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Belgium Prosecuting Scientology as a Criminal Organization [UPDATED]

Oh Belgium, how we love you

Oh Belgium, how we love you

UPDATE: See more analysis from journalist Jonny Jacobsen after the jump. The latest: Jonny’s thoughts on the Belgian investigating magistrate, Michel Claise.

We sure picked a great day to go for a long hike.

Turns out, minutes after we left for our day-long stroll, we received an e-mail from a newspaper editor friend of ours in Ghent, Belgium. He wanted to make sure we had seen a Flemish-language story breaking the news that the Belgian government is going to prosecute the Church of Scientology as a criminal organization.

Twelve hours later, we finally saw our friend’s e-mail. Ah well. Better late than never, anyway.

OK, so you may have already heard elsewhere, but it’s still pretty interesting news…

 
BELGIUM IS PROSECUTING SCIENTOLOGY AS A CRIMINAL ORGANIZATION!!

According to the UK Telegraph, “charges of fraud, illegal medicine, breaches of privacy and extortion have been drawn up against the Church and two senior executives.”

We’ve known for years that officials in Belgium were investigating Scientology, but now, the country seems to be following France’s lead, where questions about whether Scientology is a church or a “sect” were set aside and instead French prosecutors focused on fraudulent behavior in the way Scientology operates.

In February, France’s courts upheld Scientology’s fraud conviction, but the organization has not been outright banned.

In Belgium, prosecutors will be following a similar line, focusing on the way Scientology operates, and trying not to get caught up in definitions like “church” or “cult.”

We just received this report from Jonny Jacobsen, a British journalist based in Paris…

The gist of it is that federal prosecutors have issued indictments to two senior Scientology executives in Belgium — but also the Belgian organisation itself. The charges include fraud, the illegal practice of medicine, breach of privacy and extortion.

Crucially then, the organisation itself is going to have to defend itself from charges that it is a criminal organisation — so the stakes are at least as high as they were in the French trial.

The investigation appears to have sprung from a complaint filed by the Brussels Employment Office. It said it suspected that Scientology’s work contracts, both for volunteers and paid staff, might be forged and fraudulent, both the papers reported.

The organisation was suspected of using fake job offers to try to recruit people.

The move comes after years of investigation following police raids of Scientology’s Brussels offices on April 11, 2008. The investigating magistrate is a Michel Claise.

Neither the prosecutors office nor Scientology has issued a public response so far.

The story appears to have come from both the Flemish-language paper Tijd (Time) and the French-language daily L’Echo (it’s firewalled but has been translated by mnql1 at WWP here).

This is stunning news, but already it’s getting spun out of control a bit. Atlantic Wire put out a story with the salacious headline, “Could Belgium Bring Down Scientology,” which seems a stretch.

Yes, Belgian prosecutors could shut down Scientology…in Belgium. But elsewhere? That seems doubtful.

A fraud conviction in France has had no visible effect on Scientology in the United States — where the church is seriously hurting, but for other reasons.

We also can’t help remembering Spanish prosecutors going after the church in a big way during the late 1980s — and even, at one point, had church president Heber Jentzsch in chains. But if anything that prosecution provided a recruitment boost here in the US, as we recall.

Jonny Jacobsen sent over some more thoughts on this subject…

You’re right: whatever happens in Belgium does not force anyone else’s hand: somebody
over at Atlantic Wire needs to switch to decaf.

And in any case, it’s early days yet: there’s many a slip twixt cup and lip.

As the L’Echo’s article makes clear, this is not the first time Belgium has tried to prosecute
Scientology: the last one was launched in 1997 and has yet to make it to court. It got stuck in
the Chambre de Conseil, a federal legal office that can intervene in an ongoing investigation
to decide whether or not there is sufficient evidence to bring charges.

In this case however, the decision to prosecute appears to have been made: the indictments
have been issued, so perhaps that particular hurdle has been cleared.

As for this case bringing down Scientology in Belgium, I think that’s a little hasty. I’m not even sure
what the maximum penalties are in Belgian law for the offences being alleged.

Even if the nuclear option of dissolution exists (like the one French prosecutors thought they had)
Belgium’s prosecutors may not choose to press for it. You will recall that the French prosecutors
called for the Scientology organisations to be broke up — but that didn’t work out too well for them!

(Here’s the summary of what they were calling for together with an update explaining what went
wrong; and here are their extended arguments in that case, parts one and two.)

Thanks for that, Jonny, and make sure you check out his always thorough blog.

The news from Belgium is exciting, and we have messages out to journalists we know there to see how the news is being received in that country. More information when we can get it.

One final point for now: We have always tried to stay away from the “is it a church or a cult” question, and instead have stressed repeatedly that Scientology should be examined for its practices, not its beliefs. Now, Belgium is getting that part right.

When will the United States government figure it out as well? We broke the news recently that the federal Department of Homeland Security is investigating Scientology, and apparently for similar reasons as the Belgian government — for the way Scientology treats its workers.

When will there be a prosecution here?

 
UPDATE: More thoughts from Jonny Jacobsen…

The investigating magistrate handling this case, Michel Claise, is a specialist in white-collar crime, so he seems like a good fit for this case. Within days of the 2008 police raids, he had charged Scientology the organisation with fraud.

The indictment reportedly handed down by the federal prosecutors appears to elaborate on that initial move: it rather looks then as if they have followed Claise’s approach to the case, which is encouraging.

In the Paris case, you may recall that French prosecutors did not originally want to pursue the case against Scientology. It was the investigating magistrate who went ahead with it anyway, (though in court the prosecutors got on board with a vengeance).

In this case in Belgium however it does rather look as if the prosecutors and the investigating
magistrate are on the same page.

 

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  • Chocolate Velvet

    This is excellent news! What a great way to top off 2012. This will be remembered as a year when the ground shifted underneath the COS. May this trend continue in the New Year. With such stellar leadership in the COS it surely will.

    As Tory says, tick tock, DM…

  • dagobarbz

    when pigs fly, or are no longer elected to office.

  • John P.

    Given the pathological desire to avoid coming anywhere close to the church-state line, it’s unlikely that the US will take action against the cult any time soon. In addition to the political issues involved in taking on a “religion,” the economics of prosecuting an organization with such deep pockets are daunting; see my comments a couple weeks ago about the difficulty of funding a long drawn-out case against the cult for human trafficking.

    What’s interesting about the reports of the Belgian case are the breadth of the charges. Fraud, illegal practice of medicine, extortion. What next? Hurting puppies (though there seems to be evidence that “fair game” thugs will in fact stoop to that level)? I wonder if this is the sort of things prosecutors do over there to “try the case in the press” or otherwise gain an advantage, or if they are confident they can win on each of these counts?

