SUPPORT THE UNDERGROUND BUNKER
You can either make a one-time donation to the site via Paypal...

...or you can subscribe and get billed monthly:

FOLLOW ME ON
SUBSCRIBE TO OUR
E-MAIL LIST
To join our e-mail list & get daily updates on new stories, e-mail us at newstory@tonyortega.org.
RSS Feed
Click here to add The Underground Bunker to your RSS Reader

Trouble for Scientology in 1966: When the Daily Mail called L. Ron Hubbard’s degrees ‘bogus’

dailymail66a

 
Our helper is back who dives through obscure newspaper archives in search of forgotten Scientology history. Last time, he found for us a really remarkable 1968 interview of L. Ron Hubbard when a Daily Mail reporter, Peter Smith, tracked him down on his ship in Bizerte, Tunisia.

Our tipster kept digging, and found that the Daily Mail was also hot on the trail of Hubbard and Scientology two years earlier, and produced three substantial pieces that year about the movement as it existed then. At the time, there was growing pressure in the UK about doing something about the stream of young people who were coming to East Grinstead from various parts of the world to do something weird they called Scientology.

Today we have the first of those three pieces, published on February 14, 1966 as a Daily Mail “Newsight” investigation into Hubbard’s academic claims. We’ve done our best to preserve the original text as closely as we could. We found it a pretty good general description of Scientology and debunking of Hubbard some 20 years before writers like Russell Miller and Jon Atack and Bent Corydon were able to dive into matters in much greater length with their books after Hubbard’s 1986 death.

Dig in, and let us know what struck you about this drubbing of Hubbard at the hands of this crusading newspaper…

 

The pseudo-psychological cult of Scientology is based on the teachings of an American ex-science fiction writer whose claims to academic degrees are bogus. To outsiders the most astonishing fact about it is the way it has spread around the world. It has many thousands of devoted adherents.

Scientology was founded by Nebraska-born Lafayette Ron Hubbard in America in 1950.

It was based on a book he had written two years earlier called Dianetics, a science by which he claimed the human mind could be processed back to previous lives. [Underground Bunker note: Dianetics actually came out in 1950 not 1948, and Hubbard came up with ‘Scientology’ two years later in 1952 when he was regrouping in Phoenix after Dianetics had a disastrous 1951.]

 
Scientology branches, known there as Founding Churches, were opened across the U.S., then Hubbard moved to Britain.

In 1959 he bought Saint Hill Manor, near East Grinstead, Sussex, with its 30 acres of garden and park, swimming pool and lake, and made it his international headquarters. The house previously belonged to the Maharajah of Jaipur.

It is equipped as a large-scale enterprise with photographic equipment, tape recorders and a telex machine to communicate regularly with 16 main branches throughout the world. There is a headquarters staff of 200.

Today there are Scientology groups not only in Britain and the U.S., but in Europe, Canada, Australia, New Zealand, South Africa, Hawaii. Scientology claims to have “millions” of followers in the world with between 5,000 and 10,000 (“possibly many more”) in Britain.

 
IN DECEMBER the State of Victoria, Australia, outlawed Scientology after an official inquiry branded its methods there as “evil.”

The inquiry revealed there were 4,000 personal files on followers in Melbourne alone. It also showed that 10 percent of the money they paid was remitted to Saint Hill Manor, a total of £26,166 from July 1958-June 1963.

In Britain, fees for study and “processing” courses range from £2 to £360. The London branch office in Fitzroy Street, Bloomsbury, is well attended and free introductory lectures are given five nights a week.

Hubbard, 54, describes himself as a writer, student, explorer, pioneer in horticulture and many other fields, nuclear physicist, civil engineer, glider pilot, master boatsman, philosopher, and “one of the prime movers in the U.S. effort of getting man out into space.”

He claims to have “many degrees and is very skilled by reason of study.” He commonly uses the title “doctor.”

 
A SEARCHING inquiry by Newsight found his only doctorate to be a self-invented, self-bestowed D.Scn. — a Doctor of Scientology.

Hubbard’s claims are sprinkled throughout his writings. (He is said in one of his books to have written 15 million words.)

They are listed in his biographical entry in the American publication, Who’s Who in the South and South West, 1965-66 edition.

The publishers say these details were supplied and verified by him. They were also checked by Newsight. These are the findings:

B.S. in Civil Engineering, George Washington University, 1934, where Hubbard says he was in the first nuclear physics class. The university says he was there from autumn 1930 to spring 1932, and has never received any degree whatsoever in civil engineering, nuclear physics or any other subject.

Ph.D. Sequoia U., 1950: No Sequoia University is listed in the U.S. There is a College of the Sequoias in California, but it is a junior college which confers no degree above Associate in Arts. There is no record that Hubbard ever attended it.

A private institution, housed in a Los Angeles residence, used to call itself Sequoia University. It was unaccredited, its degrees unrecognised.

Student, Princeton School of Government, 1945: Hubbard has never been enrolled as a student at Princeton University either as graduate or undergraduate. An undated entry in the Registrar’s Office says: “L. R. Hubbard Military Government,” suggesting a war service study course.

Master of motor vessels, master of sailing vessels (all oceans), radio operator: Hubbard’s last license (No. 12523) for uninspected sail vessels, under 700 tons gross, issued on April 4, 1946, is no longer valid. There is no record of any radio officer license.

Commander of the Caribbean Motion Picture Exhibition and W.I. Minerals Expedition, 1935: The Motion Picture Association Inc. can trace no reference to this expedition.

Alaskan Radio Experimental Expedition, 1940: The State of Alaska’s Department of Public Works, the Federal Communications Commission and the University of Alaska can find no trace of this expedition.

Mem. 163d. Inf. Mont. N.G. 1927-28: “Ronald Hubbard” enlisted in the Montana National Guard on October 19, 1927. At his discharge on October 29, 1928, he was a private.

Lt. U.S.N.R. 1941-46, commanding escort vessels and navigating in all theatres: Hubbard did serve as a lieutenant in U.S. Naval Reserve.

Fellow, Oceanographic Foundation: The Oceanographic Society Inc. of New York knows of no such Foundation, but does not dispute that it may exist.

Hubbard is a member, in good standing, of The Explorers Club, New York, and the Capital Yacht Club, Washington.

His claim to be one of the prime movers in getting man into space was put to the National Aeronautics and Space Administration, Washington. They state he is not connected with NASA “in any capacity.”

Scientologists stress their “philosophy” cannot be effectively explained to outsiders. The non-scientologist is baffled by Hubbard’s prolific invention of words (engram, anaten, thetan).

Its purpose is succinctly laid down in his publication: Scientology: the Fundamentals of Thought (5s.). Chapter 10, two sentences long, is headed “The Goals of Scientology” and states:

“The end object of Scientology is not the making into nothing of all existence or the freeing of the individual of any and all traps everywhere. The goal of scientology is the making of the individual capable of living a better life in his own estimation and with his fellows and the playing of a better game.”

 
NOT the most modest of Hubbard’s claims for Scientology is his statement (Chapter 7, Fundamentals of Thought):

“Probably the greatest discovery of Scientology and its most forceful contribution to the knowledge of mankind has been the isolation, description and handling of the human spirit. Accomplished in July 1951 in Phoenix, Arizona, I established along scientific rather than religious or humanitarian lines that the thing which is the person, the personality, is separable from the body and the mind at will and without causing bodily death or mental derangement.”

Hubbard’s name for the spirit is the thetan. His discoveries about the thetan are remarkable: it appears to be from “a quarter of an inch to two inches in diameter,” normally inhabits the skull of the MEST body (MEST: Matter, Energy, Space, Time). It is subject to deterioration, is usually either blind or dim-sighted at first.

By Scientology processes the thetan can be separated at will from the MEST body. It is then capable of extraordinary achievements.

In his book, Scientology: A History of Man (15s.), Hubbard makes a solemn appeal to “cleared thetans”:

“Let’s not go upsetting governments and putting on a show to prove anything to homo sapiens for a while: it’s a horrible temptation to knock off hats at 50 yards and read books a couple of countries away and get into the rotogravure section and the Hearst Weeklies — but you’ll just make it tough on somebody else who is trying to get across the bridge.”

A History of Man, first published in 1952, begins with the statement:

“This is a cold-blooded and factual account of your last 60 trillion years.” The knowledge it contains will make “the blind see again, the lame walk, the ill recover, the insane become sane and the sane become saner.”

 
DELVING back into pre-history, Hubbard discovered a “clam-like animal that may be the missing link in the evolutionary chain.” This he names the “Weeper” or the “Boo-Hoo,” so-called because it had to pump salt water to obtain food. The pumping tubes were later to become the eyes in the human being.

The Boo-Hoo marked the transition from life in the water to life on land. Its plights were “many and pathetic.”

On reaching the beach the Boo-Hoo was menaced by “too much salt water, the boiling hot sun, volcanic eruptions and even preying birds.”

(Since the Boo-Hoo was the first life to emerge from the sea, the presence of preying birds remains unexplained.)

The Piltdown Man is also discussed:

“The PILTDOWN contains freakish acts of strange ‘logic’ of demonstrating dangerous [sic] on one’s fellows, of eating one’s wife and other somewhat illogical activities. The PILTDOWN teeth were ENORMOUS and he was quite careless as to whom and what he bit and often very much surprised at the resulting damage.”

(The Piltdown Man, found in Sussex between 1911-1913 and thought to be 600,000 years old, was exposed in 1953 as a scientific hoax. The Piltdown reference is still contained in the Fifth Edition, 1965, of Hubbard’s book.)

 
HUBBARD believes that people are affected, mentally and physically, by memories of being eaten by animals in previous lives. He states: “Psoriasis (a skin disease) may be caused by the action of digestive fluid in some incident where the preclear was being eaten. Subject to test.”

These discoveries were apparently made by searching back through previous lives. Using this technique Hubbard has twice visited Heaven, the first occasion was “43,891,832,611,177 years, 344 days, 10 hours, 20 minutes and 40 seconds from 10:02 1/2 p.m. Daylight Greenwich Time, May 9, 1963.” The second was some years later.

Heaven was described by Hubbard in his bulletin of May 11, 1963:

“The gates of the first series are well done, well built. An avenue of statues of saints leads up to them. The gate pillars are surmounted by marble angels. The entering grounds are very well kept, laid out like Bush Gardens in Pasadena, so often seen in the movies.

“The second series, probably in the same place, shows what a trillion years of overt acts does (or is an additional trickery to collapse one’s time). The place is shabby. The vegetation is gone. The pillars are scruffy. The saints have vanished. So have the angels. A sign on one (the left as you enter) says: ‘This is Heaven.’ The right has the sign ‘Hell.’…”

(At Saint Hill, Hubbard’s personal spokesman explained that the technique involved in this process could not be explained to the layman: “You are going up into the higher realms.”)

 
SCIENTOLOGY, which was “born in the same crucible as the atomic bomb,” is claimed to be “the principle [sic] agency that is preventing and treating people for radiation at this time.” This statement is made in a book published in 1957, called All About Radiation (15s.), which is on sale at Scientology branches.

In this, Hubbard discloses the formula of a substance he calls Dianazene which he says proofs people against radiation and cancer.

The formula is given as: Nictonic [sic] acid 200 mg.; Iron ferrous gluconate 10 grains; Vitamin B1 25 mg.; Vitamin B2 — Riboflavin 50 mg.; Vitamin C — Ascorbic acid 200 to 500 mg.; Dicalcium phosphate 25 to 35 grains.

A leading medical authority commented: “The proportion of iron is high and might give some people indigestion. The inclusion of nicotonic acid is surprising and its only known therapeutic value, and this is doubtful, is for chilblains.”

At Saint Hill Manor, Hubbard lives with his wife, Mary Sue, and four of their six children, looked after by a cook, Brown the butler, and a small personal staff. Hubbard was “not available” to Newsight.

At any time, about 120 students are undergoing processing at Saint Hill, the international Mecca of Scientology. This involves the “preclears” (patients) being “audited.”

The auditor is “one who listens, computes, and guides another with the intention of helping the preclear resolve the problems of his life.”

Frequently an electrical instrument called a Hubbard E Meter, which measures changes in the resistance of the human body, is used. Hubbard buys the meters for £17 each, and offers them for sale at £50 each (£40 to international members).

 
HUBBARD’S personal assistant and spokesman, Mr. Reg Sharpe, wearing the gilt and blue badge of a clear (a person released from all mental aberrations), said that unless preclears were audited by students (when it was free) the standard charge was £28 for a course of 160 hours.

Newsight has details of far more expensive courses. For example: Power processing; To Grade 5 release (second stage)(no rebates) £360 minimum or 1,000 dollars: Special briefing course £275, 775 dollars, Class VII interne course (staff members only) £275, 775 dollars.

Mr. Sharpe said the Australian report was “scurrilous and biased,” that in every case where Scientology is alleged to have harmed someone the true cause has been shown to be something else: “Produce them. Produce the people who have been harmed.”

He was confident that Scientology would go on from strength to strength and would not be outlawed.

He said: “We are just a bunch of guys who are trying to do some good on this planet. You won’t stop us. You can’t stop two people talking — and that’s all we do.”

 
——————–

3D-UnbreakablePosted by Tony Ortega on November 4, 2016 at 07:00

E-mail tips and story ideas to tonyo94 AT gmail DOT com or follow us on Twitter. We post behind-the-scenes updates at our Facebook author page. After every new story we send out an alert to our e-mail list and our FB page.

Our book, The Unbreakable Miss Lovely: How the Church of Scientology tried to destroy Paulette Cooper, is on sale at Amazon in paperback, Kindle, and audiobook versions. We’ve posted photographs of Paulette and scenes from her life at a separate location. Reader Sookie put together a complete index. More information about the book, and our 2015 book tour, can also be found at the book’s dedicated page.

Learn about Scientology with our numerous series with experts…

BLOGGING DIANETICS: We read Scientology’s founding text cover to cover with the help of L.A. attorney and former church member Vance Woodward
UP THE BRIDGE: Claire Headley and Bruce Hines train us as Scientologists
GETTING OUR ETHICS IN: Jefferson Hawkins explains Scientology’s system of justice
SCIENTOLOGY MYTHBUSTING: Historian Jon Atack discusses key Scientology concepts

Other links: Shelly Miscavige, ten years gone | The Lisa McPherson story told in real time | The Cathriona White stories | The Leah Remini ‘Knowledge Reports’ | Hear audio of a Scientology excommunication | Scientology’s little day care of horrors | Whatever happened to Steve Fishman? | Felony charges for Scientology’s drug rehab scam | Why Scientology digs bomb-proof vaults in the desert | PZ Myers reads L. Ron Hubbard’s “A History of Man” | Scientology’s Master Spies | Scientology’s Private Dancer | The mystery of the richest Scientologist and his wayward sons | Scientology’s shocking mistreatment of the mentally ill | Scientology boasts about assistance from Google | The Underground Bunker’s Official Theme Song | The Underground Bunker FAQ

Our Guide to Alex Gibney’s film ‘Going Clear,’ and our pages about its principal figures…
Jason Beghe | Tom DeVocht | Sara Goldberg | Paul Haggis | Mark “Marty” Rathbun | Mike Rinder | Spanky Taylor | Hana Whitfield

 

Share Button
  • EnthralledObserver

    Hubbard bogus… yeah… to say the least!

  • PickAnotherID

    Good on the Daily Mail!

    As for anything $cientology and the $cientologists said: (f5)
    http://www.lowbird.com/data/images/2011/07/128768688176790721.jpg

  • EnthralledObserver

    Say… do you think “Spirit Cooking” might have any relation to what Hubbard got up to with Jack Parsons?

  • Missionary Kid

    “We are just a bunch of guys who are trying to do some good on this planet. You won’t stop us. You can’t stop two people talking — and that’s all we do.”

    Bullshit. If that were true, we wouldn’t be here.

    I believe that at the time of the article, the British pound was worth bout $2.70. How prices have changed.

  • Susan black

    el Ron was a “pioneer in horticulture.” Yeah, right. He just liked to play with his tomatoes before he ate them.

  • Panopea Abrupta
    • Mockingbird

      Awesome.

    • daisy

      excellent shoop

    • Noesis

      “The university says [Hubbard] was there from autumn 1930 to spring 1932, and has never received any degree whatsoever in civil engineering, nuclear physics or any other subject.

      No Sequoia University is listed in the U.S

      Hubbard has never been enrolled as a student at Princeton University

      Hubbard’s last license (No. 12523) for uninspected sail vessels, under 700 tons gross, issued on April 4, 1946, is no longer valid

      The Motion Picture Association Inc. can trace no reference to [the Caribbean Motion Picture Exhibition]

      Federal Communications Commission and the University of Alaska can find no trace of an [Alaskan Radio Experimental Expedition]

      They state [Hubbard] is not connected with NASA “in any capacity.” ”

      Yeah…well…the above is just being picky, picky picky.

      Hubbard WAS served coke and lime in a glass from a silver tray by an asshat looking guy wearing a servant’s jacket and white gloves.

      What more solemn proof does one need that “Scientology works?”

      • Sitkajo

        I laughed out loud when I read that passage in https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Bare-faced_Messiah about when Lt Hubbard accidentally shelled an island offshore Mexico during WWII, believing that he was in a fight to the death with any enemy warship. The lights were from the few small houses on the island. Its also described here:
        https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Military_career_of_L._Ron_Hubbard

        • Noesis

          Yes – it would appear that Ron’s difficulties with imaginary “enemies” pre-dated his more advanced paranoia which became so obvious while he was running Scientology.

    • joan nieman

      Excellent find and such damning truth. I hope this reaches at least a few people who may be teetering on the fence. The proof of Hubbard’s deceit is clear and factual. Take off the blindfolds and have a gander.

  • PickAnotherID

    In this, Hubbard discloses the formula of a substance he calls Dianazene which he says proofs people against radiation and cancer. The formula is given as: Nictonic [sic] acid 200 mg.; Iron ferrous gluconate 10 grains; Vitamin B1 25 mg.; Vitamin B2 — Riboflavin 50 mg.; Vitamin C — Ascorbic acid 200 to 500 mg.; Dicalcium phosphate 25 to 35 grains.

    http://i.imgur.com/bTt2Cs8.jpg

    Yeah. Right.

  • Peter

    I’ve always wondered where he got the money to buy St. Hill? (Is there any paperwork on the purchase, Tony? His life just prior to that seems filled with a lot of negativity, not the least of which might have been financial.

