Subscription options

Facebook

Subscribe to our e-mail list

Ryan Hamilton jumps on Narconon’s answer in Nevada drug rehab lawsuit

Rainbow_CanyonOn Tuesday, we posted Narconon’s response to the first of four federal fraud lawsuits filed against the Scientology drug rehab facilities in recent weeks. Now, just days later, Las Vegas attorney Ryan Hamilton has come swinging back, asking the court to accept that Narconon has essentially admitted to the allegations his client made about the deceptive practices at the Nevada facility, Rainbow Canyon Retreat in the town of Caliente.

That’s aggressive lawyering, and maybe an informed approach to Scientology’s legal style, given its history.

A couple additional court notes before we let you loose on the court filing.

An eagle-eyed reader noticed that the law firm hired by Narconon in this lawsuit — Lewis Brisbois Bisgaard & Smith, LLP — is the same one that used to employ Graham Berry, the New Zealand ex-pat who lives in Southern California and who tangled with Scientology in several different actions. (For a little ancient history involving your narrator, see this story about Berry we did for New Times Los Angeles in 1999, which was also published in the Phoenix New Times.)

We asked Berry about his old firm getting involved, and he posted this to Facebook: “My old law firm, Lewis, Brisbois, is now defending Narconon in Las Vegas after successfully defending against Scientology in the Flynn case (1980s), the Yanny I (appeal) and Yanny II (trial and appeal) and Fishman-Geertz cases. I’m shocked, except that OSA and Eugene Ingram did a potentially damaging investigation of the senior partner of Lewis, Brisbois after we had also won the Fishman-Geertz case.”

Hey, there’s a whole lot of avenues for our readers to run down!

And Graham pointed out another connection we didn’t make right away. Also on Tuesday, we reported that the new judge in Laura DeCrescenzo’s forced-abortion lawsuit against Scienetology is Robert L. Hess.

We should have remembered that name, but it was Berry who reminded us — it was Hess who scheduled an evidentiary hearing in 2002 that resulted in Scientology throwing in the towel in one of the church’s greatest court defeats of all time. Rather than have that hearing occur, the morning it was scheduled, Scientology showed up with a check for nearly $9 million, ending litigation that had lasted for more than 20 years with former church member Lawrence Wollersheim. That capitulation motivated us to write about the entire Wollersheim saga. Just a couple of weeks before it was scheduled to run in New Times Los Angeles in October 2002, the newspaper folded, and we weren’t able to publish that story until 2008. Give it a look when you have some time to kill.

Anyway, as Graham points out, Judge Hess has plenty of history with Scientology, and so the church’s move to disqualify Judge Rafael Ongkeko could not have turned out worse. Hess is well aware of Scientology’s legal shenanigans, and also should be very familiar with Scientology’s deceptive corporate structure, which was very much a part of the Wollersheim matter. We’re looking forward to how he handles Laura’s lawsuit.

So, without further ado, here’s Ryan Hamilton’s motion in the Welch lawsuit. As usual, we’re looking forward to reactions from our lawyerly readers…

 

Welch vs Narconon: Motion to have Reponses Admitted

 
——————–

Karen celebrates Year One

A year ago, Karen de la Carriere began her adventures in video…

 

 
——————–

Posted by Tony Ortega on March 27, 2014 at 07:00

E-mail your tips and story ideas to tonyo94@gmail.com or follow us on Twitter. We post behind-the-scenes updates at our Facebook author page. Here at the Bunker we try to have a post up every morning at 7 AM Eastern (Noon GMT), and on some days we post an afternoon story at around 2 PM. After every new story we send out an alert to our e-mail list and our FB page.

Learn about Scientology with our numerous series with experts…

BLOGGING DIANETICS (We read Scientology’s founding text) 1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 7, 8, 9, 10, 11, 12, 13, 14, 15, 16, 17, 18, 19, 20, 21, 22, 23, 24, 25

UP THE BRIDGE (Claire Headley and Bruce Hines train us as Scientologists) 1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 7, 8, 9, 10, 11, 12, 13, 14, 15, 16, 17, 18, 19, 20, 21, 22, 23, 24, 25, 26, 27, 28, 29, 30, 31, 32, 33, 34, 35, 36, 37, 38, 39, 40, 41, 42, 43

GETTING OUR ETHICS IN (Jefferson Hawkins explains Scientology’s system of justice) 1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 7, 8, 9, 10, 11, 12, 13, 14

SCIENTOLOGY MYTHBUSTING (Historian Jon Atack discusses key Scientology concepts) 1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 7, 8, 9, 10, 11, 12, 13, 14, 15, 16, 17, 18, 19, 20, 21, 22, 23, 24, 25, 26, 27, 28, 29, 30, 31, 32, 33, 34, 35, 36, 37, 38, 39, 40, 41, 42, 43

PZ Myers reads L. Ron Hubbard’s “A History of Man” | Scientology’s Master Spies | Scientology’s Private Dancer

 

Share Button
  • Observer

    The fact that Captain Miscavige is having such an abysmal week has put a smile on my face, a spring in my step and a song in my heart. VWD sir!

    • El Con Blubbard

      I am finding this phenomena daily!! The cult is so done!

  • AndreDeLasier

    Wollersheim Award #=Nobel Prize for many to follow.

  • Markthehungarian

    IANAL, but it seems as though Scientology is going to lose. Or more likely, impale themselves on a spike of their own design.

    As for Judge Hess taking over, is it just me or has Christmas come early! Surely the LAST thing the Church of Scientology wanted in this case was a judge who has actually dealt with them before. And in the Wollersheim case no less! Can we be optimistic that this case won’t last 20 years (or until David Miscavige dies)?

    • vistaril_LOL

      is he the judge who said scamology’s paranoia and agression mirrored that off Hubbturd himself????

      • Sejanus

        He is indeed

        • http://www.4chan.org/ Vistaril

          Nope. It was the good Judge Paul G. Breckenridge, Jr. of the Superior Court Of The State of California who, on June 20, 1984, said, inter alia . . .

          . . . “[The court record is] replete with evidence [that Scientology] is nothing in reality but a vast enterprise to extract the maximum amount of money from its adepts by pseudo scientific theories… and to exercise a kind of blackmail against persons who do not wish to continue with their sect…. The organization clearly is schizophrenic and paranoid, and this bizarre combination seems to be a reflection of its founder, L.Ron Hubbard.” . . .

          • Sejanus

            Gah I stand corrected…..that will teach me to fact check before 8 am local time…dammit.

            • baddog5623

              Now OSA knows were you live

            • chukicita

              is there anyone left in OSA ? [last person out, please turn off the oiliness wall]

          • joan nieman

            Judge Brekenridge makes a stunning statement here. So true, so clear .

  • vistaril_LOL

    me gusta mucho!! where is Eugene Ungram these days????

  • Sejanus

    Every time a gavel bangs, Dainty MiniPope spoils his underoos.

    Davey whats that???

    Staff…oh those things they are saying behind your back.
    They are laughing…LAUGHING at you.
    All those years of carrying the cul…uh sca…er cherch on yer back hasn’t worked out has it?
    Hear those sirens?

    They are coming for you…coming right now.

    Quickly to the Freewinds!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!

    Activating Soopurr Powurrz.
    Battle Cry ready!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!

    ADELE DAZEEM!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!

    • PRenaud

      ah I like that… but do you think Miscavige is going to chicken out like Hubbard did and hide for the rest of his life?????

      • Sejanus

        Well given he could literally hide in a dresser drawer…yes…yes I do.
        Cripes he could bury himself in one of the bunkers and not be recovered…or just stay on the high seas….mind you…pirates….hmmmmmmmmmmm

        • 1subgenius

          And he will call it “research”.
          Yeah, its research. They will search for him, and search again.
          Hey, sailor boy, take a look at your future.

          • Narapoid

            His cell mate, Warren.

        • NOLAGirl

          “…given he could literally hide in a dresser drawer..”

          COFFEE…..EVERYWHERE!! Bahahahahaha!!!!!

    • Missionary Kid
  • 1subgenius

    Hamilton did a nice job. With Scientology known for rather technical, even molecular, insistence on every fine point of the law and procedure, he is doing his job of reading, and analyzing the facts, law, and paper.
    As you can see, he granted them the professional courtesy of extending the deadline for their answer twice. It got him nothing as they filed responses that could have been filed without even seeing the complaint. There’s an old legal term for it: chickenshit.
    Fool me once shame on you.
    Nice job Ryan. Keep it simple as Scientology has nothing other than the tactic of blowing smoke up asses.
    They are wrong, and liable, in all these cases. Every one. And where there is a wrong, there is a remedy.

    • Sejanus

      At this rate the Co$ will run out of judges who don’t have personal experience with them….and that’s not a good thing for them.

      • NOLAGirl

        I get a good giggle out of the fact that they didn’t want the last Judge and ended up with this one. Karma is a cold-hearted bitch. 😀

        • 1subgenius

          Frying pan fire.
          And since you’re from “there”, we’ll call it a skillet.
          A nice, well seasoned cast iron skillet, as in “keep your skillet greasy.” (Woody Guthrie)

        • Narapoid

          Some might say they “Pulled it in”

      • 1subgenius

        At this rate, the cult will soon run out of human beings that aren’t aware that its an evil, brainwashing, sinister scam.
        My current estimate of their market is around 7, give or take.

  • Just Dee

    I had to read this excellent story twice. Still mind boggling. So Graham Berry’s ex employers are defending scientology, instead of against scientology. And in the past OSA investigated a senior partner of his law firm – so there is damaging evidence OSA found out?

    • Sir Hemet TC Burlwood, VIII

      I can’t help but think that Brisbois excepted the case to extract $$$$ from them in a case they know they are going to lose.