    And the charge that they are using fake job offers to try and recruit people is a new low, even for the cult. While recruiting through Narconon is vile and dangerous, offering to help find a job is just … lame.

    • sugarplumfairy

      I hope the US takes note, though.. And at least doesn’t come to the defense of co$ this time..

      • ze moo

        It is up to us to make certain that the Department of State doesn’t ‘represent’ US in this matter. Those on line White House petitions are a decent place to start.

    • mirele

      “Fake job offers” are not new, they’re how Scientology works. That’s how they recruit people. The recruiter gives the new staff member the idea that he’s going to make lots of money selling crap, and as we know, that ain’t happening so much these days. I know I’ve read more than a few stories where people went in, worked for a week, and then got staff pay–and quit in disgust.

      • Skwerl King

        These are clear signs of human trafficking.

    • When the cult moved into the Ft. Harrison hotel in the 70s, there was a perma-sign out front saying “Now Hiring”. Recruitment into cultdom through a job is nothing new.

      • BuryTheNuts2

        I made a deal with the “other” that I would go shoot sporting clays in Tampa with him tommorrow as long as when we were done he would let me go to Flag in Clearwater and enturbulate the Scion Security guards.
        I will try to take video!!!

        • LaLa104

          Oh that would be fabulous….Wish I was close enough so I could join you. Your commentary on this video to come will no doubt have me peeing myself.. Best of luck!

          • BuryTheNuts2

            I will do my best not to disappoint…or get arrested!

            • LaLa104

              Hey BTN? Can you email me.. Have a question about an issue with comments.. lbee44@msn.com… thx…

            • BuryTheNuts2

              Tried, keeps rejecting it?

            • LaLa104

              Hey BTN… that’s lower case “l”bee44@msn.com… jeez.. don’t tell me someone has my account! UGH..thanx for trying though… not a good puter day for me.. LOL

        • Captain Howdy

          I wanna see you shooting skeet, that’s what i wanna see LOL !

          • BuryTheNuts2

            Puleez….Skeet!!!??? Thats a 30 minute game…..
            I am going into to da woods to shoot me some sporting clays.
            Much more difficult targets. More distance and types of targets.
            I am actually pretty good.
            But I am even better with a 9 milimeter H&K P7 pointed at the two inch center of a target!
            AH!

            • Geront

              Sporting clays! Me likes. In FLA, do they shoot them low and across the swamp water, to simulate crocagators?

            • Guest

              Why Geront, occasionally yes, they do. I shot five stand in Alabama that was all over water…that was cool.

            • BuryTheNuts2

              By the way…that was me…wrong computer and browser made me go accidently stealth…darn it.

        • richelieu jr

          Too bad it’s only Miscavige’s feet that are made of clay- Otherwise he’d be a great skeet target! He’s even about the right size! Pull!

          • Let’s make it clear that we are not advocating violence of any kind.

            • richelieu jr

              Of course not, everyone knows it is only his feet that are made of clay.. The rest is pure grade-a L Ron-approved Bullshit, not even worth shooting at.. just scoop it up gently and put it on the compost pile of history….

              KiIling is too good for him.. Much more fun to see it slip though his ever-more-grasping fingers, until he ends up like Gollum, alone in some dank cave somewhere playing with tin cans and a car battery, trying to make the needle float enough that he can find a bridge out of there…

              And crying out at the loss of “My…. pressures!”

        • 1subgenius

          Do eet!

      • Anononyourside

        If they are offering jobs to foreign nationals in the U.S., the INS should be interested. Since the INS is now part of Homeland Security, I wonder if this is part of their investigation.

    • Jonny Jacobsen

      I hear what you are saying about the U.S. squeamishness over the church-state issue: the late, lamented Danish theologian Johannes Aagard, who set up the DialogCenter in Denmark, referred to that as First Amendment Neurosis. Have a look at this piece from Time magazine, 1997. http://www.icsahome.com/infoserv_respond/by_articleother.asp?ID=44592

      • jensting

        Aagaard was great! My favourite anecdote was the time he and a bunch of UK based critics (including Bonnie Woods) took the tour at Saint Hill manor and Johs pulled out a book from a bookshelf in Ron’s office. The guide was stunned πŸ™‚

        Then an eager Damnation Navy slave made them all pose for a group photo. Only after that did “secuirty” pick up on the fact that a whole bunch of actual SPs were on the grounds and attempted to throw them out. Happy days.

    • jensting

      Fraud is pretty simple to prove (line up the claims in book 1, ask for actual proof, close case). Illegal practise of medicine is easy enough (in addition to NOTS34 which is, admittedly, a little exotic for anywhere but Flag, we have the purif).

      Extortion: pay close attention to the case of the Belgian (!) pianist Alain Stoffen. He got his ethics folder through another admin screw-up, made a copy and handed the folder back. (The criminal organisation known as the “church” of $cientology obligingly reported the theft of their property, thereby authenticating the folder πŸ™‚ ) In the folder was the plans for forcing Alain to buy courses (including stage directions “Take care to sit near the door in case he wants to leave. This will enable you to stop him and handle his disagreements.”). https://whyweprotest.net/community/threads/france2-alain-stoffen.39754/ https://groups.google.com/forum/?fromgroups=#!topic/alt.religion.scientology/Wu_n39TnQqU

      The Belgian raid netted all of the folders. What could a conscientious prosecutor not get out of the files of a notoriously paper-hoarding bunch of inept crooks like the Co$?

  • It’s obvious in Clearwater that there are many nationalities working in the Sea Org. You can hear them speaking foreign languages to each other when in public. I wonder if they ever decided to leave, how could they possibly buy a return flight ticket to Taiwan or where ever they’re from, making $50 per week I can’t see Scn saying oh, here, let us pay your way home.
    To me, this seems like employment or human rights violations. To say nothing of them holding foreign nationals’ passports, if they are doing that.

    • Captain Howdy

      Confiscating people’s passports is a classic Eastern European sex trade/slave tactic.It doesn’t get more obvious and sinister.

    • DeElizabethan

      Absolutely, like a foreign nation, more than Americans. Where would they go? Good question, find out and I could put it on a sign.

    • Semper Phi

      I know of a Russian guy who was signed up for the SO, went to Flag and washed out. He was then on his own to get home. He got as far as New York and showed up at the org, with practically no English and no money. Happily for him, though, he stayed and joined staff in NY, then fell in love with and married a nice American org staffer. I think they have finally been able to move out of her parents’ house into a place of their own. Who says there are no happy endings in Scientology?

      • Clam InAHalfshell

        Poor dude.

    • Anononyourside

      Yep, I wonder what would happen if one of those foreign nationals went to their local consulate or embassy and asked for help because they were being held in the US against their will by the CoS?

      • Jonny Jacobsen

        It happened — and there was a successful prosecution. But there’s one tiny detail escaping me here. I really should write that one up (:-) !