  • PickAnotherID

    This is a fitting story for ‘National Skeptics Day’, as opposed to ‘International Skeptics Day’ that’s in October.

    http://3.bp.blogspot.com/-LKpMMdKca4s/TeWIGZ4RCbI/AAAAAAAAC1M/PfJqUHlT6Os/s1600/skeptic_cat_4.jpg

  • Observer

    (Since the Boo-Hoo was the first life to emerge from the sea, the presence of preying birds remains unexplained.)

    How the Daily Mail has fallen!

    • kemist

      I sniggered at that.

      This kind of wit is so rare in mainstream media these days.

      • BosonStark

        Now they have to respect it, because it’s a religion and Tom Cruise believes this load of crap. Although the times they are a changin’.

        I think the preying birds may have been a flourish Dr. Hubtard added on the spur of the moment. It’s not in his earlier, A HISTORY OF MAN.

        He may have been inspired by Williams’ SUDDENLY, LAST SUMMER (1958) where there’s talk of predatory birds swooping down on baby sea turtles as they try to reach the sea after being hatched in the Galapagos. In the movie version (1959), Katharine Hepburn wants Elizabeth Taylor lobotomized for being tormented by her son’s death. (He is cannibalized by street urchins, from whom he sought sexual favors.) At least Tennessee Williams kept it in literature, and didn’t try to make a religion out of it, but he was a much better writer than Hubbard.

    • 9001

      It’s gone downhill since Paul Dacre took over in the 90’s.

    • PJK

      Well, they use the same argument that I use when discussing the book of Genesis: After Cain murders Abel and gets sent away by God he goes to the land on Nod and then marries his wife, who gives a son named Enoch. Where the heck did his wife come from? Adam and Eve were the only humans before they had Cain and Abel and with Abel dead there are only three humans still around: Adam, Eve and Cain!

      This should be enough to stop a Bible literalist in his/her tracks, but they always seem to come up with some excuse why this all makes sense.

      • Robert Eckert

        Cain’s wife was the daughter of Steve and Lilith

        • Noesis

          OY.

      • Adam and Eve provided insufficient genetic diversity for their offspring to survive for long… but I suppose if you deny evolution, denying genetics is easy – and you can always appeal to miraculous, divine intervention.

        When that kind of attitude is firmly established, there’s hardly any point in arguing with people.

      • Peter Matt

        Must we assume that Cain’s new wife was human?

      • PickAnotherID

        Simple, “…he goes to the land of Nod…”, he fell asleep and found her in his dreams. Makes as much sense as anything else.

      • OTVIIIisGrrr8!

        Cain’s wife was a mail order bride from Venus.

      • aegerprimo

        Reminds me of this…

        https://youtu.be/xVHWq0ZGE_Y

    • OTVIIIisGrrr8!

      The birds were mechanical birds.

    • Still_On_Your_Side

      I know, the TMZ-wanna-be of today is certainly not the Daily Mail that covered Hubbard in the 60s or the one that covered two world wars.

  • Chee Chalker

    I was able to get LASIK surgery for my thetans. So we’re all good

    • ze moo

      Glasses work fine too. My only problem was I was reading the eye chart in the next room.

  • Mockingbird

    Good morning beautiful Bunkeroos.

    This story is simply dazzling. It’s got information many Scientologists don’t get to until years outside of the cult have passed. It’s stunning how accurate many of the details are and how well researched it is. Modern press could take a page from these reporters.

    It has really good references to expose some odd aspects of Scientology and important facts about the cult – which it calls a cult outright – and facts that clearly show Ron Hubbard is an unrepentant liar. He lies casually and comfortably and continuously. A person that does that is a pathological liar.

    It exposes Scientology as full of absurdity and contradictions.

    “The pseudo-psychological cult of Scientology is based on the teachings of an American ex-science fiction writer whose claims to academic degrees are bogus. To outsiders the most astonishing fact about it is the way it has spread around the world. It has many thousands of devoted adherents.

    Scientology was founded by Nebraska-born Lafayette Ron Hubbard in America in 1950.”

    Just understanding it is a pseudo-psychological cult is a profound achievement. It took me over twenty five years to reach that conclusion. It uses the psychology Hubbard sought to master and covertly use which he described in his affirmations.

    • PickAnotherID
      • Mockingbird

        Great meme and supported by a lot of research on psychology.

      • Mockingbird

        It has many parallels. Leon Festinger described it in A Theory Of Cognitive Dissonance.

        John Stuart Mill did as well.

        “So long as an opinion is strongly rooted in the feelings, it gains rather than loses in stability by having a preponderating weight of argument against it.”
        ― John Stuart Mill, The Subjection of Women

      • Anony-Lurker

        That’s such a great quote, and is pretty relevant all around us at the moment.

        Hubbard and Scientologists, Trump and his supporters…and that is very scary!

    • ithilien

      Just blows my mind anyone could invest that amount of time into this ridiculousness. Understanding it is a cult is not a profound achievement. Its obvious. Apparent. Im so glad you have your life back

      • Mockingbird

        The information easily available now online wasn’t always here. Back in the day it would take a lot of work to learn about Scientology.

        And Scientology is often presented through a route or front group so it seems like it is something completely different from what it actually is.

        Many people wanting to get off drugs or get healthy or to manage a business or be a little more confident may see Scientology or a front group as something normal and socially acceptable.

  • Jack99

    “Hubbard’s name for the spirit is the thetan. His discoveries about the thetan are remarkable: it appears to be from “a quarter of an inch to two inches in diameter,” normally inhabits the skull of the MEST body (MEST: Matter, Energy, Space, Time). It is subject to deterioration, is usually either blind or dim-sighted at first.”

    Well, that’s good to know.

  • villagedianne

    “He said: “We are just a bunch of guys who are trying to do some good on this planet. You won’t stop us. You can’t stop two people talking — and that’s all we do.”

    If only it was just two people talking. Then there would be no fair game or disconnection.

    • Missionary Kid

      All I said about the same sentence earlier was “Bullshit”. You put it much better than I.

      • villagedianne

        Great minds think alike.

  • Mockingbird

    To show how spot on the article is in calling Scientology a pseudo-psychological cult I will present the argument from Hubbard himself.

    Your psychology is advanced and true and wonderful. It hypnotizes people. It predicts their emotions, for you are their ruler

    The desires of other people have no hypnotic effect upon you.

    Your psychology is good. You worked to darken your own children. This failure, with them, was only apparent. The evident lack of effectiveness was “ordered.” The same psychology works perfectly on everyone else. You use it with great confidence.

    By eliminating certain fears by hypnosis, curing my rheumatism and laying off hormones, I hope to restore my former libido. I must! By hypnosis I must be convinced as follows:

    That I am not credulous or absorbent of other people’s opinions.

    That this hypnosis will not fade, but will increase in power as time advances.

    Material things are yours for the asking. Men are your slaves. Elemental spirits are your slaves. You are power among powers, light in the darkness, beauty in all.

    You use the minds of men. They do not use your mind or affect it in any way. You have a sacred spiritual mind, too strong, too high to be touched. Your league with Higher Beings, your mighty Guardian and the All Powerful, renders you beyond all human criticism.

    All quotes from Ron Hubbard on Psychology

    (Excerpts from the affirmations)

    http://mbnest.blogspot.com/2016/02/ron-hubbard-on-psychology.html

  • Mighty Korgo of Teegeeack

    It made me sick to read that. A Scientologist would say it was restimulation but it is not. It is that so many decent people can skip over information like that, blaming it on suppressives or hoping that it would all work itself out later on.

  • FredEX2

    “IN DECEMBER the State of Victoria, Australia, outlawed Scientology after an official inquiry branded its methods there as “evil.”

    This stood out to me…that the budding cult of Scientology was recognized as ‘evil’ and outlawed in Australia very early on when Hubbard and the whole organization was just getting started. ( even before they became known for ‘Snow White’ or the truth of the OT levels, or Disconnection and Fair Game tactics )

    I doubt they ever had ‘millions of members’…EVER. And just like Hubbard’s numerous claims to all these ‘degrees’ conferred upon him proved to be a complete sham…so is Miscavige’s current claim that Scientology is ‘expanding exponentially’. Saint Hill…and all their other Idle Orgs are going downhill as they sit mostly empty.

    The only thing expanding in CoS’s world is a balloon filled with hot air…one https://uploads.disquscdn.com/images/55823ec3f67d233908a842be71faf4da7dcc9ed89655713574be213697cab16f.jpg that Leah’s next series of interviews…and other people’s devastating stories…are about to burst wide open.

    • PickAnotherID

      Can’t wait, can’t wait, come on A&E, can’t wait.

    • LongtimeLurker

      We know “deadly” when we see it.

      • LongtimeLurker

        TEST

  • Oh, goody! I just love these historical look-backs at the early days of Scientology. For me, they are kinda bitter-sweet. Sweet, because they are interesting and thoroughly expose Scientology for the fraud that it is and L Ron Hubbard for the conman that he was; and bitter, because its like no one ever learned a thing and Scientology just went on and on. Bit like cockroaches, really.

    I knew the Daily Mail had done a report on Scientology but not that it was in three parts and went into such detail. How delicious. A lot of the ground work, I suspect, was provided two years earlier with the remarkable and delightful feature written by James Phelan of the UK’s Saturday Evening Post. Entitled “Have You Ever Been A Boo Hoo”, it is as meticulous a fisking of Scientology as any. It too addresses more than a few of L Ron Hubbard’s outrageous lies concerning his biography and qualifications. Very shortly after James Phelan’s article appeared, L Ron Hubbard realised the gig was up and it was time to head for international waters. Interestingly, James Phelan’s article also mentions one . . .

    HUBBARD’S personal assistant and spokesman, Mr. Reg Sharpe, wearing the gilt and blue badge of a clear (a person released from all mental aberrations) . . .

    . . . well, this is the unfortunate Reg Sharpe. The pic is a screen cap from the 1967 documentary “Faith For Sale”, in which he certainly appears free of all mental aberrations, wouldn’t you say? Poor chap.

    https://uploads.disquscdn.com/images/170b576592736029e9cb26eb5115ee6dd510f6e6cd15db258bcfac6be0de3112.jpg

    • He could have got a good job with Hammer Films.

      • NOLAGirl (Stephanie)

        “The Lady Vanishes”

        Hmmm, sounds familiar.

        • A prequel to “The Kim and I”?

          • NOLAGirl (Stephanie)

            I’d rename it “The Shelly and I” 😀

      • KingofSweden

        Didn’t Peter Cushing like, kill this guy? Repeatedly?

    • I’ve been looking for a picture of Sharpe for this post https://scicrit.wordpress.com/2016/07/23/this-is-life-an-introduction-to-scientology-by-reg-sharpe-the-church-of-scientology-bans-its-own-books-pt3/ for ages. With your indulgence, I will copy this image and use it.

      • sizzle8
        • Thank you – I have placed a number of copies of “The Auditor” online – the problem is finding the appropriate pages in 30 years of publications. https://scicrit.wordpress.com/2014/06/11/the-auditor-30-years-of-broken-promises-from-l-ron-hubbard/

          I’m also wondering why some sources say that Reg was clear number 7 when this article boasts of 21… was this a period when new clears were being claimed at such a high rate and there had been another 14 ‘made’ after Reg and before this article was published?

          • sizzle8

            Finding stuff is a challenge! I wish there was a way to add key words to a file so the search would be easier. I found this one just by opening each Auditor of the time period and scanning for his name.
            If you look at the whole issue more clears are listed in the following pages. I believe he was clear #7 and at that point there were a total of 21. McMaster was the first.

            • I’m betting that once Hubbard realised that new ‘clears’ were not questioning their lack of the powers they had been promised, he started making clears on an industrial scale.

              Sharpe was No7 and 14 more were made before the article about the best-known (Sharpe) was published.

            • sizzle8

              BTW, is there a way to send private messages through Disqus? I’d send you my email but not on a comment board. I have fairly extensive archives in case you’re looking for something.

            • Not through Disqus, as far as I know, but you can email me through my blog at https://scicrit.wordpress.com/contact-us/ (as can anybody so inclined)

              I would appreciate access to that kind of material – and am open to publishing just abut anything relevant, so that it can more widely circulated.

            • sizzle8

              I’ll send you my email a bit later. Got to do some actual work now.

            • sizzle8
            • Thanks again. I will try to work this in later. It’s odd that he is still being celebrated in the magazine after he left in ’66, but publishing took some time, in those days, and if he went quietly…

              PS: Sad camera geek that I am,the first thing I saw was a Nikon F C/W photomic head – an interchangeable viewfinder with a pioneeringCds coupled metering system. http://www.mir.com.my/rb/photography/hardwares/manuals/nikonf/FTn.pdf

            • sizzle8

              Wow! That looks pretty obscure – I know a little about digital cameras but zilch about film, specially old school.

            • I lusted after one of those, back in the day.

          • sizzle8

            Did you see his declare posted above?

            • Yes – and thank you. I’ve already added a photograph and a an extract from “The Auditor” that people have kindly published here to the post, and I’ve just saved the declare. It will appear soon, too.

  • OOkpik

    Hubbard describes the thetan as being “a quarter of an inch to two inches in diameter,”… Yet he also describes it as”… having no mass, no wave-length, no energy, no measurable qualities
    and no time or location in space except by consideration or postulate.” Cognitive dissonance, anybody?

    Hubbard’s description of heaven is, not surprisingly, unimaginative and – MESTy. Interesting place to visit…twice?

    Did LRH himself ever evolve beyond the Boo-Hoo stage? I have my suspicions.

    • ithilien

      He hated the earth, and he hated heaven…shabby, worn down, not living up to its potential. Heaven was able to be critiqued by lron. What was target two like?

  • BosonStark

    All of Hubbard’s degrees, expeditions, accomplishments and positions (including marriages) were secret and highly classified. His studies, and later his work and research in nuclear physics was so advanced and important, it all had to be sheep dipped for obvious reasons. You see, there was a war on.

  • Xenu’s son.

    When we joined not even 1% of this info was available.What is amazing is not that L Con Fraudert made a con.L Con was a conman and that is what con men do.
    What is amazing is that there are still some selfrighteous marks left in this imploded cult.
    Dapper geezers who keep exorcising them space cooties fighting Xenu, bankrupty and senility.

  • Kestrel

    Converting the 1966 dollars to 2016 dollars estimate:

    Cheapest course £2: $40
    Course of 160 hours £28: $560
    E Meter £50: $1,000
    Class VII interne course (staff members only) £275, 775 dollars:: $5,775
    To Grade 5 release (second stage) £360 minimum or 1,000 dollars: $7,450

    • OOkpik

      And far too expensive at any price!

    • Missionary Kid

      The pound, at that time was worth about $2.70, so, with inflation you’re probably right. I’m too lazy to look up the amount of inflation.

  • FredEX2

    LRH said “He was confident that Scientology would go on from strength to strength and would not be outlawed.

    He said: “We are just a bunch of guys who are trying to do some good on this planet. You won’t stop us. You can’t stop two people talking — and that’s all we do.”

    Well CoS and COB…look who’s talking now…

    http://youtu.be/wubOY-5pDKg

    http://youtu.be/w0Kq7lR_ibc

    http://youtu.be/qFjwfVCiefM

    http://youtu.be/asr15FAF0X4

    …and that’s not all…there are millions talking about Scientology now…

  • Mockingbird

    Several really great points in Scientology history and superb quotes are used. History of Man is important for several reasons. It by every bit of information I saw was ALWAYS a flop. It sold terribly, it wasn’t beloved by Scientologists EVER and over time it became a book that was sort of pushed way back in indoctrination.

    A new Scientologist doesn’t have a route into the cult via that book. It’s too outlandish.

    We have heard Hubbard created it by having Nibs take drugs and then write his ramblings. Is it true ? I honestly don’t know quite how Hubbard came up with History of Man. It’s filled with absurdities no matter how Hubbard created it.

    In his book, Scientology: A History of Man (15s.), Hubbard makes a solemn appeal to “cleared thetans”:

    “Let’s not go upsetting governments and putting on a show to prove anything to homo sapiens for a while: it’s a horrible temptation to knock off hats at 50 yards and read books a couple of countries away and get into the rotogravure section and the Hearst Weeklies — but you’ll just make it tough on somebody else who is trying to get across the bridge.”

    A History of Man, first published in 1952, begins with the statement:

    “This is a cold-blooded and factual account of your last 60 trillion years.” The knowledge it contains will make “the blind see again, the lame walk, the ill recover, the insane become sane and the sane become saner.”

    Obviously the caution against using OT powers has the implication they exist and are restored by Scientology, without stating it.

    Hubbard LOVED a variation on a certain logical fallacy. The complex question fallacy includes a statement in a larger question so the answer is framed (limited in thinking or prejudiced to accept) with unproven claims.

    Hubbard used the variation of the complex statement. It’s more certain than the question as it tells something without asking anything.

    He used it most famously in KSW and in this quote cautions against using OT powers but just acts like their existence is an established reality. You either accept his reality or don’t.

    It’s packed with immodest claims and it either influenced people or they rejected it entirely. Most by a lot always rejected it.

    In my opinion Science Of Survival had the same problem. It was way too packed with hundreds and hundreds of new terms, new outlandish ideas and extraordinary claims piled onto each other like a never ending train. It’s also never sold well and to get people indoctrinated in its content Scientology had to force it on people via the PTS/SP course and several other courses. They still struggle with it.

    Hubbard later in the Art series introduced the idea that a communication that is too original won’t be accepted. I finally realized where he plagiarized that idea from and that it affected his propaganda techniques going forward. He took the idea from John Stuart Mill.

    • MarcabExpat

      MB, do you happen to have a link to a copy or scan of an older, unexpurgated version of History of Man? That’s been something I’ve wanted to track down for a long time. (And if you ever see me run across a complete “What To Audit,” you’ll see me do a little happy dance 🙂 )

      • Mockingbird

        Not yet, I will keep it in mind though.

  • Kim O’Brien

    every time i get all jazzed about someone leaving the cult and speaking out about abuses , I remember that they actually believed ALL of this shit and prolly just left cuz someone was hitting them up for money one to many times .

    No one ever leaves when they are shown stuff like this …they stay . They make themselves crazy because their ego can’t handle being wrong …and it was their ego that got them their in the first place , thinking that they are the ONLY ones that can ” help ” . Then ….voila …you get Tom Cruise laughing like an idiot and telling women that PPD is all in their heads and they just need a sauna .