      • 1subgenius

        It certainly is true that the lawyers want to get paid, and its likely they have a dim view of the prospects of prevailing.
        Having a sure loser, but knowing you’ll get paid, can be more secure than one, either way, that you are expected to win. Cause stuff happens. And it hurts when it does.

      • Just Dee

        Wish I could reply to two people at once.
        I am not a lawyer but certain court cases are fascinating. Especially anything to do with scientology. Couldn’t scientology argue they didn’t have a proper defense due to their history with Mr. Berry’s ex law firm, and their prior experience with scientology?
        That’s just one thought – this sounds beyond fishy to me. Who knows, they might just want the $$ but it just sounds so wrong.

        • 1subgenius

          Not a criminal case, so no.

          • Just Dee

            Very good point – duh on me, thanks!

  • NOLAGirl

    Damn Tiny Dancer, pretty soon you’ll be able to hide behind the stack of lawsuits and no one will be able to see your little ass.

    Excellent news. I hope there are many more to come.

  • Juicer77

    The only phrase I can think of is “guns a-blazin’!”

  • Silence of the Clams

    Awwww…poor Davey. It’s like operation Snow White in reverse isn’t it? Is Karma part of scientology teaching?

  • Missionary Kid

    I’m wondering what went on with Judge Hess that Co$, the “not one thin dime for Wollersheim” organization, that they folded last time.

    Could it be be that he gave them some indication in chambers that they were not only going to lose, but that sanctions would have been brought against their law firm, because of their delays?

    • NOLAGirl

      I may be wrong here, and if I am someone please correct me, but weren’t they supposed to give some very damning testimony and rather than let that info out, they settled? The Wollersheim case is the one case involving Co$ that I haven’t done extensive research on……yet. I’m getting there.

      ETA: I might be thinking of Debbie’s case….I’m not all the way awake yet. :)

      • Missionary Kid

        Thanks.

        • NOLAGirl

          You’re welcome MK, but do keep an eye on this conversation, because as I said, I may be wrong. There are so many delicious court cases, I sometimes get them confused.

  • Narapoid

    He he, I like Hamilton’s style. Wanna play stupid? Try to drag it out feigning ignorance? Let’s just go for the throat and give the judge the ammo he needs to crush you if he is not in the mood for BS. And from our hero Graham Berry’s former firm no less.

    Here is what Armie Lerma (another hero) posted on Eugene ingraham. http://www.lermanet.com/scientologynews/latimes/ingram012781.htm

    A dirty cop, working for Scientology? Say it ain’t So!

    • Observer

      You’d think Scientology would balk at hiring someone is last name so closely resembles engram.

  • Observer

    This is completely off-topic, but I can’t seem to re-hinge my jaw (from Black Rob, of course) …

    • NOLAGirl

      :O

      What in the sparkly f*^k is that??? I don’t want to believe it’s what I’m really reading it to be…..I have no words.

      • Narapoid

        LOL, wish I didn’t have to work.

        • NOLAGirl

          I’ll save your seat. :)

          This is…..I still have no words.

      • Observer

        refresh

        • NOLAGirl

          Obs, do you know what they are asking for? Are they asking someone take their mothers ashes, her body, her spirit, her thetan?? I’m so confused and so appalled I can’t quite wrap my head around it.

          • Observer

            She’s asking for a pregnant woman to volunteer her unborn child as a meat sack for her deceased mother (now in thetan form). The creepiness is off the charts.

            • NOLAGirl

              Aaaccckkk…. That’s worse than what I thought it was. And then for someone to respond with “I don’t see that there is anything awkward about this matter” Ummmm yeah…there is.
              I feel like I need another shower.

            • Observer

              I especially like the “just lovely” comment.

            • NOLAGirl

              I’ve typed and re-typed this comment 5 times. I still don’t know what to say.

            • Chee Chalker

              More like “just crazy”

            • Heidi

              Great quick descrip!

            • Sherbet

              Sounds positively Rosemary’s Babyesque.

            • Missionary Kid

              IMO, one of the funniest movies of all time. They hit every fear that a woman could have: unsympathetic husband, deformed child, supernatural powers they have no power over, etc, etc. I had to leave the theater because I was laughing so hard at the manipulation of the audience.

              O.K., I walked into the theater knowing the plot, and I’ve got a perverted sense of humor.

            • Eclipse-girl

              It is being remade with Halle Berry.

            • Missionary Kid

              It was probably just my state of mind. It was a second run movie house with a sparse audience, and I could sense the hostility of the women in the audience, so I got out of there. I didn’t want to ruin the experience for them, so I left early.

            • Eclipse-girl

              I remember seeing it within the last few years.
              It did not age well.

            • Missionary Kid

              At the time, I was still a protestant, and considered it all Catholic imagery, so I didn’t relate on that level. Now, all of the supernatural crap is just as irrelevant as thetans.

            • Betsy

              One of the major things about that movie that I remember is that Mia Farrow gave a lot of young women my age the courage or the motive or something to throw away the curlers and the scalp-sizzling hairdryers and run out and get a short hair cut. Which I did. A few years ago I found, in my mother’s effects, an envelope with my high-school graduation picture. On the envelope she had written “Graduation Photo. Hideous short haircut.” A lot of us missed the plot of the movie in our rush to liberate ourselves from constant hair-care.

            • Eclipse-girl

              I was young when Rosemary’s Baby came out.
              I remember the Mad magazine parody of it.

              I just tie my hair back either in a braid or a pony tail.

              I am in agreement of freedom from constant hair care, and constant worry about make up

            • Betsy

              I’m glad you’re in agreement! It was such a waste of time…you had to sleep on these curlers that dug into your head (I did this from junior high until I got my Mia Farrow haircut in about 1967) and of course we probably were all losing sleep every night. Not to mention the HOURS it took to style all this. Meanwhile the boys had to do none of this and people were still saying “gosh, from age 13 on girls mysteriously get behind in math and science after having had the higher grades in grade school.” Well, duh! The big “ideal” of female looks was something called “The Breck Girl,” a girl who used Breck shampoo and had absolutely impossibly perfect, soft, obedient hair. I had a kind of standing-up brush of hair that didn’t get popular until suddenly! in the 80s! My hair was COOL! Anyway, no matter what happened with Rosemary’s Baby, I and I suspect a lot of women my age used it as a permission-slip out of hair-bondage.

            • Sherbet

              (So much for my being speechless.) I’m wondering about the logistics/mechanics of such a process. Does the dead woman’s family gather at the baby’s birth and urge the thetan to get into that new body. Atta girl. Jump right in there. And it wouldn’t be a silent birth, would it? What a {great, relaxing, joyful} birth that would be. And may I add: EW!

            • SciWatcher

              Hahaha!

            • Once_Born

              I understand that the “bring back to life assist” involves shouting, “get back into that body” at a dead (or dying) person so… pretty much, yes.

              As for silent birth, the new tenant was, presumably, an advanced Scientologist who has already ‘cleared their bank’ and would not affected by the noise.

              The fact that people can think like is almost as scary as the fact that I can now follow their ‘reasoning’.

            • Sherbet

              I’m worried about you, Once_Born. 😀

            • TXCowgirl

              And will the thetan’s family be paying rent to the baby meat sack?

            • El Con Blubbard

              STAY AWAY FROM MY GRANDCHILD!! My daughter is pregnant – how do I protect the baby from a Scientologist inhabiting the baby? HELP!!

            • Espiando

              Have your daughter ground herself by holding on to copper rods. It works for COB RTC; it’ll work for her.

            • 448Beacon

              Set up some electronic ribbons and trap any nearby thetans. I know a guy who gives good rates on bulk thetans.

            • Betsy

              It’s mating season for many vultures. Hey, Scibot! Send your mom over to the vulture hill! (Oh wait. I wouldn’t wish that on a vulture.)

            • Betsy

              If there are processes to get rid of body thetans, shouldn’t there be processes to ward them off before they enter? Search the works of Elron! Surely he in his infinite altruistic wisdom dealt with this!

            • Betsy

              That poster (printout) is now going up on my wall. Yuck. This is story is beyond creepy.

        • Anandamide

          Do you mind if I use this shoop in a craigslist spoof ad? It’s giggle-inducing and to the point.

    • EnthralledObserver

      What’s this about Black Rob?

      • Observer

        Refresh

        • EnthralledObserver

          Whoa (again)… dear Merlin and Xenu… for fucking reals? Shit a brick!

    • Just Dee

      I am addicted to that thread. I think BTN put the link up about 6 months ago and I bookmarked it. The crazy never stops on that thread.

    • Juicer77

      So all his/her life this child will be compared/expected to live up to a dead person? I think I’m going to lose my breakfast.

    • baddog5623

      Yep, that will about do it. That got me up and out of bed. Reminds me of “I got a Theaten in my mirror” wow, just fucking wow!

    • Heidi

      Read it last night and nearly couldn’t believe it. If they really believe you can affect thetans like that, WHERE’S RON? He should be close to thirty years old by now!

      • El Con Blubbard

        Ron’s LATE and considered a Blown Sea Org Staff member. Ron has been declared a Suppressive Person by David Miscavige.

        This is highly confidential so please – no e-mails!

        When Ron returns – he is to go to New Mexico – the bunker we have prepared for him.

        His only comm line is the Int. Justice Chief – Mike Ellis – who is in the hole for some bad PR that hit the media recently!

        He sent a letter to Sara admitting the Church practices disconnection.

        He was beaten to a pulp and thrown in the gulag servicing his sentence.

        So there is no Int. Justice Chief available at this time. DM has a replacement for Int. Justice Chief in training – a psycho path named “Bubba” who is 13 years old, grew up in the wilderness and lived off the natives (literally) shudder!

