen.) Anyway, we found even further validation of Herb in a review of the book that provided quite a bit of background on the controversy…

Academic Mobbing reads like a “who-dunnit,” or rather, a “what-dunnit,” because it is only on page 231 that we learn what Richardson is convicted of. In the eight-year build up, allegations included bad teaching, abuse of students, administrative neglect, plagiarism, scholarly misrepresentation, disloyalty to Catholic teaching (!), mis-using a four-month medical leave, and failing to disclose his activities in “Mellen Enterprises” ? the Edwin Mellen Press (which his opponents labeled a “vanity press,” and, it must be noted, published Academic Mobbing), and Mellen University (which, perhaps because it is chartered in the West Indies, accusers labeled a “diploma mill”).

Prof. Richardson’s biography is fascinating. Born in 1932 in Baltimore, Maryland, he was reared in Lakewood, Ohio, in a downwardly mobile but politically liberal WASP family. Forbidden by his father from joining any “Whites only” fraternity, Richardson became part of a racially mixed group of pre-theology students at Baldwin-Wallace College, outside of Cleveland. In 1955 he did graduate work at Boston University with Martin Luther King, Jr. as classmate. From 1956-62 he completed a doctorate at Harvard University Divinity School where he also served as Assistant Professor from 1962 to 1968.

In 1968, Richardson became the first Protestant theologian appointed to the Roman Catholic faculty of St. Michael’s during the ecumenical euphoria with which he identified. Achievement-oriented, self-confident, hard-working, free-thinking, and entrepreneurial, Westhues suggests Richardson’s quintessentially American, Protestant, liberal personality was sure to create friction eventually.

According to Westhues, the trigger for the “mobbing” was theological differences. An example was Richardson’s 1971 book on sexuality and women’s issues, Nun, Witch, Playmate: The Americanization of Sex (Harper & Row). Then there was Rev. Sun Myung Moon’s Unification Church, tagged by opponents as a “cult” which Richardson defended from 1976 to 1985, even testifying before the U.S. Senate on the legitimacy of religious conversion. More problematic was his 1974 founding of the Edwin Mellen Press in Lewiston, New York, building it into a 3 million dollar a year publishing house, with four thousand titles by 2001.

The reviewer goes on to describe what trumped-up nonsense the university finally used to remove Herb…

The charges sustained against Richardson centered on his non-disclosure of information about Mellen Press and Mellen University, alleged conflicts of interest, and the embarrassment caused, plus the charge of abusing a medical leave. Westhues succeeds admirably in his brief for Richardson’s defense and also in documenting the mobbing phenomenon, although I thought he tap-danced around the creation of Mellen University, saying he found it less interesting to discuss. While I know of colleagues who have (very legitimately) started publishing houses and other businesses, I know of none who have started another university! SAFS members will enjoy this book. Worthy of a screenplay, it will serve as an excellent source book for many years to come.

So Herb got screwed simply because he had the entrepreneurial spirit to start a publishing house and an off-shore university. Where’s the justice?

Luckily, there were people like this reviewer to cheer on Herb and see his side of things. The person who wrote this review? Oh, sadly, he died last year. And since he’s dead, we don’t have to worry about him suing us. So we can tell you that his name was J. Philippe Rushton, and don’t get us started on what a race-baiting dipshit he was.

But hey, Herb at least had someone sticking up for him.

It was right around the same time of his university kerfuffle that Herb filed a lawsuit against the turtleneck-wearing smartypants editors over at Lingua Franca. The magazine went out of business in 2001, but there’s still an archive of sorts that contains this short summary of the incident…

Warren St. John deems Edwin Mellen Press a vanity publisher capitalizing on the desperation of credential-hungry academics. St. John also finds that the Press’s offshore adjunct, Mellen University, is little more than a diploma mill. After the exposé, Mellen chief Herbert Richardson, a former University of Toronto religion professor, accuses LF of libel and sues for $15 million. He loses. In September 1994, St. Michael’s College, where Richardson holds tenure, dismisses him for “gross misconduct.”

For Herb’s side of things, you could read his lawyer’s book on the lawsuit, published by, you guessed it, Edwin Mellen Press. A bargain at $119.95 for 116 pages.

Besides starting a publishing house, and (at least for a while) his own university, Herb also, as Rushton’s review indicated, helped out the Rev. Moon with some glowing reviews of the Unification Church. And wouldn’t you know it, Herb also gave a helping hand to the Church of Scientology. Just take a look at his praise for Scientology and its practices…

The ethical doctrines of the Church of Scientology emphasize issues common to all religions, e.g., the value of chastity before and fidelity within marriage, and the importance of social justice. There is, however, a tendency in Scientology’s ethics to place special emphasis on actions which maintain or develop reason and freedom against whatever would injure or interfere with them by creating engrams. In Scientology, acts which harm the capacity of a human being to act in a spiritual way are especially to be avoided.

Hey, Scientology spokeswoman Karin Pouw ought to be studying this stuff! Herb has a way with words.

OK, so fast-forward to September 22, 2010, and K-State professor David Askey, on his blog, characterizes Herb’s publishing house in not so glowing terms…

Yes, they occasionally publish a worthy title. No, they are not technically a vanity publisher, since apparently they earn enough from libraries with their egregiously high prices to avoid asking for subsidies from authors. But at the end of the day, so much of what they publish is simply second-class scholarship (and that is being kind in some cases), and in a time when libraries cannot purchase so much of the first-class scholarship, there is simply no reason to support such ventures.

Ouch! Harsh, yes, but Askey did his best, in the comments, to engage with readers in an intelligent discussion. Some of his commenters, for example, were academics who had been published by Edwin Mellen Press — some were glad that they had worked with Herb, some not so much.

One commenter, however, was nastier than the others, and made a reference to Herb’s getting kicked out of Toronto U., and also accused him of being in a little too tight with Scientology.

Well, that was just a bridge too far. Herb, feeling singed, filed a lawsuit against Askey, as the Chronicle of Higher Education reports

The first lawsuit, filed by the publisher’s founder rather than the press, alleges that Mr. Askey is liable not just for criticizing the publisher’s output, a task Mr. Askey said is his job as a librarian, but also for making personal comments about Mr. Richardson, a task that is probably outside a librarian’s job description.

In a copy of the statement of claim obtained by The Chronicle, Mr. Richardson specifically states that “the defendant” accused him of being a “fascist and evangelical Scientologist.” But an archived copy of the original Web site, preserved by the Internet Archive, shows that the statement in question was actually posted in the comments section of the blog by a reader, not by Mr. Askey.

OK, so maybe Herb, who is awesome, hadn’t had time in his busy schedule to read Section 230 of the Communications Decency Act of 1996, which protects publishers from being sued over what commenters say. Or maybe he had — which is why he filed suit in Canada, not the United States. And after suing Askey for $1 million, Herb filed a second lawsuit for $3 million against Askey and his present employer, McMaster University, even though Askey hadn’t yet started his job at McMaster in 2010 when he wrote the blog post.

Academics around the country, obviously envious of Herb’s excellence, have denounced the lawsuits. Says the Chronicle, “Since the case came to light last week, librarians, professors, and academic associations have rallied online, characterizing the lawsuit as an assault against academic freedom.”

Everyone’s ganging up on Herb!

Maybe it’s time he cashed in those chips with the Moonies and with David Miscavige?

Anyway, given how things went with Askey’s blog, we’re going to ask our highly intelligent commenting community to help us out and in your remarks remember to…

1. Explain how awesome Herb is.

2. Choose your favorite Edwin Mellen Press title, and tell us why it appeals to you.

We thank you for your positivity!

————-

Posted by Tony Ortega on February 20, 2013 at 07:00

 

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  • 1subgenius

    He’s a snappy dresser he is.

  • http://twitter.com/tetloj tetloj

    Dunning-Kruger effect might apply here: http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Dunning-Kruger_effect

    • 1subgenius

      You nailed it.

    • dbloch7986

      I think you just explained all of Scientology

    • Missionary Kid

      Thanks for the term. I know a few people like that, and, as dbloch7966 put it, it explains all of $cientology

    • HeatherGraceful

      I’m a little late to the commenting party,but clearly the Dunning-Kruger effect is at play in some of the characters in this little story, who are jealous of Herb’s excellence. And others of David Miscavige’s awesomeness. Nice call.

  • EnthralledObserver

    Herb is so awesome I mentioned his name.

    And it has just come to my attention just how many odd topics books are written about that I never even considered before… I have been sheltered for too long.
    I mean, it really is time I broadened my knowledge regarding how Women were represented in Novels set during the Spanish Civil War… innit? Here is a good as any place to start: http://mellenpress.com/mellenpress.cfm?bookid=8811&pc=9

  • http://twitter.com/sandyshores50 Sunny Sands

    After all this bad publicity, it’s difficult to imagine any academic using Edwin Mellen press again.

    Mr. Richardson is age 80. I have to wonder if his thought processes are fully functioning. Imagine the initial interview with his lawyer where he states his grievances, and the lawyer is hungry for revenue so takes on the case in spite of few merits to winning the case.

    A quick search doesn’t show anyone has put the original complaints online yet, that would be interesting to see.

    There is a petition at change dot org if anyone wants to support Mr. Askey. They have over 2600 signatures now.
    https://www.change.org/petitions/edwin-mellen-press-end-libel-suit-against-dale-askey-and-mcmaster-university

    • DeElizabethan

      At the least, I can do that, thanks sunny. They still need more.

  • whingeybingey

    Herb is indeed awesome! 50,000 flies can’t be wrong!

  • Gladys Kravitz

    I went looking for a book and found this on the side:

    “My association since 1996 with the Edwin Mellen Press has been positive, encouraging, and inspirational. As a former Editor at the publisher Holt, Rinehart, and Winston, I have the experience to evaluate Mellen‘s staff procedures and management. … Subsequently, I received tenure at DePaul University partly due to [my book] and translation.”

    I don’t know that I can handle this much inspiration before a 2nd cup of coffee. And LOOK: it’s the solution to the US’s unemployment problem! Write a book, Get a job. Oh wow.

  • Unex Skcus

    I am absolutely positively ROFL at the sheer awesomeness of… of… oh yea, Herbalissimo.

    Now back to reading a positively awesome tome: The Impact of the Postcolonial Theories of Edward Said, Gayatri Spivak, and Homi Bhabha on Western Thought, published by that terrific guy Herb.

  • Observer

    Herb is awesome because he has the perspicacity to see that Scientology’s ethical teachings are exactly the same as those of all other religions, at least until you look up LRH’s made-up definitions for all those nice words. He is also awesome because, with his scattershot litigiousness, he is perfect Most Ethical People on the Planet material.