    If you believe in a Boo-Hoo …..and that : “Psoriasis (a skin disease) may be caused by the action of digestive fluid in some incident where the preclear was being eaten. Subject to test.”…then just fucking stay in the cult . Just stay .

    • flyonthewall

      Gerry Armstrong left when he was shown stuff like this

      • ze moo

        Every step of the Bridge to Nowhere is fraught with prospective clams escaping. Lron didn’t care, as long as someone else was in line and paying the bills. The Lron quote about being ‘capable or dead’ is his real philosophy. ‘Capable’, to Lron meant being in $cientologies complete thrall.

        Xenu dot net has a wonderful gif of Lron and the clam.

        http://www.xenu.net/flash/specious.swf

        • PJK

          I think capable meant that he or she was able to pay. Nothing else mattered to El Ron except maybe being critical of him or his work. Because a charlatan fears nothing as much as exposure.

      • Noesis

        Yep.

        There is frequently a long series of events that trigger departure.

        Often it is personally experiencing some form of abuse that the very same person previously denied ever seeing (until it happened to them.)

        Other times it is the cumulative impact of oddities in ‘the “tech” or other Hubbard materials that just do not add up…or violate one’s sense of right / wrong to such a degree that one cannot remain “certain” in a continuous state of dissonance.

        Some times it’s the relentless money / time demands.

        Often it is all of the above (and more) that create such doubt that one more egregious example, observation or personal experience serves as a tipping point and the person goes looking for outside information.

        Once the person is on the web searching for uncensored material about Scientology, there is rarely (not never) any going back.

    • FredEX2

      Well Kim! Good to see you’re feeling better and getting back to being your ‘straight shootin’ self! 😘

    • flyonthewall

      This is a tempting sentiment but there’s a couple things you have to keep in mind.
      1. You only hear about the people who left and spoke out. Vast majority just leave and never say a peep so you’ll never know what prompted them to leave. It could very well have been for revelations like this. You have to figure there’s a good amount of shame that goes into realizing you’ve being conned so it’s natural that they would just melt away and try to just forget about it.

      2. If you’re already indoctrinated no amount of “proof” in the world is going to convince you it’s a con. The motivation to leave has to come internally not externally.

      • Kim O’Brien

        both very good points ..but you gotta be pretty fucked in the head to EVER believe that

        c “Psoriasis (a skin disease) may be caused by the action of digestive fluid in some incident where the preclear was being eaten. Subject to test.”

        • flyonthewall

          Do you think Boba Fett got psoriasis after being eaten by the sarlacc?

          • Kim O’Brien

            lemme check with the CDC and get back to you ? 🙂

      • Noesis

        “If you’re already indoctrinated no amount of “proof” in the world is going to convince you it’s a (insert adjective here.)

        This phenomenon is deeply embedded into people’s ability to rationalize their decisions…and it plays out in all manner of activities…love, politics, religion, and driving in the fast lane on the freeway while going only 35 mph.

    • BosonStark

      There’s that. But also there is the essence of what is in all religions, which is some wisdom and traditions borrowed from the past, with a lot of goofy crap made to take advantage of people’s fears and desires.

      Most of it was written at a time people had no ability to understand illness, nature, the physical universe or the human body. Frankly, Scientology is a bit late to the party, especially since the Internet crashed it in 1992. For Scientology, worse than the pretense that they are a major religion and ending crime in whole countries by passing out Way to Happiness pamphlets, is that they claim it is science-based.

      • Kim O’Brien

        scientology is not a religion and even in the freaking 50’s they new that psoriasis was not caused by a person being eaten in their past life . Jesus christ

      • Irit8ted

        Show me a SINGLE piece of Hubbard research that can be verified. Just one.
        Doesnt exist. Never did.
        Time to feel superior. And very sad for anyone gulled into Scilontology.

    • Tracy Schmitz

      or that fact that NO ONE WHO EVER GOT IN NEVER KNEW ANY OF THIS STUFF BEFORE THEY GOT IN BECAUSE IT WASN’T AVAILABLE! i’m sorry but i’m tired of hearing this.. there was ALWAYS ALWAYS information ( and yes, before the internet!) about this insidious thing if anyone truly truly wanted to find it! but the downright scary and unbelievable mindblowing thing is nearly everyone not only didn’t look but didn’t WANT to look! how in the world does that work! i mean COME ON!.. everyone looks into where they want to live, what they want to do for work and where to work, heck, what gym you want to join, by looking into it, reading up on it, asking people about it, finding out the good and bad of it and THEN MAKE A INFORMED AND EDUCATION DECISION! and including a religion/church/faith where one presumes you are going to follow and try to live your live by 24/7! BUT not with scientology though?! COME ON!… for those who do “wise up’ i commend them! for those who can admit they “were stupid and gullible and yes, even blame themselves for it?” i commend them as well! i commend all who leave this thing…
      however, it does make one think as you said in your 1st paragraph!

    • ithilien

      ^^^^^^^ what she said
      I was hoping the daily mail would comment on the ‘subject to test’ !! That made me laugh out loud.

  • Observer
  • BosonStark

    Scientology is still the principle [sic & sick] agency for treating pretty much everything that is wrong with everything and everyone. And they still can’t spell, which makes word clearing a difficult task at times, indeed.

  • ze moo

    “Psoriasis (a skin disease) may be caused by the action of digestive
    fluid in some incident where the preclear was being eaten. Subject to
    test.” All that vitamin D I take and sun lamp stuff is useless? All because I was eaten in some earlier life? Did I taste good?

    Wow, the Daily Mail used to be a real go getting, story breaking media outlet. What happened? They only do ‘stories’ on Kardashians and which Victoria’s Secret model is dating which athlete these days. Sad….

  • It’s a curious thought that, back in ’66 the story lasted for a day or so. It wasn’t long before yesterdays news was being used to wrap fish and chips. If you had missed it and wanted to read it again, or reference it, you had to go to a newspaper office and manually find it in their library.

    The reason this story came to the public eye was Hubbard’s outrageous behaviour and the invasion of Scientologists that was beginning to dominate a small community. That invasion, and the transformation of Saint Hill Manor, was so radical that the place still operates today, an effectively closed compound surrounded by surveillance cameras and Sea Org playing at ‘security’.

    It took that kind of behaviour to attract the attention of the press. To the credit of the “Mail” they pretty much got it all right. The man was a charlatan, and they presented well-researched evidence which demonstrated this.

    However, outside of East Grinstead you would not be very likely to have heard about this controversy. If you were approached in the street by someone who apparently knew all about a new science of the mind that could help you, you might take a personality test out of curiosity. You certainly couldn’t look it up on Google.

    The information was out there, but a large segment of the population was totally unaware of it.

    Today, it’s all out there on the Internet, not only easily accessible from your own home but also easy to find, copy and discuss. This is what’s made the difference. When you Google “Scientology” today, you will frequently find more references to critical than official sites.

  • RandomSP

    Tommy Davis out?

    This is a bit OT but I had a very odd experience yesterday…

    I met a fellow in a business setting. Nice guy and we hit it off.We were swapping stories and I mentioned that used to be in a cult. “Which one?” “Scientology.” He became even more animated and said that he knew a guy that used to be very into it but was out also. He said I would know this guy, that he was very high up in the organization. The guy said he used to be the “Number 1 man”. At first he did not want to give me the name. “Well, David Miscavige is the Number 1 man and sure ain’t out.” “No, this guy is in Austin (IIRC), Texas now.” “Tommy Davis?” “Yep, that’s him.”

    He said that Tommy was out of Scientology completely and “he told me that Scientology has a hit out on him.” Davis said that Scientology was trying to make him look bad and doing other typical Scientology crap.

    I don’t really follow Scientology ex-member doings so I did not know what the current skinny was on Davis but I don’t recall it being clear that he was out.

    So there you go, take it or leave it.

    • ze moo

      Tommy Davis may be out, but no one would put a hit out on him. He is not worth ‘hitting’. He hopefully has some evidence stored away for any clam attack. Besides, his mommy and step-daddy would tear Big Blue apart if anything happened. I call bullshite, but what do you expect from Tommy Davis?

      • RandomSP

        I knew the “hit” was bogus but my take is that Davis said it in a joking manner and it was passed on to me in a joking manner. This fellow I was talking to met Davis years ago in a business setting. He (not Davis, I never met Davis) is a very likable guy and my guess is that Davis found him as likable as I did.

    • What’sup

      I could believe Tommy told people he was out when he entered the wog world. He knows all to well how the wog world feels about Scientologists.

    • Tony Ortega

      Tommy hasn’t lived in Austin since 2014. He’s testified under oath that he’s still a member of Scientology, and he talks that way in private conversations, too.

      The fact that this person described him as “number one” should be a clue he doesn’t know what he’s talking about. Here’s the piece we did in August about Tommy.

      http://tonyortega.org/2016/08/15/former-scientology-mouthpiece-tommy-davis-is-settling-into-his-new-role-as-hollywood-exec/

      As for the news this week that Tommy had something to do with the breakup between James Packer and Mariah Carey, we’re still looking into it.

      • Robert Eckert

        It might, however, reflect how Tommy Davis described himself in conversation with this person.

        • Tony Ortega

          Sure, possible. He has been telling people in Hollywood that he’s out of Scientology while he’s introducing them to Michael Doven. So he’s quite capable of lying like a rug.

          • Mockingbird

            Tommy Davis lie ! Next you will tell me water is wet !

        • And its an acceptable truth. He’s “out” of various parts of Scientology.
          He is definitely not “out” of it completely.

      • RandomSP

        Thanks for the info. This guy did not know a lot about Scientology but I am sure that he meant Davis. He met Davis years ago and that is why he says Austin, TX. My feeling is that he reported truthfully what Davis told him. It would not surprise me if Davis fed him a line about being out and it further would not surprise me if Davis represented himself to an unknowledgeable (about Scn) fellow that he wanted to impress as being “the former Number 1 guy.”

        • Chee Chalker

          He could have meant that he was the Number 1 guy in OSA. Which he was technically (when he replaced Mike)

    • grundoon

      Sounds like he forgot the person’s name. Probably not Tommy Davis. Dean Stokes (once Austin’s #1)? Rick Aznaran (onetime high RTC exec)?

  • Racnad

    In the past year, the Bunker posted a video of Dan Sherman speaking in detail about Hubbard’s time in Rhodesia. He read a few newspaper accounts from there referring to him as Dr. Hubbard, which surprised me because they church hasn’t used that honorific since fraud was exposed by the media around the late 1960s. To bad they don’t take questions at those events. I’d love to ask Sherman myself why they stopped calling him “Dr.” (among many other things).

  • Anony-Lurker

    I know a woman who is a pediatrician and has a pretty good practice and a good reputation, she has copies of: “The Way to Happiness” in her office.”

    How does this happen?
    I guess you get them them when they’re vulnerable, work on their mind relentlessly until you can reel them in.

    Very scary!

    • Kim O’Brien

      post the name of the doctor if you are so concerned…otherwise , you are just allowing ignorance to spread in your own community …in a kids doctors office no less

      • Anony-Lurker

        If only it was that easy, but it’s not.

        Unless you have evidence of something harmful going on, you don’t mess with a persons job.

        • Kim O’Brien

          just the kids though right ? Yeah …way to really ” battle the cult ” there Anony . Thanks for the help .

          • Anony-Lurker

            See above.

            Additionally

            I wrote a long involved letter 1 1/2 year ago to the I.R.S., specifically the department that deals with non-profits …501 (c)(3)’s…etc, a year ago. Included were references. I received a response.

            Have you?

            • Kim O’Brien

              wow ..you wrote to the IRS ??? as opposed to say …walking down the street and informing a DOCTOR about scientology in person so you can actually protect children and maybe educate someone face to face ??

              what a risk

            • Anony-Lurker

              Have a lovely day!

            • Kim O’Brien

              coward

            • EnthralledObserver

              Hypocrite.

            • Kim O’Brien

              oh look …a comment by EO i assume .

              hide your clit EO …they are coming for you . You are stuck on a rock in the middle of the ocean and you live super close to a bunch of Muslim’s …and no one from this country is gonna save you …but you will have a friend in Mark Lucian Feigin . You guys can hate tweet together .

            • stillgrace2

              bully

            • Kim O’Brien

              rest assured …if i take my little cousin into the doctors office and see ” way to happiness ” ..i’ll make sure to address it. Right there . Right then . With the doctor . I won’t wait around …come to this blog ..and freaking whine about it .

            • stillgrace2

              I probably would too, gently, and hopefully without the toxic self-righteousness.

            • Kim O’Brien

              well …as long as BOTH of us would do something . Anony is just gonna keep sitting on his ass ….in that toxic, self righteous ,ex scientologist kinda way

            • stillgrace2

              Toxic self-righteousness— I meant you.

    • Observer

      “The Way to Happiness” sounds so innocuous that I bet she looked no further. Maybe send her some links?

      • LongtimeLurker

        “My Struggle” sounds pretty benign too.

        Crap. Godwin’d it.

      • Princess Squishy

        Before this site (I’m a never in) I would have never known that a booklet titled “The Way to Happiness” was anything more than a harmless piece of paper. I wouldn’t have assumed it was useful for anything, but I wouldn’t have assumed harmful either.
        This doctor doesn’t need her reputation ruined but it wouldn’t hurt her to have some gentle education on the matter either.

    • There could be an innocent explanation for this.

    • Chee Chalker

      Do you know her well enough to ask?
      Maybe start with the ‘What’s this TWTH booklet all about?’
      That may be a way for you to gauge her involvement.
      She may have an innocent explanation like ‘one of my clients asked if she could leave these here am I saw no harm in it’
      Then BAM! That’s when you pounce and start spreading the entheta, i.e. educating her …….. ‘did you know this is a front group for a cult?’

      Of course if she is a Scilon, you want to make sure she is not your children’s pediatrician……
      ‘Mmmm, your baby has a fever…..this is caused by gremlins that are two inches in diameter and are nearsighted….here’s some barley water….that should clear things right up!’

    • RandomSP

      How does this happen? People want answers. Science does not have answers, mostly it has questions. Scientology has no questions; only answers, only certainty. Some people need that. Their intelligence, their education,their success have no bearing on that need.

    • Kim O’Brien

      How does this happen?

      ppl like you see it …and do nothing to change it . THAT is how it happens

      • Anony-Lurker

        lol

  • David Arum

    This selection was exceptionally bad.

    • grundoon

      Bad for Hubbard!

      • David Arum

        Yes,even for Hubbard.

      • David Arum

        Yes ,he set what might be a new Hubbard-type low.

  • cinfrance

    … and of course poor old Reg Sharpe ,”Hubbard’s personal assistant and spokesman”, was inevitably declared suppressive too. It left Reg a shattered & tragic man.

    • Mockingbird

      Oh yeah. I knew I heard something about that.

    • I’d appreciate any references/links describing his life after Scientology, of you have them, please.

      All I can find is on a site run by Indies, which suggests that he walked out of Saint Hill in 1967 after an aggressive Sea Org ‘mission’ ripped through the place, and was declared later. https://scicrit.wordpress.com/2016/07/23/this-is-life-an-introduction-to-scientology-by-reg-sharpe-the-church-of-scientology-bans-its-own-books-pt3/

      • cinfrance

        Hi Once Born, You can see poor old Reg Sharpe from 5.46 > 6.02 in ‘Scientology: A Faith for Sale’ on YouTube. He’s talking to Charlie Nairn on the cans – Charlie went on to make ‘The Shrinking World of L Ron Hubbard’. Mark Bunker had a good [and v.sad] story from Nairn about why Reg became a Scientologist. Nairn said that after Reg was declared Suppressive Reg phoned him up sobbing endlessly on the phone saying could he come and see him – but never showed up.

        • cinfrance

          As a little footnote to the above, $ci/Hubbard tried to take out a High Court Injunction in London against Granada TV broadcasting [the v. well-titled] “A Faith for Sale” at the time when $ci was still being marketed as a ‘science’. $ci/Hubbard got VERY short shrift at the High Court hearing and all Granada’s costs were awarded against $ci/Hubbard. Nairn then went out to track down Hubbard on The Royal Scotman in Bizerte but Old Ron was too thick, slow-witted and insensitive to realise that Nairn was the same man that he had so recently been fighting in the High Court. [So much for the first supposedly-magical Clear not remembering the colour of Hubbard’s tie. The presumably-Clear Hubbard therefore himself displayed the insight & common-sense of an unusually dumb dodo!]

        • Thanks for that – I actually already have a post about, “a faith for sale” on my blog but never made the connection https://scicrit.wordpress.com/2014/04/08/scientology-a-faith-for-sale/

          I will add this as a link the post about Sharpe’s book tomorrow.

  • Newiga

    “This man is bogus”

    How I wish that would’ve been the end of the story.

    • Rasha

      I think about that, but then I think, if something is nipped in the bud, it would keep people from realizing what it was that was prevented. Sadly, it sometimes takes real damage to understand the true nature of the cause, and then we are better prepared to keep it from happening again..

      But, yeah. That would have spared a lot of grief in the world.

  • SarahDB

    Doing my happy Friday dance because Regraded Being is up at Mike’s http://www.mikerindersblog.org/friday-regraded-being-70/

    Diving back into my schoolwork, waving to my Bunker friends.

  • O/T

    While Stacy Murphy’s family are still waiting for a trial date following her murder death, the bumbling bozo sheriff who initially investigated Narconon Arrowhead, Joel Kerns, is standing for senate. Stacy’s dad. Robert Murphy, and ex-Narconon patient Colin Henderson, held a news conference to explain why Kerns is unqualified – http://www.tulsaworld.com/news/courts/sheriff-criticized-for-seeking-state-senate-post-following-handling-of/article_29e644aa-3751-5ddc-91b8-53ee8c313172.html

    RIP Stacy – we do not forget.

    ‘https://uploads.disquscdn.com/images/2e39d10a7ce31e2bd86b93c252cfc38d0bad1ee5cd54af4db2ffba23c57ac36f.jpg

  • Fink Jonas

    https://youtu.be/IwacDbgIuGk
    Scientologist compared to other religions

  • The Reg Sharpe who interposed himself between the “Mail” reporter and Hubbard was an interesting character. All of Hubbard’s personal assistants up to that period (e.g. Richard deMille) seem to have had money and Sharpe was no exception, having made a bundle from selling new (transistorised) television receivers.