        Bubba has proven to have the qualities we need. Bubba will do whatever DM tells him to do. He is doing his Staff Status 1 and 2 and should be available to report to duty soon.

        So Ron will be put on a routing form starting in the mansion built for him complete with Crop Circles in New Mexico. Sea Org Staff are standing by. Everyone is instructed to make no eye contact nor speak to him.

        This is confidential and please – no e-mails! There are moles that have pierced the corporate veil! Our tax exempt status is at stake!

        LOL

        WATCH 60 Minutes Australia – Marty Rathbun. The reporter says Ron Hubbard is suppose to be coming back. She flys over the New Mexico Compound and they show the crop circles. She says Ron is suppose to see this place from Space so he knows where to come to. She states he has been gone for 27 years and says to Marty “He’s LATE”! “Yes,” says Marty, “He’s LATE and the look on his face was priceless!!

      • Betsy

        OMG! I think he’s living in my homeowners’ Association!

    • Missionary Kid

      The joke is, she’s already back in a new body, as a termite.

    • sugarplumfairy

      Lol.. And that, ladies and gentlemen, explains why the scam still works.. ’cause there’s one born every minute..

      • SciWatcher

        There must be a certain amount of comfort in being that delusional.

        • aquaclara

          Like if one has just gone so around the bend, eventually, it makes sense.

          • Missionary Kid

            Isn’t that true of $cientology in general?

            • aquaclara

              Yes! We are starting our day off well here, aren’t we? Legal stuff, legal stuff, crazy stuff, legal stuff….
              :)

        • D.Y.G.

          “Comfort” is the key word here. This lady wants comfort in knowing where her mother’s soul is, in a manner of speaking.

          • Missionary Kid

            It would have been a lot cheaper if Sylvia Browne was still around, and just as nuts.

            • SS

              Ugh, another morally bereft con artist. The planet’s collective integrity went up a bit when she recently passed.

            • Missionary Kid

              Agreed.

    • K2P2

      Good grief! That is so uncomfortably bizarre that I can’t get my head around it. This can’t be a common occurrence , , , can it??

      • kemist

        It is a common theme on that thread.

        You’ll also see a lot of people “postulating their ideal 2D” repeatedly by “making space for him/her” (no, it doesn’t work), one guy who explains his multiple couple failures by diagnosing all the women he meets “psychotic” and the two awful Mace Kingsley witches proposing their services to brainwash your kids among other things.

        It’s worth a PhD thesis in bizarro sociology on its own.

        • K2P2

          Oh, I’m SURE it doesn’t work. But I was really wondering if the mere “asking” of a pregnant woman to make room for your dead mom’s thetan is common among these. . . . . . people. Bizzaro – just bizzarro.

        • OrangySky

          Well, to be fair, the postulating the ideal 2D thing is not much more ‘woo’ than “The Secret.”

          • kemist

            Don’t get me started on the harmful nonsense promoted in that book.

            This whole magical thinking attitude is one major reason people get hooked to cults and their related offshoots, MLMs.

      • splog

        Common? Oh yes, and you won’t believe just how much.

        I lost count of the number of people who would tell me stories of their recently died parent who was hanging around, then found a nice Scientology family having a baby soon. And the mother picked up the baby, then left for a short bit to make contact with the old family and reassure them all was well (because oat tees can move in and out of bodies at will, didn’t you know that? and many of them even retain memory of their previous life for like really ages, didn’t you know that too?). And then the mother’s thetan would go off and start a new cycle of life having just ended the old one properly and all is fine and dandy in the world. Common, yes indeed. You have no idea….

        And this is all considered pretty normal.

        It’s like fundamentalist Christians all sitting around discussing the rapture and how they just *know* they will be *saved* because they have done all the $INSERT_QUACKERY_BULLSHIT_HERE steps just perfectly. That’s also batshit crazy and Scn is no different.

        Holy fucking shit batman, I can’t believe I just typed that.

    • D.Y.G.

      I’m having a lot of trouble understanding this.

      • Sherbet

        For once in my life, I’m speechless.

    • HillieOnTheBeach

      Is there even an LRH approved procedure for this?

      • Richard Grant

        I was wondering that too! I would guess there is not — this is some Xenu-level crazy, and surely we’d have heard about it.

        But you know Scientologists. They’ll “make it go right” somehow. Like they lady who climbed a mountain in Colorado a few months back and turned back a fleet of UFOs preparing to invade. That was on Black Rob too, I think.

    • http://scientoonery.tumblr.com/ Natalia 2.0

      WTF?

      • D.Y.G.

        Yep, pretty much.

    • D.Y.G.

      So the disembodied thetan attaches itself at birth to the meat sack baby? What’s in the womb before that – a mindless meat sack baby?

      • D.Y.G.

        I wonder if it’s acceptable for preggers Scientologists ask for a full background check on recently deceased mama before offering the unborn up for possession, including the whole track? Because what if she had all sorts of unresolved problems – wouldn’t those engrams transfer to meat sack baby?

        I can’t believe I’m sitting here pondering this.

        • Ciru

          A post-mortem sec check would the minimum any new parent would expect before they let a thetan into their baby.

        • joan nieman

          Oh my word! I am still sitting here, my mouth agape. The cherch should be called ‘ Science Fictionology”. I am dumbfounded.

        • Betsy

          I can’t believe YOU are and I can’t believe I am pondering your comment!

      • Richard Grant

        D.Y.G., yes, I think that’s basically the case. I think this is actually a matter of doctrine, that the Thetan does not enter the meat body until the moment it leaves the womb.

        • OrangySky

          So genetics doesn’t matter then? Or, is it secondary to thetan-etics?

          • Observer

            That’s where the GE comes in.

          • Robert Eckert

            There’s a separate thing called the “Genetic Entity” which carries around all the attempted-abortion engrams and engrams from your ancestors. How that fits together with the “thetan” was never very clear (like many other Hubbard brain-farts).

    • Graham

      Way beyond bat-shit crazy, heading towards deeply sad and disturbing. Not just that someone would ask such a thing, but that someone- anyone- would give a positive reply.

    • SciWatcher

      Ha! At first I thought she was putting her mother out there as some sort of live-in nanny (maybe Mom was looking for a new home because she’d given everything she owned to the Cult). That was bad enough…then I saw the part about her “dropping the body” four days ago. I’m surprised that the cult hasn’t jumped on something like this already as a money-making scheme–pay us to arrange new “homes” for your dead loved ones!

      • aquaclara

        So while you’re LIVING, disconnecting from family and friends is the rule (since we do know that gabillions of the population are not in Scientology, mathematically, this works).

        But when you are DEAD, NOW you need to have someone make these all important connections.

        What, before you turn into a body thetan? Is a sec check required? Where is the Scientology cemetery? HOW DOES THE CULT MAKE MONEY FROM THIS? What is the hat for helping your dead mom find a new body after the trip to the funeral home? The mind boggles.

        Easier to talk to St Peter. He is just standing at the gate, holding the door open.

      • aquaclara

        Why didn’t anyone worry about this when Lisa M “dropped the body”? I don’t recall hearing this in the cult’s defense filings.
        What a horrible, humanless phrase. This is a horrible, humanless cult. Stopping now.

        • midatlanticcoast

          I agree that it’s a horrible humanless phrase. “Meat Body” is also horrible. It sounds like “piece of meat”. Dehumanization (is that a word?) seems to be a large part of their lingo and “tech”. The followers absorb and accept it (like everything else sci) with no thought or questions.

      • ze moo

        I believe you just defined a new profit center for $cientology. Now pay us for your future lives, right now.

      • joan nieman

        Oh that will probably be the next scam. You just gave them an idea SciWatcher!

    • aquaclara

      “..and after that of course she needs to be close to her new family.” Just to add the extra layer of guano to this frightening scenario.
      So we are moving mom’s body to reside close to wherever a new baby appears. Of course. Is this a Hubbardian invention, or did this woman make this up herself?
      Scientology reaches new levels….

      • D.Y.G.

        I took it to mean that the mother’s disembodied thetan is currently either hovering around her recently dropped body, or her current meat sack family. It seems they intend somehow to coax the disembodied thetan to go home with the new family. How that would happen, I am clueless.

        • OrangySky

          Don’t ask the details. Only Hubbard was sufficiently genius enough to understand the physics of it all.

          • Missionary Kid

            Damn. I’ve got a cold, and the laughter that it started turned into a coughing fit. It was worth it. I’m still smiling.

            • OrangySky

              Hee hee! Laughter is good for the immune system, MK!

            • Missionary Kid

              I’m feeling better already.

          • D.Y.G.

            Well, where is Elron when I need him? Shouldn’t he be re-meatbodied by now? Why didn’t anyone line up a meaty baby for him?

            Here’s what I’d ask him – What if the former family doesn’t like how new family is raising disembodied-reimbodied thetan? Do they file a knowledge report? What happens if the new family eventually blows the cult? Can the old family demand custody?

            • aquaclara

              Suri Cruise. Wasn’t there a rumor about this when she was born?

    • kemist

      For added rage, check the screenshot just below that one in BR’s thread.

      One of these horrible, horrible vultures wants to convince a non-sci mother to stop her mentally ill daughter from taking her prescribed medication. Gaaaaaaaahhhhh! These people repulse me.

    • Illinoisian

      “..and after that of course she needs to be close to her new family.”

      Why not just let Mom become one of your body thetans? You could have her with you all the time. (Maybe those BT clusters that are being eliminated by upper level OTs are really little family reunions.)

    • Eivol Ekdal
    • CharlieWaters

      I hope for an unborn child’s sake that no expecting parents offer to help make this happen. It’s troubling enough that one person thinks this is a good idea, but for others to give her encouragement in this matter is off the charts weird.