    I was delighted to see this book in the Edwin Mellen catalog. The role of the parrot in literature has been shockingly overlooked.

    http://mellenpress.com/mellenpress.cfm?bookid=6893&pc=9

    The Role of the Parrot in Selected Texts from Ovid to Jean Rhys: Telling a Story from an Alternative Viewpoint
    Edited by Courtney, Julia , & James, Paula
    Description
    “This book features the efforts of a group of academics from diverse disciplines that have been working together to highlight the presence of the parrot in selected texts across the centuries.”

    A must-read if I’ve ever seen one!

    • John P.

      Damn! You found an even more awesome title than the one I was about to highlight: “The Singing Farm Women of Rural Indiana (1934-2009): A Depression Era Program of the U.S. Department of Agriculture” I can’t believe that in my American Culture class this particular form of musical self-expression was not front and center. Who needs to study Gershwin, Cole Porter, Ella Fitzgerald and the like when one should in fact be studying yodeling competitions from Indiana farm wives?

      • TheHoleDoesNotExist

        No yodel in Indiana, JohnP. Cackle, crow, croon, yes

      • richelieu jr

        Excellent, excellent titles, both of you!

        I wonder if the history is actually told by parrots? They must cut out a lot of the Sqqawks and Acks, I suppose…

      • 1subgenius

        The major flaw of “The Singing Farm Women of Rural Indiana (1934-2009): A Depression Era Program of the U.S. Department of Agriculture” is its puzzling omission of the greatest epoch of singing farm women of rural Indiana, 1928-1931, also known as the Golden Dawn of Goshen. (Oh what a time!)

        Because of this glaring inexplicable academic lapse I cannot recommend it.

      • VickiStubing

        How about a singing parrot?

        http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=YYmEviJK5Hs

        Sorry, he’s probably not from Indiana…

        • Are_sics

          or married. Definitely not, therefore, awesome enough for Herb.

        • TheHoleDoesNotExist

          Parrots named “Peaches and Herb”?

        • TheHoleDoesNotExist

          Here’s Miscavige’s parrot singing “Let the Bodies Hit the Floor”.

          http://youtu.be/BXzEbtFRoes

          • Captain Howdy

            Ha Ha, I like the parrot’s version more than the original.

      • nessness

        taking the piss out of Indiana when Adam Lambert, Michael Jackson, Rita Coolidge & John Mellancamp are all natives of that state (granted whether or not rural is a point for me as I don’t have a clue as are your examples of Cole Porter, Gershwin & Ella Fitzgerald – and by the way what has rural got to do with talent?) Perhaps this particular form of talent might have held your interest for 5 minutes had you paid attention, perhaps not. Never, never in fact never lose your curiosity regardless of the title of the research. Academicians are remarkably useless in naming anything from a sales point of view. might help you find the next best if you are past the point of the cover art.

        • John P.

          The point was not to rag on Indiana, though the Hoosier State is a relatively easy target. Nor is it to mock a bunch of farmer’s wives doing their best to inject a little gloom into the Depression, and get paid modestly for it via the WPA.

          The narrowness of the focus of the book is somewhat suspicious, especially when you read the detailed description on the Mellen web site. It appears to be a 456-page data dump on a single singing group, not a WPA program that touched many lives across the state. The sheer weight of source documents that are listed in the table of contents looks awfully suspicious to me — like the author was padding out what perhaps started as a short paper into a book-length treatment to be submitted as part of a tenure “package.” The description on the site is also quite inelegantly worded, which would tend to suggest that there may be some basis to the negative commentary about Mellen Press.

          There are a lot of great things the WPA contributed to American culture. My favorite is the play called “Spirochete: The Story of Man’s Conquest of Syphilis,” which was presented in Philadelphia. I happen to have a poster from the theatrical production, which is in the bathroom in the entry way of the place in town, and which is much appreciated by my (syphilis-free) guests. I would love to hear more about this particular dramatic opus, but I don’t think it’s worth a book-length treatment.

          I was also commenting on the possibility that this book is assigned to students taking classes from the author, as a way for the author to snag a few extra royalty bucks every year. To require students to spend $120 on this instead of a similar amount of money on tunes from great artists who were really defining American music in the 1930s seems short-sighted on the part of the author. That is more of a comment on low-grade intellectual dishonesty in colleges than it is anything negative about Indiana. The same argument holds true of singing groups from any of the other states in the US. Or the provinces of Canada, for that matter.

          • nessness

            bunch of farmer’s wives doing their best – not so keen on the descriptive title – but hey grew up in the 70s, never liked the language of small. Regardless I have seen so many academic titles that are “narrow”, indeed miniscule that whether or not this particular press is legit (and it seems likely NOT) their subjects of papers would have perceived it to be so. I am so pleased to hear of Man’s Conquest of Syphillus, indeed I am sure there are many who will be smiling to hear of it,….. :)
            Ella is a particular heroine of mine and one of those if they said you could see a show of any age any time, who would you rather see/hear? I did have the glory of being at a dinner/show of Dizzy Gillespie in DC with my dad who had seen him 40 years before (was that a trip or what) and Oscar Peterson as a speech to accept an honorary degree. Don’t know if the Indiana babes would have thrown them off the list, but you know…. I don’t know, haven’t heard them. Options open

    • mirele

      Does it talk about Monty Python’s Dead Parrot sketch? If it doesn’t, then it’s DOA.

    • http://www.facebook.com/teleny Alissa Mower Clough

      I love Ver-Vert! Glad to see someone else has read it!

    • Artoo45

      Now, the gloves must come off! You have mocked a life changing book that towers over the academic landscape like a mighty sequoia of trivial minutiae. The Role of the Parrot. What can be said about a book that changed my life in a totally life changing way? Only A History of Man had greater impact on me (I fell out of my tree because my jaw hurt so much). Have you no decency? Will this nightmare of mockery never end?

      • The Dark Avenger

        Flaubert wrote a famous short story about a woman and her parrot, “Un cœur simple”, that would have to be included in this survey.

        • http://www.facebook.com/people/Oy-Humidity/100003793921451 Oy Humidity

          Stop acting like you don’t love Cruise and Scientology. You’re a buffoon.

          • The Dark Avenger

            We’re talking about literature, you moron. Try to focus for once in your misbegotten life, fool.

    • Couch_Incident

      Kingsley Amis had this sort of academic title summed up in his 1954 novel Lucky Jim: “It was a perfect title, in that it crystallized the article’s niggling mindlessness, its funereal parade of yawn-enforcing facts, the
      pseudo-light it threw upon non-problems.”

  • denise byrne

    A Study of Attitudes Toward Audience Interaction in Journalism Citizen-Based Reporting
    Morris, John L.

  • TheHoleDoesNotExist

    Holy Cow..is that a title? That’s my pick.

    Somehow throughout reading this I had a Vision …
    Tony on stage at the L Ron Hubbard Hall performing the “Mexican Hat Dance”.

    Hilarious, but in a most reverent Herbal manner. No, really. Anyone who charges those kind of prices for wicked majick is an honorary scientology Reverend in my book. Does he have my frock? Still on the Holy Grail Trail for mine.

  • http://infinitecomplacency.blogspot.com/ Jonny Jacobsen

    What do you think, Tony: should I dust off my book project and pitch it to him? I mean, he sounds very open-minded.

    • TonyOrtega

      He’d be lucky to have you, Jonny.

      • VickiStubing

        Agreed, but is $119.95 the going rate for all titles? Kinda steep for those of us with ever-growing $ci libraries.

        • http://infinitecomplacency.blogspot.com/ Jonny Jacobsen

          I like those rates! (Depending on my cut, I’ll grant you.)

        • stillgrace

          He must have a huge warehouse to store all these tomes. I guess he never heard of the “print on demand” business model for publishing. Or maybe he’s already doing it.

          • grundoon

            Already doing it. And, claims to have a 50,000 cu ft warehouse.

    • richelieu jr

      Put the book back in it first, though.

    • Poison Ivy

      “Comedy in German Drama”: Isn’t that an oxymoron? “Comedy in German Theater”, perhaps…

      • http://www.facebook.com/people/Robert-Eckert/100002715429426 Robert Eckert

        It was “Approaches” to comedy: probably not very near approaches.

  • http://twitter.com/media_lush media_lush

    Herb sounds like a truly ‘awesome’ douchebag.

  • James Anglin

    Some of the Mellen Press webpages show a brief endorsement statement by some academic author whose books the press has published. There seem to be a number of different such endorsers, changing randomly each time you load the page. When I looked at the site, the endorsement showing happened to be one from a Professor Irving Hexham. He said that Mellen Press published his books when no-one else would. As proof that his books are nonetheless serious scholarship, he mentioned that they have had more than 30 academic reviews.

    I happen to know Irving Hexham a bit. He’s a real guy, and he’s quite definitely a respectable scholar by any mainstream standard. He’s even on Wikipedia. 30 academic reviews really is a substantial credential — he’s not talking about two-line endorsements on Amazon, but short essay-form book reviews published in technical journals, and academics don’t get off their butts to write formal book reviews unless they think the books are significant. Hexham has also had books published by major publishers in his field. One of them has won at least one mainstream award.

    Perhaps Hexham’s several books with Mellen are only examples of its occasional worthy titles, whose existence Askey acknowledged. All I’m saying is, when Askey said that Mellen does publish some worthy titles, he wasn’t just hedging. It does seem to be true.

    A coincidence that may be worth noting is that Hexham’s field is fairly close to Richardson’s. Maybe Richardson’s own editorial expertise was important at Mellen in the beginning, when Hexham’s first book came out. The main thing that seems suspicious to me about Mellen now is the enormous breadth of the range of fields it covers. Perhaps it has brought in a huge stable of competent editors over the years, or perhaps it let its standards slip as it grew.

    • richelieu jr

      Sounds reasonable.

      But it’s not very funny…

    • http://twitter.com/sandyshores50 Sunny Sands

      Good comment.

    • grundoon

      Edwin Mellem’s prices ensure that nobody will ever see these books except for the author, the author’s mom, and those who are given free review copies (probably at the author’s expense). Authors might as well dig a hole in the basement and toss in their manuscript.

      • James Anglin

        The prices are actually only a bit steep by academic press standards. People don’t buy these titles to read on the beach. They buy them with research or library budget money, and pore over them in the office. That’s why Askey was complaining. He felt that library budget money was being wasted on Mellen Press books. But as I understand it, he was mainly complaining about the academic bang for buck, not the bucks per book.

      • John P.

        Actually, the heart of the scam (or the foundation of the business model, if we’re being charitable) might be that these books are required reading for any classes that the authors teach. If Mellen Press uses current print-on-demand technology, they have very little inventory risk from carrying these titles, especially if they are ordered for classes (i.e., in clumps of 10-12 copies at a time and only occasional sales at other times). At that point, if you’re just selling what amount to expensive class readers, you can stay in business for a long time selling exactly zero copies to other customers (i.e., library collections). But eventually other print-on-demand solutions such as Kindles, iUniverse, etc. might end up offering higher per-unit royalty dollars to authors than Mellen and then they will be sunk.