  • 0tessa

    Maybe the ‘church’ will find its Waterloo in … Waterloo. (Not so far from Belgium.)

    • Observer

      Now I have that ABBA song stuck in my head …

      • Captain Howdy

        “Waterloo” and “S.O.S” are both very appropriate.

        • BuryTheNuts2

          Yeah…and they both SUCK!!!

          • Captain Howdy

            Bollocks, they’re both finely crafted classic pop songs.

            • Observer

              They have this going for them: they’re not Fernando. Lord, how I loathe that song.

            • LaLa104

              Great ya’ll got me singing the Momma Mia soundtrack.. Thanx!

            • BuryTheNuts2

              Bollocks is right!

            • Captain Howdy

              Lemmy, Johnny Rotten and Joey Ramone all expressed liking ABBA at some point. The opening riff for ‘Pretty Vacant” was ripped from “SOS”. And that’s the end of my defense of the Fab Four Swedes as I actually only like 3 or 4 songs.

            • BuryTheNuts2

              Pretty vacant was one SP’s best.
              ABBA still sucked

            • sugarplumfairy
            • BuryTheNuts2

              OH MY GOD….I just watched this with the sound turned off.
              What a trip that was! That was AWESOME!!!
              That was highfreakinlariousness.

            • Captain Howdy

              WTF ????

            • sugarplumfairy

              Omg!!! Did I actually show Cap’n Video a vid he hasn’t seen before?

            • Captain Howdy

              Fuck yeah, and it had Remington Steele and Alice Ghostley disco dancing in Evel Knievel costumes !

            • BuryTheNuts2

              Flippin Surreal eh?
              Whoa!!!

            • mattekudasai

              Hear’s one of ABBA’s from the movie Muriel’s Wedding (Australian Movie) with the wonderful Toni Collette from The Sixth Sense, Little Miss Sunshine and more. Love her acting.http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=3U4kDzwZAMk

    • richelieu jr

      Erm, Waterloo is in Belgium.. Perhaps you meant ‘Brussels’?

      • 0tessa

        Oops …

        • richelieu jr

          I guess Belgium was your Waterloo, eh…? Eh?

          (crickets)

          Seriously, sorry for being such a petty pedant….

  • sugarplumfairy

    Oh, Belgium how we love you is right.. mmmm.. and their Chocolate, too.

    • DeElizabethan

      This years Christmas presents were all Belgium, mmnn good. Now love what they are doing even more.

  • Captain Howdy

    Isn’t Belgium the uppermost region of France ? All I know is King Leopold and “In Bruge” and Co$ HQ in Europe is there. Bully for them though, that’s the way to go after the cult.

    • Jgg2012

      No, it’s a separate country, though half of it speaks French.

      • Observer

        It’s a beautiful country. I highly recommend a visit if you find yourself in the vicinity.

      • Captain Howdy

        J/K.. Thanks anyway.

      • Clam InAHalfshell

        And my granddaddy fought there in WWII.

  • mirele

    I agree with Tony’s statement that criticism of Scientology should be grounded in non-religious criticism. While talking about Xenu is fun, it’s not the main thing. I don’t care if people believe Hubbard is now on the way to Target 2–that’s a quasi-religious belief. What I do care about are the actions of the organization–the hoovering of members’ wallets, the theft of Sea Org members’ lives, the way people are treated inside Scientology, the way Scientology uses its front groups to deceive and dupe outsiders and, in the process, get more money. These things can be seen in similar groups, all the way from multi-level marketing schemes to insular political groups. Scientology just seems to have all of these things together.

    I confess to being extremely suspicious of “anti-cult” groups. Too often these people have an agenda, and it’s not to expose the organization(s) they’re targeting, but rather to recruit the members into their group or affiliated churches/religious organizations. There’s an outfit here in the city where I live that makes a point of trying to get Mormons “saved,” because Mormons “believe in the wrong Jesus.” Of course, this particular group (and others like it) aren’t going to tell the people they’re recruiting about the holes in *its* belief system. Some years back, I remember standing outside an infamous anti-Mormon group’s office in Salt Lake City with a friend. The friend said, “If ST (group leader) used the same tools on Evangelical Christianity that s/he uses on Mormonism, s/he wouldn’t be an Evangelical Christian.” That was because ST’s criticisms were pretty strictly religion-based.

    And that’s why critics of Scientology need to stay with fact, not mushy belief.

    • TheHoleDoesNotExist

      Most critics seem to drag out the wacky belief jokes only while waiting for the media to stop covering the crazy and start digging deep into the deadly…and waiting…and waiting. Finally, 2012 arrived and January 2013 has many a date checked off on the To Do or To Read list.

      • John P.

        I’m a critic… and I thought I was pretty consistent about the wacky belief jokes, whether there was other stuff going on or not. The problem for me, as a never-in, with beliefs in the case of Scientology, is that the basic proposition is that this stuff is different because it’s based on science. And you should believe it because Hubbard was a genius in all things.

        That’s very different from the normal “sales pitch” of a religion, which asks you to take things on faith. I don’t criticize beliefs that live in faith — though I am unlikely to become a Hindu or a Jain or a Sikh or a Zoroastrian soon, I don’t criticize their beliefs, because they are taken on faith; they’re not presented as a scientific truth.

        Because Scientology is fairly unique in trying to convince people that it is based on two things I can assess and measure, that it’s derived from science and research, and because Scientology claims it is great because of Hubbard’s intellectual brilliance, and because Scientology claims that all that space opera stuff really happened exactly the way Hubbard wrote it, they have exposed themselves to a different sort of skepticism than the standard sort of religious beliefs.

        I have no problem with faith. I do, however, have a really big problem with trying to link faith and science; the two really don’t live in the same domain, and it usually ends badly when you mix the two.

        • sugarplumfairy

          Amen..

        • Captain Howdy

          CRACKED com “4 Dangerously Influential Dimwits”

          Guess who made the list ?

          http://www.cracked.com/blog/4-dangerously-influential-dimwits/

          • richelieu jr

            The guy clearly knows a thing or two about the lad and Scientology, doesn’t he?

            Was TC tall enough to get on that ride?

        • richelieu jr

          I quite agree, John P…. The thing is, it’s a shall game of misdirection with these liars= Scientology is a religion, with a ‘pope’ and ‘scriptures’ and everything when it suits them, and a scientific system with ‘tech’ when that is more to their advantage. By constantly changing their argument, the wrong-foot the critic at each turn…

          The whole religion malarkey only started when Hubbard was exposed as a fraud for calling Dianetics ‘science’ in the first place…

        • FLUNK000

          Thank you John for your deeply thoughtful … um … thoughts! That was a good point about pseodo science.
          ,
          They say beauty is in the eye of the beholder. I think that way about beliefs.