    • Andrew Underhill

      I wonder if the Mother Thetan would have to start all of the Bridge again regardless of where she was when she mislaid her body? Or will she be able to step into an Org and say “I was a OT5, I want to start at 6, I’ve done all of this other stuff before?” – or better still step into an org and say “I’ve got £200K on account give me some training”?

      • Missionary Kid

        It will be whatever gets the most money for Co$.

    • RandomSP

      I see that this has generated a lot of confusion so let me take a shot at explaining what this means to a Scientologist and why a Scientologist might not think it so weird. Note that the below is not taught as a formal “Scientology catechism” but is what I picked up from things like “History of Man” and innumerable LRH lectures. It is kind of like an undercurrent belief system that Hubbard termed “para-Scientology”.

      Scientology sees a human being as a meat body animated by an animal spirit (known as a genetic entity or GE) plus an immortal spiritual being (thetan) that was trapped in the meat body cycle of lives by the evil Lord Xenu (or Xemu). Animals on Planet Earth are animated by genetic entities and do not contain thetans (leaving out the occasional “degraded thetan” that might be too far gone to “pick up” a human body).

      When a child in the womb, for a portion of time it is the same as animal fetus, animated only by the GE. At some point before birth, a thetan latches onto it (don’t know if any of you watch “The Walking Dead”, but I just got a mental picture of some redneck calling “Claimed”). The thetan would have restimulated a “forgetter implant” in the “between-lives area” and will have no memory of previous knowledge when born; he will be a “baby”.

      What the fb lady is asking for is that a pregnant Scientologist be willing to “postulate”, Scientology’s version of prayer, that the child she carries be picked up by the dead Mom’s thetan. And the others are adding their postulates or prayers when they approve.

      So the fb lady is not ask that anything other than the normal occur at birth and how they handle such an idea is up to them. My guess is that the pregnant Scientologist would indicate that it was OK with her, a bunch of folks would add their postulates, and that would be the end of it. Or it could get weird but my feeling is that it would not because, as I mentioned, this is not an official part of Scientology and talking about past lives outside of an auditing session is discouraged.

    • villagedianne

      I don’t see anything wrong with their belief that their late mother can be re-incarnated in this way. I believe in re-incarnation myself. I don’t think it works exactly like the Scientologists say regarding how one’s next incarnation is chosen, but no matter.
      Let ’em believe whatever they want about re-incarnation. It’s the RPF, disconnection, Fair Game, etc, that I am against.

    • RMycroft

      Why didn’t they take her shopping for a new body before she dropped the old one? Honestly, some people just don’t plan!

      • Betsy

        Really. It’s like not shopping for a car. You want a Mercedes but you end up with a non-functional Yugo. Plan ahead!

    • Bruce Hines

      In 1975 I was interning in the human resources division (they call it “HCO”) of the advanced organization in Copenhagen. I was walking down the stairs with the guy who headed that division. A girl was walking up carrying a baby. The guy stopped and gushingly said hello to the baby and shook her hand and said how nice it was to see her again. He then explained to me that the baby used to be a lady who was in the sea org there in Copenhagen. That lady got cancer and became terminally ill. She then wrote a will that gave her possessions (the meager belongings of a sea org member) to the soon-to-be-born baby of another sea org lady who was pregnant. That poor baby then was treated by all the people around as the reincarnation of the now deceased sea org member. It was thought to be a great illustration of the sea org motto, “We come back!” Made sense to me at the time.

      • LeeAnneClark

        That poor child. Imagine being raised from infancy as if you are someone else. Poor kid must have grown up with some serious emotional issues. Wonder where she is now, and if she escaped?

      • Observer

        omg, that poor child! I hope she’s not still trapped in the “church.” What a horrible life that would be, having everyone around you think you are and treat you like someone you’re not!

    • Jimmy3

      If I had to guess off the top of my head, I would say that yes, this is the craziest fricken thing I’ve ever read.

    • Mrs Libnish

      I just came from that page, still in shock.

      That would be one weird, creepy, effed up funeral.

    • James Crouch

      That epitomizes delusional, and I am a Scientologist. Reincarnation doesn’t work that way! It would be nice if it did though. Imagine having to go through life like that. “Stop calling me! I am not your mother!!!

    • Saint

      Weird is having your parent tell you your kid is really their dead mother. Um, happened.

      • Observer

        Yikes!

  • EnthralledObserver

    Woah… that response by Ryan Hamilton was sharp and to the point. Nice!

  • RBE

    BREAKING: Tweet from Jonny Jacobsen. Tiny Fists headache just got a whole lot worse

    • EnthralledObserver

      I have to go to bed… getting up at 1am to travel, but it looks like the Bunker is going to have a brilliant day… I’ll be back to check it all out later. Have fun peeps… you might have to hold those jaws up…lol!

    • NOLAGirl

      *giggles*

    • Sejanus

      POW…right in the kisser!
      Take that, you frustrated Oompa Loompa with delusions of grandeur.
      Say Daft Massengill, how is that Cialis working out for you and Lou?

      • Missionary Kid

        Damn! A twofer. Both Oompa Loompa and Daft Massengill are new nicknames for New Location for DAVID MI$CAVIGE NICKNAMES: http://tonyortega.org/2013/10/12/tomkat-project-in-los-angeles-heres-your-chance-to-help-the-show-get-to-tinseltown/#comment-1142337863

        • Espiando

          Double-check “oompa-loompa”, because I know I definitely used the term to describe him more than once, and so have others.

          • Missionary Kid

            It was, but I have it under a separate listing with modifiers, such as “overdressed Oompa Loompa,” among others. Thanks for your vigilance.

      • 1subgenius

        POUW……right in the kisser!

        • baddog5623

          Many of Clams have heard that just after Tiny Fist grabbed his apple box and jumped up on it.

        • chuckbeattyexseaorg75to03

          “According to church spokeswoman Karin Pouw, only about 10 percent of Scientologists have attained OT III. Because she’s in the majority of members who haven’t reached that level, she couldn’t talk about OT III to New Times. Pouw became angry at questions about the church’s theology: “So what if we believe Jesus is a figment of the imagination?””

          Karen Pouw said this in 1999 Tony reported in this MUST read earlier journalism article, which I remember reading, and for which I thought Tony Ortega is likely the ONLY journalist who will go right into the darkest depths of details of why Scientology/Hubbard are so sordid!

          Tony got it so right, in this old article, that is just full of excellent writing and details, that cover all the controversies and dark connections of Hubbard’s mind to Eugene Ingram!

          http://www.phoenixnewtimes.com/1999-12-23/news/double-crossed/full/

          This article ought to be required reading for the dark side of Scientology, rather the dark side of L. Ron Hubbard’s irreligious thinking process.

          • chuckbeattyexseaorg75to03

            Tony’s 1999 article quoted a 1998 deposition of someone pressured to give false info, completely believable to those who’ve similarly experienced this Scientology style of pressure from Miscavige:

            “…the discussion turned domineering and combative when Mr. Ingram started to ask seriously deranged questions.”

            Ingram the now retired ace Scientology PI, but back then acting out the Scientology paranoid Hubbard behavior (which Miscavige has taken that mantle of behavior to push down the lines on Scientology staffers and lawyers like Moxon to get Ingram to implement).

            http://www.phoenixnewtimes.com/1999-12-23/news/double-crossed/full/

          • Jonny Jacobsen

            This is really is a key point and needs to be hammered home again and again, because it gives the lie to Scientology’s claims that it is compatible with Christianity.

            • Betsy

              I’m not even a Christian, but I am offended by the Chorch’s use of their stupid “cross.” It clearly wants to fool the non-aware into thinking that not only is it a religion, it is similar to things they know and feel comfortable with. It reminds me of the cigarette commercials in the 50s in which a “medical doctor” would be shown smoking some brand and saying “doctors agree that Brand Y is the healthy choice.” That cross is just a big loud LIE.

    • baddog5623

      I asked and I received

    • baddog5623

      Mark your calendars, this will go down as the day of Lulz

    • HillieOnTheBeach

      This is the one where there were concerns because it took +/- 15 years to bring about, right?

  • aquaclara

    So by hiring Graham Berry’s old firm, what does Scientology accomplish? Here are a few guesses. First, it does take a firm with a presence in over two dozen states off the list for anyone else who wants to file a suit against the cult. But that seems weak-there are a lot of law firms around. Two, it’s possible that defending Scientology is considered so toxic that the cult had trouble finding a law firm who would willingly take their cases. This holds water when we consider, Three, that the cult applied their usual style of dirty tricks to at least two members of that firm previously:Graham and the senior partner.

    Doesn’t seem like the best way to protect your case. In the meantime, good luck to the Welches and to Ryan Hamilton.

    • 1subgenius

      To quote Howdy’s favorite artist, “Two out of three ain’t bad.” (I kid)
      I’m kinda discounting #3, as it would be rather dicey to trust your case to someone you’re holding a gun on.

    • Observer

      He probably thinks it’s a master stroke of revenge against Graham Berry.

      • RMycroft

        He does seem to be trying to revisit his old victories (in his eyes) such as the “Battle of Portland”, “War won over the IRS”, etc. Maybe this is part of his retreat to his personal Good Old Days?

        • aquaclara

          Naval victories! I think you’re right. This is a fixed mindset, too, so I don’t think he’s making it up. He’s the captain, and he thinks he is at the helm, endeavoring to earn more ribbons.
          Bit of rocky weather ahead, though.

      • aquaclara

        That makes sense, in a cray-cray Silonic way. He is still fighting the old fights.