    • Poison Ivy

      Well said James. Esoteric topics can actually come in very handy for niche researchers. However I suppose at a vanity press like Mellen, you don’t necessarily know which you’re getting – the real scholarship or the hack.

      • James Anglin

        Exactly.

        Mellen is not a vanity press of the classic type, because they don’t charge authors money. But they don’t pay royalties, either. Academic monographs on highly specialized topics like these almost never pay royalties anywhere, because the standard contract is for royalties to start after X copies have been sold, and X is usually well above total demand. Academic authors don’t write these things for money.

        WIth no royalties to pay, the press is getting the manuscripts for free. If they can sell copies to libraries, then the only question about being a vanity press or not is whether they have high scholarly standards about what manuscripts they accept. (I don’t think that many of these titles are really textbook material. They look to be too specialized for that. So there’s probably not a lot of sales directly to students.) That’s why Askey’s complaint is a serious issue for Mellen.

        The other reason it’s serious is that it may be the only thing that will stop good scholars from sending books to Mellen. Otherwise, what a good scholar can get from Mellen is not much different from what they’d get from any academic press: no money (because academic writing never pays), not much editorial assistance (because good writers don’t need much), but the formality of publication has been duly completed and the author can note a publication on their CV. If Mellen starts getting a bad reputation, though, the good authors will send their books elsewhere, leaving only the hacks. And if that becomes too obvious, the libraries will finally stop buying.

        • TheHoleDoesNotExist

          Thanks. You answered my question about authors having to pay out of pocket. All in all, this sounds exactly like the scam (awesome scam) run on songwriters. CD Baby at one time had this package deal and it sounded like distribution by a third partu was part of it. It turned out to just be a warehousing type of outfit. All songs on a submitted CD/Album became tied up. You would have to rerecord, change the material here and there, repackage anew if you ever wanted to sell it, even selling on your own, and of course, there were no royalties if you didn’t. These packages then get reparcelled out and sold (I am assuming very cheaply). I learned about the latter only when I curiously Googled some of my titles awhile back and was stunned they were showing up on iTunes and similar venues. No promotion meant no sales of course, except a couple. Now I wonder if these authors have similar constraints in addition to the no royalties penalty.

          But hey Herb, I am in No Way Whatsoever comparing you to Musical Pirates. You’re not musical at All.

          • VickiStubing

            But I bet he’d look great in an eyepatch! Now where did I put my former avatar….

            • TheHoleDoesNotExist

              lol, bring it!

    • coonellie

      Well, yes, Dr. Hexham is an actual academic, but seeing his name explained a lot. A number of years ago I dialogued wtih Dr. Hexham and he was very gracious, although we disagreed on a number of issues.

      For another tumbler into Wonderland and COS connections, see http://www.apologeticsindex.org/h07.html

    • http://lliira.dreamwidth.org/ Lliira

      My mother makes money from royalties from her academic book. I think she’s down to getting checks for a couple bucks (her book was published about 10 years ago), but for a while she was getting checks for a couple hundred bucks. The book isn’t super-duper specialized, but it’s not extremely broad either, and it was intended for use in college classrooms at the graduate level. I believe it cost $14.99 in paperback. There were also hardcover copies printed for libraries (and something like 10 free copies for her, I’ve got one), which I think is where most of her royalties came from. It wasn’t enough to live on, but it wasn’t spare change, either.

      • James Anglin

        It can happen, but it sounds as though your mom wrote a particularly good book, on a topic broad enough to have lots of courses offered on it, albeit at the graduate level. A lot of academic books are really too narrow for that. Their market is likely to be people writing dissertations … or other specialized books.

        There is an actual valid purpose to books like this. Even if nobody really cares about such minute details in themselves, more important conclusions do get drawn from masses of detail. How often do people state some broad opinion, when their evidence for it boils down to just a few anecdotes? Well, it’s easy to say that that’s bad, but the only way to do better is for somebody to do an awful lot of work checking things out in detail.

        These academic writers do that, so that we don’t have to. Then they write their stuff up in a very specialized book. I won’t care about that book, but I might care about the book that is later based on that book plus thirty others like it. Or the book that is later based on that book, plus a dozen others like it. The highly specialized academic book is kind of the plankton of knowledge. It’s practically invisible, but it needs to be there to save the whales.

        Or at least, there has to be some way to record and recognize detailed studies. It’s not clear that books like the ones Mellen publishes are really the best way to do this. I suspect that turning a good detailed study into a book can often bring in a fair amount of unnecessary bloat. In the long run, blogs or something are probably going to be better.

  • TheHoleDoesNotExist

    Hey, if he needs a job, scientology could use another ecclesiastical SPokesHole. Karin seems busy with all these new Titles flooding the markets. Herb has The Look. Hey, we’ll give Herb glowing Recommends, right?

    • VickiStubing

      AHA! I found just the book for Karin: Why Do People Run?:
      Competitive Sport, Daily Exercise, or Community Event. Surely she will have some spare time to read at the end of her happy days in the Hole.

      • grundoon

        124 pages, $119.95.Nominated for the prestigious 2012 Society of Midland Authors Award.

        “…a fantastic tale of high-level paradoxical dilemmas….”
        (Prof. Gary I. Wade Drake University) Amazon Best Sellers Rank:

        #5,548,084. Six chapters, but nothing on Cause Resurgence, so might not help Karin.

      • dbloch7986

        ONLY HUBBARD’S WORKS ARE PERMITTED IN THE HOLE

        • TheHoleDoesNotExist

          But, but. The Hole Does Not Exist! Now I’m confused. Where’s my clay? I think I left it next to my frock, but that’s missing.

          • dbloch7986

            “Acceptable truths”

  • VickiStubing

    I’m starting with Teaching Singing to Boys and
    Teenagers: The Young Male Voice and the Problem of Masculinity because we have a squeaky-voicer in residence. Not sure how masculinity is an actual problem, however.

    • richelieu jr

      What is important is that he teaches them how to handle their masculinity. Several times a day if necessary. He never stops showing them how he handles his own masculinity, that’s for sure!

      • VickiStubing

        NO! NO! Stop it! I’m a mother, for crying out loud! I don’t want to think about my babies like…like…like THAT! la la la, I can’t hear you – sticking fingers in ears -

      • VickiStubing

        Ok, if you insist on going down that road, I will also grab a copy of The Depiction of Irish
        Masculinity in Neo-Expressionist Painting. But I won’t like it.

    • http://twitter.com/sandyshores50 Sunny Sands

      Just FYI about youth choirs, girls’ voices change, too, just not as dramatically as boys’.

  • richelieu jr

    I must say I relish this opportunity to thank Herb (as tasty a name as his homonymic (no homo!) brothers, the Herbs!) and the aptly named Edwin Mellen Press for so many years of enriching our culture and store of academic knowledge… With so many wonderful titles to choose from, it is difficult to choose just one (like potato chips you can’t eat just one, and then later you wake up from a diabetic haze covered in greasy crumbs and shame, or in this case, head spinning with information overload, murmuring verbiage that sprouts like herbs (! see what I did there?) on an endless plane of fertile power-point pages, and rolls out like the comforting sound of your favourite professor teaching you to sleep… ah.. Where was i again? Oh yes! Picking just one!

    I suppose it would have to be “Werewolves, Magical Hounds, and Dog-headed Men in Celtic Literature: A Typological Study of Shape-Shifting”

    Truly this book has something for everyone and is fun for the whole kennel club or family! As one review stated:

    “Phillip Bernhardt-House has provided an engaging and extremely useful
    survey of the vast range of material related to canids—dogs, wolves,
    werewolves, even dog-headed humans—in medieval Celtic traditions….”

    If you’re like me, you just can’t get enough of Canid Literature.. sexy, trashy with just a whiff of the pound about it, and ‘dog-headed humans’? Get out! Who’d have thought a book this entertaining, this splashy would take time to pee into the psychology of David Miscavige? Just look at that Nightline interview;. He keeps his eyes on Ted Kioppel as if he were about to throw a frisbee at any minute, or perhaps he was suspicious that Koppel’s hair might have been a long-lost friend… And have you ever seen him and Tm Cruise say ‘hello’? Down boy! You don’t need to smell me there! No wonder Tom wanted his lovely Iranian companion to file down her teeth! Who’d have thogh a human-headed human might give away the whole game! They are now furiously trying to buy every copy of that interview for English television and every photo of L Ron where he shows his snaggle-toothed canines.. Canines? Coincidence? As Hubbard said himself, ‘There are no coincidences, Ah-Rooo!’ and thne he howled at the moon and took off running at a furious pace for man of his corpulence…

    So than you, Herb, et alpert, as well as Edward’s Mellon Bookstand for blowing the id of this flea-ridden conspiracy… Thank you for never losing sight of the goal, keeping your eye on the prize by using Hubbard’s great insight as your guide for every word you published:

    ‘What is true for you is true’!

    I mean, how can you go wrong? Ah-rooo!

    • VickiStubing

      “…this splashy would take time to pee into the psychology of David Micavige?” Oops, Richelieu, I smell a lawsuit….

    • Observer

      That one caught my eye too, but I couldn’t resist the parrot …

    • grundoon

      A+

    • Captain Howdy

      Actually “Werewolves, Magical Hounds, and Dog-headed Men in Celtic Literature: A Typological Study of Shape-Shifting” sounds like something I would like to read seeing as how I’m a big Arthur Machen fan, but not enough to spend $160.00 for. That’s almost a months worth of groceries or torpedo juice !

      • Trustmeonthis

        From a penny a word to a dollar a page!

      • nessness

        what is expensive for you is expensive for you….oops….

  • sharon brown

    Wow, Herb is really Awesome ! He reminds me of LRH, you know, starting his own University, own publishing firm, ( charging Outrageous prices for their books), suing people because he doesn’t like what they say about him, regardless of the truth. He also has support from a great humanitarian in J P Rushton! I found your link on him to be Very enlightening and refreshing ! Theyseem stuck in the same time warp as $cientologists, ok, maybe JP Rushton’s a tad further behind ! lol

    • FistOfXenu

      Took the words right out of my mouth Sharon. L Ron Herbbard (who’s awesome because he’s so awesome he can wear that awesome tie with that shirt and smile awesomely about it) just needs to come up with a psycho-wheeze and write a load of books about it and he’d be way ahead of the Hub, who took awhile before he got the publishing machine running right. So now we’ve got the Hub and the Herb with 2 publishing companies selling overpriced tree-carcasses and between them, enough litigation money flowing to make every kid in the land want to be a libel lawyer when they grow up.