          Daniel Dennett, in one of his lectures on youtube, talked about a priest who lost the faith . The priest might not want to fess up, because he doesn’t want to lose his job or upset his family. But that doesn’t mean the people in the congregation believe any less.

          I feel that way about Scientologists. Even if it started as a con, once somebody adopts it as a core belief, it’s their religion.

          Now, you might say the beliefs are a trap, and therefore evil. That’s definitely part of it.
          There are also some benevolent concepts in Scientology, like The Granting of Beingness. I am reminded of the Bible and how some read it and are inspired to love, while others read the same book and are inspired to hate. Sometimes, what you get out of something is a reflection of who you are. Look at all the indies who want to have nothing to do with what they call “corporate Scientology”. Are they wrong? Even if you think they are, I think it’s it’s better to stay focused on those things which are specifically criminal, and let the chips fall where they may. I think people people will eventually figure out what’s right for them in the belief department.

    • ArtoisDetois

      Agreed. With 1 million exceptions.

      All those pesky body thetans!

      Can you rid me of my thetan infection?

      • richelieu jr

        Take two tin cans and call me in the morning…

      • Penecillin should clear that up nicely.

    • jensting

      You’re preaching to the choir!

      Ehrm, sorry πŸ™‚

      Seriously, each critic has their own style. Mine is to always write ‘the criminal organisation known as the “church” of $cientology’ instead of “scientology.” Veterans will know which part I dropped – not good for getting the point across outside the inner circles of vicious hake-mongers.

  • TheHoleDoesNotExist

    I love the smell of fresh subpoenas in the afternoon. Extortion should not have a question mark after it. It is the Only rhyme and reason scientology still stands. But the illegal and deadly practice of medicine without a license charge, yet another, hurled on top of Narconon news across several countries, means scientology is standing on quicksand these days. As far as what has happened in the past, I don’t see any comparison to what is happening now. Now…I don’t see Any person, beast or even government shill jumping up and offering a rope, unless it is to help hang ’em high.

    • Anononyourside

      The CoS is not considered a religion in Belgium, so the illegal practice of medicine charge has no religious defense there, as it does in the U.S.

      • Observer

        No illegal act should be allowed a religious defense regardless of the religion. It’s appalling that they do.

        • Anononyourside

          I agree, but most successful prosecution of illegal acts by religious cults have to do with protecting children from the “religious” acts of their parents. If an adult works 100 hours a week for $50 a week for 20 years, the government is going to assume that adult did it willingly; and if an adult is locked in the “hole” in 105 degree weather and forced to sleep on the floor, the government will assume they also did that willingly (unless they are mentally or physically unable to consent). If the CoS claims the above actions are ministerial, and the “ministers” don’t sue or file complaints within the statute of limitations, the CoS is going to get away with it, and they have been counting on the passivity of members and former members for years.

          The law doesn’t recognize the loss of free will. The people who post here know why people don’t fight back against the CoS reign of terror, but that means nothing to the courts or government.

          • ArtoisDetois

            This is why we need to keep harping on the fact that there is actual hypnotism and abreaction therapy being conducted, without proper licensing.

          • jensting

            “The law doesn’t recognize the loss of free will.” Well, its loss! “Undue influence” is a legal concept which sounds relevant (but I don’t even pretend to be a lawyer on the Internet, mus less that I know what I’m talking about regarding US law).

            However, I’m curious what if any consideration was made to Patty Hearst back in the day.

            Lastly, the law might not recognise the concept. but I would love for a jury to have a say. (Oh, they did, in the 1980s).

      • HeatherGraceful

        No doubt the issue will be relitigated in the course of the defence.

    • BuryTheNuts2

      I love the smell of fresh subpoenas in the afternoon.

      ^^^ My nomination for comment of the week.

    • Jgg2012

      How about the site of empty orgs in the afternoon?

    • Dean Fox

      I’m sure the church of scientology will be trying to influence the US Government in to condemning the Belgium Government as religious bigots. Perhaps some counter lobbying is in order.

  • LaLa104

    Here’s to hoping 2013 will expose the achilles heel of C0S. I can only hope that this year our government will really push forward and follow through with hard core investigations against C0S practices in our own country. I have a year supply of popcorn ready and my marg glasses are salted.

    • LaLa104

      Hello Bunkerites.. For some reason I can only post from my disqus account on the comment section here. Is anyone else having an issue seeing the comment section on TO’s blog today? I was on here earlier posting and now I cannot even find comments on his articles. I can’t figure out for the life of me how I lost this on the site. I scrolled to the bottom of TO’s blog that says so many comment responses but when I click on that it still comes up blank after TO’s articles.

      I’m hoping if you reply to my post I’ll be able to see anyone’s response to me from disqus.

      Any suggestions?

      • DeElizabethan

        Since I started on this new blog. Once I comment, I get the comments emailed to me, great. If I want to reply to one I poke Reply and go to the very bottom and it will usually take me there. Otherwise one has to open up newly to see all the new comments or I suppose refresh. If you can’t find something go to the last comment in your email and all should appear in order. Hope that helps a bit.

        • LaLa104

          Yeah, thanx for your help Dee.. Not working.. UGH…

      • sugarplumfairy

        LaLa, that happened to me last week.. You may have two disqus accounts.. Go into ‘my Disqus’ right above the comments.. Hit the little gear symbol right next to ‘share’.. Hit ‘edit settings’.. In a few seconds you’ll get a pop-up that says ‘my account’.. Hit ‘merging’ and follow directions.. Hope it helps..

        • LaLa104

          Thank you SPF…. I merged on disqus, shall see what happens.. John P gave me a heads up at the Google Rodeo site about deleting my browser history and stupid me forgot my user ID for my google account and now I can’t get back into the Rodeo site.. Jeez I’m having a head banging puter day. I think I’ll take John P’s 3rd suggestion and run around my laptop screaming.. LOL
          Thanx all for your help…

          • sugarplumfairy

            Oh.. I just reread your comment.. I thought you couldn’t post, but you just can’t see your post.. There is a little gold star with a number next to it under Tony’s article.. I have no idea what it’s for, but hit that.. For some reason it makes comments disappear nd reappear..

          • DeElizabethan

            I know what you’re goin’ through as I had a time early on till I wrote every one down on secure paper book to keep, Blog name, username, password etc. Continually I reference it as one does forget and it’s good to have some differences.

          • ze moo

            I you want to clear all of your browser history and cookies, use Piriform’s cCleaner. It is free and has several useful functions built in. Get it from downloads.com to be safe. It will wipe out your drop down history also, so always bookmark any place visit regularly. DeElizabethan’s write down important stuff is still necessary in the computerized world of tomorrow……

        • LaLa104

          I’m not seeing that gold star on his site.. I’m going to log onto my yahoo acct. and see if that shows from there.. Thanx again for your help…

      • LaLa104

        Thank you ze moo: I will that as soon as I finish typing this message!
        It seems I’m getting all the comments here on the blog loading on my iphone and not all of the comments are showing up on the disqus site..
        Thank you all for your helpful suggestions.. will try each and every suggestion.