  • baddog5623

    It is hard to say if the judge will make a summery judgment here but if not, Ray has set the tone of how Scientology operates. It does look as if case law is on his side but at this stage, I suspect they will claim that is why they need discovery to find out the questions he is asking.

  • baddog5623

    What we really need is another lawsuit this week. Just. One more :)

  • Chee Chalker

    If there are any CA lawyers reading this…….as I understand things as they stand……the defendant Co$ used their one preemptory judicial challenge to remove the previous judge. Give the history of the defense with Judge Hess, could the Co$ challenge Hess’ appointment based upon bias?
    In a nutshell, how many times can a party challenge an appointment? From what I gather, it seems as if you get the one free shot (preemptory)………now, can you have challenge any additional appointments for cause?

    • Elar Aitch

      IANAL but did read here in the context of this challenge that they can challenge for cause.

    • 1subgenius

      Always. But I would guess that you have to bring such a challenge within a certain period after knowing of the basis. In this case, if it is premised on his prior dealings with this party, it would mean they should have brought it right away.
      If a judge exhibits fresh bias, or the party just learns of a new basis for disqualification, the clock would start ticking at that point.
      I await a spanking by bigger brains.

    • Robert Eckert

      “Bias” doesn’t mean “we’ve been in front this judge and lost before”. Also, although I’m not sure if California rules are different, but in general a motion to recuse a judge for cause is presented to that judge first, to see if he agrees the appearance is bad, and appealing a judge’s refusal to recuse himself doesn’t stay the case unless the appeals court thinks there is enough there to call for a stay while it thinks about it. A frivolous motion to recuse can just have the effect of ticking off the judge and making yourself look like a “vexatious litigant” without actually delaying anything.

      • Chee Chalker

        Yes, I realize that bias is not simply the fact that they appeared before a particular judge previously (otherwise the roster of available judges would be slim to none!). However, it sounds like the Wollersheim case was contenious, so I thought that perhaps Judge Hess made a comment or two concerning the Co$ that could be deemed biased, such as “listen you lunatics, pay the man the money you owe him!”.

        You can bet the Co$ attorneys are going through those transcripts right now looking for any kind of comment that they can hang their hats on.

        My question was more of a
        specific CA procedural question. Graham Berry’s comment the other day confused me when he said that the defense also had a preemptory right to challenge as the Co$ had done. I thought the Co$ was the defendant unless Graham was referring to a different case.

        • Robert Eckert

          He probably just had plaintiff and defendant inverted in his head for a moment. Each side gets one freebie, otherwise they have to have a damn solid reason.

          • Chee Chalker

            Hopefully Hess will stick. I have been very impressed with how Waldrip has kept his cool so far, but it will be interesting to see what happens if the writ of mandamus gets denied. They’ll try to claim Waldrip is giving them the stink eye because they filed the writ in the first place.

  • baddog5623

    I am shocked that the cult did not answer these allegations by sending hours of footage of Captain Blackheart opening Orgs and visiting Narconons

  • Missionary Kid

    In essence, Ryan Hamilton is saying, “NarCONon didn’t answer the complaint, so according to precedence and case law, they lose.”

    NarCONon’s attorneys have lost. Talk about hitting a Co$ front with an “attack, never defend” type of strategy! As a non-attorney, the way I read this, the NarCONon attorneys can’t come back and amend their response. They even had tow extensions to form a coherent defense.

    You can bet that if any future lawsuits are filed against NN, won’t do this again.

    If Hamilton is right, the only thing left to do is determine the amount of the damages. Knowing Co$, they will delay, obfuscate, and dither.

  • baddog5623

    Dear poor OSA Slob who is required to read through these post and catolog them, DO YOU GET IT YET?

    • Bavarian Rage

      28 hour days! Good luck with that!

      • Bavarian Rage

        It’s time to walk towards the light, little OSA-baby….an ex just yesterday said that every day out here on the other side is like a vacation!

    • OrangySky

      Touché!

  • http://scientologie-secte.org/ Voltaire2003

    Greetings from France.

    Check out Plain Old Thetan’s post on everything that is wrong with Narconon. It’s spot on.

    http://possiblyhelpfuladvice.com/?p=16819

    And he also posted this as a bonus:

    • Espiando

      At least you’re not giving greetings from LRH’s Bulgravia.

      • Missionary Kid

        Zing towards our no longer here annoying commenter.

        • Robert Eckert

          He shows up at Radar Online sometimes, if you miss him.

          • Missionary Kid

            I’ll avoid him, thanks.

      • http://scientoonery.tumblr.com/ Natalia 2.0

        Ugh. That phrase just gave me a troll flashback :p

  • HillieOnTheBeach

    Cos just phoning it in now.

  • chuckbeattyexseaorg75to03

    Tony your old article on Scientology’s use of Ingram via Scientologist lawyer Moxon, is just so excellent journalism!

    I remember reading it, it overloads the mind with Scientology’s darkest nature that you are one of the only journalists to spell out that clearly.

    This article is one of your all time best, and is hard to read for the sordidness that Ingram and Moxon went to, driven by bad men’s minds like L. Ron Hubbard’s, whose mind is not alone in its paranoid insistence that other people are doing bad things.

    It’s a tough article to read, but so important.

    Eugene Ingram comes across like an insistent IAS reg trying to force false testimony, driven by Moxon, driven by Hubbard, and how many paranoid people in this world are like Hubbard was, to do like you also said in that article, to make bureaucratic policy scriptures, which Moxon was obligated to follow.

    Just one of your all time best articles on Scientology, I think.

    This quote, on Ingram’s IAS reg style, still perpetrated today by the movement:

    “Cipriano says he regrets signing the false declaration five years ago but that it seemed the only way to get rid of Ingram.”

    http://www.phoenixnewtimes.com/1999-12-23/news/double-crossed/full/

    Such a well written article, you truly were and are the best journalist ever to cover the Scientology beat into its darkest depths!

  • Seannie5

    Can somebody fill me in on why scientology wanted the first judge dismissed?

    • aquaclara

      My guess – one, that they could, so they did. two, that the judge may have been presumed to be sensitive to abortion, and therefore likely to favor Laura’s case over Scientology’s.
      They like to feel they have more control over judges, but methinks those days are passing rather swiftly.
      Let’s hope so, anyway.

      • Seannie5

        thanks

  • Panopea Abrupta

    If anyone speaks Flemish or Dutch, here’s are two newspaper articles (today’s date – see Jonny’s tweet below) on the Belgian case:

    http://www.deredactie.be/cm/vrtnieuws/regio/brussel/1.1922153

    http://www.ed.nl/algemeen/buitenland/scientology-voor-de-rechter-in-belgi%C3%AB-om-criminele-activiteiten-1.4287892

    • Pierrot

      maybe it is easier in french.

      Basically they are sent to the next step, they are not off the hook.
      $ciento is not happy!
      So many good news lately.

      http://www.lesoir.be/505812/article/actualite/fil-info/fil-info-belgique/2014-03-27/l-eglise-scientologie-renvoyee-en-correctionnelle-denonce-un-proc

    • Pierrot

      I think “correctionnel” could be translated in this context as “criminal court”

    • Just Dee

      You can translate this to english at the top of the page.

      • Robert Eckert

        Technical terms like the legalese are, alas, what the robot translators tend to flub.

        • Just Dee

          This is the second link

          BRUSSELS (Reuters / BELGA) – 2 branches of the Scientology movement in Belgium come to court. 10 Belgian members will also have to answer before a judge.That is decided Thursday.

          It is the Belgian branch of the international religious movement, as well as the European office, which is located in Belgium. These two sections are prosecuted as a criminal organization. The 10 individual members are suspected of, among other scams, illegal medicine and extortion.

          The prosecution has been working on the case and decided to prosecute. On December A special court in Brussels decided Thursday that the case goes to a criminal court. A date for the start of the process is not there yet.

          Scientology has been active in Belgium since 1972. The movement in Belgium is not recognized as a religion.

  • http://scientologie-secte.org/ Voltaire2003

    More good news, from Belgium this time. The Belgian government has announced that it is prosecuting the Belgian church and the European Office of the Church of Scientology International (located in Brussels) + ten staff members. The charges are: organized fraud, illegal practice of medicine and violations of laws on privacy. Both churches may appeal. Belgium rocks!

    http://www.rtl.be/info/belgique/faitsdivers/1079353/dix-membres-de-la-scientologie-renvoyes-en-correctionnelle

    • And I don’t rent cars!

      Belgium may rock but so does Voltaire! Thank you, Voltaire, for bringing us good news from the other side of the pond.

  • Pierrot

    Outraged by the way co$ openly subverts the law
    YOU CAN HELP, let your fingers RED X their fraudulent ads

    https://whyweprotest.net/community/threads/taking-down-co-on-craigslist-co-ads-on-craigslist.113779/page-67#post-2439360

    Your doubts are VALID. Call 1-866-XSEAORG

    TY THDNE

    • Panopea Abrupta

      gotcha

  • John P.

    Two thoughts on a more thoughtful (read: post-caffeination) read of the situation:

    First, such a rote and non-detailed response to the complaint could be an indicator of something going on behind the scenes in Cult Central. As a dilatory tactic, this one is not terribly useful: Hamilton files a fairly straightforward, brief response, and the Court orders Narconon to do it right this time. It’s not nearly as effective (read: expensive for plaintiffs) a dilatory tactic as a motion to disqualify counsel, as the recently denied anti-SLAPP motion in the Monique Rathbun case, or many other plays from the cult’s legal playbook.

    So why would the cult submit such a pathetic response to the Welch complaint? My first thought is that Miscavige is so busy on other matters that he doesn’t have time to micromanage this case. And a little thought suggests exactly what he could be so busy with. After all, the Hubbard “Birthday Event” was a couple weeks ago and there are no major events for a couple months (Auditor’s Day and Maiden Voyage were both cancelled last year, and those may not make it back on the calendar this year). So it can’t be prepping for events.