    He had joined the CofS in England 1961, became Clear no7 and earned his own hostile newspaper coverage http://www.xenu.net/archive/go/media/pe200366.htm He left the organisation in 1967, when Hubbard was no longer in residence, and a Sea Org ‘Mission’ ripped into Saint Hill.

    Sharpe also wrote “This is Life: An Introduction to Scientology”, one of the few books about Scientology published by the CofS and sold in orgs that was not written by (or at least credited to) Hubbard . In 1983, All of these texts were withdrawn..

    The full text of “This is Life: An Introduction to Scientology” is available here https://scicrit.wordpress.com/2016/07/23/this-is-life-an-introduction-to-scientology-by-reg-sharpe-the-church-of-scientology-bans-its-own-books-pt3/

    • Mockingbird

      Is Reg mentioned in several Hubbard lectures including the clearing congress videos ? I swear that name is familiar from my cult indoctrination.

      • Noesis

        Yes – that’s the guy. Most references on tape and in writing have since been edited out. Among the several reasons for “The Basics” and GAT I and II was to bring the materials of Scientology in line with their current rewriting of history to pretend that no one important has ever left the organization.

        During much of the 60’s Reg Sharpe was one of Hubbard’s primary go-to guys…hardworking and loyal, until he had served his purpose, expressed doubts…and was metaphorically “overboarded” …as was just about everyone (eventually) during Hubbard’s crime wave life.

        • sizzle8

          I think his picture was in one of the early e-meter books – have to verify.
          Then there is this:
          https://uploads.disquscdn.com/images/d7e1451a010beaf38d70b4b7e85bbc155d02ad02400a2be9969e0b8c3ae98ac7.jpg

          • Noesis

            Yep.

            Like many, many of Hubbard’s closest acolytes, Reg was relegated to the “memory hole*” after he raised questions about Hubbard’s true motives and practices.

            In the early Scientology books, tapes, bulletins and policy letters Reg was a celebrated figure, often referred to as an example of what was good about Scientology (much like John McMaster.)

            In the church materials re-edited and issued after Reg wised up and left – it is as if Reg never even existed.

            * In the novel 1984 by George Orwell, the memory hole is a slot into which government officials deposit politically inconvenient documents and records to be destroyed. Nineteen Eighty-Four’s protagonist Winston Smith, who works in the Ministry of Truth, is routinely assigned the task of revising old newspaper articles in order to serve the propaganda interests of the government (from Wikipedia.)

            https://en.oxforddictionaries.com/definition/memory_hole

      • I don’t know about Hubbard ‘lectures’, but Sharpe is praised to the skies in an introduction to his book which was published by Scientology and sold in orgs.

        He lasted until 1967, when he seems to have decisively walked out on a Sea Org Mission, which went about slapping people. He was declared soon after and wrote about doubts he was already having, in retrospect. There are more details in the link above. https://scicrit.wordpress.com/2016/07/23/this-is-life-an-introduction-to-scientology-by-reg-sharpe-the-church-of-scientology-bans-its-own-books-pt3/

        However, between ’61 & ’67 he seems to have been quite a high-profile character. It would not be surprising if he was referred to in lectures. He left without making much fuss, as well, so it’s possible that it was not worth the trouble of removing those references from the ‘lectures’ and they are still there.

        • Techie

          In the reel-to-reel copies of the lectures that most were using up to the 80s all those references were still present. When they were edited for release on cassette, and later CD, the folksy introductions where new students are welcomed etc. were taken out. So many who studied Scientology up to the 80s or even early 90s remember the unedited versions. It is kind of sad because some old timers treasured hearing their names pronounced by Hubbard in the original Briefing Course lectures etc. Besides the references to new students, Hubbard also delivered local news announcements at the beginning of lectures. Many of the famous names of 60s era Scientology are in those announcements. All missing now from the publicly available versions but still in the archived tapes.

          • I have, in the past, spoken about how Scientology is handicapped by the fact that it cannot change the words of ‘Source’.

            I now realise that this was naive. Since Hubbard’s death, there have been extensive cuts to his texts which have de-emphasised his homophobia, misogyny, racism and really dumb mistakes (e.g. his acceptance of Piltdown Man).

            There has also been the rise of books ‘based on the works of L Ron Hubbard’, which can promote almost any point of view by carefully cherry-picking extracts from his extensive writings.

            The basic ideas are untouchable, but as the years pass even the ‘infallible’ words of Hubbard can be sanitised, re-interpreted and eventually transformed.

            Scientology seems to possess its own ‘dead sea scrolls’, and is the process of changing orthodoxy while at the same time preserving it. It makes me wonder about the state of mind of those select few who preserve Hubbard’s original writings.

            Do they (for example) rationalise away his nasty racism, or do they believe that it is all true, and will one day be released when mankind is sufficiently ‘advanced’ to accept Hubbard’s original pronouncements as absolute truth? Alternatively, is their world so compartmentalised that hardly anybody sees the project as a whole?

            This is one of the reasons why I wince, whenever exes describe throwing this kind of stuff out – I absolutely understand why they do it, and it must a wonderful psychological unloading – but I wish the oldest and most important examples could be preserved. They are becoming historical documents of some importance.

            • Noesis

              ” It makes me wonder about the state of mind of those select few who preserve Hubbard’s original writings.”

              Well…her name is Shelly and her current state of mind is definitely a matter of speculation.

              Lol.

            • Graham

              So- in that sense $camatology is like all religions; claiming to be the source of eternal verities whilst actually diluting or re-casting the original message in order to keep it palatable.

            • With the important difference that, in the 21st century, the original texts and much of their original social context can be preserved and made freely available.

              Biblical scholars argue about fragments of obscure texts that were often written centuries after the events that they purport to describe.

              Political and theological disputes in the early church may have made many changes along the way, that are not preserved today. Some documents may have disappeared altogether because they did not suit a groups agenda. We have an incomplete fossil record, that may have been interfered with.

              For the first time, however, the rise of new religious movements can be documented in a way that cannot be easily suppressed. Critics of Scientology, as is often pointed out, know more about it than Scientologists do.

              Perhaps this new environment, created by ubiquitous IT and the Internet, is why the ‘big movements’ of the 1950’s have given way to the diffuse vague world of ‘New Age’ beliefs. The latter don’t depend much on flawed gurus just ideas that cannot be objectively falsified.

              I hope so – I’d rather see the inevitable woo-woo practised in a nebulous cloud of ‘spirituality’, in which there are few real disputes, than by hierarchical, oppressive apparatus like the Church of Scientology.

            • Techie

              Absolutely nobody in the Scientology world cares a hoot about the actual source documents, original traceable historical documents and so on. They just hoover in all the officially approved pablum from Dave and praise him to the skies for it. A few like Danny Sherman are given access to the archives, mainly so he can troll for tasty tidbits for the “Ron Series” and Hubbard Birthday events. With his mindset it is probably not too hard to ignore anything not suitable for a flashy trumped-up encomium. So in the bubble there is no equivalent to the Vatican archives where unbelieving scholars have access to original documents. But they are fanatically dedicated to preserving every scrap of Hubbard’s output, so it is there somewhere. Perhaps one day there will be some kind of access. Unfortunately documents not written by Hubbard are not so carefully preserved, so even if they open up someday there will be a lot of missing pieces. Dr. Winters, Don Breeding and Volney Mathison for example. Also there was a major purge of Hubbard writings at the International Base around the time that Hubbard was faced with tax litigation. Any writing that suggested he was secretly in charge and deriving benefit from Church activities was shredded, buried or burned and not all of that was recovered. That is part of why documents were discovered in the attic at Del Sol (Gerry Armstrong’s trove). So we may never have a coherent accurate record of the real development of Scientology.

            • Which, I suppose, is another reason to support independent archives, such as the one maintained by Stephen Kent.

              Thanks for that. It’s a curious adjustment of perspective for me. I cone to this thinking that an archive is a real effort to preserve original documents for future scholars.

              As you say Scientology’s ‘archive’, is actually an ad hoc project which raises money and imparts spurious legitimacy to those who control it, but the preservation of important documents is only likely to take place by accident – and anything released by them at this remove could not be completely trusted.

        • Mockingbird

          Why, you mean you haven’t listened to ALL Hubbard’s lectures yet ? I thought you were interested in Scientology !

          • If you know of any transcripts, I could read them (I skim quite quickly, and that’s more than Hubbard deserves) but I don’t have the patience for good audio books, let alone L Ron Hubbard.

            • Mockingbird

              Hahaha. You know Hubbard made thousands and thousands of recorded lectures ? The Saint Hill Specific Briefing course alone often takes students years to complete. Most students who start it never finish it.

              I believe no orgs even offer it anymore.

            • Maybe not all of them, then 🙂

              What an incredible waste of years of your life to work so hard to try to find significance in nonsense that a shallow man made up the spot to keep a lucrative con going.

            • Captain MustSavage

              I used to believe that Hubbard was a conman who later came to believe his own rubbish as he became mentally ill later in life. Now that I’ve read Cannanes book, I think I’m back to believing that he was just a film flam man to his dying day.

            • I still incline towards the con artist who gradually fell for his own nonsense – but only very late in life when he really was losing his mind in isolation and desperate for attention.

              The strange thing is that the best con artists implicitly believe their own stories when they are telling them. When it’s hard for them to tell the difference it’s harder still for us.

            • Mockingbird

              Yeah. You get the big picture in a way many people never do.

              I take a lot of comfort in knowing some things. I got away from Scientology with some years left (hopefully) and a great family including two terrific children and a wife I love and want to spend the rest of my life with. I lost twenty five years in Scientology, but was abused and traumatized far, far less than many other people. Scientology ONLY tried to drive me to madness or death ONCE. Compared to a lot of people that was easy.

              I never had to experience a forced abortion, the chain locker, RPF, Truth Rundown, the hole, overboarding, old school Sea Org conditions, R2-45, or the worst of fair game. I have not had to bury children, I have not lost family to disconnection, I have not been ruined utterly or suffered professional demise. I have not been disposed of quietly and without sorrow. Why, some people might think I never experienced Scientology at all !

              I recognize that Hubbard likely plagiarized everything in Dianetics and Scientology. I know he had hundreds of sources he stole bits and pieces from. And several subjects he studied for years including hypnosis and the occult. He took things he felt would persuade people, not true ideas or miracles. He wanted the believable not the real.

              I believed in false ideas. It happens. It’s likely every human being with a functional mind has false beliefs. I really regret the choices I made while in Scientology and particularly the evil acts I committed which caused heartache and suffering for innocent people, in particular my family.

              I don’t think it’s right to entirely blame Hubbard, Scientology or the cult. I also don’t think I am entirely responsible for everything I experienced.

              Dealing with the past honestly takes separating abuse received from abuse dished out. (Lifton in dealing with Vietnam War veterans had to separate offenses they committed from abuse and exploitation they received.)

              And the humility to see that a person needs compassion and empathy no matter what they have done or been is needed. Self compassion is a new idea and relevant to cult recovery.

              People like Hubbard despise weakness in others and can’t tolerate it in themselves. They loathe it.

              We need to accept our flaws and vulnerabilities. Honest self reflection can’t occur without it. I try to accept my inability to change the past. Work on honestly accepting the present and for the future I think the best apology is changed behavior. So I try to do better than before and treat people the way I should. It’s a daunting task to learn how to treat people after twenty five years in Scientology. It’s like being a cannibal and waking up to realize it’s wrong. You need to change your entire life.

            • My perspective, as you know assigns great significance to the power of social pressure – something all the more potent because it is typically invisible to us, and only became apparent through the totally unexpected results of experiments such as Stanley Milgram’s investigation of obedience to authority https://scicrit.wordpress.com/2014/05/03/understanding-the-scientology-mindset-pt-3-obedience-to-authority/ and Philip Zimbado’s ‘Stanford Prison’ https://scicrit.wordpress.com/2014/05/05/understanding-the-scientology-mindset-part-4-power-corrupts-the-stanford-prison-experiment/

              At the very least, this phenomenon explains why Scientology survived the death of Hubbard and proved self-sustaining. I think it also helps to explain why people spend so much time in Scientology.

              In such a toxic social situation the best of us will do questionable things, and the fine line between mistakes and complicity is explored in Zimbado’s excellent book, “The Lucifer Effect”.

              I do believe that knowledge of our vulnerability should be taught as far as it is possible, because understanding your own hidden, human, nature is the only defence against being caught up in this way.

              I have not met many ex-Scientologists, but those I have all resent the time they wasted as members, and are motivated to prevent anyone else suffering in a similar way.

              It must be hard to reconcile yourself to those lost years. However, they represent a experience which has left you with a deep and distinctive knowledge of human nature, and human vulnerability.

              It must also enable you to appreciate your present, fulfilling life and its human connections – so the best thing you can do is to enjoy that.

            • Mockingbird

              Thanks. I found the experiment by Milgram and efforts to duplicate it with variations very important.

              However after reading some of Zimbardo’s book the Lucifer effect I concluded his experiment is too flawed and uses far too few people to be good science. He admitted to a lot of errors and extreme bias in running it. I found a long list of problems with it and unfortunately don’t think it meets the standard for good research.

              I was extremely disappointed because the subject needs research and with many people feeling this experiment fills the need additional research is less likely.

            • Another important aspect of Milgram’s experiment is the way in which it advances by small increments. This provides an insight into how good people are induced into doing questionable things – by a gradual, but escalating series of small compromises. https://scicrit.wordpress.com/2014/05/14/understanding-the-scientology-mindset-pt-9-the-way-to-hell-is-on-a-gentle-gradient/

              When people were required to go very quickly to the ‘dangerous’ high voltage, hardly anyone did this.

              As for Zimbado’s experiment – the point of it was that it escalated so rapidly and end expectedly. Whatever its flaws, it demonstrated how dangerously psychologists had previously underestimated the power of a social situation and led to more research which confirmed this discovery.

            • Mockingbird

              I feel Cialdini’s six principles are a great concept.

              Professor Robert Cialdini, published Influence, one of the all-time classics on changing minds, in which he describes six principles that have stood the test of time.
              Reciprocity: Obligation to repay.
              Consistency and Commitment: Need for personal alignment.
              Social Proof: The power of what others do.
              Liking: The obligations of friendship.
              Authority: We obey those in charge.
              Scarcity: We want what may not be available.
              In addition, Cialdini talks about:
              Click, Whirr: The effects of instinct and conditioning.
              Within this, we can do some further analysis across the six factors.
              Factors Underlying Cialdini’s Six Principles: A cross-principle analysis.

              As Milgram showed slight gradual commitment with social support and approval from authority is very effective. It uses consistency and commitment to bolster obedience. Together they are a powerful combination for influence.

              Scientology as an example uses Hubbard’s routes onto the bridge and bridge itself. It combines several factors. It has social proof with a closed group that approves submission to Scientology. It absolutely rejects defiance with exclusion. The group treats that as normal.

              Scientology cult members approve members that conform. They are your friends and like you to the degree you obey Scientology.

              Scientology asks for very, very little usually in the beginning and the services can be even free or time and attention from many staff and Sea Org members. That creates a feeling of owing Scientology something back. That’s reciprocity.

              By using his gradient approaches Hubbard makes people cooperate a little then a little and through consistency and commitment it becomes rapidly easier to stick with Scientology than abandon it IF you are invested ENOUGH. That’s a key component to who stays and who quits.

              In Scientology Hubbard’s authority is supreme. Miscavige asks for some degree of it, but pretends to be a servant of Hubbard so many Scientologists see no conflict in obeying Miscavige. Some Scientologists even have greater loyalty to Miscavige than Hubbard.

              In Scientology you learn to accept the authority or leave. A black and white choice.

              Finally Hubbard and Miscavige act like the only way to get authentic Scientology is to be in the cult. The independent Scientologists are not even acknowledged by most Scientologists.

              Hubbard claimed a total monopoly on workable technology so Scientologists think it’s totally scarce. One source provides Scientology for a limited time only.

              So all six principles are used to persuade people.

            • Mockingbird

              Social pressure to conform is a primary foundation of human relationships and behavior.

              I found Cialdini and Festinger and many others saw this. Daniel Shaw tackles the subject too.

              I just know that it is flanked by other aspects of life like things from social psychology and subjects like neuroscience and hypnosis too along with rhetoric in defining the whole picture. There is a lot to it.

            • Mockingbird

              I have found the PDC transcripts and know some others are online as PDFs.

              You can spend time googling different tapes by date, title or series. There are a lot.

    • LongtimeLurker

      Thanks for links!

    • Graham

      Thanks for the link! [Said he, disappearing down yet another rabbit hole].

      “The full text can be downloaded from the link above. This is a direct scan of an original copy of the book which, as far as I know, is available nowhere else online.” Scanning over 50 page openings took some effort. Was that your doing O_B?

      • Yes, using an old laptop running Lubuntu, because Windows would no longer work with my scanner.

        I also have a wonderful 300 page text from the early days of Scientology in England (written by two teachers, who actually tried to apply it in their school) and another propaganda publication about the raids which took away e-meters, which will be online when I have time to get back to scanning them.

        • Andrea ‘i-Betty’ Garner

          You’re an unsung hero, tbh.

    • Captain MustSavage

      Being able to access primary sources is priceless. Thanks.

  • LongtimeLurker

    OT

    “I want to see Leah on True Detective or some other police procedural show. Please and thank you.” – DodoTheLaser

    F5
    https://uploads.disquscdn.com/images/d36c4c44449a54820da77f4cfe69830118dba49151cc486f06dd07d90951aa2e.jpg

    • Mockingbird

      Hahaha terrific.

    • Mockingbird

      Cult crimes are especially heinous.

      • LongtimeLurker

        lol

    • flyonthewall
    • Ella Raitch

      Somewhere in America, a cult leader just felt a twinge and retraction in his teeny tiny shorts.

      • LongtimeLurker

        Lol

  • Mockingbird

    I gotta say it.

    Heaven was described by Hubbard in his bulletin of May 11, 1963:

    “The gates of the first series are well done, well built. An avenue of statues of saints leads up to them. The gate pillars are surmounted by marble angels. The entering grounds are very well kept, laid out like Bush Gardens in Pasadena, so often seen in the movies.

    “The second series, probably in the same place, shows what a trillion years of overt acts does (or is an additional trickery to collapse one’s time). The place is shabby. The vegetation is gone. The pillars are scruffy. The saints have vanished. So have the angels. A sign on one (the left as you enter) says: ‘This is Heaven.’ The right has the sign ‘Hell.’…”

    (At Saint Hill, Hubbard’s personal spokesman explained that the technique involved in this process could not be explained to the layman: “You are going up into the higher realms.”)
    Yeah, the higher realms of bullshit. Where Hubbard lived.