  • Anononyourside

    You are absolutely right, it is illegal practices, not the religion, at issue. The problem is,

    1. The U.S. Department of Labor usually waits for complaints before it acts (unless there is an egregious sweat shop environment with locked doors, etc.). We are not the same type of society as France and Belgium, (or most other EU countries), where officials take a more paternalistic attitude towards its citizens. Labor complaints are not being filed in the U.S. either due to fear or, by the time an individual decompresses after leaving the CoS, the complaint is untimely.

    2. U.S. federal and state prosecutors have limited resources and they tend to view the CoS has having too many lawyers and too much money. This may change, however, if there is a clear crack in the CoS’s armor. A successful prosecution in the U.S. for fraud or the like may give prosecutors courage, but I think the CoS will not be brought down by prosecution in the U.S. It will be brought down the old-fashioned way. Individuals will leave the church, the money will dry up, the Indie movement will recruit any new people who in the past might have gone to the church, and Miscavige will have a public melt down of some sort. At that point, when it is clear the CoS is on its last legs, then U.S. law enforcement may have the courage to follow through on one of its many investigations.

    3. There is no oversight over CoS finances, either internally or by the IRS. The IRS assumes that church “elders” or leadership clergy will stop illegal expenditures and remove leaders who are a danger to the church. As is clear, no one inside the church challenges Miscavige. He spends money he sees fit, and hires teams of lawyers if challenged from the outside, and terrorizes any potential insider-challenger into silence. The IRS has the power to investigate breaches of its not-so-secret agreement with the CoS, but fears thousands of lawsuits will be filed against the IRS if it opens that door.

    4. The media could be exposing the CoS, but outside of Tony and one or two other brave journalists, no one has the guts to do so.

    The bottom line is that the CoS will be shut down in the U.S. when it is clear that the majority of Scientologists are outside the church, and, based on the rate of growth of the Indies and the numbers of members leaving the CoS, that could be in the near future.

    • Anononyourside

      Oh wait, there are egregious sweatshop environments with locked doors…but no complaints from those locked in. So, until there are complaints, the U.S. Department of Labor will assume the individuals locked in that CoS sweatshop want to be there.

      • ze moo

        Labor problems and bait and switch job offers, are usually the prevue of state departments of labor. If they get enough complaints, they might investigate. Only the larger states like NY and California have the resources to crack heads and take names for bait and switch job offers. Neither NY nor California are in the mood to spend money on anything not absolutely essential these days.

        Unless the CO$ were caught with a nationwide set of ads and complaints from all over the US and the state departments of labor asked, the federal Department of Commerce might investigate what US courts would probably find as multi level marketing job offers. That might be fraud, it might not. Give a lawyer something to argue about and their kids get to go to college.

        Calling the CO$ out on their medical claims might be a better strategy. It is far simpler to prove that auditing can’t cure leukemia or arthritis or, as lron called them, any psychosomatic disease. The federal Food and Drug Admin could have gone after the CO$ for their quackery any time, why haven’t they done that yet? The CO$ doesn’t seem to promise any health benefits for auditing in writing, but they do promise it verbally everywhere scamatology is sold. Their IRS agreement stipulates that the CO$ not make any health claims. The IRS has not done anything to the CO$ for that continued violation.

        I only see good press coming out of Belgium about this case, unfortunately none of it will put scamatologys American operations in danger. That sucks……

        • Anononyourside

          Bait and switch is a fraud problem, which puts the issue back to state and federal prosecutors who usually don’t care unless a judge or a state agency or a politician requests an investigation. These types of issues rarely get prosecuted unless, as you said, there are multiple complaints, and even then, rarely is anything done. The U.S. is not paternalistic, individuals are expected to bring lawsuits if they have been hΓ rmed. Notwithstanding, an attorney general in an individual state may investigate fraud, especially if it involves a charity registered in the state, like the CoS in Caliornia, but again there have to be citizen complaints first.

          There is a mistaken idea that the U.S. government will protect its citizens from scams and fraud, it rarely happens. The Department of Labor must investigate failure to pay minimum wage or overtime if the employee meets the requirements, but there must be a complaint. Generally, no one in the government is going to act unless a judge, an attorney general, a high ranking politician, or many, many citizens complain, or unless they are shamed into acting by the media.

          As far as the FDA goes, that agency does not have jurisdiction over Narconon, the individual state does. The state is responsible for regulating drug rehab and it has taken how many deaths before even one state decided to do something? And that is only because Narconon lied about what it was licensed for, not because of niacin and so on.

          The U.S. operates on the premise that if you are injured you will sue. Yes, you can file complaints with state and federal agencies, and your great grandchildren may still be waiting.

          • ze moo

            Federal regulators have already spoken about NarCONon. It isn’t covered by any federal insurance program. That is about all the Feds have been or are able to do. Many states don’t regulate their drug rehabs much, unfortunately it does take some deaths and media outrage to change things.

    • Us on staff and in the Sea Org, as has been stated by ex Sea Org and ex Staff of Scientology “churches” for decades now (since the 1980s ex staff and ex Sea Org have so voluminously stated), and studying Steven Haassan’s books, and other “cult” member victim mindset discussions, we simply DON’T even entertain the thought of going to the Labor Dept.

      We “cult” members, we think in HUGE eras of time, and are divorced from mere minor citizen normal “labor” rights, etc., etc.

      And our “cult” mindsets and layers of protective (to the cult) ideas, don’t wear off within convenient statute of legal limitations to sue for our “back wages”, like the Headley’s most deservedly at least deserved to have their case properly heard!

      This is exciting, and I hope Belgioum makes some headway.

      Good for them!

      • Anononyourside

        Chuck, I hear you. Hassan has called it “peeling an onion” to get down to the real “I.” It is a painful process.

        I hope that Belgium gives some hope to some members who feel there is no hope, and are waiting to be rescued. If Belgium is successful, other EU countries will follow suit.

        If Georgia Narconon loses its license, other states will take a closer look at Narconon, and the bad publicity may mean fewer and fewer people will enroll in Narconon. Perhaps Belgium and Georgia will light a fire under DHS. At any rate, 2013 will be interesting.

    • I think unfortunately, that the Marty Independent fresh new tide or wave of essentially splinter “new Scientology religion” adherents, as honorable as they are, they are factually much more like other past splinter religion movements, who temper the harsh extremist and irrational Catch 22s of the “mainline” “church” from which they are honorably and more ethically splintering, the bottom line is the Hubbard therapy “tech” and exorcism pseudo-therapy and the results or lack of results from that (and from the other Hubbard ideas that the splinter members disseminate and gain support from new (or old) members).