    At a guess, I wonder if Miscavige is panicking over the mass “blow” of Jillian Schlesinger and a number of her other comrades from the Sea Org. What’s interesting about a mass defection in this day and age is the central fact: mass defections are only possible if people are talking to each other and thinking impure thoughts. Given the amount of sec checking that Sea Org staff get, the fact that 12 people blew in such short notice ought to make Miscavige unhinged because it means that his ability to prevent information flow among staff is dropping.

    And his ability to catch people thinking impure thoughts via sec check is not what he thought it was. I think Miscavige is in an interesting spot when he discovers that the e-meter won’t actually read people’s minds: his only recourse is to do more sec checks while he is increasingly confronted with the fact that they don’t work. I.E., he’s stuck in the fundamentalist trap of “if it doesn’t work, do more of it.” He can’t change “the tech” to improve sec check accuracy (in the unlikely event that such a thing were possible in the real world of science and evidence).

    The idea that he’s now busily reacting to the new (and probably ongoing) Jillian Schlesinger debacle is admittedly tenuous. It is equally possible that Miscavige is obsessing over legal strategy in the Monique Rathbun case. Since the Anti-SLAPP motion failed, he’s got to flog all those expensive lawyers into coming up with another sure-fire plan to win the case (it seems unlikely that the current mandamus petition will succeed).

    Regardless of what, exactly, is consuming all of Miscavige’s time, it seems like he’s more distracted from events that would have commanded his full attention in the past, and that is a significant datum. Its significance could be that if Miscavige is detracted and allowing lightweight filings in one of the active cases, then it would be time for what I suspect will be a wave of deposit repayment cases from Ted Babbitt and other related plaintiff’s attorneys to be filed. A strategy of overwhelming Miscavige and consuming all of his micro-management bandwidth would help those plaintiffs prevail, and would generate unintended consequences in keeping the cult unable to make decisions for internal management.

    Second, it may not be terribly significant that the cult has hired the attorneys that shellacked them so thoroughly in the Wollersheim case. The cult is probably running short of people who will take their work. I am certain that they’re not terribly fun clients to deal with, and the cult is not winning too many cases these days, so the law firm’s reputation for effectiveness would take a hit. Who better to hire than someone who consistently whipped them in the past? Or so the thinking goes… I’m not sure that Lewis, Brisbois’s track record in those cases will necessarily mean that they’ll be successful in defending the Welch case.

    Alternatively, the cult’s hiring of Lewis, Brisbois may actually backfire. Consider the possibility that the partner who was investigated (read: blackmailed) after that big wave of cases may take the case not out of loyalty to the cult but out of a desire for revenge. They may pretend to be loyal foot soldiers but will engage in maximum punitive billing and might even “throw the case” by doing less than their best work. If I were a senior partner of a firm who might be close to retirement, I might enjoy one last dig at someone who made my life miserable.

    • Panopea Abrupta

      I particularily enjoyed your last paragraph.
      Revenge is indeed a dish best supped old.

    • Missionary Kid

      It seems that the strategy of divide and conquer is working against Mismanage. Apparently, he has a problem multi-tasking. Tie that with his insistence on micromanaging everything, Edit: so being attacked on many fronts means that his attention is divided, and his level of competence is even lower, so he’s going to get conquered.

      BTW, Co$ hasn’t been named in the Welch lawsuit yet, have they? Davy has to know it’s coming.

      • OrangySky

        Plus, he is not a man with many workable coping tools, to put it mildly. Beyond working out in his multi-million dollar gym, grabbing some copper rods, guzzling scotch and beating and sadistically punishing underlings, I would venture to say that he’s not a master of successful stress management.

        Therefore, the stress is going to be rendering him more mentally scattered, unable to focus on one thing for long (he sounds like he’s not so great at that naturally anyway), and he’s going to be hitting overload more easily. I posit that he’s becoming more and more insane and unreasonable every day…not that he was exactly a zen master to start with. I think Marty and Mike actually saw the “functional” Miscavige, as compared to the off the wall nutcase who’s running things now.

        I shudder for his nearest lieutenants and assistants. I wonder if Lou has bruises.

        • Missionary Kid

          Who knows what evil lurks in Davy’s mind?

          • Once_Born

            “The weed of Scientology bears bitter fruit. Crime does not pay… The Sea Org knows!”
            (With apologies to Walter B Gibson)

            • Missionary Kid

              Amen!!!

            • Mark

              “Nya-ha-ha-ha-haaa!”

            • http://frankdisalleisadummy.wordpress.com/ Get Chutney Love

              It was an advertising executive, Harry E. Charlot, who came up with that slogan. Mr. Gibson was brought in to write the pulp stories for the “Shadow Magazine” that people asked for because of the radio show that originally had “The Shadow ” as the narrator of the “Detective Story Hour”.

              More details here:

              http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/The_Shadow#Publication_history

        • Bob

          OS, the stress IS taking its toll. All you have to do is have attended GAT 2 release or Ron’s Birthday to see the grey taking over Mouse-scaviages hair. He is starting to look his age. He’s not using die yet. For a man or mouse who is winning, winning, winning he sure doesn’t look that stress free and youthful the way a Demi-god should look. I think John Ps observations and speculations are very accurate.
          When the boot starts sinking everyone starts jumping ship. In this case the rats will be the last to leave.

          • Robert Eckert

            The rats are deserting the sinking train wreck like yellow-bellied chickens with their heads cut off!

        • PreferToBeAnon2

          …which is exactly the state we want him in for the eventual depo in Monique’s case–preferably in the courtroom in front of the judge (as was once hinted at by the judge).

      • RMycroft

        I figured that Scientology’s end would come when attrition in the ranks meant that they could no longer keep all the plates spinning in the air. But if that depleted cadre is paralyzed because of the Command and Control bottleneck of David Miscavige, then the plates will suffer floor-ification much faster.

        I suppose he could try to make some trusted lieutenant his executive officer, but then he suffers the same dilemma as a mad scientist who invents a creature/device smarter than himself: The darned thing will work out that the logical thing to do is to replace its creator.

        • Missionary Kid

          His dinkyness doesn’t trust anyone, let alonne someone to be second in command.

          There’s a lot of blame that’s going on for poor revenues that have put various units being placed in “lower conditions.” There’s a lot of anger that’s coming down from the top, IMO. I think the yelling going on is just a symptom of unhappiness in the troops.

    • Graham

      “A strategy of overwhelming Miscavige”. ie the very strategy $cientology used against the Cult Awareness Network back in the nineties. Sweet to see the tables being turned, albeit so slowly.

      Yes- I did wonder about the wisdom of aggressively ‘investigating’ someone and then expecting to be able to employ them without the risk that they might take revenge, if only to the extent of doing a half-arsed job because their heart is not in it.

      I was not aware that Jillian’s defection was part of a mass escape. Is there anywhere I can read more about this?

      • Mark

        Karen de la C. was quoted as saying that Jillian was one of a dozen recent Sea Org defectors in the original posting here.

        • Graham

          Thanks Mark. So a steady drip of defections rather than people blowing in groups.

          • Mark

            Jillian seems to have escaped on her own (brave girl!) but not sure about the others.

            • pronoia

              I wonder if others didn’t take advantage attention gap due to the focus on figuring out where Jullian went — to get out themselves! And likely some of them went in pairs–a lot of them are married. The cult must be frantic trying to track them all down and bully them all back in. `Hopefully, they have all had some time to hang out on the internet. Once that little cat is out of the bag, it will never be forgotten, even if some of them are recovered for a time.

          • John P.

            Sure, a wave of escapees coordinating their activities to be able to “blow” in a single event is pretty devastating for the cult, which at this point has a massive security infrastructure to keep people phyiscally isolated and to protect them from evil thoughts. But even if they found out individually about a particular vulnerability and exploited it without coordinating with others, the fact that there are that many disaffected Sea Org able to see an opportunity and put it into motion in such a short period of time ought to strike fear into Miscavige. It means that the harder he works to keep people in, and the more he spends on imprisoning the staff, the less effective it is. It’s all slipping through his tiny iron fists.

            • aquaclara

              Gee, that’s a whole room full of empty beds! One unintended consequence of having people crammed a dozen or more to a room is that it is impossible to cover up the escape.

              There are always going to be 11 other people who will know immediately.
              x12.

    • aquaclara

      ….and I’ll add that the defection of two OTVIIIs plus the reverberating bad press is still a current topic.

      One of Davey’s many management faults is that he is far too busy fighting the last war to deal with the here and now. Plus, the “I have to do everything myself” means that nothing happens until he says so.

      I am picturing a frantic DM running around, screaming to this new law firm, that has finally managed to get his attention before the time runs out on the second extension request, “I don’t want you telling them anything. Just deny, deny, deny. Ok, do you hear me?”

      • Eclipse-girl

        One of David’s management faults is that he takes things personally.

        This whole Rathbun stuff was a personal vendetta against Marty and could have / should have been dealt with by now. But Davey wont let that happen. He can’t let Marty win. (Yes, I am well aware that it is Monique’s case — I do not think Davey realizes that.)

    • Sunny Sands

      Another scenario could be Co$ successfully coerced the senior partner into taking the case. No one functions their best under threats, blackmail, and bullying. So it’s a win either way.

      The partner only has to follow DM’s orders to the “t”, and the case will throw itself.

    • ze moo

      Who else escaped with JIll? Jill was in the financial end of things for some time, her experience is very useful, but did someone with much more info escape? Is Davy trying to recover or get a nondisclosure agreement with someone else? Or is he just into short attention span theater?