    • Chee Chalker

      Its reassuring to know that Heaven has quality workmanship.

    • Noesis

      ” the higher realms of bullshit. Where Hubbard lived.”

      And even then, he wasn’t actually a property owner…he was only renting a flat.

      • Rasha

        Well, a trailer.

      • Robert Eckert

        And stiffing the landlord.

    • Rasha

      So Heaven is now a self-serve transportation hub with scruffy pillars.

    • LongtimeLurker

      “The gates of the first series are well done, well built.”

      And BAM, we’re immediately into an awful sentence.

    • Douglas D. Douglas

      Gotta say this: It’s BUSCH Gardens, not “Bush” Gardens. It’s also the original Busch Gardens, on Orange Grove Avenue in Pasadena, down the street from the old Parson’s estate. There were a lot of movies shot there back in the day, for example, the barbecue scene from Gone with the Wind.

      Busch Gardens are gone now. Good of LRH to keep their memory alive in his scintillating prose…

      • Princess Squishy

        I thought that was the wrong spelling but I didn’t feel like looking it up, which I would’ve compulsively done before typing it again myself usually, but I didn’t this time. I mentioned it in a comment upthread in a response to another comment and I spelled it without the C like the article. Bad Squishy.

        • Douglas D. Douglas

          Actually, better to quote exactly as given. You can add an editorial comment (as I did). Not bad Squishy at all.

  • Noesis

    “Probably the greatest discovery of Scientology and its most forceful contribution to the knowledge of mankind has been the isolation, description and handling of the human spirit. Accomplished in July 1951 in Phoenix, Arizona, I established along scientific rather than religious or humanitarian lines that the thing which is the person, the personality, is separable from the body and the mind at will and without causing bodily death or mental derangement.”

    This sounds like a claim…regardless of how Scientology tries to package Hubbard’s writings as a “record of his research.”

    If even this one thing was in fact a verifiable result of Scientology, independently testable and produced on-demand (as opposed to “personally experienced” and attested to as a phenomena) it could be said that Hubbard had done something worthy.

    And yet…there are no lines of eager people queuing up around the Ideal Orgs demanding to “avail themselves” of something that has been promised for eons “on this planet”…but never delivered (at any price.)

    • Harpoona Frittata

      This is indeed one of the most central claims that Elron made and the “at will” part is foundational to all of the claims made with respect to the OaTy level abilities that are supposed to be gained at their completion. Despite his claim of having scientifically established this as fact, there has not been a single empirical study done that objectively validated it. As a result, about the only conclusion that you can draw here concerning this key claim is that either Elron himself had a profound misunderstanding of how truth claims are established scientifically or he was hoping that you did 😉

      This is still true today: About the only folks who continue to chump for the con that $cn is a scientifically-validated theory and practice are those who have no clue whatsoever about what the scientific method is or the history of how it has been used to build that vast store of knowledge in all the many fields of science and to use the principles derived from that study to actually be at cause within the MEST universe, albeit NOT as exteriorized beings. If you buy the “scientifically established” lie concerning $cn, then you’ve just bought a ticket for Mr. Toad’s Wild Ride on acid 😉

      • Noesis

        Jefferson Hawkins (IIRC) did a brilliant job of teasing apart the difference between an “ability” which is a skill one can demonstrate on-demand, versus a phenomenon…which is the occurrence or observation of an event or thing that may or may not have a good explanation…and is also frequently entirely subjective.

        • Harpoona Frittata

          An excellent point! When confronted by the absolute lack of any kind objective evidence that the “cause over MEST on all dynamics” $cn claim has ever been achieved, some of the folks who appear to be very sincere in their continuing belief in the tech’s efficacy state that they have indeed experienced these OaTy super power abilities, but can’t stably produce them. They attribute that less then complete achievement of the promised “ability gained” on the grade chart to their own case being messed up through various means and seem to continue to believe that, once they get whatever handled, they will indeed achieve these exalted super powers.

          • Noesis

            Yes indeed.

            The tautology of Scientology includes the never ending circle of “you’re doing it wrong” (or more precisely – you did it wrong) to explain away the failure of the church to deliver the promised results – which of course makes for the perfect justification to go back to the bottom of the bridge and redo stuff…forever.

            Thus one sees OTVIII completions now doing “200 hours” of Objectives….because that is “what Ron said was needed” in a “recently discovered” piece of lost tech.

            • Harpoona Frittata

              That whole topping out on the bridge thing, then being required to do very basic stuff again, just seems like such a mean and cynical trick. It’s almost as if lil davey the savage is exploring the outer limits of human gullibility and attempting to go where no con man has gone before.

              $cn seems have taken the old adage, “a fool and his money are quickly parted” completely to heart, then re-worked it slightly: “a fool and his money can be parted again and again.”

  • LongtimeLurker

    “Dianazene.”

    Did he just…

    smh

    • Rasha

      Yes. Yes he did.

  • flyonthewall

    if anyone needs any Dianazene I got the hook up, message me from an old thread

  • grundoon

    “wearing the gilt and blue badge of a clear”

    Anyone know more about the gilt and blue badge?
    How long before Hubbard hit on the idea of shaving a few more pounds from the suckers by selling them Clear bracelets?

    • Rasha

      I think that was a misspelling, “guilt and blue” are the true badge of a Scientological Clear.

      • gtsix

        Are you sure it’s not: guilt and blew?

        • Graham

          Sell ’em a piece of blue sky and fill ’em with guilt.

  • Princess Squishy

    So I haven’t finished reading this because I’m at work and it’s very long…. but are you telling me that the Daily Mail used to do actual reporting and actual fact checking? Head-splosion https://uploads.disquscdn.com/images/3dfa20e732d72cd65a547e185cc16fd18150bbf1fa68a1bbcec35db9724253ee.jpg

  • Mockingbird

    If you look at Hubbard’s claims with a good idea of his real history and have the perspective of seeing the doctrine assembled by critics that shows contradictions and hidden intention it looks entirely different.

    Its purpose is succinctly laid down in his publication: Scientology: the Fundamentals of Thought (5s.). Chapter 10, two sentences long, is headed “The Goals of Scientology” and states:

    “The end object of Scientology is not the making into nothing of all existence or the freeing of the individual of any and all traps everywhere. The goal of scientology is the making of the individual capable of living a better life in his own estimation and with his fellows and the playing of a better game.”

    If you read the affirmations, listen to the PDC tape 39 on the games maker, and see the Skipper letter and the diagram of the fool and read a bit by Crowley which Hubbard plagiarized you see this quote perhaps in a new light.

    Hubbard almost is honest when he says the end goal isn’t to free the individual from all traps everywhere. He implied he frees people, but actually he entraps them and slyly almost says it.

    The individual lives a better life IN HIS ESTIMATION not in reality ! See, Hubbard had the goal of making a belief and the better game if you understand the games maker and his rules makes a game.

    The game is better ONLY for the games maker ! The game is hidden from many people and the rules are unknown by almost everyone ! The game is disguised to most people too.

    With those concepts the statements take on an entirely different meaning.

  • Sherbet

    And 50 frickin’ years later…

    Justice moves excruciatingly slow, huh?

    • EnthralledObserver

      It’s not slow… justice in your country has been subverted… I’m sorry to say.

      • kemist

        Isn’t that the case pretty much everywhere since the dawn of time ?

        If you got money, justice isn’t quite the same for you as it is for the pleebs. In any country.

    • This is how I feel. So many good exposes, and its still here.

  • Mockingbird

    I am going to post a tiny collection of quotes from PDC tape 39 on the games maker. They were ideas from Crowley and Hubbard’s occult studies in my opinion.

    Begin quotes:
    „Now the caste system of game consist of this: The Maker of Games, he has no rules, he runs by no rules.

    The player of the games, rules known but he obeys them. And the assistant players merely obey the players. And the pieces obey rules as dictated by players, but they don’t know the rules.“

    And then, what do you know. There’s broken pieces, and they aren’t even in the game, but they’re still in the game.

    And they’re in a terrible maybe: „Am I in the game or am I not in the game?“ Now, „How to make a piece. This is how to make a piece: First, deny there is a game. Second, hide the rules from them. Three, give them all penalties and no wins. Four, remove all goals“ –

    all goals. „Enforce them… their playing. Inhibit their enjoying. Make them look like but forbid their being like players“

    – look like God but uh… you can’t be God.

    „To make a piece continue to be a piece, permit it to associate only with pieces and deny the existence of players.“

    Never let the pieces find out that there are players. Now out of these you’re going to get games

    There’s a game called freedom,“ which is what you’re playing right at this minute. „

    And Games contain trickery and misdirection to win“ – your 180 degree vector of Have and Agree. „

    It’s actually the backbone of what we are doing.

    Now, “The value of pieces. Ownership of pieces may be also the ownership of players. And the difference between players and pieces, and the difficulty of pieces becoming players“

    Now we get „The rules of games are as follows: Limitations on self and others, obedience to rules, unconsciousness of rules to add reality“ – we pretend the rules are real.

    „ARC with others to play. Pain as a penalty which will be obeyed“ – you have to have a penalty that will be obeyed. Otherwise, nobody will stick with the rules.

    „Agreement to rules and penalties is necessary to continue a game.“ And boy, are they! „Deterioration of a game until no game“ – cycle of action shows you the whole game is an object with no action.
    Ron Hubbard

    • kemist

      All that games stuff is so narcissistic in nature. They imagine everyone is interested in the same petty things they are – people are either jealous of them, or admire them. They constantly compare, compare compare. There’s never a time when they become simply… content. Serene.

      It never crosses his mind that somebody might simply be indifferent and say : Stick your games where the sun don’t shine, Bub.

      • Noesis

        “Stick your games where the sun don’t shine.”

        This of course…is some people’s idea of a game too.

        Lol.

      • Mockingbird

        Ouch. He wanted life to meet him on his terms. Not someone else.

    • Harpoona Frittata

      That’s a great section to quote as it gives you an overview of where in the Game of $cn Elron placed himself and how he viewed everyone else who joined him in playing the Game he’d created.

      Carrying on the vile tradition that Elron initiated, you might just assume that lil davey the savage had assumed the title of Maker of Games, but since he just continued to play the game that someone else created, that would not be an appropriate title. Better to think of him in this context as the Maker of Broken Pieces, the only truly masterful skill for which he will be remembered.

      • Mockingbird

        Hmm. I think David Miscavige tries to ride Hubbard’s coattails as much as possible.

        He has some Scientologists who are loyal to him but can’t equal the source status many cult members give Hubbard.

  • Sejanus

    Such a pathetic liar.
    His claims are an insult to the human intellect.

  • Interested2

    One really should not eat and read Tony’s blog….. Bad for my iPad…..

  • grundoon

    Later that very same day:

    In protest against the abuses and murders carried out under the title of “doctor” I abandon herewith all my rights and legitimate use of this title as the name has been disgraced.

    I was a Ph.D., Sequoia’s University and therefore a perfectly valid doctor under the laws of the State of California….

    Through the ages the term “doctor” has meant “a learned man” but in modern times has been stained by its preemption by medical doctors and psychiatrists and I do not care to be associated in any way with faithless men or ignorant butchers or murderers.

    The title of “Mister”, implying “Master” I also abandon. I wish to be known solely by my name “Ron” or Hubbard, an honourable name in the fields of philosophy and exploration.

    Any and all D.Scns may apply for and receive a new certificate and the title “Dean of Scientology”….

    The originator of a subject traditionally has the right to qualify persons in that subject and this is the chief source of any title of learning. I could with ease defend any use of the term doctor in any nation but the name has come into question by association. This is the second time I have requested not to be so named. The first was in the late 50s in Washington DC. But people have continued the practice against my wishes and I have not lately been active in correcting them.

    No secretary, press spokesman or LRH Communicator may hereafter refer to me as “Doctor” or sign my name as such.

    I have been a “captain” of sailing vessels, a “captain” of corvettes, a “sergeant” of marines in my extreme youth, a “commander” and many other captions. And as a Scientologist knows, one has had other names.

    “L. Ron Hubbard” is a proud enough title. Or humble enough. I wish it to so remain. The wide world calls me plain “Ron”. That is more than good enough for me, signifying as it does the friendship and confidence of the many. They are my friends.

    — L. RON HUBBARD
    HCO POLICY LETTER OF 14 FEBRUARY 1966
    DOCTOR TITLE ABOLISHED

    • Mockingbird

      Terrific. I remembered the abolition of the title but not the date. It makes sense now.

    • Douglas D. Douglas

      Great catch. Nothing like juxtaposition to clarify things…

    • kemist

      I renounce to my PhD from Captain Crunch University and hereby renounce all my rights and legitimate use of sugary cereal breakfasts.

      *Overblown blatterings about definitions and meanings of scholarly and military titles no one ever needed to read*

      “Kemist” in just fine for me, you guys don’t need to call me doctor. I’m the humblest being in the whole Guh-Laxee and my cat’s best friend.

      – KEMIST
      LOSING SOME LETTERS AFTER MY NAME AND SHIT

    • Mrs. V.

      “I would say that my name is a proud name, except that I’m too humble. And although I’m able to give myself any title I want, I’d rather just be your friend, not some authoritarian. Therefore, I order you to stop calling me anything but Ron.”

    • LongtimeLurker

      Things in this one letter that are outright lies or exaggerated to the point of irrelevancy;

      “…abuses and murders carried out under the title of “doctor”…”
      Nope.

      I was […] a perfectly valid doctor…
      Nope.

      …the term “doctor” has meant “a learned man”…
      Nope – originally an agentive noun of the Latin verb docēre ‘to teach’.

      …faithless men or ignorant butchers or murderers.
      Nope.

      …Hubbard, an honourable name in the fields of philosophy and exploration.
      Nope.

      The originator of a subject traditionally has the right to qualify persons in that subject…
      Maybe? But…nah…nope.

      I could with ease defend any use of the term doctor in any nation…
      Nope.

      …people have continued the practice against my wishes…
      Nope – I’m 100% sure you told them to.

      …a “sergeant” of marines in my extreme youth…
      This is suspect and unverifiable. But extreme youth is verifiably a stupid phrase.

      …as a Scientologist knows, one has had other names.
      Nope.

      …the many. They are my friends.
      Nope. Everyone hates you.

      • Mrs. V.

        “extreme youth is verifiably a stupid phrase”. It really is. And he’s supposed to be this awesome writer. Bah!

        • LongtimeLurker

          Stuff like that is all through his fiction too.

          He’ll be rolling along, writing readable (but mediocre) prose, and suddenly there’ll be some awful piece of clunkery that should have been cut at the first rewrite.

          Which makes it pretty obvious he didn’t do rewrites. And that’s not how to “write good” ….unless you’re Robert Heinlein.

          • Missionary Kid

            IIRC, Heinlein said that the class that taught him how to write at the Naval academy was the one on writing orders. They had to be brief, direct, lay out what was to be done, and written so they could not be misinterpreted. That’s how his stories were written.

            • That’s one of the features of good writing – being able to say what you mean in a clear and unambiguous way. The others revolve about having something significant to say, and making it interesting to listen to.

              Hubbard couldn’t do any of those things – in fact some of his worst prose was the result of trying to make his banal ideas sound deep by expressing them in the most obscure manner possible.

              It wasn’t even possible for Hubbard to write clearly, because the ideas he was writing about were woolly and often incoherent.

              At best he dashed of lines that looked as if they made sense, but fell apart after a moment’s considerations. It’s not for nothing that “Dianetics” is one of the least read books in history, even by Scientologists.

            • Missionary Kid

              Bingo.

              A way to look at Christianity is that once the bible was printed so that many people could read it, and not just the clergy, that schisms broke out because first, Luther decided that what came from Rome wasn’t scriptural, then all sorts of the people who followed, decided that they had different revelations and interpretations from the bible.

              A lot of theologians come to different conclusions over the same texts, and they work themselves into knots trying to make everything “logical” IMO.

              In the same way, $cientologists take Hubbard’s murky writing and use it to their own ends. (The bible is a much better book. I’m just pointing out how manipulative people in control of $cientology have been).

            • daisy

              . I was taught in High School English that economy of words was preferable to rambling. That always worked for me as at that time usually all i needed was a vocabulary of about 20 words.

            • Churchill worked on the principle that short words were better than long ones, and old ones were the best of all.

              The deepest sentiments in literature are expressed in words that a 8-year-old can understand – ‘to be or not to’, for example.

              To make this work, of course, you have to have something important to say, and be able to say it in an interesting way. Churchill and Shakespeare did. Hubbard didn’t.

    • I didn’t realize the title had been so degraded. Maybe we should call him Dr. Hubbard.

    • Andrea ‘i-Betty’ Garner

      That proud, humble bastard.

  • grundoon

    “The end object of Scientology is not the making into nothing of all existence…” (1956)

    Funny he would say that. That does actually seem to be the object of the OT levels.

  • Andrea ‘i-Betty’ Garner

    “Produce them. Produce the people who have been harmed.”

    Decades later, thousands of people have been produced, all claiming to have been harmed and still Scientology limps along. Reg Sharpe was prescient.

    • kemist

      Ironically, they were asked the very same thing multiple times about Clears, and never produced one.

      Scientology : Show me a motherfucking clear.

      • Now now, clears don’t fuck their mothers. There was a group called the Cleared Queers at St. Hill back then, though. And poor Elwrong – he never could get John McMaster to schtup him.

    • Noesis

      It is a very common tactic among authoritarian political leaders to defend their policies of abusively “handling” their opponents by challenging their accusers to “produce those that have been harmed.”

      Unfortunately (with many political tyrants) the folks that were abused are often not in a position to speak.

      https://uploads.disquscdn.com/images/45c0ded98b33aa77b845c0d78b83fe3a5397930a3e61a62f70bad46e7e47f609.jpg .

      • Andrea ‘i-Betty’ Garner

        🙁

    • April

      Anyone who comes forward about being harmed by the CO$, according to the CO$, are “lying, bitter appostates.”

    • Harpoona Frittata

      More than a half century later, Leah Remini and several thousand ex-members took up the challenge and said, “Sure thing, want to take a seat and have some coffee? This is going to take some time.” Eight days later, with 473 sworn testimonies presented, the case against $cn was finally rested in the court of public opinion.

      “That’s one helluva lot of bitter, vindictive apostates!” one member of jury was heard to remark.