      Oh, almost forgot the books. For me the most awesome titles of the awesome Herb’s awesome collection is either “Song and Sketch Transcripts of British Music Hall Performers Elsie and Doris Waters” by St. Pierre, Paul Matthew, for only $139.95 for 360 pages (that’s a bargain at 39¢ a page) or “What Students Learned in Gym Class: A Qualitative Study of Required Physical Education” by Cowen, Virginia S. I gotta tell you this last book almost didn’t make it. For a while I wanted to choose “Croquet and Its Influences on Victorian Society: The First Game that Men and Women Could Play Together Socially” by Scheuerle, William H. But then I thought about my gym classes and got curious about what I missed.

      Oh yeah and the book about croquet works out to a buck a page. The gym book is only about 85¢ a page.

      • VickiStubing

        I don’t know about what I learned in gym class, but I sure learned a lot in the locker room afterward.

        • FistOfXenu

          Locker room was interesting, especially one Friday in 7th grade when our gym teacher got a little too busy breaking out his game on the girls gym teacher and they didn’t notice the raid between the boys and girls locker rooms. We had a lot more interesting questions for health class after that. ;)

  • John P.

    Irrespective of the merits of the titles from Mellen Press is the utterly questionable business decision that essentially amounts to suing your customers. That is never a good idea. We in Global Capitalism HQ will immediately sell our holdings in a company that behaves in such a way, since no good has ever come of it, to my knowledge (there are certain rare exceptions, such as some defense contractors, but they tend to prove the rule). And suing universities that employ people who say things you don’t like, especially prominent ones like McMaster (rumored to be one of the biggest universities in the rural Canadian hamlets tucked away in upstate you-know-where) will ultimately bite one in the ass. Perhaps, Tony, your contact at that university in Michigan who you interviewed about the cult’s library campaign last year, will be able to give some perspective on how academic librarians are a fairly close-knit bunch and how this sort of behavior might factor into their book purchasing decisions.

    I would have to believe that this litigation will ultimately backfire in a Streisand Effect sort of phenomenon — suing to get people to be nice has the potential to expose what jerks they in fact are. It will be interesting to see how long Edwin Mellen Press stays in business. Remember that businesses don’t need to lose all their customers to be endangered; they simply need to lose enough that they swing from profit to loss. In the case of a publisher, if they see a sustained sales drop of 15%, they will either have to start cutting staff/other expenses or they will eventually go bankrupt.

    The behavior of Edwin Mellen press and of ol’ Herb is not unlike the recent behavior of Darden Restaurants (the founts of culinary excellence found at Red Lobster and Olive Garden), announcing that because Obama was re-elected, they were cutting all their staff’s hours so they didn’t have to pay for health insurance; the public reaction was so strong that their sales dropped by several percent and shredded profits… the idiots running the company assumed that their customers would be so loyal that they would write their Congressmen in the face of having to pay another ten cents a plate for health insurance for the employees, and Obamacare would be repealed as the law of the land. Fortunately, we at Global Capitalism HQ never really considered Darden high-quality operators so we enjoyed our position on the sidelines when that little drama unfolded, though I wish I had bought a bunch of put options for my personal account just because I sometimes enjoy putting a little trade on to profit from idiocy from time to time.

    Incidentally, it would be interesting to see if the backfire effect can be enhanced by getting the suit categorized as “Strategic Lawsuit Against Public Participation” (SLAPP) case, which typically results in the unsuccessful plaintiff having to pay legal expenses of the defendant.

    • http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=PBeU2utihwM Deckard Cain

      Interesting that you were watching the Darden situation from the sidelines because I was watching it too, but for different reasons. Darden is one of the biggest clients of AON’s new private health exchange, which is odd that they claim that they are ‘waiting’ for the ACA to be dismantled. If they were waiting for the ACA to implode, then why did they jump on board with AON?

      And everyone that is waiting for the ACA to implode may not have to wait much longer. I expect it to backfire considerably (in CA, at least) once we get to the 1/1/14 date. It’s the reason why I got no sleep last night out of stressing out over it.

    • TheHoleDoesNotExist

      Scientology has the market cornered when it comes to Prophit of Idiocy, but Smokin’ Herb seems to have taken stock in his position.

    • Poison Ivy

      Looks as if The Mighty Walmart is suffering from a little of that syndrome as well.

    • N. Graham

      Hey John! If you’re referring to this article-http://blogs.villagevoice.com/runninscared/2012/02/scientology_drives_librarians_nuts.php , I guess the librarian in question is me. I’ve talked with Mr. Ortega on FB just yesterday about scholarly sources, you must be psychic! We have to keep a list handy when we’re buying books of bogus publishers who re-publish Wikipedia articles, and other unsourced information from the Internet. You probably have the same problem in Global Capitalism HQ, it’s hard to find good, peer-reviewed sources when you have to wade through a lot of pseudo-intellectualism. Not that I’m “super-scholar” or anything, it’s just that the good thing about the Internet is that anyone can post to it. But the bad thing about the Internet is that anybody can post to it.

      • N. Graham

        I forgot to mention that this has nothing to do with Mr. Richardson, who is awesome.

    • Still_On_Your_Side

      I imagine that the renaissance-man Mr. Richardson has taken several law classes and prosecutes his cases without the use of lawyers. This may be another reason why his lawsuits are brought in Canada since a corporation must be represented in court cases in the U.S. by a licensed attorney.

  • Peter Robinson

    Assuming that Herb is short for Herbert (which apparently means bright) , the name has long been used in English slang as a derogatory term, in opposition to the original meaning, hence the following:

    John Ayto Oxford Dictionary of Slang (1998)

    Herbert (1960) British;

    applied to a:
    foolish or ridiculous man ; arbitrary use of the male forename

    Also used as in the following expression: “He’s a right Herbert.”

    Seems it may have some resonance in this case.

    • John P.

      Perhaps your observation here could be expanded into some academic research into the uses of the name, to be published by Edwin Mellen Press: “The Literary Trope of Herbert as Signal of Stupidity,” tracing uses of the name back into antiquity. One such use of “Herbert” in antiquity comes from the documentary, “Monty Python and the Holy Grail” where Prince Herbert is about to be married to a girl with “huge tracts of land.” http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=g3YiPC91QUk. I am sure there are others awaiting discovery. And we as a community can pad our academic resumes with what is sure to be an ironic best-seller.

      • sugarplumfairy

        Zeppo Marx’s real name was Herbert.. That surely proves your hypothesis..

        • TheHoleDoesNotExist

          That seals it then Now a scientific fact.

        • Captain Howdy

          Have you seen the Star Trek space hippie cult episode where the space hippies call anyone they think is square, ‘Herbert” ?

          http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=MRewcZXEMb8

          • Poison Ivy

            Aha! Only you, Captain, would be on the ball enough to catch this one! Brilliant!

            • TheHoleDoesNotExist

              The Capt is Ours, all Ours. You can feed him, just don’t pet. Ever.

            • Captain Howdy

              I suggest anytime an obvious troll like marco or turtlez shows up we all start bombarding it with the chant of “HERBERT..HERBERT..HERBERT ! “

            • VickiStubing

              How appropriate, considering one of my favorite Herberts is:

              Pardes, Herbert (1934– ) psychiatrist, educator; born in
              Bronx, N.Y. He became director of the National Institutes of Mental Health
              (1978–84) where he focused on improving the public image of psychiatry and
              increasing research support for psychiatric projects. He became chairman of the
              department of psychiatry at Columbia University (1984) and president of the
              American Psychiatric Association (1989).

      • FistOfXenu

        “she’s got huge ………. [hand gesture] ………. tracts of land”. Perfect!

  • VickiStubing

    Now I’m leaning towards Medieval Animal
    Trials: Justice for All. The cats in the bunker are welcome to read over my shoulder. If they bring libations, that is.

    • VickiStubing

      And one for my hubby: How to Respond to Strangeness
      in Art: Four Studies in the Unfamiliar, as he feels ALL art is strange. I gotta hand it to Herb, he publishes something for everybody.

      • Observer

        Vicki, you are killing me this morning!

        • TheHoleDoesNotExist

          Yeah.. she is smokin’ the herb today!

          • VickiStubing

            How the Use of Marijuana Was Criminalized and Medicalized, 1906-2004:
            A Foucaultian History of Legislation in America by London, Jeffrey Matthew

            He just makes it so easy. And he’s awesome!

            • John P.

              Now this seems likely to be one of those bizarre titles of questionable merit. Instead of a legal scholarship perspective on anti-pot laws, Mellen Press apparently felt that the world needs a post-structuralist literary criticism view. Foucault was one of those fashionable but annoying French intellectuals who basically said “what’s true is what’s true for you,” essentially rejecting any sort of objective truth in favor of seeing the world through lenses of what is often termed “political correctness.” Not at all unlike Hubbard’s way of getting people to separate from objective reality and joining the cult.

            • TheHoleDoesNotExist

              Wot??! OTgrrrrr8 is gonna sue!

      • http://pulse.yahoo.com/_3LVTW36FICDD5Q4L4LNZHZJB3I Carmen

        Art…it makes me fall over!

        “Stendhal syndrome, Stendhal’s syndrome, hyperkulturemia, or Florence syndrome is a psychosomatic disorder that causes rapid heartbeat, dizziness, fainting, confusion and even hallucinations when an individual is exposed to art, usually when the art is particularly beautiful or a large amount of art is in a single place”

        • Poison Ivy

          Seriously????!!!

          • John P.

            If you don’t believe Stendhal Syndrome is real, go to the Huntington Library in Pasadena on a Sunday afternoon and watch all the little old ladies swoon when they go into the gallery with Gainsborough’s “Pinkie” and “Blue Boy.” Those paintings are large, insipid and overrated, but boy do they pack in the tour buses from the rest homes.

            Me, I get all woozy in the main gallery of the library portion of the Huntington estate, where I can skip from the Ellesmere manuscript of Chaucer’s Canterbury Tales to a First Folio of Shakespeare to all the rest of one of the greatest collections of important English language works.

            • Ziontologist

              If you don’t mind me asking, were you an English major in school?
              You have a powerful writing style.

            • John P.

              Actually, I was a dual major in econ and applied math. I don’t think they would have hired an English major straight out of school into Global Capitalism HQ, unless it was in the word processing department, which we had back in those days.

              But I took a few English classes, including a class on medieval lit, which I utterly loved. My thesis paper for that class was a cleverly disguised satirical dig at the post-modernist nonsense that was beginning to infect lit-crit: “Chaucer as Proto-Capitalist: Bourgeois Economic Angst Expressed in the Three Characters of Chaucer in the Canterbury Tales.” In other words, I was taking a pro-colonial, pro-capitalist anti-Marxist view and I did it subtly and cleverly enough that I got an “A.” Ah, the joys of pompous doubletalk!