      • Eclipse-girl

        I assume that the others that escaped may not have as much support as Jillian. For whatever reasons, there is a need to protect them, or allow them their privacy

        • ze moo

          Any other escapees will come forward or not as they wish. But I do wonder what is really taking up the dwarfenführer’s attention these days.

          • Eclipse-girl

            Never having been in, knowing that Fair Game policy of scientology, and that Judge Waldrip seems to have a infinite amount of integrity, and the Rathbun case has been getting publicized.

            My guess is the Rathbun case. This one gets to him personally. It is Davids fault for letting it get to him. He is looking for a way to get this thrown out, be done, viola no more case and let me continue to harass and surveil them.

            I doubt that will happen.

            David could have ended this last Aug. He could have opened a check book paid whatever was asked, and stopped the harassment, investigations, surveillance. Why didn’t he?

    • pronoia

      Re Lewis, Brisbois, Had the same thought. Were I in their position, I would follow every instruction very literally. And I would only answer questions that were asked of me. After all, the cult thinks it knows what it is doing. So let them run their show without any flashback.

      But I bet the billing part will be harder. Part of the “blackmail” terms somehow.

    • Anonymous

      It is also true that by hiring Lewis, Brisbois Scientology has effectively removed from the field a potentially dangerous adversary in future litigation, as that firm is uniquely qualified to fight the church.

      There is almost always a dark explanation for anything Scientology does that seems surprising on its face. The idea of peremptorily silencing a potential adversary with money / work is an old trick, well used by the church in the past.

    • Michael Leonard Tilse

      John,

      Re: Sec Checking. This is an auditing procedure, and thus requires a trained auditor. An auditor who had done at least Level II auditor training and/or the “Hubbard Senior Security Checker Auditor’s Course.” This is not a lower level easy to do course. It is not a regular course, but a specialized course one would do specifically as a staff auditor or outside of the normal training lineup for an auditor.

      “Rollback” and “Truth rundown” are also specialized training.

      Now, RPFers are required to learn to do these actions on each other as part of the RPF. It’s done on a “read it, drill it, do it” basis. Even with this pool of auditors, there is not a lot of them on staff doing auditor jobs.

      Becoming an auditor while on staff is a rare thing. It is kind of a “plum” job and only awarded to those already trained at their own expense or to those who have met special requirements after being in other jobs for considerable time.

      So, if many longer term trained staff auditors are blowing over the years, the auditors required to keep up with all the sec checks required may not exist. So then, it becomes just the “Master At Arms” (MAA) (Otherwise known as an “ethics officer”) job to keep them in line. And even that seems less effective, because one can just lie on O/W writeups or in ethics actions if they know there is no real likelihood they will have to endure a sec check. I’m curious if there is an “underground” staff member discovery on how to make your needle float at will, even while you are lying.

      A tipping point may have been reached where the mental enforcement mechanism is breaking down and people feel less fear of thinking for themselves or talking to others about what they observe.

    • Jgg2012

      John, notice how quickly she blew. It used to be 5-6 years before an ex realized they could sue, at which time the statute of limitations lapsed. Now, within weeks, she (and others) realize that something isn’t kosher. Imagine thousand of them suing for forced abortions, back pay, fraud, false imprisonment and everything else.

  • chuckbeattyexseaorg75to03

    Tony your old article on Scientology’s use of Ingram via Scientologist lawyer Moxon, is just so excellent journalism!

    I remember reading it, it overloads the mind with Scientology’s darkest nature that you are one of the only journalists to spell out that clearly.

    This article is one of your all time best, and is hard to read for the sordidness that Ingram and Moxon went to, driven by bad men’s minds like L. Ron Hubbard’s, whose mind is not alone in its paranoid insistence that other people are doing bad things.

    It’s a tough article to read, but so important.

    Eugene Ingram comes across like an insistent IAS reg trying to force false testimony, driven by Moxon, driven by Hubbard, and how many paranoid people in this world are like Hubbard was, to do like you also said in that article, to make bureaucratic policy scriptures, which Moxon was obligated to follow.

    Just one of your all time best articles on Scientology, I think.

    This quote, on Ingram’s IAS reg style, still perpetrated today by the movement:

    “Cipriano says he regrets signing the false declaration five years ago but that it seemed the only way to get rid of Ingram.”

    • chuckbeattyexseaorg75to03

      from Tony’s must read detailed unbelievably thorough at laying how Scientology/Hubbard’s paranoid lawyer/PI false testimony business operated (from crazy paranoid Hubbard, to Moxon, to Ingram and perpetrated on Cipriano against Berry):

      “In June 1998, Cipriano says Moxon moved him into a Scientology boardinghouse to get him away from his meddling girlfriend. Moxon also began preparing him for a deposition that was scheduled for July. “Mr. Moxon told me to lie about the ages of Mr. Berry’s intimate relationships….Mr. Moxon told me to get Mr. Berry ‘pissed off’ at the deposition. It appeared to me that this was a game for Mr. Moxon, and it was more about scaring Mr. Berry than about a real cause of action based on truthful facts,” Cipriano states in his August declaration.”

      Tony’s 1999 journalism was just packed with excellent detail of the horrid predicaments Hubbard’s bureaucratic “scriptures” make people like Moxon and Ingram perpetrate, to produce the evidence to stifle Scientology critics.

      Just a masterful article, Tony, one of your all time best in my opinion for laying out the worst in Hubbard/Scientology and their lawyers and PIs!

      http://www.phoenixnewtimes.com/1999-12-23/news/double-crossed/full/

      Moxon trying to piss off Berry are shades of Tommy Davis pissing off BBC Sweeney!

      Such a sordid operating basis that Moxon lives!

  • Eivol Ekdal

    “Hey, there’s a whole lot of avenues for our readers to run down!”
    More like a rabbit warren…here is one good link to excerpts from the Church of Scientologyv Fishman & Geertz hearing transcript.
    http://www.holysmoke.org/gb/gb073.htm

  • Mark

    I wonder if Davy can swim? (the shoop that just keeps on giving; refresh):

    • Toni m

      It’s getting better and better.

  • kemist

    “The purpose of a lawsuit is to harass and discourage rather than win.”
    LRH

    Well, looks like it’s

  • chuckbeattyexseaorg75to03

    Another of Tony’s must read articles, just phenomenally detailed and clear.

    And so many points of such great importance, stressing particularly the Appeals Court statements about Scientology that still stand:

    “Scientology claimed that its practices were protected by freedoms guaranteed in the First Amendment, but the court rejected that argument by pointing out that Wollersheim had been coerced to remain a Scientologist through the threat of freeloader debt, the use of “fair game,” and the use of confidential information in his files.

    “The opinion by the appellate court remains one of the most damning in a long history of court denouncements of Scientology which have occurred worldwide.

    “The Wollersheim case is among the most important decisions against Scientology in its history because it showed that the organization’s standard practices used against a member were harmful,” says Stephen Kent, a sociologist of religion at the University of Alberta who is one of the few academics who studies Scientology in depth.”

    http://www.villagevoice.com/2008-06-24/news/Scientologys-Crushing-Defeat/full/

    Tony, your links to your earlier work sorting through the details on Scientology’s history, are phenomenal! Thanks.

    • Eclipse-girl

      TY for finding that link.

      It is an excellent synopsis of the Wollersheim case.

  • baddog5623

    Looks like Karen is more powerful than all of Scientology

  • PoisonIvyHerself

    Happy 1st anniversary Karen! Keep the videos coming – they brighten my mornings, but more importantly, they are getting the message out in both a powerful and entertaining way that the “church” is an abusive, criminal cult that destroys lives and souls on a daily basis.

    You are a strong, amazing woman and I salute you! (And your brilliant team!)

  • ze moo

    Ryan Hamilton knocked that one out of the park. No time wasting, no prevarication, just ‘you didn’t reply to the allegations’, so surrender Dorthy.

    Well, that ‘we need a new judge’ thing didn’t work out very well, did it Davey. Getting a judge who presided over some the Wollersheim case is a major counter intention. Report to the RPF immediately. Laura DeCrescenzo’s case just got a judge who has seen how the clampire works, and he isn’t smelling roses.

    Belgium has decided to charge 2 Clam organizations and 11 individuals with what looks like fraud. See the translation is on the bottom of the page. Jony Jacobsen has been reporting on this one for a long time. The original investigation started in 1997 or so.

    http://ocmb.xenu.net/ocmb/viewtopic.php?f=11&t=296930

    Original article, if you know Dutch.

    http://www.demorgen.be/dm/nl/989/Binnenland/article/detail/1830998/2014/03/27/11-leden-Scientology-doorverwezen-naar-strafrechter.dhtml

    • Jgg2012

      btw, I don’t know anything about Hess, but Nevada is familiar with corporate shells, pyramid schemes, etc. Equinox, a famous pyramid scheme, died there. Many alter egos are based here. Plus, Ryan practices asset protection, so, as a litigator going after assets, he knows how defendants try to hide them.

  • Captain Howdy

    Hooray for Hambo!

    Eugene Engram deserves some justice. If’ there’s any semblance of hardcore Anon or LulzSec left out there in the ether, they need to make this douchebag pay.

  • Tony Ortega

    NEW POST UP!

    • Eivol Ekdal

      Two Fer Thursday!

      • Lurkness

        Getting his stats up before 2 pm!

  • Eclipse-girl

    Before I leave this page,
    I would like to thank Karen, J Swift, AGP and all they interviewed for their first year of videos.
    As much as I enjoy them and learn from the, I hope they won’t need to continue this for several year
    TY for doing what you do to bring about the demise of the Co$

  • Peter

    Incredible. Even their own attorneys are now contributing to their downfall. Finger squeeze, loud sound, very badly damaged foot!