      “Oh, you should see the thousands of other personal accounts of families being destroyed and individuals intentionally harmed that we didn’t use in presenting the case!” Leah quickly shot back.

      Meanwhile, somewhere on Teegeeaack, in an insulated safe room, cut off from all contact with the outside world, BIG Beings # 2 and 3 had come to the end of their discussion on how this tsunamaai of entheta that threatened to engulf and destroy $cn could be stopped. Each eyed the loaded, gold-plated Colt 45 pistol that lay equi-distant between them on the table, just waiting for the other to say the obvious. They both knew that with a flap this big someone was going to have to take the fall and they’d completely run out of suitable scapegoats.

  • Kim O’Brien

    so apparently …Chicago is closed for a party

    • LongtimeLurker

      So are my pants.

      …no, hang on…

      • Princess Squishy

        lol

    • flyonthewall
      • Kim O’Brien

        i just peed a little LOL

        • flyonthewall

          yeah legit news guys will have that effect on people

          • Kim O’Brien

            he’s manly and alpha …just like Skip

      • Noesis

        I’m too lazy to dig in and trace the above down…but just out of curiosity…what the hell is being shown in that gif?

        (It’s a serious question.)

        • flyonthewall

          alex jones trying to be funny bc he’s gone crazy and loves Clinton or something. I guess it’s suppose to be a comedy bit of his but I think it is more “art” imitating life

          • Noesis

            Wow.

            • flyonthewall

              yeah there are plenty of people like Skip who actually get their news from this clown, scary

            • Noesis

              I wasn’t trying to take sides in the politics of it…was just curious as to WTF was going on in the clip.

              As a general rule, I avoid getting any news or political info from TV sources as it is usually just one step away from somebody’s propaganda factory.

            • flyonthewall

              oh it’s not TV lol, youtube channel

              eta – and website, obviously

            • Noesis

              OY – even worse (usually.)

            • Princess Squishy

              I’m glad you asked because I also had no idea. In fact I’m still a little fuzzy on the details.

            • Noesis

              “…I’m still a little fuzzy on the details…”

              In this case, that’s probably for the best.

              Lol.

            • Princess Squishy

              LOL. Mostly I just don’t know the guys in the GIF and it’s really hard to even tell if that was a show of satirical joy or a show of satirical rage. I’m so done. Can it be Christmas yet?

            • Noesis

              Yes…it would appear to be yet another great example of Poe’s Law.

              EDIT to add: Not only do I not know the guys (except by reference from others) I’m pretty sure I never want to know them.

      • salin

        Conspiracy theorist whackjob.

    • Kim O’Brien

      he can control stop lights with his mind ya know …

      you really are so fucking stupid …it’s no wonder you joined the same cult twice

    • Jimmy3

      I don’t see any news. You didn’t mean the infowars link?

    • I hear Obama occasionally eats “Soul Food“.

    • MarcabExpat

      Why on earth are you posting links to infowars? I’m not giving clicks to that hideous corporation.

  • Mrs. V.

    Daily Mail: Hey, so why did hubbard say he made all of these accomplishments if they didn’t happen? And do you realize that some of his “conclusions” about human history have absolutely no basis in fact?

    scientlogist: Oh yeah? Well who cares. We’re helping all of you and you can’t stop us.

    Daily Mail: Well, what about what happened in Australia? There were a lot of people you harmed instead of helped there.

    scientologist: Prove it! You can’t because they’re lying.

    Funny how some things never change.

  • grundoon

    “The goal of scientology is the making of the individual capable of living a better life in his own estimation and with his fellows and the playing of a better game.”

    Who is “the individual”? It’s intentionally not said. The reader is invited to imagine himself in the sentence: “The goal is making myself, Caspar Milquetoast, capable of living a better life… Ron put Scientology there for my benefit!”

    Hubbard, of course, reads the sentence that way too: “The goal is making me, L. Ron Hubbard, capable of living a better life and playing a better game.”

    Hubbard does not want you to notice that his own private reading of the sentence is its one and only true meaning.

    Hubspew is chock full of strategically placed indefinite subjects and passive voice. He doesn’t do it just to present himself as a pompous windbag. It’s done deliberately to conceal a double meaning: an external meaning for others to see, and an internal or private meaning for Hubbard himself. This is the key to a lot of Hubbard’s stuff, the “Code of Honor” for instance.

    • Harpoona Frittata

      “Hubspew is chock full of strategically placed indefinite subjects and
      passive voice. He doesn’t do it just to present himself as a pompous
      windbag. It’s done deliberately to conceal a double meaning: an external
      meaning for others to see, and an internal or private meaning for
      Hubbard himself. This is the key to a lot of Hubbard’s stuff, the “Code
      of Honor” for instance.”

      It sure is! When you re-read it with a more critically analytic eye, it often seems as if he’s toying with folks to see just how far he can go into completely unsubstantiated, totally anti-scientific realms of fantasy and utter nonsense and still keep folks rapt attention, as if every sentence revealed the wisdom of the ages. This is even more evident in his taped lectures before a live audience, where he seems to delight in free associating and making up wild tales, never pausing to answer questions or clarify points, but always hurrying on as if to avoid breaking the trance.

      The real hook for many who continue to believe in The Tech, despite the ease with which Elron can be discredited at every single level, appears to be the success that they’ve had in being audited and in auditing others. I’ve been fascinated to follow the arguments of those like Foolproof, My2Cents, Marildi and others over on Mike’s blog, where a recent piece by Terra Cognita on Hubbardian e-meter theory sparked a long and contentious debate. These die-hard $cn adherents, while completing rejecting DM and his “perversion” of the tech, continue to tenaciously believe in and defend its efficacy.

      As someone who made real and lasting gains from my early “life repair” auditing experiences, but who went on to find the upper levels of the bridge to be pure hoakum, I can relate based on my own direct experience. What is very interesting to me there is how utterly clear it is that Elron was a complete fraud, as this early Daily Mail article documents, and many of his assertions were so obviously wrong, yet some folks of normal or higher intelligence can continue to dissociate the man from the tech even at this very late date, as if all the lies about himself and his accomplishments said nothing about the Truth of the tech. Simply astonishing and breathtaking, to be filed under the category heading of “you can fool some of the people all of time”!

      • kemist

        Even if Hubbard is a complete fraud, simply talking to another human who truly listens to you, therapist or no therapist, can do wonders.

        Does not mean Hubbard’s bullshit has any merit – just means you were talking to a person with enough empathy and compassion to understand your problems. The emeter, IMHO, in the hands of such a person, can be used as a crude biofeedback device, as well as a “prop” for maximal placebo effect – e.g. “this is really getting better, see, your needle is showing it”

        • Noesis

          “…simply talking to another human who truly listens to you, therapist or no therapist, can do wonders…”

          What you describe is often the mental resolution that those who were deeply involved with the “tech” eventually arrive at after they leave and decompress.

          Your quote is almost exactly what David Mayo said once he was totally done with all of Scientology…official or “indie.”

        • pluvo

          Part of the trap is that Hubbard mixed his ‘research’ with other stuff from other people and common knowledge. If you go to the (simplified) Scn sites on the Internet which are for their PR and for the public, and read it from a view point that you don’t know all the other stuff, it does not sound so weird at all. Try it some time.

          • kemist

            Well, maybe if you forget the “Intersection of Spirituality and Technology”, and the shouting at ashtrays…

            But I’ve done something that is more or less TR0, and it wasn’t that bad, true.

        • Harpoona Frittata

          That’s an excellent point! The efficacy of any of the very different counseling models, from the subjective perspective of the client, can at least be partially attributed to just being listened and understood by an empathetic individual. Add in the 25-30% gain that the placebo effect accounts for and you end up with about the same percentage of people who continue to claim benefits through auditing after they’ve exited the corporate cherch.

          It isn’t that the Hubbardian counseling method doesn’t work; it’s just that it may very well be that the reason it DOES work has little or nothing to do with what Elron came up with that’s unique to his method. Indeed, of the folks who’ve escaped the group mind trance aspect of this cult, but who continue to maintain that they did experience real gains from their auditing experiences, it is usually the lower part of the bridge that they found most valuable, which are the areas of concern that more mainstream counseling models most often address as well. Indeed, once you ascend the bridge to the space opera realm, claims of benefit for the very expensive telepathic self-exorcism of disembodied ancient space aliens clinging all over you is a lot harder to find 😉

      • Techie

        It is frustrating to talk to my 2 cents and the others, like pounding your fist on a brick wall. Logic, reason and facts just slide off like and nothing seems to stick. But I can understand it a little, there was a time when I would have said the same. As in “Sure, Hubbard was flawed, the taped path is derived empirically, it could all be BS but I got some good out of it so to heck with you and your facts.” Possibly some of them are still practicing a form of it. Didn’t Mark Twain say something about how it is hard to dissuade someone of something they rely on for a living? If they would only do a little reading about high-control groups, the actual historical facts about Hubbard, the real history of the e-meter. Then they might find their way out. But they probably don’t want a way out.

        Living is easy with eyes closed
        Misunderstanding all you see
        It’s getting hard to be someone
        But it all works out
        It doesn’t matter much to me

        Strawberry Fields Forever Modern life is too complicated for most, almost everybody is looking for the simplifying assumption. If it is not Scientology it is some other new age fad or some kind of prejudice. Humans detest uncertainty but there is no true absolute certainty when you are looking for the truth.

        Read more: Beatles – Strawberry Fields Forever Lyrics | MetroLyrics

        • kemist

          As long as it doesn’t hurt them (or people around them), I don’t think it’s necessary that they get off it.

          Might cause them a lot of anguish for very little benefit. Especially older people – or people who are very rigid in their ideas. It’s the way they spent most of their lives. Turning it upside down is bound to be very upsetting.

        • Harpoona Frittata

          It can be frustrating, especially if you’re trying to have a civil discussion that is based on making logical points and advancing reasoned arguments, rather than just using Elron’s words as the ultimate authoritative source. It’s very much like trying to find common ground and working to achieve mutual understanding with fundamentalist faith believers to whom their preferred religious text (e.g., the Bible or Quaran) represents the ultimate source of truth and wisdom.

          However, $cn as a religious belief system is qualitatively different from most other faith traditions in that it makes both metaphysical truth claims (Xenu did it to us!) and ones that are physical in nature, such as the key claim that the reactive mind is composed of mental mass which can be utterly annihilated, or as-ised, via auditing. The direct logical implications of that theoretical construct are, at least potentially, completely amenable to empirical evaluation.

          Similarly, Elron’s claims about the abilities that all Clears are claimed to have achieved, such as total eidetic recall, are very easily tested. Indeed, he was foolish enough to attempt to demonstrate that very claim publicly early on and it was an unmitigated disaster. Going forward, he never made the “mistake” of subjecting his very extravagant claims to empirical study again. That fact alone should be enough to either put folks off $cn from the get go or serve to stir their motivation to test his claims empirically.

          If you stay out of discussions with these die-hard True Believers about the metaphysics of $cn, and refrain from trying to invalidate their subjective sense of having made personal gains and having helped others to do the the same, then, if you can keep them tracked on those parts of Hubbardian theory that IS within the realm of physics, you can have a decent discussion with them about it. However, to borrow one of Elron’s more colorful phrases, these folks are very much like “cleared cannibals” when it comes to understanding the scientific method and even about some of simpler aspects of formal logic which presents a different level of difficulty.

          As a result, they seem to lack the foundation of understanding that would enable them to get just how completely revolutionary it would be if even a single instance of a violation of the foundational physics law of the conservation of matter and energy were to be objectively demonstrated and then validated by the entire scientific community. Thus, instead of being highly skeptical, for example, concerning Elron’s claim that mental mass can be completely annihilated – just winked out of existence – through auditing, they fail to understand just how huge of claim that represents.

  • Panopea Abrupta

    With apologies to James Dean:

    LRH: Dribble without a pause

    Ideal Orgs: Rubble without applause

    $cientology: Rabble with gaping maws
    ……………………………………………………..

    $cientology, on Leah Remini: “She hit us back first”

    Free Personality Test? We will test your personality – guaranteed.

    $cientology: It’s not a word, it’s a sentence.

    And an FAQ I found online – bizarre –

    https://uploads.disquscdn.com/images/eed689a9d8626c9295c40be2c8a5acba64f77e15056c5598ba6f83385dc73313.jpg

    I coulda sworn the correct answer as to where to find CoB nuts was in Leah’s back pocket.

    https://uploads.disquscdn.com/images/66503d14db62f3d00a2adb292e9f19dd35f56b5fbcede81a9b56f25d25fd83ad.jpg

    https://uploads.disquscdn.com/images/3b1ca085603c48e8494d461210b874ef580462a5f2a6d383e0ea2f3599b3f72b.jpg

    • Rasha

      ShhhhhBAP!!!

    • Missionary Kid

      I Googled cobnuts. They’re a variety of Hazelnuts. Learn something new every day here in the Bunker.

    • Harpoona Frittata

      Forget about that half-ration of grog on Sea Orgy Day for all of Ron’s remaining faux land navy personnel, I suggest we send each one of them a bag of fresh CoB nuts and some of those candy dick jellies to honor their service and dedication to the cause!

  • grundoon

    Hubbard signs himself C. E., Ph. D. on the cover of Fundamentals of Thought (1956).

    (Isn’t it illegal to call yourself C. E. – civil engineer – unless licensed? To be licensed a college degree is not enough – you must also have professional experience, pass an exam, and meet other requirements such as bonding.)

    From Arnie…
    https://uploads.disquscdn.com/images/4f6c841d27407dbaf5fd66032e3937be6b4a552228b92a8239d4517536840241.jpg

    • PickAnotherID

      C. E. = Conman Extraordinare

  • Lousy Ratatouille

    Again a great find, Tony. Also thanks to Tony’s helper of course!

    This is the kind of article that would be a great one to be studied and discussed in a school of journalism. There’s so much in it. Now, 60 years later, Scientology still exists. You could wonder about how such a mad conman was able to pull this off. I think this article is a great piece of journalism.

    You are going into higher realms: https://uploads.disquscdn.com/images/af14eafe9cd5cd0548370c060bce8e4a3dbe3a52d5896304102a8839217a7d5f.gif

  • Iconoclast Six

    What a load of utter derp.

  • Chee Chalker

    O/T.
    Today is the parade for the Cubs. I am downtown. It’s not even 10:30 am and it’s already getting crazy.
    Estimate is for 2 MM people to along the parade route.

    In other words, 1,996,000 more people than the best attended function of the fastest growing religion on earth.

    • Supper Powers

      Ooh! Pics please! Have a lot of fun and kiss Hendricks for me. Or Ross.

    • Ella Raitch

      I read this as 2 millimetre people and wondered if Dainty Miss was invited

      • stillgrace2

        Me, too. I thought it might refer to one of the smaller ‘thetans’ contained in a MEST body.

    • Sherbet

      Congratulations! You folks waited a long time, and you deserve the party.

    • PickAnotherID

      A bit before 10am at Grant Park. A crowd DM can only get with shoops: (f5)
      https://uploads.disquscdn.com/images/64c6559c9a14cec9e34e4187a45c334fe66d39f5833aeec71ef555dae6a730ce.jpg

      • Chee Chalker

        I am officially more exhausted than any other championship celebration!

        I may just be getting old, but what a long day…

        The weather was spectacular for Chicago in November (60!)

        Crowd estimates were 5 MILLION which I believe is possible. The parade route was 5-8 miles and it was 10 people deep!
        I’ve never seen anything like it, even for the Bulls, Hawks, White Sox and Bears.
        The Bears one was nuts too but that is because it was below zero that day. And that was when I was young and the hair was big (well bigger than today anyway) and I didn’t think wearing hats was a good idea.

        I’ve already had a quick cat nap. Think I’m ready for another

    • aegerprimo
  • Rasha

    “The PILTDOWN contains freakish acts of strange ‘logic’ of demonstrating dangerous [sic] on one’s fellows, of eating one’s wife and other somewhat illogical activities. The PILTDOWN teeth were ENORMOUS and he was quite careless as to whom and what he bit and often very much surprised at the resulting damage.”

    This is Source. Etiquette Tip: Eating your wife is somewhat illogical. You may be very much surprised at the damage.

    • Harpoona Frittata

      If eating your wife just seemed “somewhat illogical” to him, then I shudder to think of the kinds of things that you’d need to do to qualify in Elron’s eyes as being “completely unacceptable” or “thoroughly reprehensible”…enslave civilizations, destroy worlds, create a completely bogus cult that continues your legacy of evil and exploitation long after your death!?

    • daisy

      It is ok as long as you know how to use chopsticks. ( ref. Grant Cardone video )

    • kemist

      Husband eating the wife is indeed not conducive to the propagation of a species.

      Wife eating the husband, OTOH, might provide nutrition for growing offspring.

      • Rasha

        Rasha is reconsidering commenting whilst distracted by customer phone calls at work.

        Still — LOL!

    • LongtimeLurker

      It’s so badly thought out. Clearly a first draft, just written on the fly.

      How could any animal possibly have a functional existence if it spends a significant portion of its time biting random flora, fauna, fora and inanimate objects?

      • Rasha

        In other words, it’s true to form for him.

        • Sherbet

          Right. Business as usual, a la Hubblub.

        • LongtimeLurker

          Standard operating procedure.

  • 3feetback-of-COS

    Lying then and lying now. The Church of Lyintology.

  • grundoon

    The Daily Mail left out Hubbard’s service in the Marine Reserve (1930-1931).

    On May 1, 1930, he enlisted with the 20th Marine Corps Reserve, a Reserve training unit connected to George Washington University in Washington, D.C. His duties were light in the extreme: on the day that he joined he was transferred to an inactive state and over the next 18 months performed only about five weeks’ active duty (all for training) (DOCUMENT A). On October 22, 1931, Hubbard received an honourable discharge from the Marine Reserve. In another hand beneath this is written, “Not to be re-enlisted.” There is no explanation of either statement. — Chris Owen, Ron the “War Hero”

    According to the letter below, Hubbard left the USMCR with the rank of first sergeant. I have long wondered how this could be possible after such slight service. Hubbard’s signature shows that the letter was in his hands at one time. I wonder if Hubbard forged the letter, and where Chris Owen got it (maybe from the Explorers Club?)
    https://uploads.disquscdn.com/images/6e731575849dfa726bdfbcd7d2b2f69c23fd5ce14d27d33fe0b298953bdb434d.gif

    • Sherbet

      Major Cronmiller — The USMC equivalent of Lt. Andre Dawson.