            • VickiStubing

              Pompous doubletalk? Fits in great with $cientology!

            • Poison Ivy

              I prefer the gardens and the tea room. Love that place. (Did some research in their archives once for a documentary.)

            • sugarplumfairy

              I get all woozy in front of the pie case at Marie Callenders.. mmmm.. my kingdom for a slice of razzleberry..

            • VickiStubing

              My neighbors, the singing farm women of Indiana, make a mean razzleberry pie, too. Sounds like it’s time for a Bunker field trip!

            • sugarplumfairy

              lol.. Yummmm..

    • VickiStubing

      A History of Galileo’s Inclined Plane Experiment and its Philosophical Implications

      Eldest son says: If an object travels downhill and strikes a Sciloon, will Tom Cruise still be the only one who can help?

      • FistOfXenu

        How come Big Being Tom didn’t fly to Russia and help all those people that were hurt by the meteor? They don’t have that many $cientologists in Russia do they?

      • Poison Ivy

        Hilarious, Vicki. You are on fire today!

      • Trustmeonthis

        Yes. Yes, he will.

    • VickiStubing

      A History of Attitudes and Behaviours toward Animals in Eighteenth- and Nineteenth-Century Britain:
      Anthropocentrism and the Emergence of Animals

      Yeah, another one for the bunker cats. As long as the author doesn’t spend too much time focusing on sheep farmers, it should be safe. Could quickly devolve with Dan Courtney’s “Deviant Nurses” fetish porn, however.

      • Poison Ivy

        Okay, I admit, I think this is actually a good thesis topic! (Having read a lot of the classic animal rights treatises). Again, though, we don’t know how good the scholarship actually is (and we aren’t about to check at those prices.) Do these books actually sell?
        The Deviant Nurses vs. Animal Behaviours does sound like a fun mashup, though.

      • Captain Howdy

        What’s wrong with sheep shagging as long as it’s consensual ?
        WARNING..NSFW

        http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=hOm8uv22e2U

        P.S- For all you Steely Dan fans, “No Sheep ’till Buxton”, is a pun on the classic Motorhead live album “No Sleep ’til Hammersmith”

        • VickiStubing

          I’m more a fan of Beastie Boys than Motorhead. “No Sleep Till Brooklyn”

    • John P.

      Re: “Medieval Animal Trials: Justice for All:”

      In medieval literature, satire was often presented in the form of animal-based fables. That was because there was no freedom of the press, and if you were criticizing a powerful figure, you could lose your head, quite literally. A good example of the genre (not of animal trials specifically, but of animal-based fables in general) is Geoffrey Chaucer’s “The Parliament of Fowls.” In Middle English, the title was a pun, because “fools” was pronounced identically or very similarly to “fowls.” So it was well understood from the get-go that the story would be sending up various figures in the government. Chaucer needed to use this form because he was one of the highest-ranking commoners in the kingdom, with a day job roughly equivalent to the President’s National Security Advisor. For him to tee off on his rivals explicitly could have cost him his job if not his life.

      I have absolutely no idea whether this particular volume published by Mellen Press is good scholarship or not, but I do happen to remember that animal-based fables were far more important in medieval literature than most people today would expect.

      • TheHoleDoesNotExist

        Noe I’m wondering about Tony’s book…lions, tigers and bears or snakes, hole cockroaches and octopus?

        • http://www.facebook.com/people/Robert-Eckert/100002715429426 Robert Eckert

          Don’t forget the clams! And the only bears in the book are eating turkeys.

      • Poison Ivy

        And going back to the Greeks….Aesop of course. The classics.
        The Native Americans are huge on animal-based stories as well. They have some of the trippiest.

      • HeatherGraceful

        Another gem of a comment that teaches me something. Thanks, JP. Animal Farm is a well known example of the genre in the 20th century, of course. I’m reminded also of The Master and Margerita. Communist Russia was quite as dangerous as medieval England for the political satirist.

    • TheHoleDoesNotExist

      Subtitled “The Life and Trials of Jan Meyer Eastgate” ?

  • Truthiwant

    Hey, Herb’s the name for me. He is Macho.

    But let’s not forget that other awesome humanitarian. Yes, Dr. David Miscavige. He, with his spiritual teacher, Prof. Ronald Hubbard, gave Scientology to the world. Actually, ‘gave’ is maybe not quite the correct term. Maybe ‘sold’ is closer to the idea. However, let us not quibble over such petty arguments. What is for certain, Dr. Miscavige re-invented the word ‘Fundraising’ and it is for this great humanitarian gift that he will go down in the anals, I mean annals of history along with such great names as….. . Along with such great names as…. . Well, anyway, along with such great names as.

    This world would be a much poorer place today if it was not for the luminary Dr. David Miscavige. Infact, there are many poorer people in the world today, thanks to his envisioned idea of fundraising.

    That’s the buzz for me, folks. Fundraising and Dr. Miscavige. Strawberries and cream. Oh, yes, and Herb.

  • SFFrog

    This guy sounds like an academic version of Grant Cardone.

    I wonder if his affinity with Scientology is partially because Bridge Publications is possibly the world’s largest vanity press.

  • grundoon

    The catalog of the Edwin Mellen Press, “scholarly publisher of academic research,” bulges with gems unequaled elsewhere. Not to be missed, for example, is Dr. Emelise Aleandri’s compendium, The Italian-American Immigrant Theatre of New York City 1746-1899, Once you’ve seen the first volume (408 pages, $149.95), you’ll be hooked: you won’t be able to resist going on to buy the next 13 volumes, each just $189.95 for over 700 glorious pages. The whole set can be yours for just $2619.30. Its 9500+ pages put the wimpy L. Ron Hubbard Psychlopedia™ to shame. Wealthy aficionados of 19th-century Italian-American theatre must certainly thank Herb Richardson for making this available at a price that reflects its value. And what a value it is: arbitrageurs take note that Volume 8, for example, sells used for $290.45 + shipping. (John P. Capitalist, are you listening?)

    Joking aside, Dr. Aleandri has contributed a quite nice little volume to the popular Images of America series, which is well worth a look at only $21.99. A customer review says, “Emelise Aleandri’s text rescues the work of a magnificent, yet forgotten, cast of actors whose lives, and contribution to the Italian-American heritage, have been divorced from time and history…. It is refreshing to be able to view Italian-Americans in this fashion and not through our contemporary media glibness still soliciting bogus.”

    • John P.

      Arbitrage is fun and we in Global Capitalism HQ rarely turn down an opportunity to reap a guaranteed profit from the lack of price transparency. However, one of the nastiest traps to get into is a strategy based on differential liquidity. The one used copy of Volume 8 available for $290.45 versus a list price of $189.95 looks like the mother of all liquidity traps to us… All we need is the owners of the other ten copies of this scholarly masterwork that were actually sold to come out of the woodwork and sell, pushing the price of a used copy down to a paltry $50 or so, and we could lose as much as $1,000 as the strategy collapses.

      You might ask why we at Global Capitalism HQ would find the loss of such a trifling amount to be a disaster. After all, $1,000 is the cost of a set of lug nuts for the nose wheel on the landing gear of one of our private jets. It’s because, in the company of arbs, you are definitely demoted to the farm team if you ever get involved in a situation that blows up, no matter how small. Our arbitrage track record is one of seamless perfection, and we value our reputation for infallibility and invincibility.

      • TheHoleDoesNotExist

        Here’s a sure fire winner 4 u then:
        “The Role of Vestal Virgins….”

        • Sherbet

          I can sum up that book in two words: They die.

          • Poison Ivy

            Ha ha!

        • Ze Moo

          Mel Brooks taught me all I needed to know about history.

          https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=b5VsYT5vbWE

          • TheHoleDoesNotExist

            The Bunker Literary Club and the Bunkerettes are as diverse as a Mellon Press catalog, to be sure.

    • James Anglin

      Okay, academic literature is specialized, but 9500 pages for over $2600 on such a special topic is definitely over the top.

  • Sherbet

    Did somebody say Herb is awesome? Well, let me be the first! Maybe not so awesome as TO and his hilarious posting above, though.

    • aquaclara

      Oh, we play nice here in the bunker sandbox! You can be first!

  • http://www.facebook.com/people/Dan-Courtney/1439096893 Dan Courtney

    Herb’s awesomeness is apparent simply because he would publish such titles as ‘Deviant Nurses and Improper Patient Care’. Academic research or fetish porn?… brilliant!

    • sugarplumfairy

      Dammm.. I gotta have it.. But i just checked eBay and amazon.. This is the best I can do and I’m not willing to part with $95..

      Condition Seller Information Buying Options
      $95.46
      + $3.99shippingUsed – Very Good
      *Withdrawn library backup copy which appears to have never been used, in exceptional condition;» Read more

      I especially like the “appears to have never been used..”

      • Captain Howdy

        You just wanna see if you’re in it.

        • sugarplumfairy

          Lol.. Hoping at least for an honourable mention..

    • Are_sics

      The book was even better than the movie. It’s pricier, but worth it. Herb is awesome!

      • TheHoleDoesNotExist

        Was Mary Reiser the star in the movie version?

        • FistOfXenu

          no, it was Elena Cardone. In fact she played her own twin in the movie version and had 3-somes with patients. 4-somes if the patient had a visitor.

          • Poison Ivy

            She is, after all, one of Maxim’s top 100 hottest women.

            • FistOfXenu

              until you watch her spend a whole minute talking about men scratching their ball-sacks. Then you put it together with her doing that vid with Grant. and like, she’s just doing everything for show. No brain cells were engaged in the making of this public image. Me, I like my women to be smart.

            • Poison Ivy

              Here here to men who like smart women!

          • TheHoleDoesNotExist

            and here I thought I was thinking bad thoughts. If most of Miscavige’s Leftovers are like Elena, now I’m kind of glad that the last remaining scientologists are in one group, where society can keep an eye on them.

        • http://www.facebook.com/gayle.smith.3994 Gayle Smith

          I think I just threw-up a little in my mouth.

      • Captain Howdy

        Did Russ Meyer direct that one or was it Alex de Renzy ? I forget.

        • Sherbet

          It was Ed Wood, and he played the nurse, white thigh-high stockings and all.

          • Captain Howdy

            Of course ! What was I thinking ?

  • VickiStubing

    Tony! I have one for you, too! A Dictionary of Cricketing Terminology so you can follow along when the Downton-ites take the field. Thanks, Herb! You’re awesome!

  • sugarplumfairy

    So, Herb left Harvard for UToronto? Awesome! Toronto is a great school, but I sure would like to know the circumstances that would induce a self-important scholar to leave the number 1 or 2 internationally ranked university.. The bloviating is sooo much better at Harvard..