  • aquaclara

    Happy Anniversary, Karen and J. We have had a chance to meet some lovely people through your videos. And thanks to Angry Gay Pope, too, for all his work in making these happen.

    • i-Betty

      Hear, hear :)

  • scnethics

    I have read Ryan Hamilton’s motion, which I would describe as “kickass”, and I believe The Crutch has already stepped in shit. That’s my legal opinion.

  • And I don’t rent cars!

    ATTENTION: All Narconon watchers and activists.

    Last week I stumbled on this YouTube channel and I’m quite convinced it is owned by Yuliya Keaton, [aka Lia Kea, aka Juliya Keanova, aka Yuliya (Julia) Muniz, aka Yuliya Maskovtseka (Kea), aka thefiredragon at ESMB] I also posted the channel link last night and I repeat some of what I wrote below:

    “The videos on this channel seems to be taken by hidden spy cameras at Flag base. If anyone remembers Tony’s two stories about Yuliya, her infiltration of the Sea Org and subsequent capture by OSA, you’ll know why I suspect these were taped and posted recently by her. These were only posted a month ago and if I’m correct about the identity of the channel owner and the source of these videos, I’m afraid they’ll be forced to disappear. Here’s the link to the YouTube channel: https://www.youtube.com/channe

    And here are the links to two stories written by Tony last year about the woman who infiltrated the Sea Org at Flagg in 2013 and was caught by OSA. I believe, without further research on my part, that these are her videos. I could be wrong but some of them suspiciously look like they could have been taken using the infamous tampon spy camera “tech” we all joked about for so long. Links to Tony’s original stories:
    http://tonyortega.org/2013/06/
    http://tonyortega.org/2013/06/

    As I mentioned, I could be wrong about the identity of the channel’s owner but the videos themselves are fascinating in that they reveal some of the secretive inner world of Sea Org training, meetings, working and living conditions, and how adoration of COB (David Misacavige) is evident in the reaction to his taped speeches or any tidbit of information that can be relayed about him. It’s chilling to hear.

    I don’t know if this type of documentation would be admissible in a court of law. I’ll let others far more knowledgeable about this sort of thing decide.”

    March 27, 2014

    This is the first of a series of Sea Org meetings and presentations that were taped in May/June of 2013 and are one of several that show the cult’s propaganda machine at work and how they present their own revisionist history to the troops, their plans and strategies for expanding Narconon worldwide, and the methods they use to rally the Sea Org troops to up their stats by getting donations for the IAS and Narconon. This one (plus one other) seem to confirm that Larry Hagman’s property in Ojai, Calif, is indeed meant to be a Celebrity Narconon. https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=mKFDIiEj3QE

    Without watching them all again and picking out the ones specific to IAS/Narconon that were presented during a single meeting in 2013 at Flag (remember audio and video is understandable poor), first pick out the videos that have Narconon in their titles but also listen/watch the ones on either side of those, as some have pretty generic titles such as, “another meeting.” Good luck wading through all of them. Be warned that it takes time and patience to pick out the diamonds that can be found amongst the rumble of poor recording quality. There are gems for everyone – no matter what specific interests or protest agendas are in play for you at this time.

    On a personal note, due to my own personal circumstances, I am unable to post these to other critic sites, especially The Tipping Point, David Love, etc. If anyone else thinks these are important, please post the links wherever else you think they might be most helpful and useful. If I could, I would do this myself. Thanks to anyone who takes the ball and runs with it.

    As I said before, I suspect once the church finds that Yuliya has posted these on line, they’ll manage to get these removed from YouTube. The last information I read about Yuliya was that she was lawyered up. This is why I was so surprised to find these posted.

    P.S. If these videos have been posted before, I apologize for the waste of time.

    • Sidney18511

      It appears that the YouTube channel is already gone. It would be a shame if it’s gone for good.

      • And I don’t rent cars!

        Say what?

        Oh try this, it should work – https://www.youtube.com/channel/UCzrodvWnv8WFuQXxR_QpLIg/feed

        I copy/pasted sections of my post and I suspect the full URL didn’t paste. I still can access it. Thanks for telling me. I wouldn’t be surprised, however, if it did disappear as Yuliya and her infiltration was quite the story last summer and I was surprised that she had the courage to post the videos OSA didn’t confiscate at the time of her discovery and capture.

        ETA: Thanks for bringing this to my notice.. I reposted the link above and it is now working.

  • Minion Gayle

    “Anyway, as Graham points out, Judge Hess has plenty of history with Scientology, and so the church’s move to disqualify Judge Rafael Ongkeko could not have turned out worse. Hess is well aware of Scientology’s legal shenanigans, and also should be very familiar with Scientology’s deceptive corporate structure, which was very much a part of the Wollersheim matter. We’re looking forward to how he handles Laura’s lawsuit.”

    Is it wrong of me to be giggling right now?

    • Jgg2012

      Yes! No giggling allowed. That’s for wogs! We have a planet to clear.
      As for Ryan’s response, Scientology is trapped. They tell the IRS that they are a religion and Narconon is part of them (so its tax-exempt); they tell patients they are getting medical treatment. They tell litigators that Narconon is NOT part of Scientology. LRH? Whose he? Our website? What website?

  • JonHenke

    It would be ironic if David Miscavige and/or Scientology is brought down by the same litigate-them-into-submission tactic that Miscavige used against the IRS.

  • Still_On_Your_Side

    What a bombshell about Hess! Judges hate to be asked to recuse themselves or to be replaced by a party to litigation. It is disrespectful and judges demand respect. Substituting a judge for no reason at the request of a party may be allowed in LA, but I am aware of no other US court that allows it. I have to believe that appointing Hess as a a judge was no accident, and I cannot wait to see the fireworks as the church starts whining about him.

    Ryan’s filing of the admission motion is also good news. He is an unexpected firebrand and I bet Miscavige et al are flipping out at how fast he is lobbing lawsuits at them and how aggressive he is prosecuting the cases. I think Ryan has many, many more Narconon lawsuits up his sleeve. I wonder if this is part of what Presley meant in her song, “You ain’t seen nothing yet.”

    • And I don’t rent cars!

      You wrote, “I have to believe that appointing Hess as a judge was no accident […]”

      Are you familiar with the process with which a new judge is assigned to a case when the current judge has to step down? Could it be just “an accident” or simply a stroke of good luck? I could not believe the good news when I realized who Judge Hess was and wondered how it came to be that he was the replacement. I assume there is a bias free, objective process in place. Or is it simply a matter of scheduling and availability? Do they have something as simple as or equivalent to picking a name out of a hat? And if you do know the answer to my question, do you also happen to know if this process is standardized across all 50 states? Thanks for considering my request.

      BTW, a few months ago, IIRC, you did a RTC trademarks search and came up with some surprising names and owners of certain “ecclesiastical” properties/items in your search results. One of those names was Lou, aka Laurisse Henley-Smith Stuckenbrock, aka D. Miscavige’s “communicator.” I thought I had copied your post that day but have since realized that I did not. I then tried to search your comment stream but saw that it was privatized [for safety and continued anonymity, I’ve recently done the same with mine so I was not surprised that you had done the same :-) ].

      So some day, if and when you have the time, could you copy/paste that section of your post again? I really think that information is important and useful in terms of trying to envision the church-cult without Miscavige at the helm (for whatever reason) and trying to predict how the Co$ would reconfigure itself after his death or removal – whether it be by law enforcement or by an internal coup. I’m still not sure how to use the information yet but I think it is important enough to be re-posted. IIRC, the day you posted your research was a busy one in the Bunker and I was surprised no one seemed to pick up on it or respond to it. Perhaps, others, unlike myself, did actually save it with the intention of responding later or kept it for later review or further research. If my request is too much of an imposition, I really do understand. Your comments are always insightful, full of useful information, and lengthy so I know it would take quite a bit of time to scroll through your comments to find it. Even if you just remembered the U.S. site name and guessed at your original search terms, that would be helpful. I’d do the rest. Thank you.

      Appreciatively,
      Cars

      • i-Betty

        I hope S.O.Y.S. is able to respond to your thoughtful post, Cars – I had the same question vis assigning a replacement judge :)

    • Lurkness

      On filing of lawsuit and for reassignments based on retirement, recusal, available right to ask for substitution (as here), it is a completely random assignment to a new judge (“off the wheel”, as it is sometimes called). You can be sure of the randomness because if it was not administered fairly, randomly and impartially, the Judges themselves would be the FIRST to complain and protest. They operate on stats too, along with personal predilections and favored types of cases, but they don’t get to pick and choose. Trust me, nobody is clamoring for dogs like a Scientology case on their docket and even if they were, it would depend on their name being next on the wheel–randomly.

      It is the “luck of the draw” as to who is up next for an assignment/re-assignment of cases.

      • i-Betty

        Thanks for the response – very helpful.

    • Barbara Angel

      I think Judge Hess may end up deserving a *Fan Club* and we are all going to LOVE him big time.
      Imagine trying to face Judge Hess when he is on to “ALL” the old Co$ sneaky tricks and cannot be fooled or intimidated. Hopefully Co$ have finally bitten off more than they can chew in his Court Room.

  • 1.1

    Captain! There is no Lobster Thermidor for this evenings meal. The entire galley has been sent to the hole for this crime. However, our CI wog lawyers & some SP called Ryan Hamilton can serve you this…

  • i-Betty

    You’re a fantastic writer, Tony.

    • Toni m

      I agree with you 100% I Just read the 1999 and 2008 articles. Many years in this fight and Mr Ortega still have the same determination to reveal the abuses of scio and dm. Mr Ortega’s journalism is impeccable,