    • Observer

      Wasn’t Lafayette born in 1911? The letter says 1909.

      • Sherbet

        Cause over MEST, Observer. Cause over MEST!

    • PickAnotherID

      Back then a “First Sergeant” was a three striper holding a position that was called “Orderly Sergeant” until 1872. The rank/title of “First Sergeant” was dropped by the Marines in 1947, then established again in 1955 as a rank that falls between “Gunnery Sergeant” and “Sergeant Major/Master Gunnery Sergeant”.

      So basically, he was the sergeant in charge of the orderly room under some officer. When he showed up for training.

      • grundoon

        But three stripes after only 5 weeks active duty?

        • PickAnotherID

          Back then the Guard pretty much gave you the rank for the position you were filling right off the bat. If you couldn’t handle it, you got notes like, “Do not reenlist” on your discharge.

          • grundoon

            Could be, I guess. Thanks!

  • stillgrace2

    The term “up the bridge” has always seemed discordant to me. Nobody ever says “Meet me in Sausalito- it’s just up the bridge”. So I was surprised to see LRH actually use the term “across the bridge”. (F5)
    You can go ‘up the road’ or ‘up a ladder’, however, https://uploads.disquscdn.com/images/c94724966bee9dbda5dc543249015f806cee75ed058089026e6c348b7a152ae2.jpg when it comes to bridges- you either go ‘across’ or you go nowhere. Oh, wait.
    Have a good day in the bunker, I’ve got fish to fry today.

    • Supper Powers

      I always thought it was something to do with the bridge on boats. I’m still not sure it doesn’t despite it being depicted as a bridge or sometimes what looks like a ladder.

    • LongtimeLurker

      Carry On Up The Bridge.*

      Worst. British. Comedy. Ever.

      *Starring Sid James as Commodore “Laffy” Hubbard.

    • pluvo

      “Up The Bridge” is according to the illustrated chart, which is also called “Scientology Classification Graduation and Awareness Chart”. “The Bridge” is abbreviated slang. The idea is a crossover from one side of a chasm to the other side at a higher plateau according to Hubbard.

      http://www.scientologymyths.info/definitions/gradechart-thumb.jpg

      • stillgrace2

        Thanks. I did not know that “Bridge” is abbreviated slang. (?) I didn’t see the reference on the charts. Something Hubbard made up, I assume? That said, I’m sticking with:
        ‘Bridges- you either go across or you go nowhere.’

        • In “The Path”, a Hulu series about a cult, they rightly go “up the ladder.”

          • Eventually, they realise that they are up the creek.
            A lot like Scientology, then.

      • Espantapajaro

        i see money, i dont know what else everybody sees on this chart..

        • JaxNGold

          Yep, money. And a big fat scam.

      • Rasha

        It’s so….. elegant.

        Newi! I didn’t save your “barfing” emoji…. can you post it here when you get a sec? Thanks! Luv ya!

      • Paul V. Tupointeau
  • nottrue
    • Sherbet

      “I joined scientology, and now I can’t afford pants.”

      Edit: Lucille Austero would NOT approve this message.

      • “I paid 300,000 for my bridge and all I got were these lousy underpants.”

        • Sherbet

          Worth every penny.

          Do we know who this guy is, anyway? Probably a tourist, having his picture taken in front of the massive, expensive white elephant, just for giggles.

          • Looks like Ricky Gervais….?

            • Sherbet

              Ricky Gervais wishes he looked like that guy…

    • flyonthewall

      avert thy gaze oh children of the bunker lest ye be turned to a pillar of pepper!

      • stillgrace2

        I could have gone all day without seeing THAT package. Scary.

        • Sherbet

          Too late.

        • FredEX2

          Oh, I don’t know Grace, I had to look several times. Impressive. And love the under-rues in front of the Scientology SMP…

          Is this a ‘selfie’? 🤓

    • Princess Squishy
    • FredEX2

      Wow! Nice pkg…erm…legs! Is this you nottrue?

    • Rasha

      “Package for a Mr. Cob. Sign here, please…”

    • Rock those shorts!

    • chukicita

      Mercy!

  • Sherbet

    “It (thetan) appears to be from ‘a quarter of an inch to two inches in diameter.'”

    I’m speechless.

    • Easy to know every inch of its body.

      Wait, what?

      • Sherbet

        Indeed.

    • Rasha

      Yes, this spiritual concept with no measurable properties is a quarter inch to two inches in diameter, making its undetectable shape either spherical or cylindrical. No doubt it is also silent at a trillion decibels and deep blue in transparency.

      This is exactly how Hubbard’s complete detachment from logic, reason and reality made him the sanest person on the planet.

      • Sherbet

        Now that I think of it, I’ve found spherical or cylindrical matter of that size on my front lawn. It’s rather noxious in nature, sort of like lrh’s blatherings.

        • Rasha

          Me, too. They appear right around time for walkies, right?

          • Sherbet

            Yes! I think we’re onto something important!

        • Robert Eckert

          Those are potty thetans

    • Andrea ‘i-Betty’ Garner

      Yes, I was astonished to learn that the thetan is actually a physical “organ” of the body. That’s why Hubbard was the scientist and I’m just an admin dude.

    • JaxNGold

      Likewise. What a lying lunatic.

    • Except that supposedly Hubbard defined a thetan as a “static” with no measurable mass and no orientation in space or time.

      • Sherbet

        A genius can change his mind, can’t he?

      • pluvo

        Right, exactly this. Didn’t make sense to me and is one of the many, many discrepancies.
        To discuss it would have been out-KSW, be “verbal tech” (was it listed as a crime or as a high crime?) and to question would have meant to clear your MUs till you understand it.

    • (((dagobarbz)))

      MY thetans are the biggest and best thetans, believe me!

      • Andrea ‘i-Betty’ Garner

        MY thetans bring all the boys to the yard.

        (They don’t.)

        • (((dagobarbz)))

          Good thing…you’d be wasting all your time yelling at them to get off your lawn! 😀

          • Andrea ‘i-Betty’ Garner

            Pests 😛

          • Newiga

            LOL! You guys are killing me…

        • Newiga

          LMAO!!

        • everchangingmeezer (wogsy)

          Hur hur 🙂

          • Andrea ‘i-Betty’ Garner

            😛

      • Sherbet

        We’ll just have to have a thetan sizing contest to settle it.

        • Andrea ‘i-Betty’ Garner

          We should hold a wet thetan competition in the spirit of Ron’s misogyny.

      • chukicita
  • Sid (Phil Jones)

    The only degree I believe Hubbard had was a high degree of B.S.

    • Andrea ‘i-Betty’ Garner

      With varying degrees of fuckwittery.

    • Also a megalomania

    • He had a doctorate in records. Oh sorry, he doctored records.

    • chukicita

      With a certificate in advanced gaslighting.

      • Sid (Phil Jones)

        I’m pretty sure he majored in that subject.

    • Newiga

      He was high on that BS too. So high, in fact, that he needed a fix every time he opened his yap.

    • KingofSweden

      He made a science out of his BS, so you could say he had a B.S. in BS!

    • scottishinlondon

      He excelled in the third degree

  • madame duran

    Twenty-five days remain until Leah Remini’s docuseries!
    OSA, don’t be scared. Don’t get the silly idea that Scientology lawyers will prevent this program from airing. They are powerless. After all, to quote Mr. Reg Sharpe’s statement from today’s blog story:

    We are just a bunch of guys who are trying to do some good on this planet. You won’t stop us. You can’t stop two people talking — and that’s all we do.”

    Leah’s doing good by talking with people. Except in this case, thousands if not millions of viewers will be watching these interviews (like how hundreds of OSA eyes look through a preclear’s “confidential” auditing folders, skimming for blackmail-worthy stuff). Nothing to get worried about.

    https://www.timeanddate.com/countdown/to?iso=20161129T22&p0=179&msg=Leah+Remini%3A+Scientology+%26+The+Aftermath+%28docuseries%29&font=slab&csz=1

    • Draco

      Just two people talking. Yes all my conversations go along these lines:
      6. Have you ever blackmailed anybody?
      16. Have you ever told lies in Court?
      20. Have you ever peddled Dope?
      23. Have you ever raped anyone?
      24. Have you ever been involved in an abortion?
      27. Have you ever practised Homosexuality?
      28. Have you ever had intercourse with a member of your family?
      32. Have you ever slept with a member of a race of another colour?
      37. Have you ever done any illicit Diamond buying?
      38. Have you ever betrayed anyone for money?
      43. Have you ever been a spy for an Organization?
      44. Have you ever had anything to do with Communism or been a Communist?
      45. Have you ever been a newspaper reporter?
      46. Have you ever had intercourse while under the influence of drugs?
      52. Have you ever had anything to do with a baby farm?
      53. Have you ever been a spy for the Police?
      57. Have you ever done anything your Mother would be ashamed to find out?
      78. Do you feel Communism has some good points?
      81. Do you know any Communist personally?
      82. Have you ever injured Dianetics or Scientology?
      86. Have you ever had unkind thoughts about LRH?
      88. Have you ever had any unkind thoughts about Mary Sue?
      94. Have you ever used Dianetics or Scientology to force sex upon someone?
      95. Do you know of any plans to injure a Scientology Organization?
      96. Are you upset about this Security Check?
      http://tonyortega.org/2013/08/27/the-dreaded-joburg-sec-check-scientology-interrogations-explained/

      Just a friendly chat between friends.

      • Mrs. V.

        I’ve always found it interesting that they seem to imply that rape is just as bad as having an unkind thought about lrh or mary sue or being a newspaper reporter.

        • Draco

          Or sleeping with someone of another race.

      • LongtimeLurker

        Ahhh, the Joburg. Always delightful.

  • Roger Larsson

    Rattlesnakes and Cobras in the Nest of Snakes made kNOTS on themselves.

  • Cult Jeopardy!

    “Became a business cult”

    BUZZ! “Who is EST/The Forum/Landmark?”

    http://fecris.org/wp-content/uploads/2015/05/Lalich_EN.pdf

    • (((dagobarbz)))

      Wormy Erhardt, ex-Scientologist.
      Just like that sweat lodge guy who killed a couple of people during some weekend warrior exercise, these two clowns learned the real lesson Hubbard was teaching.

      A fool and their money are soon parted.

      • Don’t forget the bleach cult.

        Here’s Why Authorities Want to Stop the Sale of Jim Humble’s Miracle Cure November 1, 2016, Craig Malisow, Houston Press

        Thank you Ron!

        • (((dagobarbz)))

          Woah! It sure doesn’t help with weight loss!

          “When the Houston Press asked Hawkins about how the Harris County Attorney was trying to prohibit sales of MMS, Hawkins said, “You mean trying to violate my religious freedoms? That’s all I’m going to say about it.”

          Violating your freedom to flog poison to gullible people? That DC8 don’t fly!

          • Not if that guy and Scientology’s International Justice Chief get on.

          • Observer

            I unless you’re Scientology poisoning people with overdoses of niacin.

  • my psoriasis was caused by a gluten allergy

    i didn’t have to relive the memory of being eaten by an animal in a previous life
    and i get to be on a “trendy diet” now!

    total savings $250,000+

    #LRonic

    • Rasha

      I just minimized certain foods and maintain an 80/20 alkaline to acid diet, and mine’s under control. It’s almost like some people actually studied medicine, physiology, physics and so forth and so on, and – gasp – did studies and recorded their findings, subjecting them to experiment and verification!

      But, no. I got eaten.

  • JaxNGold

    So, this morning hubby and I were waking up with coffee and I was reading Tony’s article. Got to the Piltdown Man part and read out loud “..eating one’s wife and other somewhat illogical activities”. Hubby snort-laughed and was like “whaaat?” I started laughing and just said “don’t even get me started”.

    Seriously, “somewhat illogical activities”?! Somewhat? Have mercy. As if some strange creature going around biting people and eating people’s wives is only SOMEWHAT illogical. Smh.

  • Lousy Ratatouille

    1966
    There were good and inspiring things from England too:
    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=QEAUJgw3YP8

  • Duane Alexander Miller

    Would love an article or link on the mysterious DScient. Degree. What did lrh say about it? Did anyone else receive it? Can they still be awarded?

    • Techie

      They don’t confer any lettered degrees nowadays. You can become an auditor(or practitioner), at which point you receive a title such as “Class 4 Auditor”. In 1952 Hubbard gave a series of lectures called the “Philadelphia Doctorate Course”. Some time after that Hubbard was calling himself a “Doctor of Scientology” or DScn. Then later he stopped doing that, and in almost all the literature he is referred to as “Mr Hubbard” not “Dr. Hubbard”. At another point in the 60s it was possible to be called a “BScn” or Bachelor of Scientology which I think was the equivalent of a Class 4 Auditor. They don’t do that now.

      • Under UK law post-nominals (letters after your name) must not be used to mislead or defraud

        I think an excellent case could be made that the ‘Bachelor of Scientology’ is misleadingly close to ‘Bachelor of Science’ BSc . Since Scientology charges money for everything it’s pretty clear this was designed to mislead and defraud.

        It’s remarkable that nobody took a ‘BScn’ to court in the short time that ‘title’ was used.

  • I was listening to CBC Radio last night, about treating veteran PTSD with medical marijuana. There aren’t enough studies yet (large double-blind ones with placebos), but it seems promising for some people.

    I have to wonder if CoS hates marijuana because it’s a drug, or because it might be a competitor?

    • Paul V. Tupointeau

      CoS hates all drugs because they are competitors.

    • Andrea ‘i-Betty’ Garner

      That’s very interesting.

    • Bobby Tolberto AKA TDA

      I once heard a legalization advocate, v. well known here in California, say, “I don’t know if crystals are real(in healing, protecting, New Age crap, etc,), but drugs are real.”

      It’s just part of a rear-guard action with the LEO types and the occasional billionaire who thinks they know better for what humanity needs than us underpeople do. Apparently now the majority of Americans think MJ should be legalized, but that doesn’t keep the sheriff off Fresno County, CA from wringing her hands over it recently. I guess they’ll have to find something else to bust Bulldog gang members on besides finding them with a few ounces of pot without a medical card.

      • kemist

        Oh My Gerd, someone might get high and enjoy themselves. We can’t possibly allow that.

        Or perhaps they’re worried about their jobs. What will they do if they can’t go after pot users anymore. They’ll have to go after, you know, real criminals, and that’s quite a bit more dangerous than dealing with someone who has the munchies.

        At this point I wonder why anyone takes them seriously.

      • They especially want to move into the vet PTSD market. They’re trying to push their bogus study forward, and working every politician they can for that. (Plus they have an alliance with Drug Free America and its shady cult past.)

        Category:Gulf War Illness Veterans Research Program

    • Draco

      They don’t discriminate – they hate all drugs. Because Ron said so, while popping pinks and greys, in a classic case of don’t do as I do, do as I say.

      • Harpoona Frittata

        That is, all drugs EXCEPT tobacco, coffee and alcohol…those drugs they LOVE and have CoB’s personal blessing 😉

  • Jimmy3

    Kinda freaked out… I heard this song on the radio about 9 days ago.. and today (a snippet of) the lyrics appear on the Bunker…

    Spooky, no?

    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=eG8cR4ovD_o

    Love The Beats forever

    • Andrea ‘i-Betty’ Garner

      Aww, me and dad sang this at his school folk club when I was little 🙂

      ETA. Ooh, this is a great version, from 1:44. Sending it to my pops.

  • Supper Powers

    I’m getting my Ethics in today. Seriously, I’m doing ethics training for work.

    • flyonthewall

      you don’t have a job, stop lying

      • Supper Powers

        Busted. I just live off those Big Pharma checks.

    • Jimmy3

      Damn. You should report the people responsible for making you do that.

    • I have to take the UK ABC training every year on top of our internal code of conduct training. Plus I have to take this data security course now because some idiot got caught up in a phishing scandal. Ugh.

      • kemist

        Eh. We don’t even have time to get post-pertinent training in my company. They gave me the company’s policies to read in the first week and that’s it. After that they threw the code at me and I tried to make sense of it. Whenever there’s some stuff I don’t understand, I look for a coder who came in before me.

        Problem is, things move so fast these days I’m the third most ancient on my team.

        • LongtimeLurker

          Kill the other two and become Wise Code Man!

      • Sid (Phil Jones)

        I hope the data security course isn’t with KnowBe4. That’s a Scientologist owned company.

        • It’s an internal training. I’m not sure who creates it, but they are from the UK so I imagine it’s not KnowBe4.

          • Sid (Phil Jones)

            No, they are from Clearwater so you should be fine.

      • Supper Powers

        At least it’s legit ethics and not some make believe ethics officer threatening you.

    • Princess Squishy

      yeah, who knew Busch Gardens plagiarized heaven…

    • Noesis

      It’s funny how so many of Hubbard’s auditing inspired whole-track recollections seem to have amazing similarities to the locales in which he was living when he had the “sessions” and events he was experiencing in real life at the time of his “research.”

      The DC-8’s and tax audits of the OT III story are all contemporaneous (mid-late 60’s) with the time that Hubbard “survived the Wall of Fire” research: the DC-8 was then among the most common passenger jets of the day and Hubbard himself (unbeknownst to most Scientologists) had undergone a recent IRS audit where it was found that he was personally benefiting financially from the supposedly “non-profit” COS of CA. He was being “suppressed!”

      The coincidences are remarkable and many…all through the Scientology “research and development” story. Lol.

      • Harpoona Frittata

        Curiously, despite his amazing ability to accurately locate past incidents across millions of years of time, his prescience concerning even the very near future was virtually non-existent. Elron didn’t even foresee the rise of the internet, which to me seems particularly unforgivable, especially given the fact that it has almost completely decimated $cn and cast it into such a steep decline that you can already glimpse its ultimate extinction from here.

        • Noesis

          Indeed Hubbard did not foresee the Internet and apparently his recollection of the Marcabian society indicated that it was somehow permanently stuck in the look-and-feel (culturally) of the U.S. circa the 1950’s – another lucky coincidence.

          One would think that such a large interplanetary civilization might have figured out the equivalent of their own version of the internet way back when….lol.

          On the extinction of Scientology – I always recommend that folks not overestimate their human peers. There are all sorts of stupidities that have been exposed on the internet – yet still they somehow prosper or at least continue to operate.