    • Poison Ivy

      Sugar, what a great subtunnel to go down in the rabbit hole! I wonder why he left…hmmmm….there must be a record somewhere…

      • FistOfXenu

        Hi PI, sounds like a job for a journalist. Let’s see, who is there around here who’s a journalist? :p

        • TonyOrtega

          That 1994 controversy was covered quite substantially at the time. Just look around and you’ll find news stories about it — and hey, Westhues wrote an entire book about it already.

          • FistOfXenu

            Thanks Tony. I’m not a Harvard man myself so who comes and goes there and why doesn’t usually catch my eye. But Awesome Herb, well, I just have to find out now.

    • James Anglin

      He left at the six year point. Almost certainly denied tenure. That’s not such a black mark, though. You really have to do something spectacular as an Assistant Prof at Harvard to get tenure. Harvard normally fills its tenured slots with big shots from around the world. It hires up-and-coming young types on the tenure track, works them like dogs, and then lets almost all of them go. They generally do okay after that. Getting denied tenure at Harvard is often enough to win tenure at somewhere further down the pecking order.

      • sugarplumfairy

        Thanks, James..

  • scnethics

    At Edwin Mellen Press, nothing is too niche.

    The Depiction of Irish Masculinity in Neo-Expressionist Painting

    Trance and Transformation of the Actor in Japanese Noh and Balinese Masked Dance-Drama

    And everyone is waiting for Herb’s personal labor of love, coming out in the Fall:
    Voldemort: A New Perspective

  • aquaclara

    I’ll take Popular Culture for $200, Tony.
    Exploring Guinevere’s Search for Authenticity in the Arthurian Romances: The Thousand Year Quest of a Mythic Woman to Find Her Historical Embodiment in Film and Literature.
    Gheesh – where do I start? Authenticity and Arthurian Romances. I thought that stuff was a myth, but I now stand corrected. Thousand years – wow. With a title like this and a thousand years of study, it must be popular reading. Film, wait, has that been out for a thousand years? I am learning so much, and I’m just on the cover!
    With this 1,000 year perspective, I see a definite parallel with LRH’s quadbillion year introspective on Popular Culture.

    And for our readers today, we have this as a special: $149.95 plus shipping and handling. oh, wait, there is a rumor of possible missing semicolons. Perhaps a New! Exciting! Must-have! edition will be coming out shortly; ; ; .
    I can’t wait.

    • FistOfXenu

      It only says 1000 yrs because the truth is too steep a gradient for them. Really Guinevere’s search started back when she was my lover 75000000 yrs ago. But since then she betrayed me and ended up with LRH. Poor Mary Sue. But hey, Hub, I had her first! And I wasn’t impressed.

      • aquaclara

        funny!

  • http://www.facebook.com/hartleypatterson Hartley Patterson

    The Scientology puff piece by Richardson you link – it’s on a disused Scientology website – is similar in format to many such papers collected by the cult. Some can be found at

    http://www.bonafidescientology.org/bonafide-scientology.htm

    The papers set out the author’s credentials as an academic, define the differences between cult and religion and conclude from a reading of CoS propaganda that it is not a cult. I would assume Richardson’s paper didn’t make the cut, it looks to be one of those commisioned to support the battle with the IRS.

    • Poison Ivy

      I wonder how much those academic defenders made in hard cash.

      • FistOfXenu

        Maybe they get a promise that all their dirty little secrets won’t get mad public?

  • Couch_Incident

    Herb rather reminds me of Dr. Caton in the novel “Lucky Jim”. Caton runs a shady academic journal that agrees to publish Jim’s article. Later, Jim finds that Dr. Caton has published Jim’s article in Italian under Caton’s name, thus earning Caton a department chair position at a university in Argentina.

  • Schmubbard

    I do hope “Croquet and Its Influences on Victorian Society” has pictures.

  • aquaclara

    Dear Professor Touretsky,
    Just wanted to drop you a note to say thanks for bringing this rabbit hole and contents to Tony’s rapt attention. He has so kindly shared this with his many readers, who have in turn, taken some time to reflect upon the contents of said rabbit hole. The comments below endeavor to add an academic flavor to his popular, culture-filled blog. Perhaps you’ll have a moment to critique the respective findings (below).
    Hope all is well in Pittsburgh today!

  • http://twitter.com/BradGreenwood2 Bradley Greenwood

    This Herb is bitter, I recommend him for Passover.

  • Captain Howdy

    This story is the jackpot of lunacy. First there’s the nutty professor who is a chip off of the the ole LRH blockhead along with the Moonies, $cientology and the Boys in Brown-shrits. I’m surprised to hear J. Philippe Rushton croaked. Rushton was one of the “intellectual” darlings of the WP movement along with Prof’s Arthur Jensen and Kevin MacDonald..The story also seems to include furries dressing up as Meerkats and “mobbing” professors at universities. There’s definitely a movie here. Maybe David Lynch will come out of retirement for this one.

    Thanks Tony, this more than satiated my weirdness craving for today

    • TonyOrtega

      Speaking of MacDonald, you might search the Intertubes to see who wrote the first substantial story about him way back in the year 2000. Just sayin’.

      • Captain Howdy

        Really ? Holy Shite !, I’m going to see if I can find it.

        • Captain Howdy
          • TheHoleDoesNotExist

            Thanks for the link. “Witness for the Persecution”. Excellent piece and deep. Of course, all I come away with is “Why Women Insist on Asking For Directions”. lol. DNA? PTS? SP?

            • Captain Howdy

              Tony’s article about Kevin MacDonald is the best thing I’ve read about the nutty Prof.so far and it’s long and it’s deep and I’m not done yet..almost.

            • Ze Moo

              From prof.so

              “It would have worked had you programmed it in the language you
              originally recommended. Somewhere, there is a semicolon, bracket, white
              space or other piece of arcane syntax out of place.”

              The story of Lron, as an academic….

            • TheHoleDoesNotExist

              I know, right? It did remind me that we’ve come a long way, baby. Thank Zenu. I’ve mentioned before that Hubbard was terrifed (legitimately) about being labeled Mental. In his time, and I swear up until 70′s in some families, you couldn’t marry or get a job, families took you for a long drive to the Happy Farm, said they were going out for burgers, and then they dashed home to break off your limb on the family tree and you literally became a NonPerson (maybe that’s where Hub got the idea of how to get even with enemies, real or imagined). Being labeled crazy was almost as bad as being labeled a Woman in the 50′s. I mean, if you were a female and wore Pants, you were walking a fine line.

              The ill informed and/or arrogant prejudices of not too long ago should never be forgotten.

          • http://www.facebook.com/people/Gerard-Plourde/1127841398 Gerard Plourde

            We should start talking about the “Six Degrees of Tony Ortega”. Kudos to a true journalist.

          • sugarplumfairy

            Thanks.. Wow..

    • FistOfXenu

      Maybe a follow up to “The Master”?

  • http://twitter.com/BumpItMcCarthy BumpIt McCarthy

    My father was a Herbert as well. Herbert is a lovely name, and litigious woe to those who would mock its beauty! Mind you, my Pop went by “Burt,” and had his assistant screen his calls by whether the caller Herbed or Burted him.

    Our Herb, the awesome one, has some intriguing titles; I went for “The Place of Zoroaster in History: Using the Cult of Personality as a Literary Source of Authority in the Western Tradition” (Two Book Set)
    which is a steal at only $219 ~~ easily recouped once you start your own cult of personality!

    This compelling how-to was listed in the Photography section, which was a bit baffling, but I’m sure Herb has his reasons! There was also a blurb on the page from highly, if sometimes elliptically, satisfied author John Steckley of Humber University, who’s worked with four publishers so far:

    ““The proof of the publisher lies in the product. I have worked with four
    university presses …, so I am well able to comment on the significance
    of what Edwin Mellen publishes. … They respected my vision and my
    suggestions. They did not try to impose any restrictions that would
    limit the value of my book.”

    BTW, Steckley actually, really, truly, WAS adopted into an Indian tribe, the Hurons, and sounds, well, genuinely awesome:

    his students have remarked, as per ratemyprofessor.com,

    “Funny, hairy, super intelligent and very interesting that is him in a nut shell”

    “Awesome professor! Makes learning fun and never a dull moment! You cheat and he’ll stick your exam in the parrot cage.”

    “He’s such a nice guy- empathatic and all the students loved him. He
    makes class interesting by discussing out of class & personal topics
    that relate to his teachings, …Luvs wunderbars :) & is a great
    drummer.”

    • VickiStubing

      Again with the parrots.

      • http://twitter.com/BumpItMcCarthy BumpIt McCarthy

        Prepare to have chills run up your spine; my usual online nym is….POLLY. Dun-dun-DUNNNNN!

        But you can call me PollyWog. ; – >

    • http://lliira.dreamwidth.org/ Lliira

      He makes class interesting by discussing out of class & personal topics
      that relate to his teachings

      Professors who did that on a regular basis always drove me up the wall. I’m there to learn about late 19th century Europe, not how much beer you drank when you visited Germany last! And shut up about your divorce, I don’t pay to be your therapist!

      • http://twitter.com/BumpItMcCarthy BumpIt McCarthy

        You would definitely not have enjoyed my Geology professor’s slide show of the damage squirrels did to his garage, then. Man, Marty Rathbun’s teeth REALLY could use some filing!

  • AnonPTS

    Mellen Press seems to have another connection with Scn: They appear to have sent their PR flacks to the excellent Tommy Davis/Karin Pouw/Louanne School of Countering Entheta. Check out SecretaryX’s fervent attack/defense on the Chronicle of Higher Education forum: http://chronicle.com/forums/index.php/topic,122855.0.html

    • Poison Ivy

      Excellent confront. Attack, never defend.

    • TheHoleDoesNotExist

      Sounds like more bitter apostates. Not sure if they have come with frocks.

      They left out “smartypants editors” though (I think Tony has been hanging out with Midwest Mom)

  • Ze Moo

    “The Function of the Living Dead in Medieval Norse and Celtic Literature: Death and Desire
    Smith, Gregg A.

    Description

    This study examines the nature and function of the dead in medieval
    Norse and Celtic literature. It is demonstrated that agents of the
    living dead in these literatures have a functional and formulaic role,
    largely manifested as a process of wish-fulfillment. While the authors
    of these stories provide resonances of past beliefs regarding the dead,
    they also appear to have adapted these ideas for their own purposes in
    order to involve the dead as role-players in their stories. This book
    contains 11 color photographs.