      I have to think that the bottom line, is what Hubbard said.

      We still at this 63 year mark in Hubbard writings (Dianetics/Scientology) history have NO theologian of Scientology, who is truly poly math educated and humble enough to really place crazy Hubbard (the critics are still overwhelmingly correct, my all time favorite smart cookie critic who most “got” Hubbard, is Martin Gardner, at this 63 year mark in Hubbard’s “Scientology” history); this all said, none of us ex Scientologists even have an inkling what a “theologian” might be, for Hubbard’s Scientology “new religion”, and it’s more the absurd, the UFO cult, ex members, clamoring, some still doing the Hubbard pseudo-therapy, some still hoping for reform of the Hubbard mess (me in that camp), and some thinking it’s the absurd and horribly misguided tragic cult mess that deserverses, but which will not likely have a near future “death” as the crazy UFO (Xenu and the Marcabians are REAL!!!, per Hubbard) cult that L. Ron Hubbard’s Scientology “religion” factually is.

      What a mess.

      So much to digest, and HUGE thankyou to the huge long list of fellow human beings who’ve taken time to digest this Hubbard Scientology science fiction fantasy “new religion” with all of it’s horrendous missteps into society, seeking legitimacy.

      As an American, where we are world extremists in allowing crazy “new religions” as part of our American heritage, I know this will all sort itself out, and in the meantime, thankyou all for helping sort this out!

      • BuryTheNuts2

        Cuz we are Americans first…crazy is OUR heritage.
        Ok, we make mistakes……………wholly shit we do….
        But should we not allow it?
        What is worse?
        If it fails…It should fail on merit….just like Co$ will/is.

        • Yes.

          Scientology could pretty dramatically change its stripes by a few simple actions: : a) dismantle the Office of Special Affairs (and shred all their dirty secret files on Scientology enemies), and b) cancel all of their past issued shunning orders (suppressive person declare orders).

          I hope some new fresh defectors go public, from the Office of Special Affairs this new year! And from the Int Base.

          .

  • Amstellicht

    I suppose if you are declared a criminal corporation, then you can’t be a vexatious litigant anymore.

    How inconvenient for scientology.

  • BuryTheNuts2

    STELLA ARTOIS, Waffles,…. and now this….

    GO BELGIUM…

    • ze moo

      Chimay (a Belgium white beer) is considered the best beer in the world by several beer publications, and it goes down nicely with Buffalo wings. I just don’t understand the french fries with mayo bit…..

      • ArtoisDetois

        And I believe the EtOH content is slightly higher in the trappist ales.

      • Guest

        French fries are much better with Tartar sauce than Mayo.
        Just sayin….
        And Chimay is a damn fine brew.
        You are a wise tin foil hatted french steer!!!
        Are you a longhorn or a Ankola Watusi?

        Oh wait, nevermind…those are definitely not Ankola horns…Got it…
        Or maybe its the Stella talkin’
        oops, BTN….damn…I gotta stick with one device.

        • ze moo

          I am just a brown swiss bull. The horns…..well, I had some work done. Everyone should have a tin foil hat, it keeps the body thetans out…..so many beers so little time……..

  • DeElizabethan

    Jeez Tony, you can’t just take a walk these days can ya? Good to see your coverage as usual, fine in content. Thank you!
    Three days left of this great year, my my, what next? I just know next year will be fantastic too and looking forward to it.

  • Jgg2012

    RTC will probably say that Belgium is trying to hide its crimes.

    • Captain Howdy

      How they gonna explain they put their European headquarters in SP central ?

    • Observer

      Hopefully OTVIIIisGrrrr8!! (I may have spelled that wrong) will swing by with RTC’s reaction …

    • InTheNameOfXenu

      Belgium, what are your crimes? πŸ™‚

  • Jgg2012

    The good thing about Belgium is that it is not a country that can be easily accused of religious bigotry, like Germany (Nazis!) or Russia (Stalin returns!). Ironically, it’s also Paulette Cooper’s native country.

    • BuryTheNuts2

      Paulette’s native country…………Poetic!

      • TheHoleDoesNotExist

        It’s Santa Karma who is known to arrive by landing on court building roofs on December 28. Hey, I wonder if this will be announced at tonight’s Saint Karma celebration (scientologists version of New Year’s Eve) at the Shrine auditorium in Los Angeles, CA? Number of better apostates, better lawsuits, better book expose’s, better media coverage, better SP’s, better SP countries is straight up and vertical and on track for 5x heretofore unheard of expansion in 2013. Wait. it’s bitter?

  • Jgg2012

    To give you an idea what the Cult is against, this story was covered by HuffingtonPost.com, the 27th biggest website in the wog world. Huffpo gets 500 times the readers that Scientology’s site gets, so people reading negative stuff about the Cult outnumber those reading positive stories by 500 to one.

  • As a long time ex Sea Org member, and long term reader of all that Hubbard’s written, me thinks Hubbard’s ignorance and flippancy, written into Scientology “church” policy, has stuck the members in decades of fixes.

    Hubbard was so loose with reality, loose with words describing his reality, and bending reality with words, he so wished to be considered a great man, and also wished his followers consider him “professional”, but in this era at least, these 63 years since the creation of his Dianetics Scientology movement, , we see his ignorance clashing with society..

    In the must see 1968 Granada TV production 28 minute film, see it on Mark Bunker’s haven of santiy Xenu TV, the “World In Action”, “The Shrinking World of L. Ron Hubbard”, there’s a part where Hubbard innocently (ignorantly) says the British Government wasn’t being specific with what the Scientologists were doing that was wrong back then in 1968 in England, otherwise Hubbard says the Scientologists would have complied with the laws. That is so telling about Hubbard, he played completely loose and carefree with country’s laws, himself!

    It’s obvious, Hubbard’s own ignorance about the laws, his playing his own megalomaniac game, running roughshod on all laws he merrily got away with ignoring, in America, through most of the 1950s until he was raided by the Food and Drug Administration in the early 1960s, he was contrary to his self promotion of himself as a professional, he was an ignorant amateur, at this business of religion starting!

    The real problem around the world, is Hubbard was an amateur and megalomaniac (par for the course per American psychologist William James).

    My thoughts are the OSA Belgium people will hire lawyers that tell them how to be legal, and Scientology will agree to be legal, and all of the Hubbard “church” policy that urge Belgium Scientologists do illegal things, they’ll wise up, since it is historically the case that Hubbard’s ignorance, greed and megalomania is at the root of the Belgium Scientology staffs’ law violations.

    One thing OSA is authorized to do, by one of Hubbard’s other scapegoating policies is to follow the law.