          My guess is that Scientology will continue its protean fraud in a manner that allows it to stay one step ahead of the law and for whomever becomes its next senior-most leader to live the personal lifestyle of a billionaire while BS’ing enough useful idiots to keep the wheels turning on the scam while making sure his / her every whim is administered to in a timely fashion.

          That would appear to be the initial design criteria of the church.

    • Harpoona Frittata

      While staying with Jack Parsons and dabbling in the Black Arts, the two of them loved to down whatever psychoactive substances that were to hand, then stroll arm-in-arm through this magnificent urban paradise, hallucinating like big dogs, but still on the prowl for beautiful young assistants to aid them in their nightly magicking frolics 😉

      As Elron correctly noted, drugs can seriously mess with your recall and his misrecollection of having been there some tens of millions of years earlier seems like one of the very best examples of just how badly that they can do that!

    • The LRH Heaven story has always been one of my favorite “out there” stories from anybody. The before and afterness of it, with the second visit with everything so shabby.
      The part I couldn’t understand is how people could go along with the Piltdown Man. When I read LRH the first time with that reference, that was it for me!

  • Andrea ‘i-Betty’ Garner

    This must have been shared, already, but just in case it hasn’t:

    Robert Murphy, whose daughter was the third patient to die at Narconon Arrowhead between 2011 and 2012, and former patient at the center, Colin Henderson, held a news conference Tuesday in which they challenged Kern’s fitness for District 7’s state Senate seat.

    http://www.tulsaworld.com/news/courts/sheriff-criticized-for-seeking-state-senate-post-following-handling-of/article_29e644aa-3751-5ddc-91b8-53ee8c313172.html

    • Observer

      I wonder how much Scientology/gists have contributed to his campaign already.

    • When asked about the apparent contradiction between his on-air statements and the deposition, Kerns said he couldn’t comment because of ongoing court proceedings.

      I wonder which one that is, with all the settlements happening, those two fired Oklahoma Department of Mental Health and Substance Abuse Services employees?

  • Newiga

    He (Hubbard) states: “Psoriasis may be caused by the action of digestive fluid in some incident where the preclear was being eaten. Subject to test.”

    My gawd! He just spewed this BS like a drunken guy spills his guts to a gutter.. >:( What a phoney douche!

    • Andrea ‘i-Betty’ Garner

      “Subject to test”, my arse!

      • Newiga

        Hubbard’s ramblings would be hilarious if he and his cult hadn’t ruined so many lives. May he rot on Target 2 or where ever the hell he is. May his thetan be stuck on a filthy mirror of a delusional clam!

      • kemist

        Hubbard Testing Method :

        Finding 1 doofus with psoriasis who “remembers” being eaten in a “past life”.

        That’s all you need as “proof”.

        • Harpoona Frittata

          And then there’s the corollary: If one doofus confirms your whacked shit, then doofi make it an immutable cosmic principle of the universe, not ever to be questioned or disagreed with;)

    • Sherbet

      I may have rheumatoid arthritis. To what, do you suppose, lrh would have attributed it? I’d like to know, so that I can enlighten my doctors. There’s no point in wasting everyone’s time experimenting with tests and meds.

      • Newiga

        Thankfully, the quack is on Target 2, so we don’t have to hear his take on any ailments.

      • Draco

        I seem to remember something about it being caused by suppressing anger. But I could be wrong. Who can remember all that BS anyway?

        • Sherbet

          I guess DM never will develop it, then.

      • LongtimeLurker

        It’s from that previous lifetime when you worked in a flying taco truck up in the Van Allen Belt.

        Obviously.

        • Sherbet

          Sounds reasonable.

  • Observer
    • Sherbet

      She has a look on her face like, “Yeah, so I’m up here again. What’s the problem?”

      • Observer

        The main problem is when her nails get caught in my hair and I can literally hear (and feel, of course) it ripping out of my head when I try to get her down. 🙁

        And, since she’s a sprightly, athletic dachshund she can leap up there before I have a chance to even try to prevent it.

        • Sherbet

          Puppy thinks she’s a cat.

          • Observer

            Heidi, one of Mr. Observer’s childhood dachshunds, once chased a cat up a tree–and by that I mean went up the tree after the cat–and had to be rescued.

            • Sherbet

              Heidi was recalling her whole track experience climbing in the Alps.

        • April

          My 150 lb English Mastiff says she’d like to come sit on your shoulders, please.

          • Observer

            I must respectfully decline

            • April

              Awww. Now she’s giving me the sad eyes.

    • Newiga

      Squeeee! <3

    • Andrea ‘i-Betty’ Garner

      Your look of resignation is hilarious! Look at her, though; I could eat her up 🙂

    • flyonthewall

      you could put her in a pillowcase and swing her around real fast a few times

      • Observer

        >:-O

        • flyonthewall

          what? She might like it and want to do it all the time. Be mean not to do it really

          • Observer

            >:-|

            • flyonthewall

              ok just forget it, jeez

    • Jimmy3

      I run a reformatory for dogs, if you ever require my services. It’s more like a time-out room, but I call it Pawshank Petitentiary. Let me know whenever.

      • LongtimeLurker

        Pawshank. Thank you.

    • Draco

      I have heard that the Dachshund is the dog most similar to cats in nature. She seems to prove the point 😀

    • Love that innocent look on her face 🙂

    • LongtimeLurker

      How did you get her to look at the camera?

      • Observer

        She thinks there’s another dog in there.

    • Too cute!

    • daisy

      What a cutie. So jealous, you have a cuddly girl. I am going to smear steak on my neck. The look on your face is hilarious. You are her straight man.

    • Ninara Poll

      <3 <3 <3 ¡Un salchicha!

    • aegerprimo

      SUPER CUTENESS!

    • Sherbet

      Sure, Ron, sure. Now just sit down and drink your cocoa. The nurse will be along soon with your Jell-O.

    • flyonthewall

      that’s what she said

      • JaxNGold

        Dying…

  • nottrue
    • They tightened up the wording on the description: “As hard as it has tried, the Church of Scientology has yet to avenge a decades-long crusade against it by media mogul Rupert Murdoch, writes Steve Cannane.”

      http://www.abc.net.au/news/2016-11-05/rupert-murdoch-and-the-scientologists/7987408

    • Todd Tomorrow

      You never go into a legal fight with a celeb with more money than you.

    • OpenCorporates didn’t have it, but there was a HASI Inc of Arizona:

      http://ecorp.azcc.gov/Details/Corp?corpId=%2000452884
      Corporation Name:
      HUBBARD ASSOCIATION OF SCIENTOLOGISTS INTERNATIONAL, INCORPO

      REVOKED-FILE ANNUAL REPORT
      5/10/1977

    • Harpoona Frittata

      Sure, but $cn plays a very long game and never forgets (or forgives), so even when Rupert dies there’s still his sons and media empire to seek revenge against.

  • Jimmy3

    yellow starbursts for sale or trade
    PM me

  • Ah… good old Sequoia U., Ron’s alma noverca… (Scissors and paste at the ready, kiddies): https://uploads.disquscdn.com/images/dec81a6885c94eff79cc325738c57471f6cec5b560a3eeb3cbaec8e63d118ca8.jpg

    • flyonthewall

      you could sell these and have other outfits sold separately like sailor suit, cowboy, straight jacket etc. Nobody would buy them but you could sell them and it would be funny

      • That’s a good idea, Fly! 🙂

        • flyonthewall

          thnx! I have a lot of good ideas, I should start writing them down

        • Snortle! 🙂

        • flyonthewall

          this opens up so many play possibilities, thank you

        • Observer

          The tire dress is my fave!

        • daisy

          In what store may i buy the pill dress? So many jokes, i especially liked the orange cone bra.

        • Johnny Tank (Forever Autumn)

          Is this the Joy Villa paperdoll?

        • Andrea ‘i-Betty’ Garner

          Seriously good!

      • Don’t forget the “serious writer” ascot outfit!

        • flyonthewall

          oh yes and the Queens hideout outfit, that’s my personal fav

        • Draco

          Was that “serious writer” or “English Gentleman of Leisure”?

    • JaxNGold

      Hysterical!

    • Draco

      Argh! Just as I am about to hit the sack, you present His Hubbardness in his tighty whities!
      Mine eyes! Now where did I put that bottle of Scotch? Shall it be JW Blue or the Royal Salute?

      • Kestrel

        If you’re going to slug it down, I’d go with the cheap stuff. (He said to a three-hour old comment)

        • Draco

          I was just kidding 🙂 No ways I would pay that much for any booze!
          Says she to a 14 hour old comment.

    • LongtimeLurker

      That. Is. Great.

    • Sherbet

      I love the diploma mill!

    • aegerprimo

      Genius.

  • chukicita
  • LRH seems to have never lost his 1950s, whimsical cuteness in his writing. He thought this whimsy had served him so well in his Sci-Fi such as Ole Man Methuselah, and the rest of his writing that he kept it for his “serious” writing. Boo Hoos. Weepers. LRH probably figured he was hilarious, but for everyone else it was too serious a time to be whimsical, hence, no sense of humor in Scientology.

  • Ann B Watson

    I just remembered the ascot photo!Always hand under chin as Crowley posed too.Double Black Creepy.Ron was a jack of all Degrees in the literal and mystical sense.Master of none.💖

    • Todd Tomorrow

      Hi Ann B.

      • Ann B Watson

        Hi Todd,Good to see you!💗

    • JaxNGold

      Ain’t that the truth!

  • Lousy Ratatouille

    I can’t help thinking L. Ron Hubbard liked Mr. Reg Sharpe best for this first name:
    https://uploads.disquscdn.com/images/7af07cd4a5d00ad33c1c75cd981c782cfef4f8017ff8956df69cfaf0509158c4.jpg

    • Todd Tomorrow

      Expense is relative when it comes to $cientology. You are not only making an “investment” in your present life but in lives to come. An “investment should not be confused with a Woggy 401’k or Roth IRA. You’ve got thetan bugs, too. Ignore your family especially your kids and get rid of the bugs and the future will somehow take care of itself when you’re an OT 9 and are making bucket loads of $.. Aren’t we up to 9 now?

      • Harpoona Frittata

        Exactly! If you’ve actually been around since forever and Scn really does represent your very best chance to “escape the trap” in the last 75 million years, then money is obviously no object and every other consideration pales in comparison. This is an essential selling point in the loopy logic of the BIG con that is $cn. Once you come to wholeheartedly believe in the immortal being/endless lifetimes tenet of the faith and that you’re currently living a degraded existence far beneath your true native state capacity which only $cn can help you to regain, then with that tonnage of manure fully on board, it makes complete and logical sense to spend your very last dime (then borrow more) in pursuit of regaining you former god-like self. Like VoB (Voice of Bart) said, ideally I want to be god 😉

        Good luck with that one, Nancy, and all you other True Believer $cilons as well! If there was even the thinnest shred of evidence to support those whacked beliefs, then I’d be on board too. But there’s not, so I won’t. You could wait around another 15 or 20 years just to make sure Elron is not going to be making it back to finish the job as promised, if you like but please don’t spend the kids’ college fund and all of your retirement money; it’s never a bad idea to hedge your bet 😉

        • Todd Tomorrow

          I’ve learned to deal with my thetan’s and they leave me alone. Except for that one that says,”You should start smoking cigs again and doing recreational drugs you enjoyed most of your life.” I throw him a valium and he/she shuts up!
          Edit: One time I was at hospital when my sister had a baby and I swear he tried to get into the infant’s meat body. I placated him with some hard core pills and hid in a locked steam room so he didn’t get out.

          • Harpoona Frittata

            Making peace with your pieces is obviously the preferred way to go. Elron’s “War on BTs” just pissed them all off and now all sorts of innocents are suffering needlessly. How he got the idea that they were all bad, all no good, is just beyond me.

            Personally, I think it’s because he’s a redhead. I’ve known a few in my time and they’re alike – impulsive, flighty, quick to judge and to blame others. Maybe, because of the red hair, BTs are just more attracted to folks like Elron and having too many of them – all shoving each other around, competing for control – is actually what makes it intolerable for redheads. And because Elron was always projecting his stuff onto everyone else, he just assumed we were as badly afflicted as he was.

            Yea, now THAT’S starting to make some real sense to me! What he should have done was just confine his ministry to his fellow redheads and help those who were really suffering. It’s just too bad that he didn’t survive until now so that we could have shared this epiphany together ;(

            • OOkpik

              Easy now! My twin brother is a redhead and the nicest guy you would ever hope to meet. 🙂

  • Todd Tomorrow
    • Sherbet

      Oh, brother!

    • ha ha… clickbait and then they show a teen picture. But seriously Ron needs to come up with what i knows about this woman, maybe a current picture. He has to know something!

  • Lousy Ratatouille
  • OTVIIIisGrrr8!

    https://uploads.disquscdn.com/images/e4c85c64d0d60ee483a545b760be7847ed84e00c5038b9c998c0c61a8e99e948.png

    L. Ron Hubbard. “Between Lives Implants”, SHSBC #317. 23 July 1963: “And well, it starts like this — it starts like this: I was up in the Van Allen belt — this is factual, and I don’t know why they’re scared of the Van Allen belt, because it’s simply hot. You’d be surprised how warm space is. Get down amongst the clouds and so forth, it can get pretty cold and damp. But you get well up and sunlight shining around and that sort of thing, it’s quite hot. And the Van Allen belt was radioactively hot. A lot of photons get trapped in that area and so forth.

    And I was up there watching the sunrise. Well, that was very interesting. And my perception was very good, and I was taking a look at Norway and Essex and the places around, you know, and getting myself sort of oriented. And then something happened to me that I didn’t know quite what had happened to me. I thought some facsimiles must have appeared in front of me, but they didn’t look like facsimiles. And some other things happened and I had a feeling like I might possibly go into the sun. And a few other little uncomfortablenesses there where… That wasn’t what awed me. But I got confused. I got confused because the sun was suddenly larger and then it was smaller and somehow or another I was doing a change of space process that I myself was not familiar with. And it made me sort of bite off my thetan fingernails just a little bit, you know?”

    • Noesis

      And your point?

      Are you seriously attempting to invalidate noted space researcher and explorer L. Ron Hubbard?

      Into the chain locker with you.

      Edit to add: There must be two suns illuminating that picture as the space vehicle and Ron’s face are seemingly lit from different directions.

      He was such a big thetan…imagine the adventures he must have had and then kept to himself so that he did not over-restimulate us before we are ready.

      I can’t wait for OT IX and X !

      • OTVIIIisGrrr8!

        Off with your head! We in RTC were affirming the work of the Founder who, as Danny Sherman informs us, was not only a noted space researcher and explorer, but was also the first person upon the scene of the 1947 Roswell crash.

        https://uploads.disquscdn.com/images/9bd22496e31454ce0d9a59a7a6619c601045756e4a7eef8494b7eba56d88d48e.png

        • Noesis

          My bad.

          I trust the guy on the right more than the guy on the left.

          At least he can say with some degree of truthfulness that “I am not from this planet.”

          While the guy on the left clearly stated on tape “I have never lied to you.”

          But that’s just me.

    • Sid (Phil Jones)

      “I was up in the Van Allen belt — this is factual”

      As long as it reads on an e-meter then that’s good enough for me.

    • Sherbet

      Because you’re so good, I honestly can’t tell if the second paragraph is real Hubbard blubblub or a parody. This is factual.

      • OTVIIIisGrrr8!
        • Sherbet

          But “thetan fingernails”? The CC says “fate and fingernails,” but that doesn’t sound right, either.

          Anyway, you win. It really was Hubbard flapping his fishy lips again, completely ignoring the concept of being “factual.”

    • Juicer77

      Zzzzzzzzzz….

    • Eivol Ekdal

      Ground control to Major Cyst.

  • Kim O’Brien

    Just got home …had to take an Uber . My driver was a woman who said she was a Christian who had an abortion at 19 , smokes pot …and is hoping that her husband dies soon cuz she said he was a douche . Oh , and she is voting for Trump .

    so there ya have it . The strangeness of my week is complete

    • flyonthewall
      • Kim O’Brien

        i stand corrected

      • LongtimeLurker

        Damn you to hell.

        • Sherbet

          Most of you guys would comment, “What spider?”

          • flyonthewall

            that’s bc heterosexual men like mammary glands

            • Sherbet

              I think I heard about that on Dr. Phil’s show.

          • Jimmy3

            I took a screencap so I could see it without the spider.

            • Sherbet

              I’d expect nothing less from you.

          • Kestrel

            There was a spider?

            • Kestrel

              By the way, I saw the tarantula.

        • flyonthewall
      • Sherbet

        And, just think, Observer has only a cute little dog roaming all over her.

        • flyonthewall

          she could try shoving it down her shirt but it prob wouldn’t work as well. Worth a shot though

          • Sherbet

            True.

      • Rasha

        *Peter Parker hurriedly and excitedly updates his list of doing whatever a spider can…*

      • Mymy88

        Delete! I order you to Delete that GIF now. It is giving me the supreme willies.

        Just kidding. But it would be nice if you did delete it of your own free will, you know.. if you feel like it lol.

        • flyonthewall

          I can’t do that. It wouldn’t be fair to the perverts

          • Fly Lady

            Thanks for thinking of me.

          • JaxNGold

            Lol…classic

            • flyonthewall

              😉

          • Mymy88

            lol I figured it would be something like that.

      • Observer
        • Rasha

          BWAHAHAHA!!!!!

    • Try Lyft next time, I use both.

      • Kim O’Brien

        LOL …

    • Liberated

      Did you thank her for “sharing”?

      • Kim O’Brien

        She actually started to cry. i told her to have a wonderful day. I hugged her, and then as soon as i got inside my house …i made myself a drink . It’s not even 3:30 yet

        • LongtimeLurker

          3 stars.

    • That is his demographic.

    • Todd Tomorrow

      Good god almighty. one Uber driver wanted me to ride around with him all night and do crystal meth. I’m no prude but I wouldn’t touch anything like that. Didn’t seem like a voter..

  • nottrue
  • daisy

    I have been gone all day and very few new comments. WTH its Friday .

    • all day! and i need moa coffee

      • daisy

        It is after 5 don*t bother with coffee.

    • OOkpik

      We were all waiting for YOU!

      • Yes! we were all quiet up till then…

      • daisy

        I just refreshed lots of new comments. DUH

  • I like those short outburst: “You either do it Ron’s way, or we’ll hunt you down and ruin your life.”

    • Harpoona Frittata

      Me too! My favorite: “WHY!!? Because Ron said so!”

  • Dave Reams