    Reviews
    “The single greatest strength of Dr. Smith’s monograph may reside in
    its presentation of a comprehensive typology for surviving
    instantiations of the theme of the Living Dead in medieval Celtic and
    Scandinavian sources. … In sum, it is against the benchmarks offered
    by the models, typologies, and hypotheses presented throughout the
    present study that future archaeological, linguistic and literary
    investigations into medieval attitudes towards the dead will need to be
    evaluated.” – Paul G. Remley, University of Washington”

    Who knew the Norse invented Zombies and why do you need color photos of the dead? Aren’t they all grey? I can see it now, blond haired, blue eyed Norwegians stumbling around chanting ” hjerner’, “hjerner”……(‘brains, brains”)… Only an academic of truly mythic proportions can bring the world nordic zombies. All hail Herb!!! I would like to have seen a zombie parrot though……

    • FistOfXenu

      “instantiations of the theme of the Living Dead”

      We’re talking about RPF now?

      • Ze Moo

        Is there an RPF for academics?? Someone has to teach ‘Remedial English Basketball Players’ or the ‘Physics of Toys’. Maybe they just grade papers for online colleges like Phoenix University.

        • FistOfXenu

          There was an English guy, I think he’s dead now, used to write a load of “aren’t they wonderful” shit for them. And others. But really, RPF knows no status except the oily rag, the rice and beans and pig berthing. Nothing there an academic can’t manage. $cientology has bent a few academics over the desk in their time.

    • TheHoleDoesNotExist
      • grundoon

        Creepy!

      • Captain Howdy

        Who’s the kid that looks like Alfred E. Neuman down in front ?

        • TheHoleDoesNotExist

          Har. Shelly or Davey?

    • Sherbet

      Zzzzz…Wha’? I’m sorry, Ze Moo, I seem to have dozed off while reading Remley’s review of this book, awesome as it is.

    • Captain Howdy

      Does it cover “White Walkers” ?

  • Robert Long

    Being contrarian by nature, I think Herb sucks. It’s common knowledge that he kidnapped the Lindbergh baby, and he basically admitted to killing JFK. Combine this with the fact that he aided fleeing NAZI war criminals and may be the person most responsible for 9/11 and you’ve got a real shitbag on your hands. Sorry Tony, I hope this doesn’t cause you any trouble. ;-)

    • FistOfXenu

      The psychs. You forgot the psychs. Didn’t the Herb pay Freud to come up with modern psychiatry, and didn’t he fund big pharma to invent psych drugs?

      He did all that AWESOMELY, though.

      • Poison Ivy

        Actually there is a trove of psychology-based books in Herb’s catalogue – not very Scientologist of him.

  • Poison Ivy

    1. Herb is THE MOST awesome because he’s not one of those pointy-headed intellectuals piling on to trash Scientology. Good for him! I mean, Scientology is made up of the most ethical people on the planet! Look out your kitchen window; they’re going through your trash right this minute!

    2. So many titles to choose from at Mellen Press…and the prices! (Will these works be available on eBook at a discounted price – say, $90 each?) Anyway, I pick “A Critical Study of Female Culinary Detective Stories: Murder by Cookbookby Soler, Nieves Pascual” as one of my favorites.

    (Actually I have to admit, I saw some pretty interesting titles in there. I don’t know about the quality of the scholarship, but a lot of the topics were great.)

    • TheHoleDoesNotExist

      Is this similar to musical warehouses, where you have to Buy your way in so your material can sit on shelves forever and ever? Do the authors have to pay Mellon Press anything?

  • http://www.facebook.com/gayle.smith.3994 Gayle Smith

    Play nice, huh? Umm, uh… *twiddling thumbs*

    *examining ceiling*

    *snapping fingers*

    I think that Herb sounds like he is an as fine and exceptionable human being as David Miscavige himself.

    • Ciru

      And his personal hygiene is beyond reproach.

      • http://www.facebook.com/gayle.smith.3994 Gayle Smith

        Not to mention those stylin’ glasses.

  • dbloch7986

    How about an encyclopedia of infanticide? http://mellenpress.com/mellenpress.cfm?bookid=8204&pc=9

    “This book includes 166 articles discussing specific issues related to infanticide. Each is cross-referenced with related articles. The volume also contains an extensive bibliography. ”

    I hope this guy is a Scientologist because if he’s not it means that there are people out there who are exactly like Scientologists but are not Scientologists. I think he should ask Miscavige to hook him up with legal representation, or as Scientologists like to call it: judicial blackmail.

    • moxonmoxoff

      “I hope this guy is a Scientologist because if he’s not it means that there are people out there who are exactly like Scientologists but are not Scientologists.”

      ACK!! I hadn’t even thought of that possibility. I’m ascairt now.

    • http://lliira.dreamwidth.org/ Lliira

      What’s wrong with articles about infanticide? History’s not pretty. If historians were only allowed to study things that weren’t disturbing, to only talk about things that aren’t morally horrible… I guess we could maybe talk about art some? But not the artists.

      I don’t understand what’s wrong about the second one either. I haven’t read it, maybe it’s some “Men’s Rights” nonsense, but the simple title makes it look like it could be a perfectly valid and valuable work.

      • dbloch7986

        Really, an encyclopedia about infanticide?

    • http://www.facebook.com/people/Gerard-Plourde/1127841398 Gerard Plourde

      “there are people out there who are exactly like Scientologists but are not Scientologists.”

      Sadly, this is true.

  • Sherbet

    So many exciting titles to choose from: “History of the Finnish Temperance Movement,” “A College Level Tuba Curriculum,” “Mountain Climbing as American Transcendental Pilgrimage,” How Anthropology Informs the Orthodontic Diagnosis of Malocclusion’s Causes (aka Why doesn’t your mouth close properly? Let’s look at an old skull).”

    • TheHoleDoesNotExist

      Hey, how many more authors that we didn’t know about have ripped off Hubbard? That’s the story of the Clams in “History of Man”. Hubbard was right. Everyone Was against him, trying to steal his brilliant ideas.
      http://upload.wikimedia.org/wikipedia/en/2/25/Scientology_-_A_History_of_Man.jpg

      • Poison Ivy

        Just like with Herb! It was all jealousy, academic jealousy! See, the psychs wanted Dianetics for themselves, it was so powerful. When they couldn’t have it, they set out to destroy Hubbard! “Big Beings” are always being persecuted like that. Just ask the brilliant original thinker, COB David Miscavige.

        • TheHoleDoesNotExist

          Lol.

    • VickiStubing

      As long as I can drink a cold Lapin Kulta while I read about the Finnish Temperance Movement, I’m in!

      http://www.amathusdrinks.com/ourbrands/beers/lapin-kulta.html

      juokaa loppuun! teidän terveyteenne

    • Poison Ivy

      That Malocclusion article is in direct opposition to Scientological Fact, unless the treatise traces that “anthropology’ back to our well-established clam ancestors.

      • Sherbet

        You’re an author; do you think you could consolidate all titles to save some reading time? Something along the lines of “On a Mountain Top: The Story of a Finnish Tuba Player With a Bad Overbite”

        • moxonmoxoff

          Is one even physically able to play a tuba in a bad overbite situation? Having a bit of trouble picturing that . . .

          • Sherbet

            I think the malocclusion would also contribute to the tuba player’s temperance, since he/she would have a hard time navigating a beer can.

            • VickiStubing

              That’s why God invented the beer stein! Ach du lieber! Stumperers!

            • moxonmoxoff

              Presumably he could eat an apple through a picket fence, so he’s got that going for him.

            • Sherbet

              Let the Finnish tuba concert begin!

      • Artoo45

        Not to mention Piltdown Man’s huge teeth with which he was known to bite his wife. The GE’s whole track reality is rife with dental mayhem.

    • Observer

      I wonder what role unfiled incisors play in orthodontic malocclusion …

    • dbloch7986

      Oh boy. So much fun to be had with that last title. Where is BTN2 when you need her?

      I believe the answer has something to do with clams and pinchy fingers.

      • Sherbet

        Are you being a bad boy again, Derek?

        • TheHoleDoesNotExist

          Again? Did he stop and didn’t tell us?

        • dbloch7986

          Maybe, maybe not >.>

  • VickiStubing

    Herb, Herb, Herb. You’re an awesome guy and all, but seriously, dude, you need to publish some 18th Century Studies, man! I’m sure there’s a lot of GREAT research for us to examine. You are denying us our God-given right to joke and degrade a whole CENTURY!

    • TheHoleDoesNotExist

      No, Vicki, no. He is denying the Existence of an 18th Century, period. Didn’t happen, see?

      • VickiStubing

        An entire century has been declared SP? What are its crimes!?

  • BosonStark

    Mellen Press and Mellen U sound like good possible purchases for Scientology. It wouldn’t be taking over higher education, but getting their foot in the back door. You’ve got clients who are vulnerable smart people stuck in a publish or perish “incident,” let’s call it.

    As long as they’d agree to do some light shilling for Scientology’s batshitcrazy, they could add a finish for a cult that is lacking in academic gloss, given that some of the cult’s most prominent members didn’t finish high school.

    Bridge Publications has extensive experience in felling forests to publish masses of Hubbard crap few people actually read. As obscure as some of these Mellen titles are, some of them sound more interesting than learning how to disseminate to whole countries, and the stuff that Scientology does seminars on. It also sounds like Herb could use some of the cult’s legal clout too.

    • aquaclara

      Oh, Bosun Stark, you have hit on something big here! I can see it now.
      “Earn your college degree here at Flag! We offer courses in Bridge-climbing, thetan communications and well, a bunch moar stuff. See our shiny new classrooms in SuperPower U right across the street. Tours will begin momentarily.**
      Earn your degree while you work in the Sea Org.* Night and weekend classes available. Mass transit conveniently provided from all local Scilly hotels.
      *E-meter purchase required.
      ** Any moment. Really.

  • Ze Moo

    NarCONon Arrowhead (Oklahoma) may have to close down on Nov 1, 2013.

    http://www.wireservice.ca/index.php?module=News&func=display&sid=9796

    • TheHoleDoesNotExist

      Yes yes and Hell Yes! All who made this happen, you are Real True Heroes who don’t need no stinkin’ SuperPower rides to make the magic happen. I hope more will be interested in sending a note to their own Senators and request similar laws be passed in their state. This Awesome OK Senator had the forethought and sincere care to put the bill in easy to assimilate language for other states to copy so no other mother or father has to suffer the lifelong grief of losing their child to the Narconon Nightmare.

  • http://www.facebook.com/teleny Alissa Mower Clough

    My favorite is the “Boy’s Studies” category. You’ll read that Black youth is at risk because of insufficient parenting! With case studies! Also, how French knights became courtiers. Um, aren’t they different castes, or something?

  • http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=PBeU2utihwM Deckard Cain

    Reading these titles at the Mellen Press reminds me of just how any topic can be dissected, puffed up with big words and analysis, then put into an academic (or in the case of most Mellen Press works, a pseudo-academic) study or “treatise”. On my last day of my undergraduate career at a very big name university was an ‘easy A’ class that I took on 20th Century American musicology, and the very last day had a guest lecturer who wrote a book on a Los Angeles celebrity and his impact on the Los Angeles punk rock scene in the 80s. This very celebrity was one that I knew personally, and knew of him to be an incredible perv/scumbag and star wannabe.