    Scientology will claim ignorance and incompetence, but they won’t target their founder leader Hubbard, yet that’s where the blame should go.

    (Sidenote: the movement has yet to figure out how to NOT blame Hubbard for the deepest faults in the Scientology movement, which is also par for the course I think for any “new religion”, they all similarly find ways to deny their founder’s gross failures, and this “Hiring Staff” policy that Belgium is nailing Scientology for, is Hubbard’s fault, clearly, to those of us who know his policies.)

    Hubbard’s dead, but his policies for the Scientology staff hiring are what are in conflict with law.

    They’ll take the hits, figure out how to evolve, and carry on, my prediction.

    This won’t tank them, I agree with you Tony.

    I hope the case gets really specific, and really slaps Hubbard’s “church” rules though.

    The staffs of “churches” of Scientology are definitely full of secular jobs. For 6 going on 7 decades, the “churches” of Scientology have been allowed to have staff considered as religious workers and volunteers, when in fact those staff members most definitely thought they were doing a regular job.

    The era of Scientology “church” staff who are really doing secular jobs, and are NOT ministerial in function, I hope this Belgium case will bring this 6-7 decade long fraudulent trend to an end, at least!!!!

    Force Scientology to pay secular staff minimum wage, I hope becomes law somewhere and extends worldwide eventually!

    Chuck Beatty
    ex OEC/FEBC Course Sup 1977-1981
    ex OEC/FEBC Word Clearer 1981-1982
    ex OEC/FEBC Course Sup 1982-1983
    ex Admin Course Sup (OEC/FEBC/PR) 1989
    ex Sea Org (1975-2003)
    866-XSEAORG

    • 0tessa

      It will most probably OSA Europe under close supervision of OSA Int that will coordinate this case.

    • nobs

      Thanks Chuck, insightful and informative, as always.

      BTW, do you get calls on the 866-XSEAORG number?

      • 866-XSEAORG got 3 “significant” calls, for which 2 of the 3 calls resulted in successful escapes from the Hubbard Scientology mind trap, in 2012. That is hugely LOW, in terms of what I think people expected of this toll free “help” lifeline to cult members. But that is what it is. It’s mainly a symbol, a tiny realistic ray of hope, to those stuck in the crazy cult. (Thanks should go to Paul Adams, the man who convinced me to run this 866 number, and to the lady in California, one of the anonymous protestors, who pays the phone bill, I’m just the sap ex member Sea Org member who will spend hours talking freely, to whomever calls me!)

        • stillgrace

          Thank you, Chuck for what you do. Maybe the help line is mainly a symbol, “a realistic ray of hope” (I like that!) up until now, but who knows? As things continue to decline, 2013 may turn into a busier year for you! Two ex-Sea org members are free tonight, because of you. That’s definitely worthwhile.

        • jensting

          and thank you very much for doing that, Chuck!

        • Clam InAHalfshell

          Bravo, Chuck!

  • richelieu jr

    In sadder news, apparently poor Katie was a washout on the Great White Way!

    (Though Tom appears to have been used as cheap publicity for his latest conquest’s nightclub career much to his chagrin… Poor guy! Getting used by a lover for ulterior purposes! That is so out-ethics!Can’t he have her teeth filed down or something?)

  • derfty

    Yay

    • ArtoisDetois

      The combination of your moniker, and your subsequent sentiment, is quite funny.

      • derfty

        Thank you.

  • Excellent on Belgium officials! Thankyou!

    Excellent on Jonny Jacobs being so helpful to so many of us ex Sea Org members, in recent years, listening, interviewing us, way before this whole tide of new media, I wish Jonny could have done some stories and gotten more credit for bringing, especially, the whole Miscavige violence story, finally into the public. Jonny is a huge unsung media person, in the 2000s decade media Scientology story, that’s percolated and finally come to so many good stories and books in the recent decade and a little extra number of years! Thanks Jonny!

    And thankyou Tony for being diverted and so thoroughly absorbing Scientology!

    It’s amazing how a story finally gets covered.

    Thankyou Tony!

  • ArtoisDetois

    Hey, cool to see BTN contributating over at the Huff Po!

  • Zaphod Beeblebrox

    David Miscavige is undoubtedly agreeing with Douglas Adam’s assessment on the galactic view of the propriety of this Flemish homeland.

    Hopefully someone reminds him to grab a towel and not panic.

    • BuryTheNuts2

      42

      • ArtoisDetois

        That’s the answer, but what was the question?

        • BuryTheNuts2

          Duh, the meaning of life (so to speak)
          or the answer to everything.

          • ArtoisDetois

            Absolutely not. LRH was not nearly as funny (not by a long shot) as good ol’ Adams. RIP

            • BuryTheNuts2

              Touche’

        • Zaphod Beeblebrox

          What do you get when you multiply 6 x 9? 42

          Shows how fundamentally screwed up the universe is.

      • DeElizabethan

        What’s 42?
        When you come to Clwtr give me a heads up and I can meet, greet and give em’ some fun.

        • ArtoisDetois

          42 is the answer to life, the universe, and everything. But it took so long to get the answer, that the question has been misplaced.

          • DeElizabethan

            Still don’t get it. Don’t remember the question either. How about Ron’s answer to life’s problems is it a 36? Whatever LMAO!

            • ArtoisDetois

              It’s all just geek talk about “The Hitchhiker’s Guide to the Galaxy,” by Douglas Adams. RIP

            • DeElizabethan

              Oh hey, I remember that one, however apparently not too well.

        • BuryTheNuts2

          Email me how to get hold of you:
          BurytheNuts@gmail.com
          Imma be there tomorrow….we were thinking about going to “Columbia” for Paella…want to Join us?

        • BuryTheNuts2

          Got it….sent you one back. will hook up with you in the AM by phone.
          Too fun!

          • DeElizabethan

            YES!!!!

  • Ziontologist

    Belgium successfully prosecuting Scientology for the crimes they commit (and the trust they betray) could be a moment of clarity for planet Earth!

    • BuryTheNuts2

      Z? What could I do to get you to permanently retire that av?
      Any options?

      • BuryTheNuts2

        Come on, give me a hint…..?

  • ArtoisDetois

    That Huff Po article must be moderated by the shy cetaceans of Alabama. Man, are they slow- 33% comments pending.

    • BuryTheNuts2

      One of the reasons Huff po sucks…!
      Even if they are one of the best “agregators” around.

    • BuryTheNuts2

      Good lord, who is on first?
      I would have a headache…but I refuse πŸ™‚

      • ArtoisDetois

        Well, you never know. There are contiguous waterways leading to Alabama, and dolphins are smarter than we think. And sneaky.

        • BuryTheNuts2

          Bite me!…how is that for a brain stimulant?
          πŸ˜‰

          • ArtoisDetois

            Huff Po is close to 50% comments pending review, pathetic! Someone need to be hatted!