    So the fact that this perv was the subject of that lecture and the book had me trying not to laugh during the entire class session because these people took him so seriously and were making much-ado academically about this guy using big words and soggy analysis.

    • Captain Howdy

      who was the celebrity? actor ? musician ? local celebrity or international ?

      • http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=PBeU2utihwM Deckard Cain

        All of the above. He’s a complete skeev that knew just about every major artist (musicians, mostly) out there. But the point is that academia can make a mountain of words and still not have a clue.

        • Captain Howdy

          David Lee Roth ?

          • http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=PBeU2utihwM Deckard Cain

            LOL. No. This person was/is famous for who he knows, not necessarily what he did although he did have some businesses that were actually influential in getting many famous bands off the ground. But he was the Gary Glitter of his time.

            • John P.

              He was the Gary Glitter of his time.

              Hopefully the analogy doesn’t extend to Mr. Glitter’s long history of convictions, arrests and near-arrests for kiddie porn, sex with underage women, and various other charming behaviors.

            • http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=PBeU2utihwM Deckard Cain

              No, I heard ‘yes’ but I cannot confirm (for drugs), don’t know but wouldn’t be surprised, yes, and yes (there were many ‘charming’ behaviors). I had a very brief brush with Hollywood’s seedy underbelly, and it was enough to last a lifetime.

  • http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=PBeU2utihwM Deckard Cain

    Do you think they are taking some legal tips from Scientology? This was on the Mellen ‘newsletter’:

    The Edwin Mellen Press

    Needs You!

    We need to enlist you – our authors – to defend your professional reputation

    Over the years, there have been some malicious attacks on The Edwin Mellen Press and its methods of operation. Currently, there are two chat rooms where our press has been unfairly criticized. We do not know why the criticism persists, but this problem has gone on for some time and has done a great deal of damage. One site is called Academics Anon http://academics-anon.livejournal.com/1363940.html; the other site is found on the Chronicle of Higher Education’s forums http://chronicle.com/forums/index.php?action=search2 under the subject listed as: “On The Edwin Mellen Press.”

    Will you do yourselves a favor?

    We need Mellen authors to fight these false and malicious comments. In a previous situation we had at least 8 authors who stood up for the integrity of our publishing program and their book. We need more of our authors to contest the disinformation. With your help, we can protect the integrity of the press and your publications. Together, through a concerted effort, we will strengthen the press’ position as an independent academic publishing house whose sole mission is to promote scholarship and debate.

    • John P.

      Everybody, including these guys, who thinks they invented Internet “astroturfing” (fake “grass roots” campaigns) is really surprised when it blows up and ends up being a net negative. The good news is that the rest of us get lots of lulz watching the implosion.

    • TheHoleDoesNotExist

      Anons? haha Barbara, meet Streisand.

    • http://lliira.dreamwidth.org/ Lliira

      So they’re asking others to defend them from people being mean to them on the internet. Professional!

  • BosonStark

    Herb is awesome because if you can’t get into Carnegie Mellon, you can always go to Mellen U. It would be a better investment than Scientology probably, and to graduate you wouldn’t have to travel farther than your own mailbox. No brainwashing or prison camp either.

    • Sherbet

      I keep thinking of SCTV’s Melonville. I wonder if there’s a Melonville U.

      • Captain Howdy

        I completely forgot about Melonville. SCTV ruled SNL’s ass !

        • Sherbet

          Sure did, Howdy. Their celebrity parodies were the best.

  • Bathsheba Everdene

    Judging from the titles, most of these “books” are dissertations. I’ll bet cash money that the dissertation writers realized they would never get even a crappy one-year job without a “published book,” and they saw this press as their only option (since writing a real book on a real topic actually takes a lot of time, which you don’t have when you’re teaching 3 classes a semester). There are more candidates and fewer jobs every day, so having a “published book” is seen as essential these days. For those who don’t care about quality or relevance, Mellen Press must seem like a good way to achieve a published book.

  • Truthiwant

    I have just read this creepy thing….

    Before L. Ron Hubbard died, he wrote a book called “The Present” under the pen name Micheal Smith. He said this new doctrine must be hidden and could be released on December 21, 2012 and not before, because the world was? not ready. The time had to be right, the planets had to align etc. Many of us thought it was the end of the world, but it was actually the beginning of a heaven on earth.

    It was linked to this http://truthcontest.com/

    Also to Amazon http://www.amazon.com/The-Present-Universal-Truth-ebook/dp/B0049U497M

    • Captain Howdy

      I just spammed one of those comments off of the “Tom Cruise Scientology” video 20 minutes ago. They’ve been posting those type of comments under numerous different accounts on the most popular anti-CoS videos and everywhere else on YouTube for over a year now. As far as I can tell it’s a scam/wannabe cult. It does seem to be gaining traction though.

      • Truthiwant

        I thought it might be. Thanks Captain.

    • http://www.facebook.com/people/Gerard-Plourde/1127841398 Gerard Plourde

      Following the link brings you to a site belonging to a group that calls itself “The Church of the Pearl.” They identify themselves as Gnostics. Gnosticism was a movement in early Christianity that in its most radical form believed that all creation was evil and that the physical world was to be spurned. I doubt that Hubbard had anything to do with this. Mainstream Christians have long considered Gnosticism to be a heresy although some recent writers like Camille Paglia are drawn to it.

      • DeElizabethan

        I’ve read some of it and wouldn’t give any credits to Lron for writing it. I’d need some good proof.

  • http://www.facebook.com/phil.mckraken.58726 Phil McKraken

    So, let me get this straight. This guy wrote and published a whole book about how everyone he worked with hated him so much he got fired, and then claimed it was a because he was too good at his job. I don’t have to know a single other fact before I know that it’s a crock. People who are excellent at their jobs don’t get fired for cause.

    I think the commenter who pointed to Dunning-Kruger hit the nail on the head. Herb doesn’t even know how much he sucks. I know how much he sucks, because I read that snippet about Scientology “ethics,” where he apparently isn’t aware that he’s spewing utter, degenerate drivel.

  • http://lliira.dreamwidth.org/ Lliira

    I’m getting seriously annoyed by online “journalists” who report things and talk about how boring what they’re reporting is, and claim that no one cares and it’s not important. It seems to be an ever-growing trend. First, then why are they talking about it? Second, they sound twelve years old.

    It is a damn big deal when someone might sue you if you say something critical of him. It’s an even bigger deal when you’re in academics. Academics is based on being critical of other ideas and it’s also based on trusting that everyone has basically good motivations. When there is evidence that someone does not have good motivations, that evidence has to be brought to light and discussed. If it’s not, the whole thing breaks down.

  • Still_On_Your_Side

    I am very disappointed by his low prices. Sadly, I believe that books of this caliber should never sell for less than $1.00 per word. I realize the $120.00 price was probably the discounted e-book price, but nevertheless with works of this quality, scholars have been known to pay thousands of dollars. Granted, those books were original printed books from the 16th century, but the century should not be the reason for selling books for under $500 in paperback, and $10,000 if a second or third printing hardcover. I am now so sad over these low prices for such quality books, I probably will have to tell my book buyer to cancel my orders for 1000 copies of Mr. Richardson’s most recent book, and it was such a good book. Sigh.

    • Couch_Incident

      Per the article Tony had the other day, if LRH was paid at your rates for his hack sci-fi stories instead of at a penny a word, we never would have had the horror that is Scientology.

  • ParticleMom

    Herb is so insightful about Scientology! He really gets how much weight the COS puts on “reason” and “reasonableness.”.

    And I’m sure the book he published: Holocaust Education: A Resource Book for Teachers and Professional Leaders supports the Scientology perspective. Down with evil Psychs!!!

  • jensting

    Wow! If Prof Richardson isn’t a member in god standing of the criminal organisation known as the “church” of $cientology, he really should be! He and David “he is NOT insane!” Miscavige ought to get along just fine, plus maybe David Miscavige could do with some fancy academic title like L Ron Hubbard had?

  • grundoon

    Prof. Frederic Will, now of the University of Phoenix, tells an extraordinary tale of Mellen University, from his vantage as its first President: http://herbertwarrenrichardson.com/will-fred/

    I was to meet Herbert Richardson in the Miami Airport, and to fly with him to Turks and Caicos, where we were to examine and degree grant the
    first class of the new University, Mellen University, Herb was founding, and of which I was to be President. In the course of a week in the islands we were to grant doctor’s degrees to a group of Clinical Pastoral Educators. We did just that. For a week we talked non stop with our twelve candidates, read their files, which had been vetted by a couple of distinguished scholars–well, actually, that was true, no kidding–and finally gave the candidates hour oral exams which were bracing, based on their professional experience as pastoral counselors, and wide ranging…. The degree candidates, for the professional Ph.D., were members of CPE
    (the society of Clinical Pastoral Educators) They were to meet us on Turks and Caicos, and in the course of a week, during which they were to be examined on the basis largely of their professional experience, they were to be given their degrees. (As it turned out, one or two of the group of twelve were asked to return later for further examination; the degrees, which a critical world was later to see as bought, were not in fact simply bought, nor in spirit were they in any way bought., for the candidates were a mature and independent lot, brought with them full and risking life experiences, and quite rightly considered themselves appropriate recipients of advanced degrees.) We all settled down in the same hotel in Cockburntown, and spent the week discussing the candidates’ lives as work, their professional values, and ultimately gave them oral exams to test their credibility. Then we went home, leaving many of the candidates with professional Ph.D.’s, which I hope have proved valuable to them….Why should settled and antique Universities be the only legitimate granters of degrees? … Herb is a radical pedagogue, and a darned effective one….

    “Professor” Herbert Warren Richardson’s awesomeness is thoroughly attested by his appreciative friends and admirers at http://herbertwarrenrichardson.com/

    • sugarplumfairy

      Lol.. I’ve spent a week in Turks and Caicos on three different occasions.. If only I’d known….

      • sugarplumfairy

        In fact.. If you can get a PhD in a week, in 3 weeks maybe I could have been a rocket scientist or a brain surgeon..

        • grundoon

          Not just anybody can do this. It’s for those who consider themselves appropriate recipients of advanced degrees.

  • Roger Larsson

    The awesome Herb and the awesome Elena Cardone as co-writers can do a masterpiece together titled “Great balls on fire”

  • Skydog

    In a belated tribute to the awesomeness of Herb Richardson, he has confirmed what has been known for sometime. The reputation of the church is such that calling someone a scientologist is defamatory.

  • i-Betty

    I would like to bake Herb Richardson a cake. He is awesome and breathtaking, and quite lovely.