            • BuryTheNuts2

              You should go hat them!
              You know how.
              Edit…go give em a Sec Check

            • Captain Howdy
            • ArtoisDetois

              Whoa, what gives, there was a picture of you in that video eating a turkey leg!

            • Guest

              chicken leg if you really want to ENTURBULATE him…..MUAH Howdy…MUAH!

            • mattekudasai

              That FUCKING ROCKS Capt Howdy! I call first dance with you at the big S.P. Rave and Sing “Wassa madda wit you, hat”?

            • DeElizabethan

              That could mean they are being swamped? I already answered 3 replies to my post by email notice, tho maybe not seen yet.

          • Guest

            You did not answer me on the bite me question πŸ™
            I never said it like it was a “bad thing”

            • Guest

              Huh?

        • Guest

          I like sneaky…As long as i can still figure “Sneaky” out….
          No one wants to get bored..eh?

    • DeElizabethan

      I got a reply to mine, so it’s on, and I replied back. Asked if I was a scio.

  • Jonny Jacobsen

    I was having so much fun answering Tony’s questions, I thought I might as well post a report at Infinite Complacency: http://infinitecomplacency.blogspot.com/2012/12/federalprosecutors-in-belgium-have.html?utm_source=BP_recent

    • DeElizabethan

      Whoa, a great article Jonny and a pleasure to read. Thank you.

  • ArtoisDetois

    What a happy, fortuitous time to be a scientology watcher!

    Bless me, Xenu, for being alive at the perfect time to help Belgium tear your stupid abusive cult a new A-hole,

    Amen

    • Guest

      Consider your sector of the galaxy blessed!

      By XENU!

  • ArtoisDetois

    I think DeElizabethan is the new “popular girl” over at Huff Po. She got 7 “favorites” on one post, a rarity for a newcomer!!

    • Guest

      Go Dee…how cool is that AD?

      • ArtoisDetois

        Very cool! Tres Chic!

        • Guest

          Go to sleep or somethin!

          • ArtoisDetois

            What?

            • Guest

              ?? URself

            • ArtoisDetois

              Big time, go shoot some crocagators:)

            • Guest

              I can’t change who I am.
              It tis what it tis..night.

            • ArtoisDetois

              As long as it’s night

            • BuryTheNuts2

              Hey, goodnight! Pita!
              Catch U on the other side of a crocagator or something…..

            • Guest

              Lol, she has no idea….

    • DeElizabethan

      No crap! I’ll have to take a look at it, maybe the trolls seeing new meat and want all my blood. I’ve got the truth and plenty of blood to give.

      • Guest

        U GO GURLLLLLLLLLLLLLL

        • DeElizabethan

          Thanks guys, a cheering section! Make my day…..IMHO tee hee

          • ArtoisDetois

            Hey, I think you got 8 “favorites” over there, pretty cool!!

            IMHO the reason people are so naturally interested in you is because you are honest, and sadly, that is a rare quality

            • Guest

              Go Dee

            • DeElizabethan

              Interesting. They, Huff blog printed the reply I recently gave but the replies to the “how did you do spy thing” and “how easy to get out” ones submitted hours ago are not there. They have half pending now 75 in -74

      • ArtoisDetois

        I suspect they are responding to your honesty, and real knowledge of the subject.

        • DeElizabethan

          That would be very nice, thank you.

    • Guest

      Totally cool…and I get to meet her tomorrow….how awesome.

      • ArtoisDetois

        You can inform her that she is a rare celeb on Huff Po, a poster that by default gets respect. People respond to the fact that she was in, and now is vocally out.

        • BuryTheNuts2

          Will do! πŸ˜‰

  • I need an assist, can anybody point me in the right direction to get info on Mission Renaissance ( art academy), founder Larry Gluck ?

  • I need an assist with getting info on Mission Renaissance and Larry Glick. Just a point int he right direction would be appreciated. We know somebody teaching there (they are new). This is a Co$ venture, correct? Thanks in advance for any links.

  • Hermesacat

    Ah, to ring in the New Year with Belgian chocolate, Belgian beer, & the Belgian judicial system seeking justice re. criminal CoS! Mm, Mm good.

  • HeatherGraceful

    Magnifique!

  • DodoTheLaser

    It’s funny how RTC keeps failing to control/manipulate Belgium through the Ideal PR actions/buildings of theirs. I bought a champagne size bottle of Stella Artois today. Viva, Belgium!

  • I’m still going to throw it out there:

    Can someone please tell Homeland Security to contact me? I’d like to find out what they need to keep the investigation going…

    • mattekudasai

      What about contacting them. Just imagine the 1000’s of tales from defectors that could be culled into “Binders” full of dossiers on what really goes on behind the gates of Scientology. If many of the escapees, NDA signers (by coercion/force), paying a “freeloader’s debt” to get out of the sea org and remain in good standing, withholding passports and documents, misrepresentation at Narconon facilities, psychotic breaks,children and teens indentured to the sea org with lies of being able to have regular contact with family, married sea org members pressed into having abortions and rarely having time with their 2D, disconnection, suicides, deaths and members abandoned when ill,old or broke and no longer of any use to this vile organization. A compilation such stated would be HUGE. I can see vehicles loaded with document boxes lined up in front of ___________ building (I wouldn’t have a clue even here in Canada which government bureaucracy would be the best place for this action) with media reporting on site along with as many “bodies and souls” that we could assemble together for a huge demonstration with protest signs held aloft demanding investigation into the practices (not the beliefs) of the Co$. Since I am so new to any kind of activism and unsophisticated in legal matters, I’m sure I’ll be told this is just a “pipe dream” or too enormous an undertaking so please allow me this early morning indulgence Derek and bloggers. By the way Derek we finally got some snow here so I’ll post a pic of my backyard to you soon. πŸ™‚

    • sugarplumfairy

      And don’t advertise online what you’re doing, my friend..I’m sure Co$ keeps track of this blog.. And they’ve retaliated for less than threatening to talk to authorities.. Hope your holiday was nice..

  • Asamatteroffact

    Tony, Don’t be hard on yourself for going hiking and being out of contact for twelve hours.. it is but a flash in the billion year war for domination of planet earth. Seriously though you keep up an amazing stream of scientology news, and deserve the odd break πŸ™‚
    Of all places, Belgium with its particular legal system and style is probably the best equipped to give Scientology a long, hard battle.. Nice!

  • Deckard_Cain

    I would hope that Marc Headley makes good on his promise to reveal the details behind Connor Cruise’s “adoption” although many of us can guess that it involves baby buying, at the very least. He sure has OSA’s panties in a wad about his promised revelations, that’s for sure. The recent Tom Cruise leak fishing expedition over at ESMB shows a level of fear about it, that’s for sure.